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    South Baton Rouge Breast Cancer Walk and Health Fair start at 7am, May 19

    The Wall of Fame Committee, Councilwoman Tara Wicker, Susan G. Komen® Baton Rouge, State Rep. Patricia Smith, Sen. Yvonne Colomb, and other community groups and civic-minded individuals are hosting a community-wide breast cancer walk and health fair on Saturday, May 19, 2018, 7am—1pm at the Dr. Leo S. Butler Community Center, 950 East Washington Street.

    Woman’s Hospital and Mary Bird Perkins-Our Lady of the Lake Cancer Center will have mobile units on site for health screenings; and other valuable information and services will be available, as well as free t-shirts, conference bags and other exciting giveaways. Please help us to encourage strong participation in this important community event!

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  • Williams of New Venture honored

    New Venture Theatre’s artistic director Greg Williams Jr. is the recipient of the 2018 Man-Up Theatre of Arts Award from Patterson Enterprises who presents the 2018 Voice Awards, May 13, in New Roads. For 11 years, Williams has led New Venture’s productions in Baton Rouge.
    Greg Williams, Jr. is in his eleventh season as Artistic Director at New Venture Theatre. Before beginning his role at New Venture, he served as a co-founder of the King Little Theatre and also the Creative Production Company.

    His professional theatre background includes working with Don Holder (Tony Award Winning Lighting Designer for Disney’s THE LION KING), The Negro Ensemble Theatre Company (NYC), Black Theatre Network (New York), The Little Black Box Theatre Company (New Jersey), Northwestern State University (Louisiana) and American Family Theatre (Philadelphia.) He conceived the highly acclaimed musicals SHOUT! and SWEET GEORGIA BROWN, which both played to sold out audiences.

    As Artistic Director for New Venture, Mr Williams’ directing credits include over 35 productions such as August Wilson’s FENCES, the regional premiere of THE COLOR PURPLE, AIDA, DREAMGIRLS, FAT PIG and LADY DAY AT EMERSON’S BAR AND GRILl.

    Mr Williams is a graduate of Northwestern State University (Bachelor of Arts), Ellis College of New York (Masters in Business) and the International Association of Assembly Management Performing Arts School (Graduate Certificate.) He has earned many distinctions including a State of Louisiana Commendation for his contributions to the performing arts in the African American community, iHope Award for his dedication to the arts, MLK Leadership Award for leadership in the arts community, The Baton Rouge Links Louisiana Role Model Award for contributions to the performing arts community, and was nominated for the Fichandler Award under the Stage Directors and Choreographers Foundation. Under his leadership, New Venture has also earned distinction for productions of artistic excellence and highly praised theatrical diversity.

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  • La Capitale Chapter of The Links, Incorporated presents Wigs, Martinis and Bow Ties

    Wigs, Martinis and Bow Ties presented by the La Capitale Chapter of The Links, Incorporated is Friday, April 27, 2018. The event kicks off at 7 pm at the Renaissance Hotel, 7000 Bluebonnet Boulevard. Tickets are $75 per person, and include dinner, dancing, live entertainment, and a cash bar with the event’s signature martini, the Linktini. Proceeds from the event benefit Cancer Services, Incorporated and La Capitale’s community service programs. Guests are asked to bring an unused wig to the affair for donation to Cancer Services, Incorporated’s Wig Salon.

    The event will also feature the awarding of the La Capitale Trailblazer Award where three honorees will be named for their significant contributions toward cancer research and support.
    Tickets may be purchased online at lacapitalelinksinc.org or through any member of the La Capitale Chapter.

    The Links, Incorporated is an international, nonprofit corporation established in 1946. It is one of the nation’s oldest and largest volunteer service organizations of extraordinary women. The La Capitale was chartered as a chapter of The Links, Incorporated in April, 1986. The Chapter celebrates 32 years of service to the East and West Baton Rouge communities under the leadership of its current president, Paula H. Clayton.

    Nationally, Links members contribute more than 950,000 documented hours of community service annually – strengthening their communities and enhancing the nation through its five programmatic facets of National Trends and Services, Services to Youth, Health, The Arts, and International Trends and Services. La Capitale Chapter members have provided more than 2,500 hours of service this program year.
    ONLINE www.linksinc.org

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    Kina Kimble appointed commissioner of 19th judicial court

    Judges of the 19th Judicial District Court recently appointed Kina Kimble as one of two court commissioners after the resignation of Quintillis Lawrence. Commissioners are quasi-judges who make recommendations to judges. As a commissioner, Kimble can set bail for newly arrested prisoners, and also sign search warrants, arrest warrants, subpoenas, and seizure orders for foreclosures. She can also take indictment returns from grand juries. Kimble is a 2005 Southern University Law Center graduate who had been an assistant public defender since 2013. She was an adjunct professor of criminal and juvenile law in the Southern Law Center Clinical Educational Department from 2010 to 2015. As a commissioner, Kimble handles numerous prisoner lawsuits filed annually against the state Department of Public Safety and Corrections, applications for post-conviction relief, and uncontested applications to expunge certain criminal records. The court’s other commissioner is Nicole Robinson

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    COMMENTARY: What about the grandparents raising children?

    According to the U.S. 2010 Census, there were more than 2.7 million households with grandparents raising their grandchildren. Census Bureau reported that 67,000 Louisiana grandparents are responsible for meeting the needs of grandchildren. The reasons why are varied.

    There are cases where the parents are unable to care for the children because of drug abuse. Or the parents themself are struggling financially and grandparents have stepped in to help raise the child. And sadly some are raising their grandchildren due to domestic violence. Many were not prepared to do this all over again as they enter retirement age.Believe it or not, some grandparents are still in the workforce.

    The toll taking on the role of parent can be great. Increased household expenses, mental stress of the realities of raising children again.Not to mention having the energy to keep the children involved in extracurricular activities.

    What is also not realized is the legal and financial realities. There are grandparents who go through the process of getting guardianship of their grandchildren or the parent will sign a power of attorney. Doing this will allow them to make more decisions for the children while the parent still retains parental rights.

    What about life insurance ?

    In the middle of raising grandchildren grandparents can easily overlook having life insurance coverage for themselves and the grandchildren. According to LIMRA 2016 Facts About Life, only 44 percent of U.S. households have individual life insurance. That includes the grandparents raising their children.

    Thankfully life insurance rates are not as expensive as some would have you to believe.For grandparents over 50 who do not have life insurance they have options available to them for coverage.In addition there are policies that will not require medical exams.

    One would be a final expense burial life insurance policy. These are small face whole life insurance policies that will take care of their final expenses. Another option would a guaranteed universal life policy. This policy acts like a cross between term and whole life insurance. The death benefit is guaranteed up to certain age, while the policy accumulates cash value. An option younger grandparents may like.

    Then finally we have term life insurance.A term policy will terminate after a set number of years up to 30. It will provide pure life insurance for a grandparent. However the price of term life insurance can be pricey for individuals in their late 50′s into the 60′s. Some policies have questions that will automatically decline older clients. In addition the amount of coverage allowable decreases around age 64.

    Coverage for grandchildren ?

    In each example I cited above, grandparent can purchase a term rider to put their grandchildren on the policy. A rider is simply an add-on allowed to the policy at the time of applying. The term rider will put term coverage on the grandchildren until they are either married. Or they age out of the term coverage. The exact age varies by company. By the way a grandparent has another option at their disposal.

    Companies do sell whole life insurance policies for children ages 14 days old up 17. For the most part they are very inexpensive. Not to mention, the child can keep this policy well into adulthood. One carrier I personally use will you to purchase as much as $50,000 of life insurance on a child.

    Grandparents are being called to duty again as parents. They are answering the call with love and attention. At the same time we should make certain they have knowledge and access to affordable life insurance. Not only for them, but also the grandchildren they are raising.

    Submitted by Thomas Dickson

    Thomas Dickson is a licensed independent life insurance agent in Baton Rouge, La. His company is Acadian Insurance Group. Specializing in senior life insurance. He can be reached at thomas @ acadianinsurancegroup.com

     

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    State epidemiologist receives The Reverend Connie Thomas Award

    Erica J. Washington, an epidemiologist for the State of Louisiana, will be presented with The Reverend Connie Thomas Award in honor and appreciation of her years of service and dedication to Luke’s House, the community and her robust work in the field of healthcare. Washington, a native of Baton Rouge, LA, moved to New Orleans in 2007 to pursue a master’s degree in public health from Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. She began working with Luke’s House as the organization’s first public health intern, and recruited others to volunteer from Tulane SPHTM. In 2013, Washington was recognized as a White House Champion of Change for Prevention and Public Health. She was a 2016-2017 Informatics-Training in Place Program Fellow through Project S.H.I.N.E. – a collaborative between Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and National Association of City and County Health Officials that seeks to increase the informatics capacity of health departments nationwide.

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    SU, BRCC sign articulation agreement for STEM students

    Officials from Baton Rouge Community College and Southern University and A&M College signed a Memorandum of Understanding signifying the agreement between the schools to facilitate the articulation of coursework and to provide a seamless transfer of BRCC Associate of Science students into the SUBR College of Sciences and Engineering to earn a Bachelor of Science.

    The agreement, which is effective immediately, was signed by Dr. Ray Belton, President/Chancellor SU System; Dr. Larissa Littleton-Steib, Chancellor BRCC; Dr. James Ammons, Executive Vice President/Executive Vice Chancellor, SUBR; Dr. Toni Manogin, Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs, BRCC; Dr. Patrick Carriere, Dean of College of Sciences and Engineering, SUBR; and Ms. Laura Younger. Dean of STEM Division, BRCC.

    “We are excited to build upon our current partnership with Southern University to continuously enrich our students’ transfer and workforce opportunities,” said BRCC Chancellor Larissa Littleton-Steib. “This agreement will not only allow a seamless transfer for our students pursuing bachelor degrees in STEM-related fields, but it will also encourage future students to consider the endless opportunities available to them by starting their college careers at Baton Rouge Community College. We are grateful to the Southern University System for this partnership.”

    “This agreement between two of the leading institutions of higher learning in the state is another step in expanding our offerings in STEM,” said Ray L. Belton, president of the Southern University System and chancellor of Southern University Baton Rouge. “This new program will allow a greater number of students to seamlessly matriculate and obtain their bachelor’s degrees right here in Baton Rouge. We look forward to their success and another great partnership with BRCC.”

    Under the agreement, BRCC students who receive the Associate of Science degree in Computer Science or General Science following the prescribed coursework and declaration of intent to pursue the Bachelor of Science in the College of Sciences and Engineering at SUBR, will be admitted to SUBR as a junior upon successful completion of the BRCC AS degree with an overall GPA of 2.0 on all work attempted. 

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    Angela Rye to speak at Southern University Spring Commencement

    Political commentator and social activist Angela Rye will be the speaker for Southern University’s spring commencement. The ceremony will be held in the F.G. Clark Activity Center on May 11 at 10 a.m.

    A prominent strategist, Rye can be seen regularly on several media outlets including BET, CNN, NBC, HBO, ABC, MSNBC and TV One. She has also been featured in publications such as Marie Claire, Ebony and the Washington Post. Her dialogue from political campaigns to legislation and administration policies that have long-term implications nationally and internationally.

    Born and raised in Seattle, Washington, Rye says she learned the importance of advocacy through her family’s political and community activism. She is a graduate of the University of Washington and Seattle University School of Law.

    Rye is principal and CEO of IMPACT Strategies, a political advocacy firm in Washington, D.C. Her past appointments include serving as the executive director and general counsel to the Congressional Black Caucus for the 112th Congress. In this role, Rye was tasked with developing the overall legislative and political strategy for the Caucus. Prior to working for the CBC, she served as senior adviser and counsel to the House Committee on Homeland Security under the leadership of Congressman Bennie G. Thompson. Upon moving to Washington, Rye co-founded IMPACT, a nonprofit organization that seeks to encourage young professionals in three core areas: economic empowerment, civic engagement, and political involvement.

    Rye serves on the boards of the Congressional Black Caucus Institute, Congressional Black Caucus Political Action Committee (CBCPAC), the Seattle University School of Law Alumni, Women in Entertainment Empowerment Network, Inclusv, and Wilberforce University. She is a member of The Links Inc., National Bar Association, American Bar Association, and the Washington Government Relations Group.

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  • Community responds to AG’s decision, firing of Salamoni in Sterling case

    Community responds to Attorney General Jeff Landry’s decision and the Baton Rouge Police Department’s firing of Blane Salamoni in Alton Sterling case.

    Senator Regina Barrow
    Louisiana Legislature

    I’m disappointed with the decision from Attorney General Landry regarding Alton Sterling’s death. I’m upset that he took this long to do what I believe was already determined months ago. And, while I support law enforcement, I believe we must be a community of accountability. I hope we can have the kind of law enforcement we can all be proud of. I remain committed to seeing our communities become the best they can be for all of us. My thoughts and prayers are with the family.

    Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome
    East Baton Rouge Parish

    Baton Rouge Police Chief Murphy Paul concluded his administrative investigation and has made a decision in the Alton Sterling case. I have placed my trust in Chief Paul and fully support his decision. I am grateful for his leadership and his swift, decisive, and fair action on this matter. Although the investigations into this case have concluded, the dialogue does not end today. I pledge to continue to lead and facilitate respectful conversations between the community and law enforcement in an effort to build trust and understanding on both sides. The backdrop of this Holy Weekend serves as an opportunity for our community to move toward collective healing. While support and prayers for the Sterling family are encouraged, we know that these alone will not heal their family or our community. It is vital that lessons are learned from this tragedy and that we apply our knowledge to prevent future incidents and implement policies that make this community safer and more unified.

    Rev. Lee T. Wesley

    Rev. Lee Wesley

    Rev. Lee Wesley

    Together Baton Rouge 

    Baton Rouge Police Department Chief Murphy J. Paul did two things that showed leadership and wisdom.  He said “unreasonable fear within an officer is dangerous.” Those words are echoing across the country right now. Second, he challenged us to work toward police reform and higher pay for officers as two things that need to go together, not competing visions. That’s exactly the right vision we need to work towards as a community. We thank our Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome and Chief Paul for their leadership.

    State Representative Randal L. Gaines

    Randal Gaines

    Randal Gaines

    Chairman, Louisiana Legislative Black Caucus 

    We, the Louisiana Legislative Black Caucus members, would like to express our disappointment in the apparent lack of justice that was demonstrated by the recent decision in the Alton Sterling police shooting. This lack of judicial action is consistent with an unfortunate pattern of “failure to prosecute” in cases that raise the question of excessive use of deadly force against Black male victims.

    It is vitally important that our law enforcement authorities continue to strengthen standards, enhance training, and enforce departmental policies that enable our police departments to recruit and retain high quality law enforcement officers, as well as maintain reasonable policies that present a threat to the safety and personal well-being of our citizens.

    It is also critically, important that we instill public confidence in our justice system by ensuring that any individual whose deliberate unlaw actions result in injury or loss of life of another are prosecuted under applicable provisions of law.

    Donovan Hudson
    Attorney

    A meaningful, powerful response is needed. One that will resonate powerfully to galvanize us all to the realization that such actions, (the killing of Mr. Sterling as well as the institutional responses) by those cloaked in authority, are intolerable and perpetuate institutional injustice in our criminal justice systems, as well as those systems (social and economic) that serve as underlying reasons for these tragedies. I suggest such actions MUST be much more than the brief eruption of street marches and protests, but must start with personal commitments by those opposed to this type of matter and response, to stop going along with unjust systems for the sake of expedient comfort. The apparently small wrongs that are not met with opposition form the base for explosive and more dramatic wrongs, but the ultimate corrosive results are the same in both instances: the destructive de-valuation of lives.

    Ernest Johnson JD
    Former President, Louisiana NAACP  State Conference

    Firing is not Enough. We demand a Grand Jury! We demand AG Landry convene a grand jury and Open the Grand Jury to the public/press!

    This can still happen legally!

    What We Need!

    1. Our Elected Officials to apply consistent pressure for this case to be heard by a Grand Jury.

    2. Consistent Community Members congregating on his steps until he agrees to let the case be heard by a Grand Jury.

    3. Jam their phone lines and email boxes until he agrees to let this be heard by a Grand Jury.

    4. This state needs all 24 Black Caucus votes to pass a state budget. We need our elected officials to not vote on Approving this budget without the AG sending this case to a Grand Jury.

    After watching the video showing the murder of Alton Sterling, we all should be willing to fight HARDER!  AG Landry can still reconsider and have this matter heard by a Grand Jury, and this should be our ask!  Some may think this is extreme, but I watched a video surrounded by extreme circumstances. AG Landry has clearly abused his power, and we need our elected officials to take on this fight!

    Colleen Kane Gielskie

    Colleen Kane Gielskie

    Colleen Kane Gielskie

    Assistant Director, ACLU of Louisiana

    On March 27, Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry announced that his office would not bring criminal charges against the two police officers who shot and killed Alton Sterling as he lay pinned by them to the ground in front of a convenience store in Baton Rouge.

    Attorney General Landry’s decision is two contradictory things: It is shocking, and it is unsurprising. The decision sends a clear message about policing in America today, and highlights the continuing crisis of accountability when it comes to unlawful use of excessive and deadly force by police.

    The failure to hold police accountable for the killings of Black men and boys is standard practice at both the local and federal level. Last year, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, the nation’s so-called “top cop,” and his Department of Justice concluded there was insufficient evidence to bring federal civil rights charges against the officers involved in Sterling’s death. And, while the Baton Rouge Police Chief said disciplinary hearings would be held for the officers this week, the officers who killed Sterling, and whose killing of Sterling was caught on video, both remain employed by the Baton Rouge Police Department.

    Sterling was one of 233 Black people shot and killed by the police in 2016. And while the national media spotlight on police violence has faded, the death toll has remained steady. The Washington Post Police Shooting Database records show 2,934 people shot and killed by police between 2015 and 2017. That’s nearly 1000 deaths per year. Earlier this month, police officers in Sacramento fired 20 rounds at Stephon Clark, who was unarmed and standing in his own backyard. He died of the wounds inflicted on him by law enforcement. As did Danny Ray Thomas, another unarmed Black man, a man in mental distress, who was killed by police in Harris County, Texas, just days ago.

    Sterling’s death is a glaring reminder that police officers too often use aggressive tactics and excessive force, informed by implicit bias rather than community protection. Upon first arriving at the scene, one of the officers reportedly put a gun to Sterling’s head and said “I’ll kill you, bitch.” The AG’s report describes the officer as giving Sterling a “stern” warning: “Don’t fucking move or I’ll shoot you in your fucking head.”

    A death threat is not an acceptable warning. And, coming from police and directed at Black and brown people, it is too often a promise. The ACLU of Louisiana and partner organizations are working to reform police practices to combat these killings.

    Some reforms are already under way. In November 2016, the Baton Rouge Police Department, the East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff’s Office, the Louisiana State Police, and the City of Baton Rouge committed to use only the level of force objectively reasonable to bring an incident under control, and use deescalation techniques when dealing with protesters. Baton Rouge Mayor Sharon Weston Broome, who took office in January 2017, has successfully pushed for implicit bias training, a stronger use-of-force policy, and expanded the use of body cameras to the entire police force.

    That the officers who killed Sterling have not been charged is by no means the end of this fight. There are questions that must be answered about Sterling’s death, and we demand that all body camera and surveillance footage of the incident be released. We demand accountability, equal justice, and an end to racialized policing.

    Alton Sterling didn’t have to die on the pavement that night. The Baton Rouge police officers chose aggression. They chose to shoot Sterling six times. We must address and dismantle the conditions that led the officers to use deadly force when it was not needed or legal. We must end the epidemic of police violence once and for all—and bring accountability to this broken system.

    > Read: No charges filed against officers in Alton Sterling shooting; Family files civil lawsuit
    > Read:COMMENTARY: Dr. King, Alton Sterling, and the Difficult Days Ahead

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  • A noose hangs over Tangipahoa schools not just on Whitlow’s post

    A few people in the African American community have expressed their surprise by our position concerning the social media post by Tangipahoa School Board representative Mike Whitlow. (Whitlow posted a photo of a hanging noose with the sentence, “If we want to make America great again we will have to make evil people fear punishment again.”)

    To be clear, there is a real noose. It has been in existence for a very long time. The huge noose that exists around the neck of the Black community of Tangi is evident in a system’s persistent efforts to keep strong-minded and talented Black educators from leading the system and bringing out the best in our children. The noose was evident when a system zoned piles of Black kids who struggle academically together in Greenville Park and Woodland Park. How does a school drop over 30 points in a single year? Something is wrong with this. What happens to uneducated Black children?

    As we have said before, images like these are hurtful to many, but they do not even come close to comparing to the aforementioned. From the sidelines, many of us have watched a system successfully lynch our kids by robbing them of an adequate education. Do we not see that the demographics of just about every school’s in-school suspension room mirror the demographics of our own parish jail? The NAACP’s concern far surpasses an image. We never aim to ruin a person’s life as a result of something like this. It is not the right thing to do. Has the Board Member voted in favor of decisions that are in our kids’ best interests? This is what we look at.

    Here is what I have come to understand and respect: The Plaintiffs Attorney has been single handedly fighting for all of us behind the scenes for years. He has been doing this by himself. Why? He has been a true hero in all of this. His support for us is documented and is still being documented in court records. It is real. He has been the one who speaks up for us in court when our system deals blows that are not in the very best interests of our children. This is the real untold story.

    So, it is time for us to finally do our part to stand with him in standing for our kids. I see good coming from all of this. For years, I have been here at almost every board meeting speaking out against injustices because I could not stand to see him carry this cross alone. Now, I am so glad to see so many African Americans united at school board meetings to help him along the way. I really want us to use this energy to join him in focusing on something meaningful– the future of our children. Let’s focus on holding our system accountable for making decisions that are good for our kids. We surely don’t want Black people in leadership roles just because they are Black. And we don’t want White people in leadership roles who do not know how to educate Black children. We want people who we know have our kids’ best interests at heart. We want the best for them. This is where I believe our focus should be.

    By Patricia Morris
    President, Greater Tangipahoa Parish Branch NAACP

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    Halfmann delivers courageous account of a slave teacher’s legacy

    Steal away, children.
    Hide, sneak, and risk your life to learn to read under the dark cloak of midnight.
    This was a dangerous feat for a courageous people and an unrelenting teacher. It is the story many people have heard passed from grandparent to grandchild for generations. Thanks to Janet Halfmann, London Ladd, and Lee & Low Books, there is at least one narration that has been validated in the pages of “Midnight Teacher: Lilly Ann Granderson and Her Secret School.” This historical, beautifully illustrate children’s book on Lilly Ann Granderson’s life gives a wide-eyed account of the effort, fears, and successes slaves underwent to be educated. Granderson’s passion to teach takes the reader through an abandoned cabin at midnight to the fearful moment where she is caught teaching by the slave patrol. She and her students face a charge of severe whippings or death. Halfmann pens the perfect record of Granderson’s phenomenal legacy from educating slaves to graduating students at the Natchez Seminary (now Jackson State University) and influencing generations, especially her own family’s who were the first to graduate from Spelman Seminary (now Spelman College). “Midnight Teacher” is a gift with clear storytelling of a heroic educator. #JSBookandBrew

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  • ‘You’ and elected officials did the hard work to keep Zoo

    North Baton Rouge Now Blue Ribbon Commission is pleased with the decision of the BREC commissioners to keep and invest in the Baton Rouge zoo at its current location. This has been a long and arduous fight, however, the voice of the elected leadership and, most of all, the people have finally be heard. Collectively we were able to come together and stand for what we believe in and for what’s best for our community!

    With excitement, I watched the community speak up and share concern and the desire to revitalize this community jewel.

    Charles Perrouloux spoke up on the need to help bring ALL communities together. Kristy Donnellan pointed out her and so many other’s concern of the economic impact to the north Baton Rouge community, especially our children. Stephany Anthony (photographed) and Sarah Sanders boldly told the commissioners how concerned the parish is about the lack of animals and the overall well being of the animals at the zoo.

    They are a few examples of the many reason why this decision was the BEST decision. Most importantly, is the fact that without these and so many other very active, engaged voices speaking loudly and frequently, we could have had a different outcome. We didn’t, and the zoo remains in North Baton Rouge because of a collective community voice.

    It was also an honor to see the commitment and support from our elected officials! It is important to be as vigilant with acknowledgements as we are with calling out our officials for poor decisions or lack of involvement.

    Some of the most notable officials stood in support of what was best for their constituents and this entire parish! Councilwoman Chauna Banks (Dist. 2) valiantly lead the charge with her display of exceptional leadership and fortitude on this initiative! She was the galvanizing force that attracted the support and action of many of her colleagues, community partners, and members.

    Baton Rouge Mayor-President Broome, Baker Mayor Darnell Waites, Central Mayor Junior Shelton, and Zachary Mayor David Amrhein demonstrated their support and resolve to keep the zoo at Greenwood. They also committed to be a part of the investment strategy that will revitalize this asset. State Representative Barbara Carpenter and Senator Regina Barrow are boldly creating legislature to support the zoo now and into the future.
    Baton Rouge Metrocouncil leaders Lamont Cole (Dist. 7), Erika Green (Dist. 5), and Donna Collins-Lewis (Dist. 6) committed to put their efforts and resources to gather additional support to the revitalization of the zoo.

    BUT, WE ARE NOT DONE! This victory, though sweet and extremely important is only the beginning. We must remain engaged and see this through! We encourage the community to continue to be vocal and active in the process. It was our collective voice that initiated and carried the momentum of this initiative, and it will take our voice and deliberate action to see this through. You’ve made this happen now continue to support it! Here’s how.

    IMMEDIATE NEXT STEPS:
    Support the zoo by making it a part of your immediate recreational plans. Encourage your church groups, social organizations, schools, and families to plan trips and events at the Baton Rouge Zoo and Greenwood Park. You can host birthday parties, family reunions, summer camp field trips, and lunch dates within the zoo and in the theatre. This is the easiest and most collective method to illustrate your interest, support, and investment of the zoo.

    COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
    Attend and engage in public meetings. Bring with you your ideas, feedback, and contributions/commitments.

    ACCOUNTABILITY
    It’s time for a changing of the guard. BREC’s administration has not been a good steward of our existing assets or public trust. We should start fresh with management in order to improve the success of this initiative. In addition to this, oversight is necessary to ensure that moving forward all activities are transparent, clear, and equitable.

    CORPORATE SUPPORT
    We can each use our circles of influences to encourage corporate events and sponsorships (including revitalization efforts).

    We will all remain excited, proactive, and vocal in continuing this work to revitalize our zoo to its fullest potential.

    By Sateria Tate
    NBRNOW Blue Ribbon Commission

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    COMMENTARY: Dr. King, Alton Sterling, and the Difficult Days Ahead

    Fifty years ago today Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. He was there on behalf of Memphis sanitation workers marching for higher wages and better working conditions. Their cause was central to King’s Poor People’s Campaign, the final phase of his movement for civil and human rights.  The King of 1968 had evolved considerably from the early years of the movement.  In a May 1967 report to the staff of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, King wrote:

    We have moved from the era of civil rights to the era of human rights, an era where we are called upon to raise certain basic questions about the whole society. We have been in a reform movement…But after Selma and the voting rights bill, we moved into a new era, which must be the era of revolution. We must recognize that we can’t solve our problem now until there is a radical redistribution of economic and political power.

    King’s assassination cut short his pursuit of this more radical vision.  In many ways it also marked the beginning of a new chapter in America’s sordid problem of the color line.

    chi-mlk26loot-20080228Amid the riots that followed King’s assassination, President Johnson signed the long delayed Fair Housing Act of 1968.  The Act promised to interrupt the processes of Black ghettoization and white suburban flight that were well underway by the end of the 1960s.  After decades of weak enforcement, however, cities today remain racially segregated. Moreover, the nation’s legacy of racist housing policy has led to an ever-widening racial wealth gap that has emerged as a defining feature of the much larger issue of growing economic inequality.  As an affordable housing crisis grips most American cities, the public is increasingly in tune with concerns over gentrification and the need for equitable redevelopment.  Said differently, there is a growing recognition that we must aggressively pursue the hard work of correcting for the failed urban policies that have long had as their chief objective the exclusion and marginalization of Black communities.

    As the urban redevelopment consensus grows, so too does our appreciation of the depths of the problem.  The determination to ensure Black social and economic subordination shaped twentieth century urban policy.  Consequently policing and incarceration emerged as the dominant policy responses to the government-mandated racial segregation that destabilized Black communities in the first place.  Decades of redlining, wage theft, dilapidated infrastructure, and the many other deliberate assaults on Black humanity were casually forgotten.  Black “culture” was deemed solely responsible for the condition of poor Black neighborhoods and marked them for the most draconian, inhumane, and extra judicial treatment.  The resulting tide of mass incarceration further destabilized those neighborhoods while taking a devastating toll on Black families and individual lives.

    These nationalized trends manifested themselves in a variety of locally-specific ways.  In Baton Rouge the record-setting 47-year fight over school integration effectively reshaped one city into two. It gave birth to “North Baton Rouge,” a local shorthand for the geography of Black poverty and social exclusion.  For those who have internalized the logic of racial stratification, having a geographically adjacent zone of racialized mass disinvestment was a small price to pay for the satisfaction of punishing the Black communities they were convinced deserved such contempt.

    Alton_Sterling_just_before_being_shotRacial tensions exploded in the summer of 2016 when cell phone video captured the killing of Alton Sterling while two Baton Rouge police officers pinned him against the pavement.  Last week the Baton Rouge Police Department finally released the body camera video from the fateful encounter. The video shows Officer Blane Salamoni –abandoning any semblance of police protocol or basic human decency– rush a confused Sterling, hurl expletives in an enraged tirade, threaten Sterling’s life before needlessly taking it, then cursing his dying corpse while callously rifling through his pockets for an alibi. It’s shocking and horrific. The tragedy follows a seemingly unending succession of similar tragedies around the nation and a growing consensus that decisive action is necessary.  In spite of all of this, neither the Department of Justice nor the Louisiana Attorney General could find probable cause to impanel a grand jury for a possible criminal indictment.

    The chorus of bigotry and hatred from those who populate the online comments sections of the city’s papers or those who have voiced their unyielding support of Salamoni – even in the face of the new video – is drowned out only by the silence of many, many more.  Part of the trauma many of us experience watching the Sterling videos and others like them is tied to the indifference of those who refuse to accept that something pathological, intentional and historically driven is at play.  It’s likely only a matter of time before we receive the next hashtag about a Black body racked with bullets after making some armed, trained officer fear for his life.

    This is America 50 years after King’s assassination.  The relative progress made in civil rights since April 4, 1968 is rife with tragic contradiction and complexity.  King likely did not dream that after climbing to the “mountaintop” our first words would not be “free at last” but rather “Black lives matter.”

    In his last speech King prophesied that we had some difficult days ahead.  That is as true in 2018 as it was in 1968.

    By Christopher Tyson
    Guest Columnist
    Christopher TysonChristopher J. Tyson is the Newman Trowbridge Distinguished Associate Professor of Law at LSU’s Paul M. Hebert Law Center, where he teaches property and local government law. He is also the son of former U.S. Chief District Court Judge Ralph Tyson. Follow him at @chrisjtyson.

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  • ,

    An open letter to the citizens of Baton Rouge

    During the early morning hours of July 5, 2016, we were placed on a journey to determine how we would understand and respond to the tragic death of Mr. Alton Sterling. There have been moments along the way where we have been confronted by the truth of this journey and reminded it’s not just going to go away. The decision by state and local authorities to look to the United States Department of Justice, the announcement of findings by the DOJ, the passing of the issue to the State Attorney General, the announcement of his decision, the press conference by Police Chief Murphy Paul to share his decision, and then the release of the video footage from that senseless and horrible moment, have all served to remind us that we must all decide how we understand and respond to what happened in the parking lot of a convenience store in North Baton Rouge.

    I believe that any understanding and response must begin with Mr. Sterling’s family. They have endured loss and pain beyond imagination. And they have had to do so under the glaring lights of news cameras and public scrutiny. This family deserves our respect and compassion. We cannot just “co-opt” their loved one to suit our agenda, whatever it is. Alton Sterling is not a hashtag or a character in a horrific video. He was a member of our community with family and friends who cared about him greatly. Any effort to process all of this that does not begin with this reality if fatally flawed in my opinion.

    We must then be willing to be honest with each other about the perceptions and experiences of Black men in Baton Rouge wrapped up in the most difficult 90 seconds I have ever seen. In the last moments of Mr. Sterling’s life we are brought face to face with some harsh realities about our city. There are some people in Baton Rouge who must create ways to make money to live and provide for their families. Opportunity is not readily accessible for all. Those who are sworn to protect and serve are not always professional and respectful of every citizen. Black men are thought to be angry and violent and as a result must be treated differently. For 20 months I have said healing requires the acknowledgement of a wound. As a community we must speak the truth about these perceptions and experiences or all of this pain and strife will be for nothing. Until we do, any effort to understand and respond will be doomed to failure.

    My final belief is that we must move beyond responding to moments and begin to build movements. Moments last through the news cycle or until the next moment happens. Movements challenge what we think and demand that we do something. Movements bring about change, moments don’t. Political science professor Ron Walters, Ph.D, is quoted as saying the difference between a moment and a movement is sacrifice. This is certainly true in our situation. The only way Baton Rouge will learn, grow and change is if there are enough people who are willing to sacrifice and work to make it happen. We can all do something and we don’t all have to do the same thing. Find a place where you can connect with people who are serious about making this city better and get busy doing so. Don’t be distracted by the negative voices screaming for attention. That’s all they know and all they will ever speak. But we are better than their hatred and small minds.

    Most of my life has been lived in Baton Rouge. I have seen and experienced the good, the bad and the ugly in these years. It is my sincere desire to be a part of leaving a better Baton Rouge to the next generation. A Baton Rouge where Black men are seen as assets and vital members of our community. A Baton Rouge where we are all productive, connected, healthy and safe. A Baton Rouge where my neighborhood and zip code don’t determine my access to opportunity and resources. This is the movement I am determined to be a part of building. In April of 2016, I, along with a number of partners, convened the Urban Congress on African American Males in Baton Rouge for the first time. We did so because we could no longer ignore the realities associated with being a Black male in the community we love. Since that time we have continued to build a movement that matters. A movement that makes a difference. Today, I am more committed to the work of the Urban Congress than ever. And you are welcome to join us in this work. But if not the Congress, find something that allows you to get busy doing something that changes Baton Rouge for the better. My prayer is that these painful moments will motivate people us beyond the place of emotions and to a place of ongoing action. This city needs it.

    Sincerely,

    Raymond A. Jetson
    Chief Executive Catalyst
    MetroMorphosis

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    Temple honored by Boys and Girls Club

    Candace Temple was honored by the Boys and Girls Club at its Great Futures Gala that was held on March 3, 2018. Temple serves as a member of the East Baton Rouge Parish Library Board of Control, East Baton Rouge Parish Complete Streets Advisory Committee, GBRA Realtors Government Relations Committee and Forum 35. She is also serves as co-chair of Baton Rouge Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome’s Transition Team’s Housing and Land Use Subcommittee and a volunteer for the Bethany Church Kids Ministry. Temple is a full-time real estate agent with EXIT Realty Group. She is the mother of two daughters.

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  • High schoolers win at national court competition in DC

    On March 23-25, 2018, four East Baton Rouge Parish high school students competed in the Marshall-Brennan National High School Moot Court Competition in Washington, D.C. The competition was hosted by American University Washington College of Law. The East Baton Rouge Parish students, Constance Springer and Jaidyn Bryant juniors at McKinley High School, Maya Jones a senior at Southern University Laboratory High School, an​d Ariel Simmons a senior at Glen Oaks Magnet High School, competed against more than 70 high school students from across the United States. They argued a case involving issues relating to the First Amendment’s freedom of speech and expression, and the Fourteenth Amendment’s equal protection clause. Jaidyn Bryant earned second place in the petitioner category, and Constance Springer placed among the top ten in the respondent category.​ Bryant also received an award as a top four competitor.

    Ariel Simmons, Maya Jones, Constance Springer, and Jaidyn Bryant

    Ariel Simmons, Maya Jones, Constance Springer, and Jaidyn Bryant

     

    Jaidyn Bryant receives her award as a top four competitor

    Jaidyn Bryant receives her award as a top four competitor

     

    The students were the winners of the Southern University Law Center Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Project Regional Moot Court Competition. The Southern University Law Center Marshall-Brennan Project is sponsored by the Louisiana Bar Foundation, Southern University Law Center, Wilson Fields, judge 19th Judicial District Court; Luke Thibodeaux, attorney in the law firm of Gordon McKernan Injury Attorneys; and Alejandro Perkins, partner in the law firm of Hammonds, Sills, Adkins and Guice.

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    COMMENTARY: 3 ways stress takes a toll on your body

    April is Stress Awareness Month

    Did the latest challenge at work bring on a tightening in your stomach? Does constant worry about a loved one’s health make you physically ill yourself?

    Everyone at some point feels the effects of stress. Not everyone deals with stress in the best way, though.

    “Often stressed-out people seek relief through alcohol, tobacco or drugs, but that just makes matters worse,” said Richard Purvis, a health and wellness practitioner and author of Recalibrate: Six Secrets to Resetting Your Age.

    “Instead of relieving stress, those toxic substances tend to keep the body in a stressed state, causing even more physical problems.”

    April is Stress Awareness Month, a good time to reflect on how the demands and anxieties of daily life put a strain not just on our minds, but on our bodies as well.

    Stress, of course, is not always a bad thing. It does serve a positive purpose.

    “It can keep us alert and prepares us to avoid danger,” Purvis said. “But stress becomes a negative factor when a person faces continuous challenges without any time mixed in for relief or relaxation.”

    As a result, he said, people become overworked, and stress-related anxiety and illness can occur. The strain leads them to suffer from such ailments as headaches, upset stomach, elevated blood pressure, chest pain and problems sleeping.

    Purvis says a few examples of how stress can play havoc on our bodies include:

    • Musculoskeletal system. When we experience stress, it’s natural for our muscles to tense up. “It’s the body’s way of guarding against injury and pain,” Purvis said. Usually, the muscles relax once the stressful event passes. But chronic stress keeps the muscles in a constant state of guardedness. “When muscles are taut and tense for long periods of time other reactions in the body are triggered,” he said. Chronic muscle tension in the shoulders, neck and head can lead to tension-type headaches and migraines.
    • Respiratory system. Stress causes people to breathe harder. “That’s not a problem for most people,” Purvis said. “But if you suffer from asthma or a lung disease such as emphysema, getting essential oxygen can be difficult.” He says some studies show that acute stress events – such as the death of a loved one – can trigger asthma attacks in which the airway between the nose and the lungs constrict. Also, rapid breathing associated with stress – or hyperventilation – can result in a panic attack in some people.
    • Gastrointestinal system. Sometimes people who are stressed will eat much more than usual. Sometimes they will eat much less. Neither is healthy. “You can get heartburn or acid reflux if you eat more food or different types of food, or if you increase how much alcohol you drink or tobacco you use,” Purvis said. When you’re stressed, the brain sends alert sensations to the stomach. Your stomach can react with “butterflies,” nausea or pain. “Severe stress can cause vomiting, diarrhea or constipation,” he says. “If your stress becomes chronic, you might develop ulcers or severe stomach pain.”

    So what’s to be done? Purvis pointed out that stress is a natural occurrence in life and happens to everyone.

    “Since you can’t avoid your job, bills, or other life experiences, the best thing to do is learn to manage stress,” he said. “You won’t avoid stress entirely, but it is possible to minimize the effects by eating healthy, exercising regularly, getting enough sleep, and taking care of yourself in general.”

     

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  • ,,,

    ALL CITY Teen Poetry Slam Festival takes over Baton Rouge April 18-21; April 27-28

    Following its huge 2017 victory at the 20th Annual Brave New Voices International Youth Poetry Slam Festival (BNV), Baton Rouge based arts nonprofit Forward Arts, Inc. is gearing up to select its 2018 All Star Team, by way of its 12th annual ALL CITY Teen Poetry Slam Festival, April 18-21; 27-28, downtown Baton Rouge. This year’s theme, “Defining Brilliance”, gives a nod to Baton Rouge’s youth poets who are setting a standard for what literary excellence is in their generation. All events, outside of opening ceremonies, are open to the public. A full schedule is available at Forwardarts.org.
    ALL CITY serves as both a community event, as well as an opportunity for area youth, ages 13-19, to experience performance poetry on a large scale, including a chance for six lucky young poets to represent Baton Rouge at the 21st Annual BNV to be held this year in Houston. The festival also includes workshops, panel discussions and specialty open mic events. At Grand Slam Finals, to be held April 28 at the Manship Theatre, the top ranked team of poets of the competition will be named ALL CITY champions and the six top ranked poets will become the 2018 Forward Arts All Star Team and represent the city at this year’s BNV this July. The 2017 Forward Arts All Star Team won BNV to become the top ranked youth poetry slam team in the world and the first team from the south to win the two decades old competition.
     Web ALL TEEN Poetry Slam
    More than just a competition, ALL CITY has been a springboard for many youth in Baton Rouge to take a career in the literary arts into serious consideration. Five of the festival’s former participants were accepted into the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s First Wave spoken word cohort – the only program of its kind in the nation. Of the students who already graduated, more than half have pursued careers as educators in the field of English. The festival also adequately prepares youth participants for larger competitions like Brave New Voices.
    “ALL CITY allowed me to perform my poetry in front of a huge audience,” said 2017 BNV champion and Forward Arts youth, Imani Sundiata. “Having ALL CITY also gave me a deadline to work towards and help with my time management, because if I wanted to get on the BNV team, I would have to work hard and push myself to finish poems and practice performing them. That training and opportunity gave me the stage experience I needed to feel confident in my poems and writing ability. Altogether, ALL CITY gave me the tools to make me a better performer.”
    A poetry slam is an Olympic-style spoken word poetry competition in which poets perform original writing within a three minute time limit. Originality, physicality and vulnerability are some the hallmarks of successful slam poems. The youth of Forward Arts are under the tutelage of internationally-acclaimed slam poets – executive director Chancelier ‘xero’ Skidmore, Individual World Poetry Slam Champion, 2013; program director Desireé Dallagiacomo, a multi-time international poetry slam finalist and viral video sensation; and Donney Rose, a 2018-2019 Kennedy Center Citizen Artist Fellow. The staff of Forward Arts collectively has more than 15 years of experience as teaching artists and administrators of youth spoken word poetry.
     Anyone interested in volunteering at the festival may contact volunteer coordinator, Roe Lewis, at Roneshialewis@mybrcc.edu.
    The ALL CITY Teen Poetry Slam Festival began in 2007 and is the only festival of its kind in the region. It has hosted hundreds of youth poets in the Baton Rouge and surrounding areas.FA_SlamFlyer-Back_2018-edited
     Forward Arts, Inc. fosters personal and social transformation by providing arts instruction, literary education, and youth development in Southeastern Louisiana.
    Festival Schedule
    Wednesday, April 18thCYPHER NIGHT (competing participants only)

    5:30-8:30PM
    Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge, 427 Laurel St.
    Thursday, April 19th & Friday, April 20th
    PRELIMINARY BOUTS #1-6
    5:30-9:30PM
    Mid City Ballroom, 136 S. Acadian Thruway
    Saturday, April 21st
    POETRY + LIVE MUSIC Concert
    7:00-10:00PM
    Mid City Ballroom, 136 S. Acadian Thruway

    Friday, April 27th

    ReVision
    7-10PM
    The Parlor, 705 St. Joseph St.
    Saturday, April 28th
    GRAND SLAM FINALS hosted by Ebony Stewart
    6-9pm
    Manship Theatre, 100 Lafayette St.
    *Tickets available at manshiptheatre.org*

     

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    Discover world of space with Renee Horton

    Outer space and astronaut travel enthusiasts of all ages are welcome to join the celebration of the One Book One Community selection Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly during a FREE talk by led by Renee Horton, Ph.D., at the Main Library at Goodwood, 7711 Goodwood Blvd., at 2pm, Sat., April 7.

     Horton is a space launch system lead metallic/weld engineer at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, and the author of children’s book Dr. H Explores the Universe. Her presentation will cover an in-depth discussion on space and astronaut travel, as well as details about the projects and initiatives of NASA from the unique perspective of a Black woman working in a science, technology, engineering and mathematics-centered career field. A question-and-answer period will follow the presentation.

    There are various other events, programs, movie nights, book talks, crafts and more related to the book and OBOC that will be scheduled throughout the community all spring long. All the events are FREE.

    ONLINE: www.reneehortonphd.com and www.ReadOneBook.org

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    COMMUNITY EVENT: Celebrate National Minority Health Month

    Submitted news

    UnitedHealthcare Community Plan of Louisiana will celebrate National Minority Health Month in April 2018. This year’s theme released from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health  is “Partnering for Health Equity.” Join us for a time of Community Awareness and free events.

    According to OMH director Dr. Mathew Lin, “Partnerships at the national, state, tribal, and local levels are vital to the work of reducing health disparities.”  UnitedHealthcare will host a series of events that will partner with local government, private, and public community stakeholders.

    The Kick-Off event will be a Lunch and Learn held at the Exxon Mobil YMCA, 7717 Howell Blvd., Baton Rouge, LA. From 12:00 noon until 2:00 pm. This event will feature a key-note speaker, Robert L. Newton, Jr., PhD, Director of the Physical Activity and Ethnic Minority Health Laboratory Director of the Physical Activity and Ethnic Minority Health Laboratory and allow community partners in health equity to share available services that can benefit the community.

    UnitedHealthcare has a host of partners including EBRP District 2 Metropolitan Councilwoman Chauna Banks, the Jewel J. Newman Community Center, Baton Rouge Primary Care Collaborative, Southeast Community Health Systems, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, and the Exxon Mobil YMCA, Save-A-Lot Grocery Store, Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center Pediatric Residency Program, Southern University School of Nursing and Allied Health, Southern University AgCenter, and Smiles on the Go to name a few.

    These community partners and more will host a series of events throughout the month of April.

     

    Diabetes & Hypertension Awareness Fair – Wednesday, April 18, 2018

    Southeast Community Health Systems, 6351 Main St. Zachary, LA at 4:00 pm -6:00pm

    Health Equity Community Summit and Panel Discussion – Thursday, April 19, 2018

    Jewel J. Newman Community Center, 2013 Central Road, Baton Rouge, LA. Doors opening at 4:00 pm for vendor fair and panel discussion at 6:00 pm.

    Preparing Healthy Meals with Community Grocery Stores – Saturday, April 21, 2018

    Save-A-Lot Grocery Store, 12200 Plank Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70811 at 10:00 am until 2:00 pm

     

    Each event is free, opened to the public, and will provide, food, presentations, valuable health information, and more. Come out and learn what an important role partnerships play in health equity for our community!

    For more information, please contact Deborah Jones with United Healthcare Community Plan at 225-413-2198 or email deborah_w_jones@uhc.com.

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  • ,,

    No charges filed against officers in Alton Sterling shooting; Family files civil lawsuit

    Baton Rouge Police Chief plans to release footage, complete officers’ hearing by Friday

    Louisiana’s Attorney General Jeff Landry announced Tuesday following a 10-month investigation that his office will not pursue criminal charges against the officers involved in the Alton Sterling shooting.

    Sterling, a 37-year-old Black man, was shot six times by a white Baton Rouge Police officer on July 5, 2016, in front of a Triple S convenience store. The officers, Howie Lake II and Blaine Salamoni were responding to a call about a man with a gun who was assaulting someone. Sterling had been selling CDs in front of the store with permission from the owner.

    Officials said Salamoni shot Sterling while his partner Howard Lake looked on.

    “After careful thought and review of the evidence, the Louisiana Department of Justice will not proceed with prosecution of Officers Lake or Salamoni,” Landry said. “This decision was not taken lightly.”

    Landry said his office thoroughly investigated the case, even re-interviewing witnesses in the case.  He said the evidence just didn’t warrant pursuing criminal charges.

    Attorney General Jeff Landry

    Attorney General Jeff Landry

    “We must analyze the evidence and draw a conclusion, but we’re always mindful of the family,” Landry said. “I know the Sterling family is hurting.”

    The Attorney General’s office received the case in May 2017. This after the U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Louisiana determined during its own investigation that there was not enough evidence to pursue criminal charges or civil rights violations.

    Family members, community leaders, and the Sterling family’s attorneys say they weren’t surprised by the latest findings.

    “We didn’t get any justice,’ said Quinyetta McMilon, the mother of Alton Sterling’s son, Cameron.  “The system failed us. We’re all out of tears. We all knew what it was going to be. We may not get justice down on this earth, but when God comes…As a family, we just got to stay strong.”

    “It was total B.S.,” said community activist Gary Chambers.

    “To put Blane Salamoni back on the street, you’re putting a murderer back on the street,” said Sterling’s Aunt Sandra Sterling who has had two strokes since the incident.  “Shame on you Blane Salamoni. You took an oath to protect and serve not protect and kill.”

    Sterling’s attorneys are filing a civil suit and have called for the firing of both officers who have remained on paid leave since the incident. Together, the officers have been paid more than $130,000 in salary while on leave.

    Sandra Sterling, Alton's aunt, who has suffered two strokes speaks to reporters. Photo by Michele McCalope

    Sandra Sterling, Alton’s aunt, who has suffered two strokes speaks to reporters. Photo by Michele McCalope

    “We’re putting the City of Baton Rouge, the Mayor and the Metro Council on notice,” said attorney Michael Adams.  “We’re disappointed, but this fight is not over. We have filed a civil suit and justice will be served. The officers will have to talk to us and explain their actions. Baton Rouge will have to hear the truth about what happened. We plan to put it all out there in the light of day.”

    Meanwhile, Baton Rouge Police Chief Murphy Paul said a disciplinary hearing has been scheduled for the officers this week so police can determine if any policies or procedures were violated.

    The officers will have a chance to tell their side of the story to the chief and his three deputies. The hearing will not be open to the public.

    “We’re asking the community for a little more patience and to keep our community in your prayers so we can begin the healing process,” Paul said.

    Once the hearing is completed, Paul said the department will announce what, if any, disciplinary action will be taken against the officers. Paul also said all videos, audio, and 911 calls regarding the incident will be released at that time.

    Broome, who has already said publicly that she wants the officers fired, said she still feels that way.

    “Our focus for our community, city and parish is to have justice and equity not just for some, but for everyone,” Broome said.

    By Michele McCalope
    The Drum contributing reporter

    Read more:

    Gov. Edwards, ACLU, 100 Black Men, community leaders release statements on Alton Sterling decision

    Attorney General to give update on Alton Sterling case

    ‘I am that next legacy’

    Department of Justice statement on the Alton Sterling investigation

    ‘Voices from the Bayou’ pulls powerful, emotional writing from BRCC students

    Dialogue necessary to move beyond fear

     

    Read more »
  • ,,

    SU Land-Grant Campus to host ‘One Health Symposium’

    The Southern University Agricultural Land-Grant Campus will host a symposium themed, ‘One Health Symposium: Promoting Sustainable Communities.’ The event will be held April 12-13 at the Southern University Law Center.

    The ‘One Health’ concept is a worldwide strategy for expanding interdisciplinary collaborations and communications in all aspects of health care for humans, animals and the environment.

    This symposium, which is free and open to the public, will bring the various disciplines of the One Health community – medicine, veterinary medicine, public health, social sciences, nutrition, food science, engineering, agricultural and environmental sciences – together to improve the health of people, animals and the planet.

    Participants will have an opportunity to come together and share strategies as well as learn about the latest educational tools and resources which could facilitate the improvement of their health, the health of their animals – both pets and livestock – and the overall health of the environment.

    Sessions during the symposium will include:

    • Bacterial Diseases and Zoonosis
    • Community and Economic Development
    • Designing Health Communities
    • Developing a healthy and vibrant food system in Louisiana
    • Diversity in the Health Care Field
    • Economics and Health Disparities
    • Environmental Health
    • Exercise, weight loss and well-being. Is weight loss imperative to obtain wellness?
    • Health Equity: “Health Care for all”
    • Healthy Child Development
    • Human Animal Bond
    • Human Disease Prevention and Intervention
    • Louisiana Opioid Epidemic
    • Mental Health Issues
    • Pet Equity
    • The Effects of Nutrition Policy on Population Health
    • The Science of Human “Sense of Taste and Health Diet”
    • True Care Health and Wellness “Healing with Herbs”

    This is the ideal event for new and beginning farmers, agricultural business owners, community leaders, non-profit and community based organizations, pet owners, students, faculty, staff and anyone eager to learn!

    The symposium is also designed to increase the marketability of the students in the SU College of Agricultural, Family and Consumer Sciences, while exposing them to individuals in their respective professions.

    Students will participate in FASpitch (elevator pitch), oral, and poster competitions. The students will also be able to participate in student ‘HUDDLEs’ where they will meet with agency representatives, academicians, and practitioners one-on-one to share their experiences and learn about job and scholarship opportunities.

    A highlight of this symposium will be a ribbon cutting for the SU Land-Grant Campus’ three institutes – the Southern Institute for One Health One Medicine, the Southern Institute for Medicinal Plants, and the Southern Institute for Food Science, Nutrition and Wellness.

    ONLINE: www.suagcenter.com/symposium.

    By LaKeeshia Giddens Lusk
    Contributing Writer

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  • ,,

    SU law student asks, ‘Can Alexa Testify Against You?’

    We live in an age when increasing numbers of people rely on devices to turn off their lights, make a phone call, or set the morning alarm. This may explain why since its launch in 2015, Alexa—or what Amazon calls a “virtual assistant” —has become a virtual extension of the lives of its estimated eight-million-plus owners.

    This codependency however comes with its own set of risks, according to a research paper published in the Southern University Law Review. (Read the paper here.)

    The paper “Alexa, Pick An Amendment”: A Comparison of Fourth and First Amendment Protections of Echo Device Data,” asks whether Alexa owners are protected under the First and Fourth Amendments when their privacy rights are infringed upon. The paper was written by by Tara Melancon, a third-year law student at Southern University Law Center in Baton Rouge.

    Tara Melancon

    Tara Melancon

    Melancon writes that American society has been preoccupied with privacy rights since at least the late 19th century, when The Right to Privacy, a law review article from 1890, broached the perennially relevant subject of the need for “privacy laws to keep up with technological progress.”

    The issue has become increasingly relevant.

    The reason, as Melancon explains, is not only because Alexa might be used to collect evidence against owners entangled in the criminal justice system; but because recent technological advances, notably our smart phones—which track our every move and purchase—have made us vulnerable and possible targets for investigation.

    Read more at The Crime Report by Julia Pagnamenta.

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  • ,,,

    Nurses focus on ‘community medicine’ to restore healthcare desert

    There is a new healthcare provider in north Baton Rouge. That news alone should spark hope in many residents from Zachary, through Baker and Scotlandville, and on to Mid-City. But most residents do not know that the Champion Medical Center on Howell Blvd. now houses the Louisiana Healthcare Services and its three providers. Open every day, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., the new clinic provides medical care for the entire family, a Medicaid application center, family planning services, as well as onsite lab services.

    Most importantly, Louisiana Healthcare Services provides these services in the middle of a healthcare desert in East Baton Rouge Parish. “We are a drop of water in this desert,” said registered nurse Nicole Thomas.  She and Leah Cullins, FNP, own Louisiana Healthcare Services which opened at 7855 Howell Blvd. in June 2017.

    exterior_460w-300x300

    Thomas said when she and Cullins began planning the clinic, they looked for an area with the greatest need. “The first thing both of us said was north Baton Rouge,” Thomas said. “Knowing that there were a lot of things that were going to fight against us. Lack of resources are in this area, and not just health resources but food resources; resources period are just scarce,” she said knew that those would be a battle for us, we decided to push through them.”

    In 2013, Earl K. Long Memorial Hospital was closed then later demolished in 2015 and replaced with the LSU Health Baton Rouge North Clinic with 15 treatment chairs. An ER was opened in 2017 as an 8,800-square foot addition built adjacent to the existing clinic. The facility includes an infusion clinic and services for primary care and oncology. It sits on Airline Hwy, 3 miles away from Louisiana Health Services. The Jewel Newman Community Center still houses the Baton Rouge Primary Care Collaborative Health Center at 2013 Central Road—nearly 5 miles north. And the Margaret Dumas Mental Health Center is open a mile away on 3843 Harding Blvd for mental health and substance abuse treatment. None of these facilities are designed for patients to regularly see the same health care provider in order to manage their health. Similarly, there are no other doctor offices or primary care facilities within the five surrounding zip codes.

    “There have been so many barriers to care for so long in the community,” said Thomas who grew up in the same community. As a student at Glen Oaks Medical Magnet High School, she was introduced to healthcare through the school’s medical training classes. She graduated from Southern University School of Nursing and worked as a nurse at what she called “the best hospital ever,” Earl K. Long Memorial Hospital, then to home health, and managed care with United Healthcare. It opened her eyes to the business of healthcare although she still had a “yearning for the clinical aspect.”

    IMG-4407

    She said she began asking herself what more she could do to have an impact. “What legacy am I going to leave behind?” she asked. “For me coming back to open a clinic here was purposeful. I realized that every single step of my journey that I went through, every job, every up, and every down was to get me to prepare me to be here,” said Thomas.

    “Here” for both she and Cullins is in north Baton Rouge providing what they called “community medicine.”

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    “This (at LHS) is where you come to establish a relationship with your doctor,” said Collins. “This is where you come for the personalized care.” As a child, Cullins watched this community medicine being practiced by Black doctors in South Baton Rouge. “I saw how these doctors cared for patients. Taking whatever they could afford to pay at the time. Sometimes it was some type of commodity or produce; most times patients paid in cash.”

    Thomas said she saw the same community medicine being practiced while she was a high schooler completing clinical rotations with nurses at Earl K. Long Hospital emergency room. “This nurse gave it literally her all. Seeing how she was able to truly provide care for the patient and make an impact,” she said. “You change the entire course of their lives.”

    As a result, Louisiana Healthcare Services allows patients to pay a minimal fee of $65 for visits without insurance and providers make house calls to care for established patients.

    “This is the type of care people deserve,” Cullins said. As a nurse practitioner, she is the primary care physician for hundreds of patients.

    Along with family care, the clinic offers wellness screenings, immunizations, HIV and chronic disease management, illness treatment, and family planning services. The extended hours of 8am to 8pm allow LHS to accept walk-ins. There are three providers—one bilingual—and an onsite lab. Medicaid application assistance are available. Cullins said they partner with specialists across the city who provide obstetrics, cardiac, dermatology, and pharmaceutical services for LHS patients. In the near future, LHS will house specialists “so that our patients won’t have to travel out of their communities — miles from their homes—to be cared for,” Cullins said.

    “We’ve hit many brick walls,” said Thomas. “We are writing our own blueprint as we go. We are doing what matters in order to impact this community the most.”

    For instance, in January, a team from LHS joined volunteers with LaMOM at the Baton Rouge Free Health Clinic and provided dental, medical, and vision care to more than 1,400 residents over three days. “This service was so needed, and with all the providers and medical staff there, we couldn’t assist everyone. There were so many,” said Thomas.

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    “People stood out in the freezing cold as early as 4am, lined up waiting for the doors to open,” said Cullins. Many of them had not been seen by doctors for years. Cullins remembered siting with one patient who need to received dental care but their blood pressure was too high. “They were hypertensive and had no medicine and no doctor,” she said. After sitting with them and explaining the severity of their health and its impact on their teeth, Cullins said she was surprised when the patient said, “You’re the first doctor to sit next to me and touch my hand.” After some time, Cullins said, they were able to lower the patient’s blood pressure so that the dentist could repair her teeth.

    IMG-4577“We’ve got to start seeing doctors who care about us,” said Cullins. One of their goals is to build on their partnerships with providers and specialists who will care for patients on site. “We (LHS) are needed,” she said.

    The surmounting HIV and AIDS cases in Baton Rouge is also a major concern for Collins and Thomas. The city is number one in the nation for new HIV cases. In 2015, more than 3,700 residents reported having the disease and the number is growing quickly. “We can prevent this and we can help our patients live longer with the disease,” said Cullins who specializes in HIV/AIDS management.

    “This is a vulnerable community, from hypertension, diabetes, HIV, and other conditions” said Thomas. “Their care starts with a primary care physician not in urgent care or the emergency room.”

    “We both know how it feels to be disadvantaged and being told no for services…This is a legacy we’re building here,” Cullins said.

     

    By Candace J. Semien
    Jozef Syndicate reporter

    Photos by Hodge Media Group

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    Entrepreneurship program seeks new applicants from military personnel

    The Louisiana Veteran Entrepreneurship Program, or LVEP, is accepting applications from Louisiana military personnel, including active duty, reservists and veterans, who are interested in starting a business. The deadline to submit applications is April 17.

    LVEP was created in 2017 as a partnership between Louisiana Economic Development, the Louisiana Department of Veteran Affairs, the Louisiana National Guard, the Louisiana Business and Technology Center and LSU Executive Education. LVEP is designed to boost business opportunities for Louisiana veterans through a three-week, online learning program, followed by a one-day “boot camp” or in-person training session. LVEP graduates are then provided long-term counseling from small business resource partners in their communities.

    The program strives to have at least 30 percent of its participants launch a business and collectively raise at least $5 million in startup capital. A long-term goal of the program is to create 100 new jobs through new veteran-operated businesses.

    “Our veterans come home with remarkable leadership skills and on-the-job training,” said LSU Innovation Park executive director Charles F. D’Agostino. “This program empowers them to utilize these skills and channel their entrepreneurial spirit, creating new businesses and generating jobs in our communities.”

    Participants must have access to a computer and Internet connection to participate in the three-week online portion of the course and to complete assignments.

    Submit applications on the LSU Innovation Park website:www.lsu.edu/innovationpark/LVEP.php.

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  • ,,,

    Senator Chabert writes ‘It’s time to end attacks’

    Dear Editor:

    Since 2014, several parishes have filed lawsuits in an attempt to make energy manufacturers pay for rebuilding Louisiana’s coast. These lawsuits are mostly being driven by plaintiff’s law firms that have built reputations for suing our state’s oil and gas companies.

    Restoring our coast and protecting our wetlands is an important mission, but these lawsuits are not the answer. The reality is that there are many parties that contribute to coastal and wetland degradation in our state, not just energy manufacturers. The energy manufacturers are good corporate citizens that contribute to their communities in many ways. These employers are the source of thousands of high paying jobs, tens of billions in economic growth, and billions more in state and local tax revenue. The recent approval of the Bayou Bridge Pipeline project is an example of this recent growth.

    These lawsuits attack the companies that are currently the largest contributors to our coastal restoration funds. If we truly want to grow and maintain our coastline, we should be doing everything possible to encourage the industries to locate and expand in our state. It’s time to end these attacks and come together to create a coastal protection plan that works for everyone.

    Sincerely,

    Senator Norbert “Norby” Chabert
    Louisiana Senate District 20

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  • ,

    Southern rolls out Ag mobile during annual small farmer conference, hundreds in attendance

    More than three hundred small farmers from throughout Louisiana gathered at the Felton G. Clark Activity Center for the Southern University Land-Grant Campus’s 8th Annual Louisiana Small Farmer Conference. The three-day conference themed, “Transforming and Elevating Louisiana Small Family Farms,” was held March 15-17, 2018.

    Events kicked off on March 15 with a ribbon cutting for the Southern University Agricultural Land-Grant Campus’s Mobile Education and Technology Center.

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    The mobile center will be used to provide educational training, bring Internet access, hands on testing and live instruction to low-to-moderate income families residing in the most marginalized areas and remote corners of the state.

    Sessions held during the day included grant writing, emergency preparedness, and integrated pest management.

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    La Agriculture and Forestry Commissioner Mike Strain DVM

    The second day of the conference began with an address from Louisiana’s Department of Agriculture and Forestry Commissioner Mike Strain, DVM. The keynote address was delivered by Leonard Jordan, the acting chief of the United States Department of Agriculture’s National Resources Conservation Service.

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    Leonard Jordan

    Session included Programs for Veterans, Intensive Small Scale Farming, Agro-Tourism, Farm Liability Insurance, Social Media Marketing, Biodiversity on Your Farm, Estate Planning, Record-Keeping and Urban Farms.

    The Louisiana Living Legends Banquet was held on the evening of March 16 following the conference’s sessions. This banquet honors individuals who have made significant contributions to Southern University in the areas of Agriculture, Family and Consumer Sciences.

    The 2018 honorees were Winzer Andrews, retired county agent/ parish chairman with the LSU AgCenter’s Cooperative Extension Service in Caddo Parish; State Representative Barbara West Carpenter, Ph.D., dean of International Affairs and University Outreach at Southern University; and Veeraraghava R. Bachireddy, Ph.D., professor emeritus of plant and soil sciences at the SU College of Agricultural, Family, and Consumer Sciences.

    The three join 24 others who have been honored with this recognition since 2005.

    Anthony Reed, director of special projects for the School of Agriculture and Applied Sciences at Alcorn State University, served as the speaker for the banquet.

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    The conference concluded with a workshop on Managing Feral Hogs. During the workshop Gene Cavalier, a biologist with the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry spoke to the attendees about the rules and regulations for feral hogs in Louisiana. Derrick Banks, extension agent at Prairie View A & M University also made a presentation on managing feral hogs.

    By LaKeeshia Giddens-Lusk
    Contributing Writer

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    COMMENTARY: Preparing Parents for the ACT

    Standardized tests give many students the heebie jeebies, especially tests that are known by three letters and determines many factors about life after high school.  I’m talking about the ACT and the SAT. As a an academic and college coach, I either have to help students reduce their anxiety about these tests or light a fire beneath them.  My true preference is to have students in the middle of these extremes. Students should have a healthy respect for these tests. They should not feel that their intellectual identity is reflected in the scores they make.  However, they should not take it lightly either.

    While it has been nearly 17 years since I have had to prepared for the ACT, the test has changed very little.  My test preparation was trial and error over the course of my high school career. My family did not have the resources to take a full course by the top test preparation companies. And, neither one of them attended college so these tests were foreign to them, which means they could offer minimal help.  So, I purchased a $25 test prep book and went at it on my own for about two hours during the week and five hours on the weekend. I religiously did this from my sophomore year to my senior year. My score was enough to give me a competitive edge for scholarships and awards.

    Throughout the years, I realized that my study methods, nor the result, were a common practice or experience. I really wanted  to empower students to conquer the ACT regardless of the hand life has dealt. I began to offer workshops and personal coaching services. While the students benefited the most from the information, parents were comforted knowing that they were able to provide support for their child.  Here are the top 6 tips that I always provide families embarking on their journey of test preparation.

    1. Start early. A majority of the ACT is based on skills learned in 7th – 10th grade.  Most students wait until junior or senior year to take the test. By then, they have forgotten most of the concepts, especially in math.  Arrange for your child to take the test in their spring of their 9th grade year.

    2. Take the ACT often to decrease anxiety. Taking the ACT is like any other performance activity.  The more students practice in real conditions the more comfortable they will be when it counts. Also taking the ACT frequently can help students recognize patterns of questions that will help them streamline their study strategy. Taking the test one or two times raises the stakes for students and causes pressure, which in turns breeds fear and anxiety.  Start with taking the test once a year during 9th and 10th grade years. Increase attempts to two times in the fall and spring during their junior year. Seniors should take the test as many times as possible until the desired score is reached. Taking practice tests at home under similar testing conditions is also useful.

    3. Dedicate special study time. Slow, consistent and steady wins this standardize test race.  Starting ACT prep as early as the 9th grade prevents cramming which leads to anxiety. Help your student set aside quiet time that is dedicated to practice.  Schedule a few, intense, short study sessions (30 – 50 minutes) per week during the academic year. Increase the frequency during the summer to prevent summer melt.

    4. Divide and conquer.  The ACT is perceived to test students on everything they have learned. This is a myth that paralyzes students with stress.  There are a set number of skills and concepts that the ACT focuses on. You can find a complete list of topics on act.org and in most preparation books.  Devise a strategy to attack the content and create a schedule to cycle through content. Use scores on official and practice tests to determine weaker areas.  The ACT administration can provide students with their actually answers along with the answer key for an additional fee. Paying the additional fee may be worth the cost, as students can gain valuable wisdom and insight into own their testing habits. I often find students getting wrong answers because of 2nd guessing, simple mathematical mistakes, or misunderstanding the question and not because they could not answer the problem.

    5. Invest in affordable resources. There are many free and low-cost resources available to aid students in their preparations.  A test prep book is an essential resource. However, they are not all the same. To get the most bang for your buck, make sure the book has a diagnostic test, at least two additional practice tests, and skill building sections where students can refresh on concepts. Another type of prep book is a workbook that walks students through specific content in-depth.  Workbooks allow students to become their own tutor and interact with the material. There are some preparation books that are just a series of practice tests. These types of book offer very little help on individual concepts, however they offer great information on how to eliminate the wrong answer and attack common questions. Lastly, there are also books that just provide tips and strategies.  Besides books, you can also find flash cards, mobile apps, and email subscriptions. ACT.org has free and paid practice material. Sites like Kahn Academy and YouTube have free videos that help students work through particular problems and concepts.

    1. Talk positive.  Words, positive or negative, can impact a student’s mindset and mindset has the greatest impact on performance.  I often hear parents say, “She’s not good with tests.” “He’s never been good in math.” I see the result when students are in front me in a workshop.  Students give less than 100% effort while saying, “I don’t remember this or “I could never get this.” When students think they are already defeated, they won’t commit the time or effort into improving. This is known as a fixed mindset.  Individuals with a fixed mindset believe that their talents, traits or performance can never improve. Those with a growth mindset Parents can help shift students’ mindset from fixed to growth by calling attention to their hard work, quality time dedication and their persistence. Parents should recognize small improvements no matter if it is getting one practice problem correct or improving their score on the official test. Focusing less on skills or ability and more on effort and strategy can help your student improve their performance on the ACT as well as get them in the college mind frame.

    While I am a part-time college coach, I am also a full-time higher education administrator who works to improve the number of students who complete college.  Understanding the full picture from admissions to graduation, I know that grades and scores are shallow predictors of success especially for minority students.  There are plenty of smart students who are college drop-outs. Those who persist to the end are the ones who take advantage of resources, practice self-management, confidently face challenges, acknowledges their weaknesses and appreciates learning. Therefore, it is not a coincidence that I give these same tips to parents during freshman orientation on how to help their child succeed in college.  How a student prepares for the ACT can give more insight into college performance than the score by itself. Helping them to connect quality effort and discipline to high performance can be as valuable of a win as achieving the score alone.

    By Erin Wheeler, Ph.D.
    Erin Wheeler, Ph.D., is the founder of BePreppy.com, a college counseling site dedicated to providing quality low-cost, college planning assistance to all. She can be reached at erin@bepreppy.com.

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  • COMMUNITY EVENTS: March and April 2018

    Local and Statewide Events

    March

    22 – 25: Louisiana Crawfish Festival: 5:00 p.m. at the Frederick J. Sigur Civic Center at 8245 W Judge Perez Drive in Chalmette. Cajun entertainment and current hit parade bands explode on stage to draw crowds to the sounds and glitter of showmanship.

    24: BRBT Dancin’ in the Streets 2018: 4:30 p.m. at Perkins Rowe, 10202 Perkins Rowe, B.R. Event presented by the Baton Rouge Ballet Theater. Enjoy an awesome dance party in the streets of downtown with pulsing live music and delectable food provided by various local restaurants. $55 advance, $65 at gate.

    24: Repticon Reptile and Exotic Animal Convention 2018: 10 a.m. The convention will be held at the Lamar Dixon Expo Center, Gonzales. $12 Adults, $5 Children 5-12.

    24: BREC’s 2018 Summer Camp Registration: 9:00 am for Baton Rouge residents (April 3, 2018 at 3:30 pm for non-residents). For further information, call 225-272-9200 ext. 580.

    24: Sistars of Empowerment Social Organization “Bossed Up to Glow up” Empowerment Breakfast: 9:30 a.m. at Main Library at Goodwood, 7711 Goodwood Blvd, B.R. This is the second part of the Boss up Series by Sistars of Empowerment. This women’s empowerment breakfast will motivate and inspire you to “glow up” even after the “boss up”. This event is for young ladies and women who are looking to reach their greatest potential in every aspect of life. Guest speakers, Door prizes, Food, Fellowship, and Fun. Free, RSVP to sistarsinc13@gmail.com.

    25: The 100 Black Women of Metropolitan Baton Rouge “Stay at Home Tea” Fundraiser: All day online event. For further information, visit their website at https://www.100blackwomenmbr.com/workshops.

    25: Screening of the movie “Backpack Full of Cash”: 2:30 at Main Library at Goodwood, 7711 Goodwood Blvd, B.R. Come join Progressive Social Network (PSN), Louisiana Association of Educators (LAE), and One Community One School District for a followed by a panel discussion with local education leaders, activists, and experts. The panelists will include individuals with diverse views on charter schools in Baton Rouge. Narrated by Matt Damon, this feature-length documentary explores the growing privatization of public schools and the resulting impact on America’s most vulnerable children. Filmed in Philadelphia, New Orleans, Nashville and other cities, “Backpack Full of Cash” takes viewers through the tumultuous 2013-14 school year, exposing the world of corporate-driven education “reform” where public education — starved of resources — hangs in the balance.

    27: Mary B. Perkins Cancer Center’s Mobile Clinic: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The mobile clinic will be at the Main Library at Goodwood Blvd., B.R. distributing free breast, prostate, skin, and colorectal kits. For further information, call 225-215-1234.

    27: Southern University Agricultural Land-Grant Campus’s 14th Annual “Connecting Businesses with Contracts” Procurement Conference: 8:00 a.m. at the Felton G. Clark Activity Center. The conference provides a venue for potential and existing business owners, contractors, non-profits, small towns, and municipalities to learn about the resources that are available through federal, state and local government agencies and major prime companies.

    30: Downtown Baton Rouge Live After 5 2018: 5 p.m. City Hall Plaza, 100 North Blvd, B.R. Come out and enjoy free live entertainment on March 30, April 6, April 13, April 20, April 27, and May 4, 2018. Free.

    April

    4 -8: Cycle Zydeco 2018:  6:00 a.m. at the Ramada Lafayette Conference Center, 2032 SW Evangeline Thruway, Lafayette. This festival consists of a leisurely ride through Louisiana’s swamp country. Participants ride from venue to venue eating, dancing and drinking their way to a good time.

    6: SwagHer Magazine Issue Release Party- Changing the Narrative: at 7:00 p.m. at BREC’s Jefferson Highway Park, 8133 Jefferson Hwy, B.R. $15.

    6: Denham Springs Fair: 4:00 p.m. at 7510 Vincent Rd, Denham Springs.

    6-7: Scott Boudin Festival 2018: 5:00 p.m. at the City Hall Grounds, 125 Lions Club Road, Scott, LA. The festival is filled with plates of lip-smacking Cajun cuisine, rhythmic blues and carnival entertainment for kids of all ages. $45 all weekend ride pass.

    7: The New Orleans Chapter of the National Black MBA Association: “Leaders of Tomorrow Scholarship Gala”: 5:00 p.m. at the Homer L. Hitt Alumni and Visitors Center, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, New Orleans. The keynote speaker will be former U.S. Attorney Kenneth Polite, Jr.  For further information, email the association at scholarship@nonbmbaa.org.

    7: The 3rd Annual Crawfish Color Run:  10 a.m. at The Lodges at 777, 777 Ben Hur Road, B.R. This kaleidoscopic 5K was established in 2011 and takes place in several cities throughout the world. Run, laugh, listen to music, dance and be doused with colors along the way. The first 500 people to register and make a suggested $5 donation to Relay for Life receive a free shirt.

    7-8: BREC’s Baton Rouge Zoo Zippity Zoo Fest 2018: 9:30 a.m. Celebrate 48 years at the BREC’s Baton Rouge Zoo, 3601 Thomas Road, B.R. For further information, call 225-775-3877.

    12: Women’s Council of Greater Baton Rouge General Meeting: 11:30 a.m. at Main Library at Goodwood, 7711 Goodwood Blvd, B.R.

    12 -15: 35th French Quarter Festival:  11:00 a.m. at the New Orleans French Quarter.  There will be 21 stages set up throughout the French Quarter that celebrate all genres of music from contemporary jazz, folk and gospel to Zydeco and New Orleans Funk. Food and beverages offered at the festival are provided by local New Orleans restaurants.

    13 – 15: 47th Annual Ponchatoula Strawberry Festival: Noon at the Memorial Park located in the historic and beautiful Ponchatoula, Louisiana. The Ponchatoula Strawberry Festival is a free family friendly outdoor festival, filled with lots of great food, games, and live entertainment.

    14: The CEO Mind Foundation: WOMANHOOD 101: GIRLS EMPOWERED: 9:00 a.m. at 4000 Gus Young Ave, B.R. For further information, call 225- 372-1416 or info@theceomind.org.

    14: Urban Congress on African American Males: 2018 Urban Congress General Convening: 8:15 a.m. at 6955 Florida Blvd, B.R. This is an open invitation to individuals of all interests, industries and backgrounds who share one common agenda: creating a Baton Rouge where Black males are valued by the community as integral assets and are productive, connected, healthy, and safe.

    14 -15: 24th Annual Baton Rouge Blues Festival: Noon at Louisiana Old State Capitol, 100 North Blvd, B. R. This year’s festival will feature performers such as Mavis Staples and Kenny Neal. For a full performance listing, visit their website at http://www.batonrougebluesfestival.org.

    18: Champions of Services Awards and Gala: 5:30 p.m. at Capital Park Museum, 660 N 4th St, B. R. Volunteer Louisiana will celebrate its 25th Anniversary and the legacy of national service and volunteerism in Louisiana. The event will feature a keynote address from Governor John Bel Edwards. For further information, please visit http://www.volunteerlouisiana.gov.

    19-22: Louisiana International Film Festival: Cinemark Perkins Rowe, 10000 Perkins Rowe, B.R. Guests will see Louisiana’s finest along with terrific films submitted from around the world. For movie listings and pricing, visit https://www.lifilmfest.org/event/fulllineup or call (225) 761-7844.

    21-22: Angola Prison Rodeo: 9:00 a.m. at Angola Prison Rodeo Arena, 17544 Tunica Trace, Angola.  Tickets are $20, children 2 and under free.

    25 – 29: Festival International de Louisiane:  6:30 p.m. at Downtown Lafayette, 315 Lee Ave, Lafayette. The festival celebrates the French flavor of Southwest Louisiana with five days of world music, art and food in downtown Lafayette.

    25: East Baton Rouge Parish Prison Reform Coalition: 6:00 p.m. at Main Library at Goodwood, 7711 Goodwood Blvd, B.R. A community coalition is forming with a campaign to expose the deplorable conditions in the EBR Parish jail. There will be a call for reforms so that city officials can take the necessary steps to correct this gross violation of residents’ rights. All those interested in participating are invited to attend.

    27 – 29: New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival (Week One): 11:00 a.m. at the New Orleans Fairgrounds. Advance tickets are $65 for adults ($80 at the gate), $5 for children ages 2-10. For performance listings go to http://www.nojazzfest.com/lineup.

    28: The CEO Mind Foundation GRILL AND CONNECT: 11:00 am. at 4000 Gus Young Ave, B.R. This is a community outreach event that allows the organization to connect organically with the members of a neighborhood. Refreshments will be served. For further information, call 225- 372-1416 or info@theceomind.org.

    29: Louisiana Earth Day Festival: 1:00 p.m. at LSU Parker Coliseum/Ag Center, B.R. For further information call 225-274-8367.

     

     

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  • ,,,

    There’s a Juke Joint in West Baton Rouge

    The West Baton Rouge Museum is pleased to announce the grand opening of the Juke Joint exhibit on April 6th at 6:30PM. This new permanent exhibit will interpret the rich blues heritage of West Baton Rouge. It is one of the first projects of the museum’s new curator of exhibits Kathe Hambrick.

    Kathe Hambrick, Curator of Exhibits, West Baton Rouge Museum

    Kathe Hambrick, Curator of Exhibits, West Baton Rouge Museum

    The Juke Joint grand opening is a tribute to Slim Harpo with living legends Henry Gray and Carol Fran along with tomorrow’s legends Carter Wilkerson and the Riverside Blues Band and Rudy “Trey” Richard, III. We will be frying fish and serving up Juke Joint beer from Tin Roof and the all new “Baby Scratch My Back” cocktail invented just for us by Cane Land Distilling Company, said museum planners.
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    Juke joints have a history that is deeply rooted in small towns throughout the south. West Baton Rouge was famous for the juke joints that provided relief to the workers coming in from the sugarcane fields and long hard days of work on the Mississippi River. The night time establishments in West Baton Rouge Parish drew crowds as the Blue Laws of East Baton Rouge did not apply on the west side. You could hear live music playing all night through open windows across the canebrake. Ernest Gaines is quoted in his memoir, Mozart to Leadbelly, “Baton Rouge was a dry town on Sundays; so I…would go across the Mississippi River into Port Allen, into The White Eagle bar.” He wrote about hearing Bobby Rush, Bobby Blue Bland, and Ernie K-Doe in The White Eagle.

    Learn more of the juke joints and the Blues musicians that made West Baton Rouge famous. Be prepared to dance and share your juke joint stories from West Baton Rouge Parish.

    ONLINE: http://westbatonrougemuseum.com

    Photos by James Terry III

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  • Erika McConduit resigns as president of Urban League of Louisiana

    The Urban League of Louisiana (ULLA) announced today that President and CEO, Erika McConduit, has resigned to explore other career opportunities, effective July 2018. The search for McConduit’s successor will begin in the near future.

    In an official letter to the Board of Directors, McConduit stated: “For the past five years, I have proudly served as president and CEO of this esteemed organization and community treasure. During this time, I have had the privilege of serving under a dedicated Board of Directors, and leading an incredible team of professionals, who’ve all worked tirelessly to breathe life into our mission of assisting African Americans and others seeking equity to secure economic parity, power, and civil rights. Personally and professionally, however, I challenge myself to have an even greater impact in a different field, which is why I am exploring other career opportunities at this time.”
    McConduit worked for the Urban League of Louisiana for nearly a decade, first serving as Vice President of Programs and subsequently as Executive Vice President before being named President and CEO in 2013. She is the second woman to serve in this role in the affiliate’s 80-year history.
    During her tenure as President and CEO, McConduit achieved incredible outcomes, most notably, expanding the organization from serving the Greater New Orleans area to a statewide entity, with a satellite office in Baton Rouge and space agreements in surrounding parishes in Louisiana. McConduit also oversaw the purchase of a new 26,000 sq. ft. headquarters building in the mid-city area of New Orleans, which also provides office and meeting space for small businesses, non-profits, and the community at-large. Under McConduit’s leadership, the organization responded to crises including flood recovery by providing over $3.5 million in clothing and household goods to impacted families in the Greater Baton Rouge area, and hosted a landmark conference to commemorate the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, releasing a research publication examining the State of Black New Orleans Ten Years Post-Katrina.
    “As the President and CEO of the Urban League of Louisiana, Erika McConduit dedicated herself to the mission of the organization,” said ULLA Board Chairman Chris D’Amour.  “Erika exemplifies the Movement. As Chair of the Board, I extend a sincere and heartfelt thank you to Erika. ULLA will now conduct a first class search to find our next CEO who will continue Erika’s legacy of changing lives throughout Louisiana.”
    The Urban League touches the lives of over 10,000 Louisianans each year through direct service programs in early childhood education, parent engagement, college and career readiness, workforce development, economic inclusion, and civic engagement. During McConduit’s service as President and CEO, countless members of the community were impacted in each of ULLA’s direct service areas, which had a direct and sustainable impact on the region at large.In addition, her tenacious policy and advocacy efforts helped to transform systems at both the local and state level.
    McConduit expressed her appreciation by stating, “I’d like to extend my deepest thanks and gratitude to our clients, funders, partners, community members, staff, Board of Directors, Young Professionals, Guild, and the National Urban League. In our 80th anniversary year, the Urban League of Louisiana is strong, vibrant, and ready to grow to even greater heights.”
    During her remaining time at the organization, McConduit will play an active role to ensure a seamless transition for continued success in the League’s work to Empower Communities and Change Lives.
    McConduit concluded her letter to the board with, “It has been my greatest honor to have had the privilege of serving as president and CEO of such an important, effective, and transformational organization as the Urban League of Louisiana. I sincerely appreciate the trust and support you’ve given me throughout this incredible journey.”
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  • Federal judge blocks construction of Bayou Bridge pipeline said it would ‘irreparably harm’ Atchafalaya Basin

    Federal District Court Judge Shelly Dick halted the construction of the controversial Bayou Bridge pipeline across the Atchafalaya Basin. Today’s decision grants a preliminary injunction to prevent ongoing irreparable harm to this ecological treasure while a lawsuit, filed Jan. 11, is being heard.

    Dick found that the lawsuit filed by several groups — Atchafalaya Basinkeeper, the Louisiana Crawfish Producers Association (West), Gulf Restoration Network, Waterkeeper Alliance and Sierra Club, represented by lawyers with Earthjustice – raises serious concerns and that the 162-mile pipeline would irreparably harm the Atchafalaya Basin.

    The groups recently presented live testimony during a hearing showing that the ancient cypress and tupelo trees slated to be turned into mulch while the pipeline right-of-way is being cleared would never return, including evidence that these old-growth trees are the Noah’s Ark of the swamp – providing habitat for migratory birds, bears, bats and numerous other wildlife.

    In addition, the groups showed that pipeline construction would further degrade nearby fishing grounds that local commercial crawfishers rely on for their livelihood.

    “The court’s ruling recognizes the serious threat this pipeline poses to the Atchafalaya Basin, one of our country’s ecological and cultural crown jewels,” said Jan Hasselman, attorney from Earthjustice representing plaintiffs in this matter.  “For now, at least, the Atchafalaya is safe from this company’s incompetence and greed.”

    Jody Meche, a third-generation commercial crawfisher and president of the Louisiana Crawfish Producers Association-West, testified about how the Bayou Bridge pipeline would make existing problems worse – problems created by the irresponsible behavior of oil and gas companies during construction to previous pipelines in the basin.

    These problems include hypoxic water conditions that kill crawfish, eliminating harvests in areas of the Basin, the safety of local communities and the survival of Cajun culture.
    “We fight the fight for years, telling our story, raising public awareness about the issues we have in the Atchafalaya Basin,” Meche said. “It felt great to finally be able to tell my story in a courtroom.”

    “After years of witnessing the systematic destruction of the Basin with impunity by these companies, while our government turns a blind eye, it felt good to finally tell our story to a person with the power to make a difference,” Dean Wilson, executive director of Atchafalaya Basinkeeper said.

    The groups also raised concerns about the fact that construction of the pipeline would decrease natural flood protection in the basin, which acts as the major floodway project that protects millions of people in coastal Louisiana and the Mississippi River valley from Mississippi flood waters.

    The Bayou Bridge pipeline project proposes to connect the controversial Dakota Access pipeline, which transports volatile and explosive Bakken crude oil from North Dakota to refineries in St. James Parish and export terminals, forming the southern leg of the Bakken Pipeline. Energy Transfer Partners (ETP), which owns the Dakota Access Pipeline and is a joint owner in the proposed Bayou Bridge Pipeline, has one of the worst safety and compliance records in the industry.

    Federal data shows that Energy Transfer Partners and its subsidiary Sunoco Inc. have been responsible for hundreds of significant pipeline incidents across the country in the last decade.

    Last week, Sunoco was fined a record $12.6 million by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection for violations incurred during the construction of the Mariner East 2 Pipeline.

    The court ordered BBP to halt construction, citing the need to prevent further irreparable harm until the matter can be tried on the merits. The judge said the court would provide a more detailed opinion at a later date.

    Additional reaction from plaintiff groups:

    “ETP has a horrible track record that keeps getting worse every day,” said Donna Lisenby, Clean and Safe Energy Campaign Manager at Waterkeeper Alliance. “Waterkeeper Alliance is very grateful and relieved that a despicably horrible and incorrigible repeat offender has been temporarily stopped by the courts from damaging water, land, and wildlife in Louisiana.”

    “We have no time to lose,” said Scott Eustis, Gulf Restoration Network. “The sand stolen by these rights-of-way must flow to the coast—the sand cannot be spent filling our swamps. Once those swamps are filled, there’s no fish, and the vines cover the trees, so no birds. It’s over.”

    “The Bayou Bridge pipeline would pose an unacceptable risk to the wetlands, water, and communities along its route, and should never be built. It is a relief that the court has granted this injunction so we can make our case against this dirty, dangerous pipeline, and we will continue to fight until it is stopped for good,” said Julie Rosenzweig, Sierra Club Delta Chapter Director.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Homecoming crowd celebrates Tasker Memorial’s anniversary

    Words from two favorite old hymns best describe the recent 150th anniversary celebration at Tasker Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church in Ponchatoula.

    Written after Tasker was organized in 1867 and, like the church, both songs have stood the tests of time: “O what a foretaste of glory divine” (“Blessed Assurance” 1873) and “What a day of rejoicing that will be” (“When We All Get to Heaven” 1898.)

    Indeed, the rejoicing by the congregation was just a sampling of the future awaiting Christians everywhere.

    Former City Councilman Wayne F. Foster was master of ceremonies and two choirs participated, Tasker’s and visiting Amite Butler Chapel A.M.E. Zion.

    The choirs led and were sometimes joined by the congregation in singing as well as solos by Barbara Dixon and Clifford Guy Walker. Songs heard: “He is Lord”, “Leaning on the Everlasting Arms”, “I’ll Go if I Have to Go by Myself”, “Hold to God’s Unchanging Hand”, and “How Great is My God.”

    One song, “He’s an On-Time God,” reminded everyone of God’s timing: “He may not come when you want Him to, but He’ll be right there on time!”

    During the service Jacqueline Brumfield extended a welcome, Debbie Brown gave history and Virginia Jeanpierre and Yvonne Elzy gave reflections.

    Pastor Rev. John E. Hurst Jr., welcomed everyone, introducing Mayor Bob Zabbia who thanked the church for the invitation, expressing what the church and its members mean to the community. He recognized Community Center Director Lynnette Jackson Allen who grew up in the church and introduced Kathryn Martin as the writer of the proclamation.

    Gwen Bankston, read with great feeling its words, some of which are:

    Whereas, Tasker Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church stands at the corner of South Sixth and West Ash Streets in Ponchatoula as a permanent monument and testimonial to the toil and sacrifice of its faithful leaders and members across the years; and

    Whereas, the church has always been of great historical importance to the City of Ponchatoula since its organization October 12, 1867; and

    Whereas, the leaders, members and friends who come and go from the place of the Holy on a regular basis help meet the needs of the church family as well as those of the community and many others through their support of home and foreign missions; and

    Whereas, the church and its family serve as a beacon to the feet and light to the path to lead the way for countless men, women, boys and girls to know our Savior and Lord Jesus Christ;

    Whereas, it is a privilege to extend the expression of our esteem and best wishes to Tasker Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church on its 150th anniversary;

    Now, therefore, I, Robert Zabbia, Mayor of the City of Ponchatoula, Louisiana, hereby proclaim this day as Tasker Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church Day.

    Rev. Dr. John Wesley Forbes III, pastor of Butler Chapel A.M.E. Zion, brought a rousing timely sermon.

    Those working behind the scenes to bring the special day about were the program committee: Helena Brown, Jacqueline Brumfield, Barbara Dixon, Wayne F. Foster, and Joyce Roberts; finance committee: Debbie Brown, Charles Dixon, Wayne F. Foster, M. Nathaniel Kelly, and Joyce Roberts; music committee: Linda Hodges and Lawrence Greely.

    The service was followed by a time of feast and fellowship and this blessed and wonderful day will long live on in the minds and hearts of everyone attending.

     By Kathryn J. Martin
    Contributing Writer

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    Public asked to comment on future of Medicaid-management care March 14 – 16

    The Louisiana Department of Health is seeking public input as the State moves towards improving its Medicaid managed care program. Those who are interested in learning more about the department’s plans are invited to attend one of three forums scheduled this week.
    The forums will allow participants to learn about, and provide input on, Medicaid’s next Request for Proposals (RFP) for new Medicaid-managed care contracts. This competitive process will begin in early 2019. The meetings will be held at the following dates, locations and times:
    March 14
    Baton Rouge
    Our Lady of the Lake, Main Auditorium
    5000 Hennessy Blvd., Baton Rouge
    6 pm to 8 pm
    March 15
    Lafayette
    Lafayette General Hospital, Administrative Office
    920 W. Pinhook Road
    6 pm to 8 pm

     

    March 16
    Lake Charles
    Lake Charles Memorial Hospital, Sherman Conf. Center
    1701 Oak Park Blvd.
    11:30 am to 1:30 pm
    Louisiana Department of Health Secretary Dr. Rebekah Gee will be attending the March 15 forum in Lafayette.  “The future managed care approach will emphasize rewarding providers for better care, improving whole-person care and excelling at population health management,” said Gee.
    With more than 1.5 million Louisiana residents enrolled in Healthy Louisiana, Medicaid’s managed care program, the Department of Health is committed to designing a procurement to find the best health plan partners to achieve the “Triple Aim” of better care, better health, and lower costs in the Medicaid program.

    “The Department is early in the policy development and information gathering stage for this future procurement and looks forward to public input in the design process,” said Jen Steele, Medicaid director.

    Currently, the state has contracts with five managed care plans to provide specific Medicaid benefits and services to eligible children and adults in Louisiana.

    The current Medicaid-managed care contracts will expire on December 31, 2019, and the new Medicaid managed care contracts formed through the RFP will be in place for January 1, 2020.

    All meetings are open to the public, and pre-registration is not required. For more information, visit www.makingmedicaidbetter.com or email healthy@la.gov.

    Read more »
  • ,

    3 ways to prepare for a troubled teen’s return from a treatment center

    Raising a teenager can be a challenge under the best circumstances.

    But when a teenager’s addictions, learning disabilities, or emotional and behavioral issues become more than parents can bear, the young people often are placed in residential or wilderness treatment programs where professionals help them work through their issues.

    Success can quickly unravel when the child returns home, though, if parents aren’t ready with a game plan to help with the transition.

    “Parents often fear that their son or daughter is going to relapse into old, unhealthy or dangerous patterns,” said Tim R. Thayne, PhD, a marriage and family therapist and author of Not by Chance: How Parents Boost Their Teen’s Success In and After Treatment (www.drtimthayne.com).

    “They have fears about how their child will connect socially with other people and whether they will find the right friends. They fear their teen will fall further behind in academics.”Unknown-1

    Thayne suggests a few ways to help parents ease the transition:

    • Identify natural mentors for your teen. A natural mentor – such as a neighbor, teacher, relative or coach – is typically more effective than an officially assigned mentor. “Studies suggest that most formal mentoring relationships last less than a year,” Thayne said. “In contrast, natural mentoring relationships, which come from the church, school, family and neighborhood, are far more durable, with the average lasting nine years.”

     

    • Know when and how to grant back privileges and freedoms. Don’t let your teen pressure you into promising the return of certain privileges. Long before they come home, teens in treatment often begin asking what they are going to be able to do and how soon. “They want back the freedoms they once had, such as cell phone and car use, sleepovers, computer time, dating, time with friends and so forth,” Thayne said. “If there is ever a time not to buckle under pressure from your teen, it’s now while they are still in the program. If your teen is going to be angry, let the program deal with the fallout.” When they do come home, don’t make a rule you aren’t willing to back up. Consistency is key. Over time, as your trust grows, be ready to hand out rewards before being asked, but this doesn’t have to be done all at once. “Things can be handed out for a weekend trial, or at a level of 50 percent of what your child initially pushed for,” Thayne said.

     

    • Find someone to talk with. “Parents should have someone they can open up to about their emotions,” Thayne says. He suggests finding a therapist or a coach who has experience working with parents in this situation. “That counselor will be better equipped to help you through this transition,” he said. “Nothing will surprise them; not your fears, not your questions, not your situation.” In addition to an expert coach, Thayne said, it also helps to have a trusted friend you can vent to as well.

    “Long-term success doesn’t come about by chance, by hoping or simply because you shelled out a lot of money and sent your child away to get help,” Thayne said. “It requires work and changes on your part, and it takes a concrete plan.”

     

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    SU Land-Grant Campus holds successful 75th Annual Livestock Show

    For 75 years, Southern University has continued the tradition of providing an opportunity for youth throughout Louisiana to gain valuable knowledge and skills at its Annual State Livestock and Poultry Show. The event was held March 1 – 3 at the Maurice A. Edmond Livestock Arena.

    “We are excited to celebrate 75 years of holding a livestock show. Southern is the only Historically Black College or University that currently holds a livestock show and we are very proud of that,” said Dawn Mellion-Patin, Ph.D., SU Land-Grant Campus vice chancellor for extension.

    To qualify for the state show, competitors had to have won first place at a parish livestock show.
    Thirty-nine young people from across the state were named state champions in various breeds of dairy and beef cattle, lamb, goat and poultry during the show.

    Southern provides a holistic experience for its participants, the community and college students enrolled in the College of Agricultural, Family and Consumer Sciences.

    “Our participants are learning about every aspect of the livestock industry,” said Patin. “They are responsible for feeding the animal, taking care of the animal and ultimately selling the animal and using the money from the show to purchase another animal and repeat the process over next year.”

    Patin also discussed the importance of this 75th anniversary.

    St. Joseph mayor and retired Tensas Parish Extension Agent, Elvadus Fields, has travelled with participants to Southern’s Livestock Show for 57 years.

    “I think it (SU Livestock Show) aids in the development of responsible womanhood and manhood,” said Fields. “Most of all that child is responsible for that animal. If the animal eats, the child has to feed it. If the animal gets sick, the child has make sure the animal gets well.   The child has to learn how to discipline the animal and be disciplined as well,” said Fields.

    Seventeen year-old Destinee Morris is an example of the development that Mayor Fields talked about. The West Feliciana Parish native has been showing steers at the Southern University Livestock Show since she was 11. She said participating in the Livestock Show has helped her learn to enjoy nature.

    “In the past I did not like being outside at all, but now I enjoy being around animals and different farm animals and taking care of them,” said Morris.

    She credits her sister for peaking her interest in showing steers after seeing pictures of her participating in Southern’s Livestock Show.

    This year is Morris’ last year participating in the Livestock Show. The high school senior plans to attend college out of the state in the Fall. For her final show she took home Reserve Champion in the Market Steer Division and placed 3rd in Showmanship.

    The Southern University Livestock Show is like no other show in the state. “Our show is unique in the fact that we offer guided school tours that include a petting zoo, gardening station and educational presentations while the participants are showing their animals,” said Harold Mellieon, Ph.D., director of Livestock Show Programs. “The tours provide an opportunity for many youth in the Baton Rouge area to see live farm animals in person for the first time. We also have college students from Southern’s College of Agricultural, Family and Consumer Sciences assisting with every part of the show. This gives our college students hands on experience in the field,” he said.

    Southern also holds a “Night with the Stars: Old Fashion Livestock Decorating Contest” on every Friday evening after all the animal have been judged.

    “We hold this event to give the participants an opportunity to have fun with their animal one last time because the Jr. Auction on Saturday morning,” said Mellieon.

    The “Night with the Stars’ winners are:
    Kyle and Wyatt Sonnier, both from Calcasieu Parish, dressed as the Cookie Monster with Borden’s milk and a cookie in 1stplace; Brady Hayes from Jefferson Davis Parish, dressed as Elvis & The King in second place and Zabadiah Ates from Union Parish, dressed as St. Patrick’s heifer in 3rd place.

    The first, second and third place winners received a $100 and a Ozark Trail 26 Quart High Performance Cooler, $50 and a EndZone Bubba Keg and $25 and a Coleman’s Oversized Quad Chair, respectively.

    The following is a list of additional winners in various livestock categories and their home parishes. Each winners received a premium, ribbon, rosette and trophy belt buckle.

    Registered Dairy
    Grand Champion – Wyatt Sonnier, Calcasieu Parish
    Reserve Champion – Kinsley Windom, St. Tammany Parish

    Commercial Dairy
    Grand Champion – Camille Sonnier, Calcasieu Parish
    Reserve Champion – Kyle Sonnier, Calcasieu Parish

    Dairy  Showmanship
    Grand Champion – Wyatt Sonnier, Calcasieu Parish
    Reserve Champion – Kinsley Windom, St. Tammany Parish

    Brahman Bull                                                           
    Grand Champion – Caplan Young, Winn Parish
    Reserve Champion – John Michael Pickett, Winn Parish

    Non Brahman Bull                                                   
    Champion Non-Brahman – Skylar Primm, Caddo Parish

    Brahman Heifers
    Champion Brahman – Jesse Sandel, Sabine Parish
    Reserve Champ Brahman – John Michael Pickett, Winn Parish

    Non Brahman Heifer                                    
    Champion Non-Brahman – Hailee Daigle, Ascension Parish
    Reserve Champ Non-Brahman – Zabadiah Ates, Union Parish

    Commercial Heifer
    Grand champion – Ashlyn Natali, Calcasieu Parish
    Reserve Champion – Trevor Mclendon, Sabine Parish

    Beef Showmanship
    Grand Champion – Tanner Browning, Sabine Parish
    Reserve Champion – Brenden Ford, Sabine Parish

    Market Steer
    Grand Champion – Brady Hayes, Jefferson Davis Parish
    Reserve Champion – Destinee Morris, West Feliciana Parish

    Market Lamb
    Grand Champion – Jacob Reyenga, Bossier Parish
    Reserve Champion – Caroline Dupree, Bossier Parish

    Market Lamb LA Bred
    LA Bred Champion – Jacob Reyenga, St. Martin Parish
    LA Bred Reserve Champion - John Adam FontenotBossier Parish

    Lamb Showmanship                                      
    Grand Champion – Tanner Browning, Sabine Parish
    Reserve Champion – Brenden Ford, Sabine Parish

    Market Goat                                         
    Grand Champion – George Chambers, Bossier Parish
    Reserve Champion – Katlyn Mathews, Bienville Parish

    Market Goat LA Bred                                     
    LA Bred Champion – Katlyn Mathews, Bienville Parish
    LA Bred Reserve Champion - Luke Padgett, Claiborne Parish

    Goat Showmanship                                     
    Grand Champion – Madison Green, Winn Parish
    Reserve Champion – Katlyn Mathews, Bienville Parish

    Market Hog                                          
    Grand Champion – Brady Hayes, Jefferson Davis Parish
    Reserve Champion – Jada St. Pierre, St. James Parish

    Hog Showmanship                                        
    Grand Champion – Palynn Fontenot, Cameron Parish
    Reserve Champion – Jada St. Pierre, St. James Parish

    Broiler                                                             
    Grand Champion – Jamie Kile, Rapides Parish
    Reserve Champion – Taylor Martin, Rapides Parish

    Broiler  Premier Exhibitor                           
    Grand Champion – Addisyn Robinson, St. Landry Parish
    Reserve Champion – Cedrick DeRouen, East Baton Rouge Parish

    By LaKeeshia Giddens Lusk
    Contributing Writer

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  • Rose selected for national recognition at The Kennedy Center

    Baton Rouge poet and teaching artist, Donney Rose, has been selected for the 2018-1019 Kennedy Center Citizen Artist Fellow Recognition. The Kennedy Center Citizen Artist Fellow Recognition is an award that highlights Citizen Artists across the country who utilize their art form for positive impact on communities and who live up to the ideals of service, justice, freedom, courage and gratitude that are inspired by President John F. Kennedy’s legacy.

    As part of the recognition program, Rose will attend the 2018 Kennedy Center Arts Summit, “The Future States of America: Using the Arts to Take Us Where We Want to Go,”  April 15-16, held in Washington, D.C. He is also invited to collaborate, share practices, and receive mentorship from Kennedy Center artistic partners and staff at the Kennedy Center Citizen Artist Fellows Retreat, tentatively confirmed for Sept. 21-24. He will receive ongoing professional development opportunities with Kennedy Center staff and partners; information regarding national convenings to attend, potential grant applications, and other resources from top partners such as the Aspen Institute, National Endowment for the Arts, ArtChangeUS, and Citizen University. Rose is also invited to attend, present, and participate in Kennedy Center’s 2019 Arts Summit.

    Rose was nominated for the fellowship by Maida Owens, Louisiana Folklife Director, Louisiana Division of the Arts. The nomination process included recommendation letters from which Rose received high praise in varying areas of his work by attorney and LSU Law professor, Chris Tyson; former Louisiana Poet Laureate Ava Leavell Haymon; LSU English professor Sue Weinstein Ph.D.; Love Alive Church pastor Ronaldo Hardy; and Humanities Amped co-founder Anna West, Ph.D.

    Rose began his work as a poet through spoken word and competing nationally in poetry slams. A graduate of Scotlandville Magnet High School, Rose has always sought ways to better his hometown and as such, is invested in the city’s youth development scene. He began working in youth development in 2008 through Louisiana Delta Service Corps. He has worked full time as a teaching artist and marketing director for Forward Arts, Inc. for nearly a decade. He was named to The Drum‘s Men to Watch in 2015 and  Business Report’s Top Forty under 40 class in 2017. He was the recipient of the inaugural Making a Mark award at the 2017 Ink Festival (Tupelo, Miss.) and the 2016 Humanitarian of the Year award from New Venture Theatre. His writing has been featured on Button Poetry, All Def Digital, and in Nicholls State’s Gris Gris literary journal. Following the turmoil of Baton Rouge’s summer of 2016, Rose was a pivotal voice in the community and was interviewed by the BBC, Democracy Now, the New York Times, Huffington Post, and The Advocate.

     

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    COMMENTARY: Teachers have Been Armed!

    A couple of days ago, I read a blog post from a sister who works within the public fool system. She stated emphatically that if white teachers were to be armed, she would immediately remove her Black son from the school.

    Trust me. I think that that’s a great idea.

    My only issue is that we are so reactive.

    If white folk do this, I’ll do that.

    If Dump becomes president, I’m moving to Afrika. (I wonder how many have actually repatriated.)

    Always reacting.arming-teachers-28166604_10108801548667945_659648788552076372_n-680x680

    The reality is that teachers have always been armed with the weapons of miseducation, cultural misorientation, and low expectations. They, Black and white teachers, have been dealers in mentacide for the longest. That “mental gun” has shattered more dreams and lives than we can ever calculate.

    We don’t need anything else to happen within the schools to know that the public, private, and charter fool system is no place for the young Afrikan mind.

    Let’s be proactive. The proactive posture fills us with power and puts us in control of our lives and our children’s education.

    This reactive stuff is LAME.

    With or without guns in the classroom, our Afrikan minds don’t survive in the contaminated soil of the Eurocentric educational system. But we can do something about that.

    Revolutionary Love,
    Baba Dr. Brotha Samori Camara
    from Accra, Ghana

    P.S. Mississippi has already begun the process of arming teachers. Now what? Read about it HERE.

    Samori Camara, Ph.D., is an Afrikan warrior scholar, director of Kamali Academy–which began in New Orleans, educational consultant, life coach, and motivational speaker. Follow his @SamoriSpeaks

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    Celebration of ‘Hidden Figures’ continues with book talks, outdoor movie at Baton Rouge libraries

    The 2018 One Book One Community (OBOC) celebration of Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly continues with various other events, programs, movie nights, book talks, crafts and more.

    The OBOC launched in late February with a free, fun, family friendly Launch Party at the Main Library at Goodwood, 7711 Goodwood Blvd., which featured food, music, games, prizes, stargazing and even a Moon Walk. Special guest Alyssa Carson, a 16-year-old aspiring astronaut talked to the crowd about the wonders of outer space and encouraged youngsters to follow their dreams. Mayor Sharon Broome also was in attendance and addressed party goers with an inspiring message.

    All the events are free. A schedule and related information, as well as an InfoGuide, is posted at www.ReadOneBook.org, and it will be updated with additional events periodically. Here are some upcoming related events:

     LASM Discovery Dome Presents Magic Tree House: Space Mission and We Are Stars. Presentations run now through March 28; For a full schedule, pick up a copy of the Library’s monthly newsletter The Source, or visit the online calendar at www.ebrpl.com.

    Discuss Hidden Figures with Tamara Wade, Ph.D., 10 am, Tuesday, March 20, Main Library at Goodwood

     Book Talk with Author of The Radium Girls Kate Moore, 7 pm, Saturday, March 24, Main Library at Goodwood

    Hidden Figures Escape Room Mission for Adults, 4 pm, Thursday, March 29, Delmont Gardens Branch

     Hidden Figures Movie Night on the BIG Screen, 7 pm, Friday, April 6, Main Library at Goodwood

    The World Behind Hidden Figures with Renee Horton, Ph.D., 2 pm, Saturday, April 7, Main Library at Goodwood

    History of Flight with Jim Slade & Katharine Wright, 2 pm, Sunday, April 22, Main Library at Goodwood

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Summit scheduled to engage communities around improving health, addressing gaps

    The Louisiana Center for Health Equity is hosting a statewide conference, the 2018 Health Summit: Engaging Communities for a Healthier Louisiana, March 20 at the C.B. Pennington Jr Building Conference Center, 6400 Perkins Rd., Baton Rouge.

    LCHE and the Campaign for Healthcare for Everyone – Louisiana in collaboration with the Louisiana Department of Health-Office of Public Health, and our summit partners, will serve as the hosts. This signature conference is designed to share knowledge among a broad audience with a goal of developing a framework for the mobilization of communities to address social and economic gaps that impact the health of Louisiana residents.

    This year’s summit will build upon the work done in the 2016 and 2017 Health Summit’s to continue our collective efforts toward improving health in Louisiana. Check out the preliminary agenda here:

    The distinguished speaker lineup includes:

    • The Honorable John Bel Edwards, Governor of the State of Louisiana
    • Senator Regina Barrow, Chair, Select Committee on Women & Children, Louisiana State Senate
    • Mayor Sharon Weston Broome, Office of the Mayor-President of East Baton Rouge
    • Dr. Parham Jaberi, Assistant Secretary, Louisiana Department of Health, Office of Public Health
    • Patti Rose, Ed.D, Rose Consulting and Faculty Member, Florida Atlantic University’s Graduate School of Business, Author, Health Disparities, Diversity, and Inclusion, Context, Controversies and Solutions, First Edition
    • Dr. Corey Hebert, CEO, Community Health TV, Assistant Professor LSU, Assistant Professor, Tulane University, Chief Medical Officer, Dillard University
    • Judy Lubin, PhD, MPH, Center for Urban and Racial Equity
    • Jennifer Mathis, JD, MA, Deputy Legal Director & Director of Policy & Legal Advocacy, Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law
    • Michael McKnight, B.S., Vice President of Policy & Innovation, Green & Healthy Homes Initiative
    • Alexander Lu, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology, Francis Marion University
    • Ritney Castine, Principal and Chief Strategist, Imagine Greater
    • J. T. Lane, M.P.H., Senior Director, Alvarez & Marsal Public Sector Services, LLC
    • Sarah M. Gillen, M.P.H. Chief Operating Officer, Louisiana Public Health Institute

    Keynote:

    Patti Rose Ed

    Patti Rose Ed

    Patti Rose, E.D., is director and founder of Rose Consulting and previously served as president and CEO of Plainfield Health Center in Plainfield, New Jersey and as vice president of Behavioral Health Services at The Jessie Trice Center for Community Health, one of the largest community health centers in the nation, in Miami, Florida. She is the author of several books, including, Cultural Competency for Health Administration and Public Health, Cultural Competency for the Health Professions, and  Health Disparities, Diversity and Inclusion: Controversies Contexts and Solutions by Jones and Bartlett Learning. She also has published articles including a piece in the Harvard Journal of Minority Public Health, which focused on teenage pregnancy in the Black community. Dr. Rose’s passion is to travel the globe to understand the world and to share her knowledge of various cultures, history, health education and health promotion, health disparities, globalism and diversity through her writing, teaching and speaking engagements. Her current research is focused on health disparities, particularly in the United States, from a social justice vantage point, utilizing a cultural lens, and through comparative analysis, from a national and global perspective.

    ONLINE: 2018 Health Summit

    Read more »
  • ,

    ANALYSIS: La’s non-unanimous jury law: an instrument of legal, political, social oppression

    While Louisiana fought the Civil War, Booker T. Washington was a child slave.  After the Civil War, both he and the state of Louisiana had a new course to charter. Louisiana, faced with the emancipation of approximately 331,000 slaves, had to confront issues including voting rights, education and criminal justice. Washington was tasked with shedding his identity as an object—a piece of property—and embracing the world as a human with rights, feelings, aspirations and a purpose. History records Washington as the victor.

    Washington, a great orator, writer and respected advisor to Presidents, founded a university and became one of the most influential Black intellectuals of the late 19th century. Instead of true transformation, Louisiana opted for cosmetic reform. It went from a state that trafficked people for their free labor in a financial and a social caste system to a state that criminalized and incarcerated people within the same caste-based structure.

    With high hopes, Washington pleafully penned an open letter to the Post-Civil War, 1898 Constitutional Convention:

     Since the war, no State has had such an opportunity to settle for all time the race question…as is now given to Louisiana…Will your Convention set an example to the world…?…It requires little… statesmanship to repress, to crush out, to retard  the hopes and aspirations of a people, but the highest and most profound statesmanship is shown in…stimulating a people so that every fibre in the body, mind and soul shall be made to contribute…to the usefulness and nobility of the State.

    His sagacious words met resistant ears. In reflection on their accomplishments, the Convention of all white males haughtily expressed: “Our mission was…to establish the supremacy of the white race…to the extent to which it could be legally and constitutionally done.…”

    Non-unanimous verdicts, used in non-capital, felony cases, made its way to the Constitution of 1898. They allow convictions on a vote of as few as ten jurors. Besides Louisiana and Oregon—the only free state admitted to the union with an exclusionary clause prohibiting African Americans from residing or owning property there and once an embracing home to the Ku Klux Klan—all other states have a unanimous jury system, requiring all twelve jurors to vote in favor of a conviction in these types of criminal cases.

    In 1803, when Louisiana became a territory, unanimous verdicts were required. The change from unanimity was to: (1) obtain quick convictions that would funnel people into Louisiana’s newly-created convict leasing system (as a replacement for free slave labor); and, (2) ensure Black jurors would not block convictions of other African Americans.

    This Jim Crow Era law was revisited during the 1973 Constitutional Convention.  A change from nine to ten of twelve was made.  “Efficiency” was cited as justification for maintaining the system.

    In the 1972 case of Apodaca v. Oregon, the United States Supreme Court endorsed this system. Citing Apodaca, Louisiana courts won’t consider challenges, despite over forty-five years of credible research establishing that unanimous verdicts are more reliable and more thorough.

    There’s evidence that non-unanimous juries contribute to wrongful convictions, mass incarceration and the marginalization of women and minorities. This law causes different Sixth Amendment standards between federal courts (which require unanimous verdicts in criminal cases), the other forty-eight state, criminal courts (which require unanimous verdicts) and the Louisiana and Oregon state courts. The impact is tantamount to a form of gerrymandering in that it dilutes a voting block within the jury.

    The law allows a prosecutor to circumvent jury discrimination rules preventing race from being justification not to seat a juror by simply silencing the voice of Black seated jurors after-the-fact. It shows flagrant disregard for the American Bar Association’s position that unanimous juries should be used in all state and federal criminal courts.  The law also promotes oppression and discrimination and undermines public trust in the Government.

    Courts are not the sole solution. The legislature could initiate or endorse a change in the law, which will ultimately have to be removed from the state constitution.

    Racism, oppression and discimination are sustained not only by humans, but also by laws, policies, and systems. Efforts to address one, but not all will produce outcomes instead of changes. Emancipation was not just about physical freedom. The Civil Rights Movement was not just about physical presence. The struggle has always been about social, legal and political equality. The 1898 Convention officials knew the consequence of denying these things.  They observed:

    Whatever is unjust carries in itself the seeds of defeat and decay. Justice is irrepressible. No matter how you may trample it…its voice is never silent. It clamors…with a force that is irresistible until at last its voice will be heard and the structure whose foundations rest upon its violation will crumble into ruin….

    The Sixth Amendment assures an impartial jury and the Framers envisioned that to be a unanimous vote of twelve.  It is our collective duty, “with a force that is irresistible, to crumble into ruin this unjust system.”  Washington did what he could.  Will you?

    Angela Allen-Bell

    Angela Allen-Bell

     By Angela A. Allen-Bell

    Angela A. Allen-Bell is an associate professor of legal writing and analysis and B.K. Agnihotri Endowed Professor at Southern University Law Center. Follow her @AngelaAllenBell

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Feature image from http://www.courts.oregon.gov/courts/lincoln/jury/Pages/default.aspx

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    Louisiana creatives flourish in light of Black Panther

    As the sun rises on the blockbuster Black Panther movie, it illuminates the work of Louisiana Black creatives including an English professor who writes and lectures on Afrofuturism, a comic creator who uses historic air legends to pen a new future, and an artist who embraces the imagery and passion of Afrofantasy in developing the culture for his labor of love.

    A recent Baton Rouge expo brought the three together. Mid City Micro-Con: Welcome to Wakanda was a launch party for the release of Marvel’s Black Panther. The micro-con had a Black Panther theme highlighting a range of comic styles and fandom groups. It featured discussion panels, a comics and arts marketplace, cosplay, workshops, film screenings, games, and competitions.

    The Black creative forces in attendance were quick to explain that Black Panther isn’t revealing the birth of impactful Black roles in the sci-fi, comic book world, but it is shining light on the efforts that have been at play for decades, if not centuries. LSU professor Isiah Lavender III is a latter-day scribe who melds race, science fiction and historic fact vs. fiction. He’s a New Yorker who attended Southern University, completed his master’s work at LSU, and returned to teach at LSU after earning a Ph.D.

    Isiah_Lavender

    Isiah Lavender III

    imageloader

    Lavender is the author of Race in American Science Fiction and Black and Brown Planets: The Politics of Race in Science Fiction. Lavender studies American literature and popular culture with an emphasis on Black American literature. “I study race and ethnicity in speculative fiction, particularly Black writers in the science fiction genre,” he said. “I think the more important question is why study race in science fiction at all?”

    Consuming his theme, Afrofuturism, is no easy task. He explains that Afrofuturism involves the past, present and future of race in sci-fi. “Science fictional Blackness comes into being, dating back to the enlightenment era that remains as a part of the world into this contemporary age,” Lavender said. “I mean science fictional in a sense that these flights of fancy have used science to create a fiction of race as it is applied to Black people, indeed, all people of color.”

    “Now Afrofuturism has emerged to understand the science-fictional existence that Blacks have always experienced living in the new world, an unreality driven by economic demands, would-be science, and skin color.”

    Lavender uses a plethora of beautiful words that signify that he really “liked” Black Panther and is thrilled that this movie, with such a strong Black influence is seeing great success at the Box Office. “We want to see complex images of race and racism and we want to discuss the implications,” he said. “We want to see Black creators do their own thing.”

    Me

    Marcus Williams, comic artist

    Enter children’s book author Greg Burnham ready to do his own thing with Tuskegee Heirs. Burnham is a graduate of Bossier High School and Grambling State University. He and his co-creator Marcus Williams, comic artist and illustrator, have developed a fictional world based on the legendary Tuskegee Airmen, Black World War II pilots.

    Tuskegee Heirs is a futuristic sci-fi that takes place about 80 years from the present in a time when man-piloting is illegal. All air flight is remote or with the use of drones. “These five teen pilots are learning how to fly in the old P-51s that the Tuskegee Airmen flew,” Burnham explained.

    Tuskeegee_Heirs1

    Zachary Robinson enjoys meeting BlackCreatives of the Tuskegee Heirs during Mid City Micro-Con: Welcome to Wakanda at the Main Library in Baton Rouge.

    The Tuskegee Airmen were the first Black military aviators in the U.S. Army Air Corps, that later became the U.S. Air Force. They received their training at the Tuskegee Army Air Field in Alabama and flew more than 15,000 individual sorties in Europe and North Africa during World War II. Their performance earned them more than 150 Distinguished Flying Crosses and helped encourage the integration of the American military.

    The celebration of Black Panther was also the celebration of #BlackCreatives and the Tuskegee Heirs  creators showed no evidence of competition. In fact, Tuskegee Heirs hosted an exclusive Black Panther movie premier event for fans in Atlanta.

    Tuskegee Heirs stands with Black Panther in many ways including the use of strong female characters: Ayanna, a unit leader; Genesis, the mission briefer; and Jena, the mechanic. Tuskegee Heirs is a six-book series that the creators hope to push toward animation.

    Flying solo and not far behind is Baton Rouge visual artist Antoine “GHOST” Mitchell who has nurtured a stunningly beautiful collection and is moving toward a comic book release.

    Mitchell’s labor of love, Sankofa’s Eymbrace, is scheduled to be finished at the end of this year. He describes his concept as “Afrofantasy.” He employs fantasy settings, but the characters are Black people. “I’m taking elements of different African spiritualities and ways of life and building something imaginative from that much like what JRR Tolkien did with the Lord of the Rings, taking a lot of Norse mythology,” Mitchell said.

    Mitchell_comic_art

    Sankofa’s Eymbrace by Antoine “GHOST” Mitchell

    If differs from Afrofuturism, but his admiration and excitement for Afrofuturism is through the roof. Mitchell explained that Afrofuturism, as what is seen with Black Panther and Wakanda, does not mean the setting is in the future, but that it employs futuristic technology emerged in the current time setting. It is “a marriage of sci-fi and Black culture.”

    Mitchell’s art is vibrant, stunning and Afrocentric. He has not summarized his storyline, but the words released in conception reflect his background in poetry as well as art:

    In the beginning was the beat.
    The beat became the Dual Rhythm.
    The Dual Rhythm became Sankofa, the two Swans of Balance.

    They would become the A’she, or Magical Spiritual Energy,
    Wielded by the chosen Sankofa Children
    Who would stand against the reoccurring force of DysOrder
    .

    Mitchell sees a refreshing wind blowing as more embrace the hashtag #BlackCreatives. “They are anyone who is Black and creative working in creative industries like movies, comics, cosplays, jewelry making, artists, and more,” he said.

    Mitchell, growing up in a small rural town in East Feliciana Parish, sparked an imagination that helped him embrace worlds like Wakanda and realms now open for travel through Afrofuturism and Afrofantasy. “I’ve been doing this since I was 11 and always wanted to do comic books,” he said. “I had this idea of wanting to do super hero-type comic books, but after I got more into fantasy, I wanted to create something that tells an epic story and uses a lot of elements that I’ve mentioned.”

    Story and photos by Frances Y. Spencer
    Jozef Syndicate reporter

    BONUS: Blerd-ish podcast–https://www.mixcloud.com/blerdish1/mid-city-micro-con-special/–promoting the Mid City Micro-Con! Guests include Samantha Belmont, organizer; TaLynn Kel, Cosplay Judge and Body Image in Comics & Cosplay Panelist; and Chenese Lewis, Body Image in Comics & Cosplay Panelist!

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    Grocery Delivery begins in Baton Rouge

    Baton Rouge area residents can get groceries delivered from a variety of stores, right to their door.  Instacart, the nation’s largest on-demand grocery delivery service, is launching in the Baton Rouge area starting March 8, through popular local stores including Rouses Markets, Albertsons, Costco, CVS, and Petco. 

    The delivery area will cover over 188,000 households and is bringing income earning opportunities to the area with plans to bring on more than 100 new shoppers. Areas of service include: Baton Rouge, Gonzales, Denham Springs, Zeeland Place, Port Vincent, Dennis Mills, Geismar, Dutch Town, Brittany, Duplessis, Prairieville, Hobart, St. Amant, Acy, St. Gabriel, Walker, Inniswold, Westminster, Acadian Place, Merrydale, Monticello, Park Forest, Old Jefferson, Shenandoah, and West River Oaks. The service is also launching in New Orleans.

    ONLINE: www.instacart.com

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    Honoring Baton Rouge’s centenarian: Ann Isadore Wilson Gray

    Baton Rouge leaders, family, and friends celebrated the life of centenarian Ann Isadore Wilson Gray who was born January 21, 1918, in Covington, La., to Alexander and Viola Wilson. Affectionately known as “Mother Gray,” she has six children, 12 grandchildren, and 12 great-grandchildren. She attended Reddish Street Primary School and finished up at Our Lady of the Lake Nursing School. She loves to read books and will do so for hours. (Photo by Kat Turner-Thalleen)

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    11-day Arts Fest features creative writing workshops, spoken word performances, art demos, showcases, live music

    Baton Rouge Community College will present its 10th Annual Arts Fest, March 12-23, throughout three of its locations – Mid City Campus, 201 Community College Drive; Acadian Site, 3250 N. Acadian Thruway E.; and Frazier Site, 555 Julia Street. The festival includes art demos, lectures, discussions, creative writing workshops, spoken word performances, student showcases, and live music.

    Sponsored by BRCC’s Division of Liberal Arts and the Student Government Association, this year’s festival will celebrate community, throughout a variety of morning, afternoon, and evening events and programming, presented by local and student artists, as well as nationally and internationally renowned visiting artists. All events, unless otherwise noted, are free and open to the public.

    The festival will kick off at BRCC Mid City on Monday, March 12 with a breakfast for BRCC students. Festival highlights include a variety of art and printmaking demonstrations by professional visiting artists and BRCC professors to be held at Frazier and Acadian; a series of creative writing workshops and spoken word performances by renowned writers including local talents, as well as internationally acclaimed visiting artists, Hanif Abdurraqib and Ebony Stewart; and the Mid City Jazz Festival, which is in its third year.
    Below is a schedule of events. A detailed schedule is available below.

    Monday, March 12

    Kick-Off Breakfast, 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., Bienvenue Student Center, Mid City

    The BRCC Art Club will run ceramics and printmaking demonstrations, and music will be provided by BRCC’s own Dr. Charles Brooks

    Silk Screening Workshop/Textile Printing Demo with BRCC Instructor Jerome Rankins, noon to 2:30 p.m., Old Print Shop, Room 131, Acadian

    Students and guests will be able to screen print their own canvas bag and koozie can holder.

    Jerome Rankins, BRCC adjunct graphics instructor and former Istrouma High graphic arts teacher for 15 years will do a demonstration on textile printing. He will be talking about screens, screen preparation; materials needed and proper clean up to preserve your screen.

    Chronicling Community with anthropologist Malcolm Shuman, 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., Room 127, Louisiana, Mid City. Local writer and anthropologist Malcolm Shuman will this discussion of the material culture of three communities—prehistoric, African American, and European—at one site, over time. What can we understand about these communities from analyzing the artifacts they’ve left behind? What was the role of art in each community?

    Malcolm Shuman has been practicing archaeology for more than 40 years, and publishing fiction even longer. After serving in the US Army, he earned a doctorate in anthropology from Tulane University in 1974, and has traveled much of the world, carrying out archaeological and anthropological work in the U.S., France and Mexico. MysteriousPress.com has recently re-released fifteen of his novels published in the 1980s and 1990s, including the books in his three mystery series–the Micah Dunn mysteries, set in New Orleans (St. Martin’s Press), the Pete Brady mysteries, set in one of those small north Louisiana towns where murders never (and of course, always) happen (St. Martin’s Press), and the Alan Graham mysteries, featuring a Baton Rouge archaeologist who solves mysteries past and present (Avon Books).

    Tuesday, March 13

    “Voices of a People’s History of the United States” performed by students from East St. John High School (Reserve, La.), 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Dumas Conference Room, Magnolia, Mid City. Voices of a People’s History of the United States brings to life the extraordinary history of ordinary people who built the movements that made the United States what it is today, ending slavery and Jim Crow, protesting war and the genocide of Native Americans, creating unions and the eight hour work day, advancing women’s rights and gay liberation, and struggling to right wrongs of the day.

    Performances of Voices are put on around the country; in schools and in places like Lincoln Center. It is a series of dramatic readings of letters, speeches, and diaries by groups of oppressed, marginalized, or forgotten figures in American history. Based on the work of historian Howard Zinn, Voices challenges a white cisgender, heteronormative, patriarchal narrative of history. Students and special guests will perform these readings as monologues, with narration before each.

    Narrative Creative Writing Workshop with Julie Wedding, Noon to 1:15 p.m., Academic Learning Center, Magnolia, Mid City. An Arts Fest favorite, Julie Wedding, returns this year with her popular narrative poem workshop.

    Creative Writing Workshop with former Baton Rouge Youth Poet Laureate, Brittany Marshall, 3 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., Academic Learning Center, Mid City. In this workshop, attendees will be asked to share aloud their thoughts on/experiences with community. They will collectively discuss aspect of their identities, interests, or hobbies in attempts to find ways to connect with each other and form a collective identity. The text “We Real Cool” by Gwendolyn Brooks will also be explored.

    Born and raised in Baton Rouge, Brittany Marshall was Baton Rouge’s Inaugural Youth Poet Laureate (2016). She is now enrolled as a senior at Louisiana State University where she is studying English Secondary Education and Spanish. She has represented LSU at the College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational (2017), and is the author of musings of a black girl (May 2017, Penmanship Books).

    ReVision Colorism Healing Creative Writing Workshop with Sarah Webb of Colorism Healing, 4:30 p.m. to 5:45 p.m., Academic Learning Center, Mid City. Colorism is the bias and discrimination against people of the same race based on their skin tone and other features like hair texture. Participants in the ReVision workshop will explore the topic of colorism from a multicultural perspective by engaging in a sequence of creative writing activities designed for writers at all experience levels.

    Sarah L. Webb is a Ph.D. candidate in English who studies intersections of race, gender, literacy, and technology. In 2013, Sarah founded the website Colorism Healing through which she hosts annual writing contests, publishes books, and provides information and resources related to colorism. She has been a professional writer, teacher, and mentor since 2007, working in a range of industries such as universities, non-profits, small businesses, K-12 public education, magazines, and TV news. Her writing has been published in numerous places online, such as For Harriet and Blavity, and in print books and magazines such as Teaching Tolerance and Dig. ColorismHealing.org

    Wednesday, March 14

    Etymology Creative Writing Workshop with Taylor Scott of Forward Arts, Inc., 4:30 p.m. to 5:15 p.m., Dumas Conference Room, Magnolia, Mid City

    In this 60 minute writing workshop, participants will create a poem from a saying or phrase that they hear so often – whether it stems from pop culture or a particular family member. Ultimately, each participant will take a phrase and create new meaning, turning the phrase on itself in such a way it is unrecognizable from its intended usage.

    Taylor Scott is a writer, performance artist, and director from Baton Rouge who works as a teaching artist through Forward Arts. She is an alumnus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s First Wave program – the only collegiate hip hop and spoken word community of its kind in the country. She has graced many stages including the Little Amsterdam Theatre on Broadway, Contacting the World Theatre in Manchester, England, and Queen Elizabeth Hall in London. She directed the Bellhops, a Madison-based blues and hip hop theatre ensemble. In 2014, the Bellhops premiered Honey In My Tea, a 45-minute production that centers the narratives of black women, at the Overture Center for the Arts. The following year, the Bellhops released a 6-track EP, Hero of My Own Tale, which is available on Bandcamp. Scott is now pursuing a master’s degree in English at Louisiana State University, where she has an individualized, interdisciplinary course plan that includes black diasporic literary and performance studies.

    Joy & The Elegy Creative Writing Workshop with Hanif Abdurraqib (5:30 p.m. to 6:15 p.m., Dumas Conference Room, Magnolia, Mid City. The workshop will center on the elegy, and look to find ways to extract joy out of a form that is usually reserved for grief. We’ll look at different elegies before using the blueprint of the form to write elegies for living things, for things we find the potential to be hopeful in.

    Hanif Abdurraqib is a poet, essayist, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His first collection of poems, The Crown Ain’t Worth Much was released in 2016 and was nominated for the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award. His first collection of essays, They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us, was released in fall 2017 by Two Dollar Radio.

    Spoken Word Showcase featuring Brittany Marshall, Taylor Scott, and Hanif Abdurraqib; Hosted by Donney Rose, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Magnolia Theatre, Mid City

    A showcase of spoken word poetry by some of today’s most gifted and accomplished writers. Readers/Performers include Brittany Marshall – Baton Rouge’s inaugural youth poet laureate (2016); Taylor Scott – alumnus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s First Wave program, the only collegiate hip hop and spoken word community of its kind in the country; and Hanif Abdurraqib – renowned and internationally acclaimed poet, essayist, and cultural critic. The show is hosted by teaching artist and area poetry legend, Donney Rose.

    Thursday, March 15 (Frazier Day)

    Instant Zine Print Workshop with Hope Amico of Gutwrench Press, 10:30 a.m. to 1:15 p.m., Print Shop, Frazier. At its simplest, this tiny folded book can be made with one sheet of paper, a pair of scissors and a pen. Once we master the basic form, the possibilities are endless. We will start by using a Vandercook Proofing Press to number the pages of your future zine. Then we will use drawing, collages, and other materials (all provided) to create one-of-a-kind books that can be photocopied and shared (or traded in true zine fashion). What is a zine? Short for fanzine, these photocopied booklets were once small magazines devoted to a certain subject. In the past years, book artists and zinesters have exploded the realm of possibility creating everything from books of basic instruction to complicated art books.

    Hope Amico founded Gutwrench Press in 2008. Gutwrench Press is dedicated to better correspondence through letterpress printed postcards, unique hand-bound books and zines exploring our connections to our hometowns. We re-purpose materials whenever possible and encourage you to write back through the Keep Writing Postcard Project. Hope has a BFA from Louisiana State University, focusing on printmaking and book arts. She has worked with letterpress printers in Louisiana and the Bay Area, is currently a member of the New Orleans based letterpress shop, Baskerville. In 2016 she returned to New Orleans where she now resides. In her other life, she teaches yoga to all sorts of people.

    Friday, March 16

    Student Art Showcase, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Winners announced at Noon, Magnolia Gallery, Mid City. Join us as we celebrate the student artists at BRCC, whose work will be featured in the Magnolia Gallery. The top placing artists and artworks will be announced at noon.

    Monster Mugs with Caroline Smith, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Ceramics Studio, Frazier. Ceramics Demo + Talk — come make your own MONSTER MUG!

    “STEAM Day” Event: “The History, Artistry, and Science of Brewing” by German-born brewmaster, Henry Orlik, 3 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., Dumas Conference Room, Magnolia, Mid City. Henryk Orlik is a German born Brewmaster. In his more than 40 years in the industry, Henryk has brewed in Germany, and all over North America. Although currently at Legal Draft in Arlington, Texas, Henryk has strong ties to Louisiana, having worked at Heiner Brau in Covington, Abita, and was also contracted to brew specialty beer for Chef Josh Besh and Zea’s. On Friday, March 16th, BRCC’s Art Fest in conjunction with the STEM department is proud to have Henrk Orlik speak on “The History, Artistry, and Science of Brewing”. This talk will examine the German roots of brewing as well as the current trend of the emerging microbrewing industry, explaining both the science behind brewing as well as the artistry.

    Monday, March 19

    Intro to SUMINAGASHI - Designing with a Dip with Petrouchka Moise of Mooi Labs, 3 p.m., Frazier. Have you ever wondered how do they get cool psychedelic swirl pattern on fabrics, nails, or paper surfaces? Have you seen the latest dip designs on Facebook or Pinterest and wanted to try it out for yourself? Now it’s the time for you to learn to swirl with your favorite colors. Come and unwind and as we teach you how to make colorful creations on silk with the use of dyes, and resists. No prior painting or art skills required. Suminagashi, Japanese for “floating ink”, is what we call is also known as “Marbling”. This is a technique used to create these surface designs that resemble the patterns found in water. It’s been used for many years to create book covers and endpapers, and now we are seeing in high-end nail salons, fashion brands, and home décor.

    Petrouchka Moise is the founder and artist/teacher of Mooi Lab. Mooi Lab is a creative pop-up concept for individuals and their friends to try out their inspirations and passions. Through Mooi Labs, Petrouchka promotes the importance of art, culture, and education across Louisiana and the Caribbean. Petrouchka is a creative driven by the “aha” moment. She is a first-generation Haitian-American from Brooklyn, New York, who’s been living in Baton Rouge for almost 20 years and is loving every minute of it. It’s all about the discovering what makes life more authentic, colorful, and priceless. Petrouchka believes in the power of art. After a severe car accident in 2012, she lost her ability to see colors, to connect with the world around her or even have the confidence to pick up a brush. As she learns to regain her life back, Petrouchka’s artwork has been the source of her healing. “My art helps me daily in learning how to cope with PTSD, communicate my thoughts to others, and find joy in redefining myself”. Silk painting has created a new chapter for Petrouchka. “The silk takes me on a journey of color and collaboration”. Through silk, she is currently working on a collection of art to share with others her process of being a survivor of traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Tuesday, March 20

    Careers in the Arts Panel – Local Artists for Panel TBA (10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., Recital Hall, Governors, Mid City. Members of the local artistic community share their experiences in making their way in their respective fields. There will be a moderated talk followed by a Q-n-A, time permitting.

    Speech and Theatre Showcase (noon to 1 p.m., Dumas Conference Room, Magnolia, Mid City. BRCC’s stellar speech students share their work in a special performance.

    “Models of Diversity” Fashion Show spearheaded by Jada Titus, BRCC Liberal Arts student and fashion designer, and BRCC Art Professor and fashion designer Cynthia Giachetti 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Magnolia Gallery, Mid City. BRCC’s Inaugural Arts Fest Fashion Show. The theme is Models of Diversity and is spearheaded by Jada Titus, BRCC Liberal Arts student and fashion designer, and BRCC Art Professor and fashion designer Cynthia Giachetti. There will be fanciful fashion, music, and refreshments.

    Spoken Word Performance by 2017 Women of the World Poetry Slam Champion, Ebony Stewart, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Dumas Conference Room, Magnolia, Mid City. The performance will consist of a collection of poems centered on the theme of ‘community’. Ebony Stewart strives to speak her truth from a black woman in America’s point of view, undo systematic thinking, and inspire marginalized voices. Following the performance, Ebony Stewart will facilitate a Q&A period.

    Ebony Stewart is an international touring performance artist and slam poet. She is the 2017 Woman of the World Poetry Slam Champion (hosted by Poetry Slam, Inc., Dallas, Texas), and the only three-time adult woman slam champion in Austin, Texas. Ebony Stewart is the story of the black girl winning.

    Wednesday, March 21

    Voices from the Bayou, one year later discussion,  3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Dumas Conference Room, Magnolia, Mid City. The student authors of the book, Voices from the Bayou will share their experiences during their book tour since the book’s publication last year.

    “Merchandising Museums: The Unanticipated Consequence of the American System of Cultural Patronage?” by LSU professor, Kevin Mulch, Ph.D., 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Dumas Conference Room, Magnolia, Mid City. Mulcahy is the Sheldon Beychok Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Public Administration at Louisiana State University, where he has taught since 1980. Mulcahy is the author of numerous articles and books. On Wednesday, March 21st, Mulcahy will present his article “Merchandising Museums: The Unanticipated Consequence of the American System of Cultural Patronage?” at BRCC. This article is from his book Transforming Nostalgia into Novelty-The Merge of Museums and Creative Industry. In the talk Mulcahy will examine “Merchandising Museums”, the current trend of museums to cater to the wants and wishes of wealthy donors and corporate sponsors, and the negative effects this can have.

    Ceramics Demonstration with Osa Atoe, 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., Frazier. Functional Pottery and Ceramics Demonstration.

     

    Thursday, March 22 (Frazier Day part II – Self Portrait Cycle)

    Self-Portrait Photography Workshop with Heather Weathers, 10:30 a.m. to 1:15 p.m., Design Room, Frazier. Self-Portrait Photography Workshop utilizing performance art methods. A camera phone is required.

    Self-Portrait Video Workshop with Bernadette Vielbig, 1:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., Design Room, Frazier. Self-Portrait Video Workshop utilizing performance art methods. A video phone/smart phone is required.

     

    Friday, March 23

    Mid City Jazz Festival III, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (competition); 7 p.m. (concert), Magnolia Theatre, Mid City. The Mid City Jazz Festival is an annual event that fosters Jazz education and performance for middle school and high school students. They interact with each other and nationally recognized Jazz Artists in a friendly and competitive environment. The adjudicators will give constructive feedback to all participants to enhance their performance and interpretation of Jazz as an art form. This years’ judges will be local artist and international touring tubist, Michael Foster, Willis Delony Virginia Martin Howard Professor of Keyboard Studies & Professor of Jazz Studies at LSU, Yamaha recording and performance artist  Rex Richardson. That night, after the competition, the judges, and the festival founder, Charles Brooks, will give a free concert which is open to all participants, their families and the general public. For more information on the Mid City Jazz Festival go to thecharlesbrooks.com/MidCityJazzFestival.

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    COMMUNITY EVENT: Tea and Truth Dialogue Series

    Common ideas of gender identity can build bridges and barriers in every part of our lives. From societal roles to glass ceilings, we can feel empowered or restricted because of gender.

    Come join 821 and your fellow community members as we share our experiences with navigating societal ideas of gender and think about how to break the glass ceilings and barriers that exist.

    This article was submitted online.

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    Black mothers keep dying after giving birth, researchers blame racism

     Tennis superstar Serena Williams recently made international headlines after telling the harrowing story of how, after giving birth to her daughter, she had to demand life-saving treatment from hospital staff who didn’t take her seriously. Her story renewed public interest in a topic that needs more attention: Black women in the U.S. are nearly four times more likely to die from pregnancy-related complications than White women.

    According to the CDC, a pregnancy-related death can occur not only during pregnancy but also within one year after the end of pregnancy. There has been a steady increase in U.S. pregnancy-related deaths, but Black mothers are disproportionately affected.

    In Louisiana, Black women are nearly four times as likely to die within one year of birth as White women, Louisiana obstetrician Dr. Joia Crear Perry, president of National Birth Equity Collaborative, wrote in an essay for The Root. The maternal mortality rate for the state is 19.6 per 100,000 live births, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.Joia PerryWhile chronic conditions like heart disease, hypertension and diabetes are usually said to be the main culprits, research shows that some other issue may be to blame for this disparity: racism.

     In a joint investigation, NPR and ProPublica collected more than 200 stories from Black mothers, and revealed that “the feeling of being devalued and disrespected by medical providers was a constant theme.”

    Black mothers from around the country told terrifying stories about how doctors wouldn’t believe them about health conditions until it was almost too late and even regularly dismissed their pain. These stories revealed how Black women are facing these issues regardless of education and income.

    20171207-shalon-in-uniform-inline

     

    The publications also highlighted the story of Shalon Irving, a 36-year-old mother and an epidemiologist from Atlanta who collapsed and died three weeks after giving birth. She insisted to nurses, “It just doesn’t feel right” and was sent home anyway with only a prescription.

    As reported by NPR, Irving was researcher working to eradicate disparities in health access and outcomes who has become a symbol of one of the most troublesome health disparities facing Black women in the U.S. today: disproportionately high rates of maternal mortality.

    Chronic stress caused by racism outside of the healthcare system also influences the health of Black mothers, reproductive justice advocate Elizabeth Dawes Gay, MPH, wrote for The Nation.

    “Black people experience chronic stress resulting from exposure to overt and covert racism and micro-aggression, which can range from something as basic as intentionally avoiding eye contact to the extreme of being harassed, abused, or killed by police,” Gay wrote.

    293884104_4358392094001_1280

    Erica Garner on Time.com

    Some believe this chronic stress contributed the tragic death of activist Erica Garner, daughter of the late Eric Garner. Vox reported that the stress of her father’s chokehold death by police, combined with her chronic health issues, could be the reason why the 27-year-old mother died just four months after giving birth to her second child.

    “The US has failed to deal with its high rates of maternal mortality on many fronts — particularly for women of color,” Vox staff writer P.R. Lockhart wrote.

    These grim statistics reveal that something needs to be done about pregnancy-related deaths among Black women. But what will the solution look like?

    Gay said the first step is acknowledging racism’s role.

    “We won’t go far in solving the American maternal-health problem without first acknowledging and then addressing how racism—both inside and outside the health-care setting—harms Black moms,” she said.

    By Anastasia L Semien
    Contributing writer
    Anastasia Semien is an award-winning digital journalist whose work has been published in publications across the country. This article was featured at WeBuyBlack.com. Follow her at @AnastasiaSemien
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    Community Vision Board Party

    Interested in changing your local and global community for the better? Want to be a global citizen?

    Create your own community vision board that molds your vision for global citizenship and social change in your local and global community!

    All supplies will be provided. If you have some old magazines or newspapers you don’t mind cutting up, bring them along. If not, just bring yourself!

    This article was submitted online. .

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    Federal class action suit filed against Johnson and Johnson on behalf of buyers

    Co-counsel Ben Crump says people of color were ‘victimized twice’

    This week, new documents were uncovered as part of existing lawsuits filed by ovarian cancer and mesothelioma victims. The documents indicate J&J knew for decades that cancer-causing asbestos and heavy metals were prevalent in the talc used in its Johnson’s Baby Powder and other products but failed to put a warning label on them. J&J stock prices plummeted after this and earlier disclosures.

    Rosen Law Firm, a global investor rights law firm, and Ben Crump Law, a civil rights and personal injury firm, announced the filing of a federal securities class action lawsuit on behalf of purchasers of the securities of Johnson & Johnson between Feb. 22, 2013, and Feb. 7, 2018, both dates inclusive (“Class Period.”) The lawsuit seeks to recover damages for J&J investors under the federal securities laws.

    FL-2015-Justice-Benjamin-Crump-large

    Ben Crump

    According to the lawsuit, throughout the Class Period defendants made false or misleading statements, and failed to disclose that J&J has known for decades that its talc products include asbestos fibers and that the exposure to those fibers can cause ovarian cancer and mesothelioma. J&J’s denials that talc could cause cancer and mesothelioma were materially false and misleading, and the company concealed contingent liabilities and loss of future revenues from the product. As a result of the company’s actions, the lawsuit claims, investors suffered damages when the true details entered the market.

    Crump said Johnson & Johnson engaged in “cynical tactics to market these products to women of color, while knowing their potential harm.”

    “Johnson & Johnson devalued Black lives by expressly marketing a product to Black customers that they knew for decades to be harmful,” Crump said. “Given that many Black workers’ retirement funds depend on government pension funds that invest in this stock for their retirement, Johnson & Johnson victimized them twice, jeopardizing their physical and their financial health.”

    In the 1990s, Johnson &Johnson began a concerted effort to boost the sales of its baby powder by “targeting” Black and Hispanic women, according to a company memorandum made public in recent lawsuits that led to multimillion-dollar verdicts against the powder manufacturer. In the past, Black women have reported significantly higher use of feminine hygiene products, including genital powder. A 2015 case-control study in Los Angeles found that 44 percent of Black women reported using talcum powder, compared to 30 percent of white women and 29 percent of Hispanic women.

    Rosen said the class action lawsuit has already been filed. Anyone wishing to serve as lead plaintiff, must move the Court no later than April 9, 2018. A lead plaintiff is a representative party acting on behalf of other class members in directing the litigation. Anyone wishing to join the litigation should go to http://www.rosenlegal.com/cases-1288.html or contact Phillip Kim or Daniel Sadeh of Rosen Law Firm toll-free at 866-767- 3653 or via email at pkim@rosenlegal.com or dsadeh@rosenlegal.com. Rosen Law Firm represents investors throughout the globe, concentrating its practice in securities class actions and shareholder derivative litigation. Since 2014, Rosen Law Firm has been ranked #2 in the nation by Institutional Shareholder Services for the number of securities class action settlements annually obtained for investors.

    Ben Crump is well known for representing clients in a wide range of civil rights and personal injury cases and is a former president of the National Bar Association. He has been recognized by the National Bar Association as the Nation’s Best Advocate and listed on The National Trial Lawyers’ Top 100 Lawyers. His firm also focuses on practice areas that include class actions, personal injury, wrongful deaths, and workers’ compensation.

    The Rosen and Crump firms announced a partnership earlier this year to expand and diversify reach and help bring justice to organizations and individuals impacted by securities fraud and corporate misconduct throughout the world.

     

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    Lafayette to unveiling African American History Parade poster

    Revealing of 1st Annual African American History Parade Poster

    The African American Heritage Foundation in Lafayette will start their annual Black History Month Celebration with the unveiling of the 1st historical poster,  Sunday, Feb. 11, at Benoit Galleries, 535 ½ Jefferson St.

    Visual artist Bryant Benoit was commissioned to create a piece that embodies the Let Freedom Ring theme. The theme incorporates cultural, education, health, economics, and politics as all paths leading to freedom.

    The Lafayette native studied architecture at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and entered the construction industry. He worked as a commercial construction project superintendent for several years. “I decided to explore my creativity in art. My perception of my culture is expressed through my work. I tell stories of love, pain, family and spirituality. My work is like music. I feel the vibrations of the melody and relate its words to events that either happened or are happening in my life. My art is vibrations of my thought perception on canvas,” said Benoit.

    His work has been featured in regional galleries and favored by art collectors around the world. Bryant’s work is owned by clients & collectors in the USA, Paris, New Zealand, and Ghana. When Benoit isn’t in the gallery, you can find him at art markets and festivals including Jazz Fest, the New Orleans Art Market in Palmer Park, Bayou Boogaloo Cajun Food Festival in Norfolk, VA, and Piedmont Park Arts Festival in Atlanta.

    Prints and signed number prints of Let Freedom Ring will be for sale. To purchase the poster online: https://squareup.com/store/benoit-gallery-llc

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    PERSPECTIVE: Metro council considers marijuana policy changes to stop criminalization

    The Baton Rouge Metro Council is considering potential changes to the city’s current marijuana possession policy. The proposal, co-authored by Councilmen Chandler Loupe and Lamont Cole, would prohibit the arrest of individuals in possession of small quantities of marijuana and disallow the use of prior marijuana possession convictions to be used to justify longer prison sentences for repeat offenders. The proposed changes are an example of sensible, progressive policy and bipartisan cooperation that seem to be more common coming from the council recently.

    The move towards decriminalization of marijuana is happening in cities all over the country as attitudes regarding marijuana have changed and more attention is being focused on the potential adverse effects of current drug policies. In 2016, the New Orleans city council passed an ordinance that decriminalizes marijuana possession by providing tickets, not arrests, and reducing the penalties to modest fines.

    Unlike the New Orleans ordinance, the proposal currently before the Metro Council retains current penalties; a fine of up to $300 and/or 15 days in jail for possession of up to 14 grams of marijuana and a fine of $500 and/or 6 months in jail for possession of more than 14 grams. However, the proposal ends the practice of using prior marijuana possession convictions to compound penalties for repeat offenders which prevents misdemeanors from turning into felonies with lengthy jail sentences.

    The proposed changes are smart policy and a good first step for several reasons. No longer arresting for marijuana possession eliminates potential hurdles and financial barriers individuals with arrest records face. Despite the rate of marijuana usage being roughly the same for across racial lines, Blacks are much more likely to be arrested for possession. And thus for a single marijuana charge, more young Black men and women will be denied jobs, school loans, housing assistance, and promising futures.

    Aside from impacting inequity in the criminal justice system, there is also a strong fiscal argument for making these changes. The proposed policy would not only save the city money, but it would free up resources in an already stretched thin police force.PSN BR logo

    At the Jan. 24 Metro Council meeting despite Cole’s requesting that the item be deferred for two weeks, several concerned citizens and advocates expressed their support for passage of this ordinance. We think that this is smart policy that benefits the community as a whole and hope that it will receive the full support of the council when it comes up again at the next meeting.

    Perspective By Progressive Social Network of Baton Rouge
    Special to The Drum

    Progressive Social Network is a grassroots advocacy organization promoting the progressive values of equity, inclusion, and accountability in the greater Baton Rouge area. ONLINE: www.psnbr.org

     

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    Baton Rouge Mardi Gras Fest selects official poster design painted by Christopher Turner

    The 2018 Baton Rouge Mardi Gras Festival poster, depicting New Orleans Mardi Gras Indian, are being sold. This year’s collectible poster was designed by none other than artist Christopher Turner

    “The New Orleans Indians performance at the 2017 Jazz Fest was a highlight for everyone who attended,” said Henry Turner, producer/director of the Baton Rouge Mardi Gras Festival. “I’m happy to celebrate our culture and the new tradition of the festival poster” said  Turner. This tremendous tribute to one of New Orleans’ great treasures.”  

    Turner’s poster titled “Big Chief: A painting of a New Orleans Indian” is the first in what festival producers promise will be a series of musician-designed posters to come.

    Unsigned posters are $40. Artist-signed prints are $100. Order at www.batonrougemardigrasfestival.com/,  Meet and Greet held  at Henry Turner Jr.’s Listening Room Thursday, February, 8. from 8pm to midnight meet poster artist Posters will also be for sale on the grounds of the Baton Rouge Mardi Festival, February 10

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    Protect and Serve Louisiana First

    First Black State Trooper reflects on dealing with racism 
    On August 10, 1967, A.Z. Young, president of the Bogalusa Voters and Civic League (BVCL) began a 105-mile march from Bogalusa, Louisiana to Baton Rouge. The ten-day march began with 25 participants but grew to as many as 600 near its conclusion, as they successfully made it to the state capitol. Though the event was organized as a peaceful demonstration in an effort to bring attention to a number of local and state employment discrimination issues, over 2,200 National Guardsmen and policemen were ultimately required to protect the march participants. One of the issues that the BVCL sought to challenge then Governor John J. McKeithen on was integration of the Louisiana State Troopers law enforcement body.
    In response to that public challenge, McKeithen stated that he would agree to hire black personnel for the State Troopers, but was unaware of any capable candidates. After watching that statement on television Ernest Marcelle Jr., who had graduated from college with a degree in criminology, had served as a military policeman, and had a previous stint with the New Orleans Police Dept., called the governor and made him aware of his previous experience and a desire to take on a position with the State Troopers. After speaking with Governor McKeithen, Marcelle was told that he would put him in touch with a black attorney working with the governor who would process his information. Following that conversation the attorney told Marcelle that the governor’s office would make contact with him in a few days.

    AZ Young

    AZ Young

    “To be honest I thought that that would be the end of it. But a few days later I did get a letter from the Superintendent of the State Police,” Marcelle said in a recent interview with the Shreveport Sun about his time with the department. “He interviewed me and afterwards I was selected. That was in July (1967) and they gave me a notice to come back in November (training period). There were 39 whites and I was the only black, so of course being the only black in the class it was a little rough. They wanted us to sleep in the barracks together just like it was done in the military. They tried different things to discourage me. They gave a test every Saturday morning and if you failed one you were out of the academy. So one of their strategies was to get me frustrated where I would either fail one of my tests or just quit all together. During that time I did a lot of praying, and I was able to make it through successfully.”
    Reflecting on his first days actually serving with the State Troopers, Marcelle said, “They did not want to put me in an (official) uniform so they started me out as a detective working in the Wildlife and Fishery building in the French Quarters in New Orleans. I worked there for about a year and a half, but at the time I was working for a captain who sent me in to Homer, Louisiana to work undercover. I was building narcotics and prostitution cases. My cover involved working in an auto dealership at the time. Nobody (locally) was supposed to know who I was. After building up a bunch of cases over a few weeks, one of the drug dealers that I had built a case on came into a restaurant where I was one morning and called me out by my real name. I ignored him but he told me that he knew who I was. He told me that he knew that I was building a case against him and told me that if I didn’t get out of there in a hurry that I would be going back to New Orleans in a box. He then described the captain that I was working under to me … He (the captain) went to Homer and talked to some of the drug dealers telling them who I was and that I was building cases on them. He felt that the drug dealers would then wipe me out.”
    Maecelle said he quickly fled back to New Orleans and tried to contact the Superintendent for the State Troopers regarding what happened, but never was able to reach him. Shortly thereafter he utilized contacts he had with local media outlets in New Orleans and recounted how he was being set up. After gaining some attention with the subject, Maecelle then received a call from the Superintendent who advised him to relocate to Baton Rouge and serve in Troop B, where he remained throughout the rest of his time with the department.
    Ernest Marcelle Jr. Louisiana's First Black State Trooper

    Ernest Marcelle Jr.
    Louisiana’s First Black State Trooper

    “My very first day I walked in for roll call in Troop B, there was a Shift Lieutenant who walked up to me in front of everybody and told me that this was a white man’s job, ‘We don’t want any niggers here and we are going to get rid of you.’ He spent his whole career trying to get rid of me,” Marcelle recounted. He added that the Lieutenant made it a habit to look through the tickets or arrest reports made by Marcelle seeking out white offenders. If he found them the Shift Lieutenant would routinely contact them and get them to file false complaints reports against Maecelle, attempting to get him fired. The scheme ultimately failed.

    After seven years with the State Troopers, Marcelle was an active participant in the National Association of Black Police officers. He helped to organize his local chapter in 1973. During a convention that he attended in Louisville in 1975, Marcelle and three other black State Troopers that were hired later were approached by a representative from the U.S. Justice Dept. The representative made them aware of an opportunity for the four of them to file suits against the state regarding discriminatory practices. Ultimately Marcelle ended up being the only one of the four troopers to file a suit against Louisiana through the Justice Dept.
    After the process became public knowledge Marcelle recalls his time serving on a desolate patrol route during the late evening. Of particular note he felt very odd about a series of communications from his superiors eager to pinpoint his specific location. Feeling that he was being setup for some type of ambush he gave them inaccurate information.
    Additionally he recalls several other attempts to sully his official record and his reputation whereby his superiors would tell him that his work schedule had been changed and he would then be reprimanded later for failing to show up for work. Marcelle said that they used a similar scheme — giving him notice that he would be required to testify in court on a particular issue, but giving him the notice after the trial had ended. In conjunction with some other generally minor infractions on his record, for which he never saw his fellow white officers reprimanded, Marcelle was terminated from the Louisiana State Troopers in 1967. This occurred two months before he would be able to qualify for his retirement benefits.
    Marcelle recalls being frustrated by the move mostly because he was passionate about his role in the department. During his interview he stated that his time in the department was not always bad, and remembers serving with some decent and fair-minded white colleagues.
    Currently  Marcelle  serves as chaplain of the Disabled American Veterans Association. He also speaks about his time as a State Trooper to various audiences across the state.
    by Ronald Collins Jr.
    Shreveport Sun News
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    Ask Dr. Kevin: Understanding clinical trials and sickle cell disease

    Clinical trials are critical to bringing new medicines to people who need them, particularly those affected by conditions with limited treatment options, such as sickle cell disease (SCD). These studies, which determine the safety and effectiveness of new investigational treatments, rely on the participation of volunteers. Without enough volunteers, researchers are unable to complete the research required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to evaluate if a new drug should be made available to patients. Therefore, the only way to get any drug approved by the FDA and accessible to patients in need is through clinical trials.

    Unfortunately, finding enough patient volunteers is often a challenge in conducting clinical trials, and this has been particularly true for trials exploring new treatment options for SCD, which occurs in one out of every 365 African American births. Although African Americans make up 12 percent of the U.S. population, they comprise only 5 percent of clinical trial participants overall.

    Fear and misunderstanding about clinical trials likely contribute to the difficulty of recruiting participants. Recently, Pfizer and the NNPA collaborated on a national poll consisting of 741 participants to learn more about perceptions of SCD and clinical trials in the Black community. A majority of respondents indicated a willingness to participate in future clinical trials for SCD, if given appropriate knowledge and recommendations from health care professionals. Of those who indicated that they would not participate in clinical trials, ‘fear of uncertainties’ was the most cited reason.

    To help address some of these uncertainties, I’m here to answer the most common questions about clinical trials. It is my hope that this information will help you make an informed decision should you or a loved one choose to participate in a clinical trial in the future.

    Are clinical trials safe?

    Strict guidelines and supervision are in place to protect the safety of people who take part in studies—from careful study design to periodic monitoring of study data by independent experts. That said, clinical trials are designed for research purposes, and because of this, there is some level of risk involved. However, before an investigational drug can be given to clinical trial volunteers, researchers must complete a rigorous screening and preclinical testing process (in the laboratory and in animals), which can take up to six years to complete.

    If I participate in a clinical trial, will I get a “sugar pill” or placebo instead of a real drug?

    Participants in a clinical trial using a placebo will always be informed if there is a possibility they could be receiving the placebo, which looks identical to the real drug but does not contain the active ingredient. However, the vast majority of studies are not placebo-controlled trials, and patients in the clinical trial who are not receiving the drug under study will receive the current standard of care available to the public. Patients who take part in clinical trials will never be asked to sacrifice quality of care.

    Will it be expensive to participate in a clinical trial?

    Patient care costs are generally covered by health insurance, as they are for tests and treatments you would receive even if you were not involved in the research. The majority of participants in clinical studies receive at least some reimbursement from their health insurance. Most often, the clinical trial sponsors will pay for the study therapy and insurance companies will pay for the routine care procedures, such as blood tests.

    Before participating in clinical trials, I recommend checking with the researchers regarding your financial responsibilities as a patient, as well as with your health insurance carrier regarding coverage.

    How do I find out about clinical trials?

    You can always talk to your doctor; however, he or she may not know about all available clinical trials that might apply to you. Only approximately 1 in 5 patients say that their health care professionals have talked to them about participating in a clinical trial.

    As for resources, the National Institutes of Health has an online database that is a great tool to search for appropriate trials: https://clinicaltrials.gov. Another great resource is “I’m In,” a campaign to build awareness about the importance of diversity in clinical trials, especially among African Americans, Asian Americans, and Hispanic populations. You can find more information on Pfizer’s Clinical Trial page, too.

     

    What’s the timeframe for clinical trials?

    I’m often asked, “Why does a new treatment take so long?” The short answer is that treatment takes as long as it does because the cardinal rule of medicine is “First, do no harm.” Thus, the development of a new therapy is a multi-stage, complex process that has to meet the highest standards of patient protection.

    Clinical trials, which generally take 5 to 10 years, are at the center of the rigorous science that demonstrates the safety and efficacy of a medicine and provides a thorough view of its benefits and risks, and is the only avenue to bring medications to patients in need.

    By Dr. Kevin Williams
    Chief Medical Officer, Pfizer Rare Disease Unit

    ONLINE: more information about sickle cell disease, the collaboration between the NNPA and Pfizer Rare Disease, and a new nationwide poll conducted by Howard University to deepen understanding and gauge perceptions around SCD and clinical trials among African Americans.

     

    Dr. Kevin Williams is the chief medical officer for Rare Disease at Pfizer. He pursued medicine after being inspired by his father’s work as a general practitioner in his hometown of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Follow Pfizer on Facebook and Twitter.  This article is the third installment in the “Ask Dr. Kevin” series, brought to you by Pfizer Rare Disease in collaboration with the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) to increase understanding of sickle cell disease.

     

     

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    Miss Black Louisiana USA 2018, Makeva Armant to participate in Mardi Gras Festival, Feb. 10

    Miss Black Louisiana USA 2018, Makeva Armant, will be part of this years’ annual Baton Rouge Mardi Gras celebrations. She is a French teacher at McKinley Senior High School and pursuing a Masters of Arts in Teaching and Languages through on-line courses from the University of Southern Mississippi. Her hobbies include singing, traveling and spending quality time with family and friends. Her goal is to share her passion for languages, cultures and the wellness of the Black community with as many people as possible in order to spark the same interest in the many young people that she encounters as a professional.  Armant will introduce Henry Turner Jr. at both the Mardi Gras VIP Festival Pre-Party on Thursday, February 8th at Henry Turner, Jr.’s Listening Heritage Museum and at 5th Annual Baton Rouge Mardi Gras Festival at North Boulevard Town Square on Saturday, February 10

    image

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    State asks public for comments on reallocating disaster recovery funds from The Great Food of 2016

    The Louisiana Office of Community Development is accepting public comments on an Action Plan Amendment that reallocates Community Development Block Grant-Disaster Recovery funding received from the Department of Housing and Urban Development for recovery from The Great Floods of 2016.

    Action Plan Amendment 7 will move $22,484,482 from the Multifamily Rental Gap program, which has experienced lower than anticipated demand, into the Neighborhood Landlord and Piggyback rental programs; and will amend the maximum award for the Piggyback program in order to accommodate multiple affordable housing models. The total Rental Housing Allocation will remain the same at $134,163,402.

    The formal public comment period for Action Plan Amendment 7  continues until 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018. Residents, community leaders and elected officials can view the plan by visiting http://www.doa.la.gov/Pages/ocd-dru/Action_Plans.aspx and clicking on the respective APA link.

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    We’re over the moon about ‘Hidden Figures’; Celebrate the One Book One Community selection

    It’s that time again – time to begin the 2018 One Book One Community (OBOC) celebration! Everyone in the whole family is invited to join us for a FREE, fun, family friendly LAUNCH PARTY at the Main Library at Goodwood, 7711 Goodwood Blvd., at 6 p.m. Saturday, February 24, in honor of this year’s selection Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly. The title was first announced at the annual Louisiana Book Festival downtown in October 2017.

    There’ll be FREE food, music, games, prizes, stargazing and even a Moon Walk (cake walk)! Our special guests include Tamiara Wade, Ph.D. former Learning Expert at the NASA Stennis Space Center, and Alyssa Carson, a 16-year-old aspiring astronaut who attended Space Camp seven times, Space Academy three times, Robotics Academy once, and is the youngest to graduate from the Advanced Space Academy! Learn more about Carson at www.nasablueberry.com. Partners Forum 35 also will be on hand to welcome the NASA STEM Team!

    There are various other events, programs, movie nights, book talks, crafts and more related to the book and OBOC that will be scheduled throughout the community all spring long. All the events are FREE. A schedule and related information, as well as an InfoGuide, is posted at www.ReadOneBook.org, and it will be updated with additional events periodically.

    Here are some upcoming related events:

    · Mid City Micro-Con: Welcome to Wakanda | FREE!
    10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday, February 10, Main Library at Goodwood

    · LASM Discovery Dome Presents Magic Tree House: Space Mission & We Are Stars
    Presentations run March 5 – 28; For a full schedule, pick up a copy of the Library’s monthly newsletter The Source, or visit the online calendar at www.ebrpl.com.

    · Book Talk with Author of The Radium Girls Kate Moore
    7 p.m. Saturday, March 24, Main Library at Goodwood

    · Hidden Figures Movie Night on the BIG Screen
    7 p.m. Friday, April 6, Main Library at Goodwood

    · The World Behind Hidden Figures with Dr. Renee Horton
    2 p.m. Saturday, April 7, Main Library at Goodwood

    · History of Flight with Jim Slade & Katharine Wright
    2 p.m. Sunday, April 22, Main Library at Goodwood

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    East Baton Rouge Parish Library celebrates Black History Month

    February is Black History Month! To celebrate, the East Baton Rouge Parish Library is inviting the whole family to join in the fun with a variety of FREE programs and events to commemorate the rich culture and traditions of African-Americans and their impact on United States history.

    Other events include movie screenings, trivia games, exhibits and more for all ages. For a complete schedule, visit the online calendar at www.ebrpl.com. Here are some of the Black History Month programs and events planned at your Library:

    Featured Events

    Mid City Micro-Con: Welcome to Wakanda
    Come to the FREE Mid City Micro-Con to gear up for the release of Marvel’s Black Panther film at the Main Library at Goodwood from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Saturday, February 10! For more information, visit the InfoGuide at www.ebrpl.com, or call Samantha Belmont at (225) 231-3710.

    One Book One Community LAUNCH PARTY Celebrating Hidden Figures
    It’s that time again – time to begin the 2018 One Book One Community (OBOC) celebration! Everyone in the whole family is invited to join us for a FREE, fun, family friendly LAUNCH PARTY at the Main Library at Goodwood at 6 p.m. Saturday, February 24, in honor of this year’s selection Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly. Enjoy FREE food, music, games, prizes, stargazing, a Moon Walk (cake walk) and so much more! For more information, visit www.ReadOneBook.org.

    Resources for African-American Genealogy

    Adults are invited to the Main Library at Goodwood at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, February 7, for a class focused on resources designed to help in researching African-American ancestors. Due to the history of slavery, prejudice and discrimination against African-Americans in our country, African-Americans were routinely excluded from many records that could have documented details of their daily lives. In this class, attendees will learn several search techniques and how to navigate special records collections including African American Heritage, Ancestry.com and more that will assist in genealogical research. Registration is required. To register, call (225) 231-3751.

    Adults

    Three-Part Black History Month Film Series
    Adults are invited to celebrate Black History Month at the Carver Branch at 5 p.m. Thursday, February 8, 3:30 p.m. Friday, February 16, and 11 a.m. Saturday, February 24! We’ll watch three different films that highlight the stories of African-Americans throughout history.

    Make African Doll Crafts!
    Experienced crafter JoAnn Fryling will be back at the Library again this year to give a fun craft tutorial. Adults are invited to the Scotlandville Branch at 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Thursday, February 15, to learn how to create a beautiful African doll craft. All supplies will be provided. Registration is required. To register, call (225) 354-7550.

    Black History Month Trivia for Adults

    Come to the Carver Branch at 11 a.m. Wednesday, February 28, for a little friendly competition with other adults on black history. Spend the beginning of February brushing up on your history and then come prepared to impress!

    Teens

    Self-Portrait Remix

    Hey teens! Join us at the Library for the Self-Portrait Remix program! Bring your friends with you to the Carver Branch at 4 p.m. Monday, February 5, to be inspired by prominent African-American portrait and figurative artists such as Kehinde Wiley, Mickalen Thomas and Ernie Barnes, and create a collage portrait of your own. You even can use your art as a swagged-out Instagram or Facebook photo!

    Black History Month Trivia for Teens
    Join other teens at the Carver Branch at 4 p.m. Monday, February 12, to celebrate Black History Month with the Black Heritage Trivia board game! Test your knowledge on history, cultural experiences and major contributions made by African Americans from the year 1619 until present day. Winners will receive a prize!

    Traditional African Textiles

    Teens can come to the Carver Branch at 4 p.m. Monday, February 26, to honor Black History Month through the appreciation of fabric and fashion. Explore printmaking and patterning through traditional African textiles to make a beautiful hand-stamped scarf or bandana inspired by traditional African fabrics such as Kente cloth, Mud cloth and Ankara cloth.

    Children

    Peanut History Story/Craft
    Kids ages 8-11 are invited to the Carver Branch at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, February 20, to hear a reading of George Washington Carver by Julia Garstecki. Afterwards, each child will create a peanut man craft! Registration is required. To register, call the Children’s Room at (225) 389-7460.

    Fairwood Awesome Bookworms Book Club
    Kids ages 7-11 can come to the Fairwood Awesome Bookworms (FAB) Book Club meeting at the Fairwood Branch at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, February 27! We’ll be reading Daniel Hale Williams: Surgeon Who Opened Hearts and Minds, a biography of the pioneering African-American doctor who in 1893 was one of the first in the world to successfully perform open heart surgery. Afterwards, you’ll learn a little about your own heart when you take your pulse both resting and after light exercise. Registration is required. To register, call the Children’s Room at (225) 924-9386.

    For more information about any of these Black History Month events, call the Library location directly. To learn more about the Library or any of its other free programs, events or resources, visit us online at www.ebrpl.com.

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    Love your heart more

    Did you know that heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States and that every 1 in 4 deaths that occur in America are heart related.

    It doesn’t have to be that way, said health providers at the Louisiana Healthcare Services in Baton Rouge.  “Often times heart disease can be prevented by simply making modifications to your daily life,” said Nicole Thomas, RN. According to Thomas, four modifications can be made right now to decrease chances of battling heart disease.

    Make Healthier Food Choices. Listen we know here in the south we are know for the best cuisine and cajun foods however we need to be smart about it. So instead of getting the southern fried fish, try the grilled salmon or the blackened fish. Instead of adding a side of fries add a side salad. Instead of adding mayo, add honey mustard. It’s all about making better choices.

    Exercise More. Now we know that this is a big one for some people but guess what a few extra steps can turn into a mile. So even if you cant run on a treadmill at the gym for a whole hour, instead of taking the elevator all day while at work, takes the stairs all day. Instead of riding around looking for the closet parking spot, park further out which will require you to walk more. Rather than sitting outside watching the kids play, join them in a game of basket ball or riding bikes.

    Stop Smoking. If you don’t smoke, don’t start. If you do smoke devise a plan to stop such as decreasing week by week how many cigarettes you smoke. Rather than reaching for a cigarette at the first sign of stress, take a walk to blow off some steam. There are even medical alternatives that your medical provider can provide to assist with kicking the habit.

    Develop a Relationship with a Primary Care Provider. The best thing you can do is to have a relationship with a Primary Care Provider who is fully vested in helping you to live your best life. This means attending annual wellness screenings, having further testing done for that pain that you feel in your chest, receiving care for that headache that just wont go away, and asking questions when you don’t understand.

    Located at 7855 Howell Place, Set. 103B, in Baton Rouge, the Louisiana Healthcare Services has primary care providers available daily 8am – 8pm. Call (225) 810-3188.

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    Gov. Edwards Proclaims February 2018 Black History Month in Louisiana

    Gov. John Bel Edwards proclaimed February 2018 Black History Month in the state of Louisiana.

    “Every year during the month of February, we pause to pay special appreciation for the role African Americans have played in our state’s economic, cultural, spiritual and political history. Without a doubt, Louisiana is a better place for everyone to call home because of those who have fought for justice, equality and freedom. We take this time each year to celebrate and learn more about the significant achievements and contributions they have made to our state and our nation.”

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    Bayou Classic Ranked Number One HBCU Classic

    The numbers have spoken. Bayou Classic enters its 45th year as the number one ranked HBCU Classic. With 66,550 attendees in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome for the November 25, 2017, battle on the gridiron between Grambling State University and Southern University, the attendance numbers surpassed their top four HBCU Classic competitors. Also on the list were Magic City Classic (#2 with 61,221 attendees), State Fair Classic (#3 with 55,231 attendees), Florida Classic (#4 with 47,819 attendees), and Southern Heritage Classic (#5 with 47,407 attendees).

    This ranking comes with another number one spot, as the Bayou Classic also topped the attendance rankings of the top 35 Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) games played in 2017.bayou classic

    The ranking should ignite pride and excitement amongst longtime Bayou Classic fans and newcomers. “As we look to the future of Bayou Classic, the possibilities are limitless. Building off this momentum, we hope to engage a larger fan base and provide even more opportunities to students, fans, and alumni.,” says Dottie Belletto, President and CEO of the Bayou Classic’s management company, NOCCI.

    Since 2011 when NOCCI took over as the Bayou Classic’s management company, the game experienced a 63.4% increase in overall attendance. The Bayou Classic has come a long way and hopes to hold on to that number one spot for years to come

    The 2018 Bayou Classic Game will be held on Saturday, November 24, 2018, in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome.

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    2018 ESSENCE Festival Initial Line-Up Announced July 5-8 In New Orleans

    ESSENCE wants you to grab your squad and plan your trip as it announces its exhilarating initial talent line-up for the 2018 ESSENCE Festival, taking place July 5-8 in New Orleans. The nightly concert series keeps the spotlight on women, featuring electrifying headline performances from Janet Jackson; Mary J. Blige; a headline set featuring Erykah Badu and Jill Scott, with special guests Snoop Dogg and many others in a special curation by The Roots; Xscape; Fantasia and Miguel*Additional acts will be announced in the coming weeks.

    This year’s Festival will feature chart-topping names and inspiring experiences across four days of music, culture, empowerment and entertainment. The electric nighttime concerts will feature more than 40 acts and will take place across five stages at the Louisiana Superdome—including the Festival’s renowned Mainstage and four intimate Superlounges. For the first-time, the Festival will also feature an ESSENCE Superlounge with a unique DJ-curated experience—with offerings by actor/DJ Idris Elba, MC Lyte and more. Also, for the first-time, the Festival welcomes an interactive music experience with The Read’s Kid Fury and Crissle hosting a Superlounge.

    *Artists scheduled to perform at the nightly ESSENCE Festival concerts over Fourth of July weekend at the Louisiana Superdome include: Janet Jackson; Mary J. Blige; Erykah Badu and Jill Scott, along with Snoop Dogg and more in a special curation by The Roots; 112; Daniel Caesar; D-Nice; Doug E. Fresh’s Legends of Hip-Hop Show featuring Big Daddy Kane, Kool Moe Dee and more; DVSN; Fantasia; H.E.R.; Idris Elba; Kelela; Kelly Price’s For The Love of R&B featuring Dave Hollister and Vaughn Willis; Kevin Ross; MAJOR.; Mali Music; Marsha Ambrosius; MC Lyte; Miguel; Mykia Jovan; Ro James; Teddy Riley’s New Jack Swing Experiencefeaturing Wreckx-n-Effect, Blackstreet and Guy; The Read’s Kid Fury and Crissle; VICTORY, Xscape and many more to be announced soon. Mainstage host: Roy Wood, Jr.

    “In 2018, women are at the forefront of a seismic shift reverberating across the cultural landscape, and this movement comes to life for our community at the ESSENCE Festival,” said Michelle Ebanks, President, Essence Communications. “Some of the most iconic female artists and powerhouse performers of this generation—Janet Jackson, Mary J. Blige, Fantasia and others—embrace ESSENCE and the Festival as a sacred space to entertain, inspire, revel in culture and be renewed.”

    Weekend ticket packages are on sale now with prices starting at $150. For information about ticket sales, accommodations and the latest news about the ESSENCE Festival® visit EssenceFestival.com.

    Join the Festival community: Follow us on Twitter @essencefest #EssenceFest and become a fan of Festival on Facebook. The 2018 ESSENCE Festival® is presented by Coca-Cola®State Farm is a major sponsor. ESSENCE Festival is executive produced by Essence Communications Inc., and produced by Solomon Group with the ESSENCE® Empowerment Experience executive produced by GeChar.

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    Louisiana Travel Association announces new officers, honors graduates of tourism leadership class

    The Louisiana Travel Promotion Association–-which voted Jan. 23 to change its name to the Louisiana Travel Association-– installed a group of tourism industry leaders as new officers for its executive committee and board of directors during the association’s Annual Membership Meeting at the DoubleTree by Hilton in Lafayette.

    “For 57 years, LTA has strengthened Louisiana’s tourism industry through our marketing program, advocacy efforts and educational opportunities,” said Jill Kidder, LTA President and CEO. “We are thrilled that our members have selected tourism industry leaders from throughout the state to lead this organization as we continue to promote a viable job-creating and revenue-producing industry.”

    New officers installed on the executive board committee include:
    · Chairman Travis Napper, Ruston-Lincoln CVB
    · Vice-Chair Janice Delerno Verges, The Stockade Bed & Breakfast
    · Secretary Ben Berthelot, Lafayette CVC
    · Treasurer Kerry Andersen, Pinnacle Entertainment
    · Immediate Past Chair Mark Romig, New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation

    New directors:
    · Timothy Bush, Louisiana’s Cajun Bayou
    · Dustin Gontarski, Compass Media
    · Jennifer Ritter Guidry, Atchafalaya National Heritage Area
    · Kevin Kelly, Houmas House Plantation & Gardens

    Returning directors:
    · Marc Becker, New Orleans Hotel Collection
    · Peggy Benoit, Carmel Inn & Suites Thibodaux
    · Dickie Brennan, Dickie Brennan & Company
    · Alana Cooper, Monroe-West Monroe CVB
    · John Crook, Vernon Parish Tourist Commission
    · Brandy Evans, Shreveport-Bossier CTB
    · Marion Fox, Jeff Davis Parish Tourist Commission
    · Arlene Gould, Natchitoches Parish CVB
    · Andy LeBouef, Mardi Gras World
    · Ralph Ney, Marriot Hotel Baton Rouge
    · Donna O’Daniels, St. Tammany Parish Tourist & Convention Commission
    · Lynette Tanner, Frogmore Plantation & Gins
    · Denise Thevenot, Louisiana Tax Free Shopping

    LTA also honored the Louisiana Tourism Leadership Academy graduates during the meeting. The 18 members of the LTLA class spent all of 2017 developing their leadership skills while learning from seasoned professionals from throughout the tourism industry. The goal of the program is to equip each class member with knowledge and skills that will enrich their tourism-related organizations, therefore strengthening the state-wide tourism industry.

    “LTLA has been a tremendous opportunity for those interested in learning more about Louisiana’s tourism industry, and we are proud of the 2017 graduating class,” said Jill Kidder, LTA President and CEO. “It is our hope that these professionals will utilize their new-found knowledge and experience to better themselves, their organizations and their state.”

    Louisiana Tourism Leadership Academy 2018 graduate

    Louisiana Tourism Leadership Academy 2018 graduate

    The graduating class of LTLA includes: Rebecca Blankenbaker, with Cane River National Heritage Area; Marica Brewster, with Von Mack Agency; Alvon Brumfield, with Louisiana Renaissance Festival; Kimberly Caldarera, with L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles; Megan Gavlick, with L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles; Katherine Johnson, with Natchitoches CVB; Zondra Jones, with St. Tammany Parish Tourist Commission; Leslie Landeche, with Mardi Gras World; Barry Landry, with Louisiana Office of Tourism; Shanna Landry, with Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana CVB; Kaylie Leblanc, with Lafayette CVC; Angie Manning, with Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana CVB; Joshua McNemar, with Office of the Lt. Governor; Jessica Ragusa, with Office of the Lt. Governor; Madeline Sanchez, with Louisiana Travel Association; Timika Spurlock, with Sheraton New Orleans; Stella Thorton, with Louisiana Tax Free Shopping; and Kellie Walters, with Louisiana’s Cajun Bayou.

    LTA is a trade association leading and strengthening Louisiana’s vibrant tourism industry through promotion, education and advocacy on behalf of our members. The membership voted in early 2018 to shorten the association’s name and staff is working with an agency to reveal a full rebrand later this year. Tourism generated $1.04 billion for Louisiana in 2016 and employs more than 230,000 people throughout the state.

    ONLINE: LTPA.org

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    Technical assistance services available for small businesses impacted by floods

    The Louisiana Office of Community Development has announced an application deadline of Wednesday, Feb. 28, for the Restore Louisiana Small Business Program, which offers interest-free, partially forgivable loans to businesses impacted by the 2016 floods.

    The $43 million program is designed to help eligible businesses in the 51 parishes that were impacted by the March and August 2016 floods. To date, the program has funded about $11 million in loans.

    “This program has the potential to help many small businesses impacted by the 2016 floods, but time is running out,” OCD Executive Director Pat Forbes said. “The first step for owners to find out if they qualify is to apply, and we encourage all of those who are in the recovery process to do so before the deadline.”

    There are five participating lenders accepting applications throughout the 51 impacted parishes. Their information, as well as coverage area, office locations, program criteria and application instructions can be found on the Restore Louisiana website.

    The interest-free loans range from $10,000 to $150,000, with 40 percent of the loan forgiven if qualified borrowers comply with all program requirements.

    The loans can be used for working capital—such as rent, mortgage, utilities, non-owner employee wages and inventory—as well as for furniture and movable equipment. Construction-related expenses are not eligible. For more information, call (225) 219-7824.

    Representatives from the Restore Louisiana Small Business program will be available at upcoming outreach events for the Restore Louisiana Homeowner Assistance Program, where representatives will answer questions and accept applications. Due to the recent winter weather, some outreach events have been rescheduled. Please note the new dates:

    • Feb. 5 – East Baton Rouge Parish Library/ Greenwell Springs Road Regional Branch from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    • Feb. 6 – Livingston Parish Library/ Denham Springs-Walker Branch from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    • Feb. 7 – East Baton Rouge Parish Library/ Baker Branch from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.

    Flood-impacted small business owners are also encouraged to contact a local office of the Louisiana Small Business Development Center for technical assistance services. These centers can provide free one-on-one consulting, financial management guidance, business plan development, long-term recovery and sustainability plans, financial projecting and disaster preparedness planning. Click here for a list of locations and contact information.

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    Thank You from the Odell S. Williams Museum

    I am so  proud of the city. Thank you, Baton Rouge, for answering the call for a Day of Peace in Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

    It brightened my day to know that by Wednesday morning, there had been no homicides in the City of Baton Rouge,and for that with pride, we are grateful.

    A Special “Thank You” to all the caring citizens for coming together planting, cleaning, painting and nailing up empty buildings.  Hundreds of volunteers, artists and concerned citizens came together to help create a Better Baton Rouge and a real “Scenic Highway”in Scotlandville.

    I firmly believe that “Little By Little, Day by Day, Working Together, We Can make a Difference.”  We will take this little minute and use the sixty seconds in it to become stronger and better as we work towards justice, peace, and love.

    HARAMBEE! Let’s Pull Together. WE ARE BRPROUD

    Sadie Roberts-Joseph
    Odell S. Williams Now And Then African-American Museum
    Baton Rouge
    Sadie Roberts-Joseph is the founder of the museum. Photo by Daniel Atkinson.

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    Know Your Liver educational session planned for Feb 24

    Rarely are we informed about the importance of a healthy liver, or the ramifications of an unhealthy one. The L. K. Davis Liver Disease Awareness Association was created with this in mind, setting out to address liver health issues in our families and communities. Consisting of physicians, nurses, practitioners, health coaches, counselors, liver disease patients, caregivers, and many other interested parties, our goal is to help educate the public about the necessity of a healthy liver, and support those affected by liver disease, from early diagnosis through end-stage. Our services are free, and all donations are tax-deductible.

    Our first educational session of KNOW YOUR LIVER will be held on February 24, at the Carver Branch of the EBRP Library, at 11am. Our educational sessions will be held monthly, as will our support group meetings for liver patients and their caregivers.

    L. K. Davis Liver Disease Awareness Association is a non-profit organization, which collaborates with local health-care providers, drug/alcohol treatment programs, veteran’s services, schools, and others, in the common interest of liver disease awareness.

    For more information about this topic, email liver.disease.awareness@gmail.com.

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    Metro council to hear public on marijuana penalties, considers fencing downtown area overpass

    Baton Rouge metro council meetings are off to a running start in January. With one meeting out of the way and one upcoming on the 24th, now is the time to get informed and involved in local government.

    At the January 10th meeting, Councilman Matt Watson (District 11) removed his proposal to create a tax for the increase of Police Salaries. By deleting the proposal from the agenda ahead of public comments and a vote, the tax issue can be raised again at another time. Had it gone to a vote and failed, rules state that it cannot be brought forward for another calendar year. He cited a current lack of support as his reason for the removal.

    New BR police chief Murphy Paul made an appearance at the meeting to ask for a budget increase for the Targeted Violent Criminal Program. These funds, which come entirely from a federal grant, would be used to purchase an automated dispatch system.

    Council members deferred a number of items to future meetings. Changes to the city pay plan are on hold for sixty days after a heated debate on how changes will impact newer employees. The decision on whether or not to re-appoint Cleve Dunn Jr. to the Airport District Board was deferred again and is currently set for the next meeting on January 24th. The 24th meeting will also readdress the placement of fences under the overpass at North St. This discussion was deferred out of concern for the homeless population that resides there. The Mayor’s office is working with organizations and stakeholders to create a program to address concerns.

    Issues introduced at the meeting on the 10th will be up for public comment and voting on the 24th. A draft introduced by council members Chandler Loupe (District 3) and Lamont Cole (District 7) will change the enforcement of marijuana possession. The penalty for possession of under 14 grams would be punishable by a $300 fine and no more than 15 days in jail under the changes.

    An item intended to reduce crime in hotels and motels introduced by council members Watson, Erika Green (District 5), and Barbara Freiberg (District 12) could have negative repercussions for hotel owners. Under the changes hotel and motel guests will have to present a valid government issued ID before being allowed to stay in a room. The changes also increase the fines levied if a hotel or motel keeps an incomplete record of previous guests. Under current law, hotels must retain guest records for the previous three years of operation.

    The proposed changes also create a permit system for hotels/motels. These business would have to register with the Department of Development in order to operate. The required permit could be suspended or revoked if the hotel or motel had too many police dispatches for drug or prostitution related crimes over a given time period. Hotels and motels without an up to date permit would not be able to stay open for business.

    By Progressive Social Network of Baton Rouge
    psnbatonrouge@gmail.com
    @PSNBatonRouge.

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    AKA, L’Auberge host 3rd Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Unity Prayer Breakfast

    SUBMITTED NEWS–The Gamma Eta Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. partnered with L’Auberge Casino & Hotel Baton Rouge to host the third annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Unity Prayer Breakfast on January 15,  in the L’Auberge Baton Rouge Event Center.

    The nearly 400 attendees included elected officials, community and business leaders, local law enforcement officers, community members, L’Auberge staff, high school and college students, community partners, and members of the National Panhellenic Council, which encompasses nine historically Black Greek-lettered organizations.

    Gwendolyn Thomas, Gamma Eta Omega Chapter President, presided and provided the occasion. Mickey Parenton, L’Auberge General Manager and Senior Vice President, and Kizzy Smith, L’Auberge Human Resources Director, welcomed the guests, who also received greetings from Monique Edwards, Gamma Eta Omega Chapter Vice President.

    The Woodlawn High School JROTC presented the colors, Danielle Gardner performed the National Anthem, and John Gray Band provided entertainment. LaChondria Holder and Pamela Honoré served as committee chairmen.

    Those in attendance listened to guest speaker Louisiana DOTD Secretary Dr. Shawn Wilson, enjoyed breakfast and united in prayers led by Reverend Patricia Turner-Brown, assistant pastor of Bethel AME Church, and Minister Ashlynn James, associate minister Impact Outreach Ministries. Following the breakfast, Gamma Eta Omega Chapter members participated in The Walls Project community service activity. Members assisted the organization with revitalization efforts in North Baton Rouge encompassing the area from US 190 to Swan Street.

    Special tribute was presented to the members of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated by Mavis Lewis as the organization celebrated its 110th year. The sorority is an international service organization founded on the campus of Howard University in Washington, DC on January 15, 1908. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority is comprised of nearly 300,000 members in approximately 1,012 graduate and undergraduate chapters in the United States, Liberia, Bahamas, US Virgin Islands, Germany, South Korea, Bermuda, Japan, Canada, South Africa, and the Middle East.

    Specifically, Gamma Eta Omega Chapter has served her community since 1940 with multi-faceted programs in education, music & arts, family strengthening, and financial literacy. Also, she provides scholarships annually through her charitable foundation, The Ivy Foundation, Incorporated, to East Baton Rouge Parish graduating high school seniors plus Louisiana State University and Southern University students. Finally, she partners with various organizations to provide impactful community services.

    Picture shown left to right:

    LaChondria Holder
    Committee Chairman

    Mickey Parenton
    L’Auberge General Manager and Senior Vice President

    Kizzy Smith
    L’Auberge Director of Human Resources

    Dr. Shawn Wilson
    Louisiana DOTD Secretary and Guest Speaker

    Gwendolyn Thomas
    Gamma Eta Omega Chapter President

    Pamela Honoré
    Committee Chairman

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  • Hammond welcomes first baby of 2018: Clarielle White

    HAMMOND—Nearly 19 hours into the new year, Shaquell LaFrance and Clarence White of Hammond celebrated the arrival of their second daughter and North Oaks Medical Center’s first baby of 2018. Health care providers at North Oaks Medical Center presented Clarielle White and her parents with a “Baby New Year 2018” welcome basket. Clarielle White arrived at 6:59 p.m. on Jan. 1 to ring in the new year with her parents and 3-year-old sibling Sha’Niyah, who is “very happy to be a big sister.” Clarielle was delivered by Obstetrician/Gynecologist Diana Dang, MD, and weighed 6 lbs., 8.3 oz. LaFrance is a sophomore studying accounting at Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond. White, a running back, recently transferred to Alcorn State University in Lorman, Mississippi, from Fresno City College in Fresno, California, to join the Braves’ football program. Participating in the basket presentation were Labor & Delivery Staff Registered Nurse Shannon Davis, Dr. Diana Dang, and Nursery Certified Nursing Assistant Wintress McCormick.

    ONLINE: northoaks.org.

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    Tangipahoa library plans meetings to discuss March 24 tax renewal

    The Tangipahoa Parish Library will host seven town hall meetings to discuss their upcoming millage renewal leading up to the March 24 proposition election.

    Starting Jan. 16, the Library system will hold public hearings at each of their six branches to answer questions and outline plans for the millage renewal.

    Currently, the Library receives three mills for “improving, maintaining, operating and supporting the Tangipahoa Parish Library and its branches.” The 10-year tax has been on the books for decades and has been critical to provide library services for the public.

    Scheduled meeting dates and locations are as follows:
    Amite Branch: Jan. 16 at 5 p.m.
    Kentwood Branch: Jan. 29 at 5 p.m.
    Loranger Branch: Feb. 5 at 5 pm.
    Ponchatoula Branch: Feb. 20 at 5 p.m.
    Independence Branch: Feb. 26 at 5 p.m.
    Hammond Branch: March 1 at 5 p.m., and March 17 at 10 a.m.
    For more information on the March 24 Tangi Library tax renewal, go to www.TangiLibrary.com.

    Read more »
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    Gov. Edwards declares State of Emergency, Crisis Action Team activated Wednesday due to freezing weather

    Gov. John Bel Edwards issued an Emergency Declaration Wednesday, Jan. 17, due to the freezing precipitation and low temperatures throughout Louisiana. The Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness, Dept. of Transportation and Development and other state agencies have been activated in response to this emergency.

    “The weather conditions are extremely dangerous, and while it may be tempting to venture outside, it is critical that everyone stay off the frozen highways and streets and heed all state and local warnings in order to be safe,” said Edwards. “Parts of all major interstates in Louisiana have closed because of the icy conditions and unfortunately, one life has already been claimed by this extreme weather. Our state Crisis Action Team and DOTD have been working around the clock responding to emergencies, salting roadways and providing resources to those who need assistance. Until the freezing temperatures lift, I urge everyone to take the necessary precautions, remember to check on people, pets and pipes, and stay warm and remain patient.”

    DTsog0tX4AEnRF0.jpg-large

    The winter weather has caused major road closures throughout the state. DOTD began salting and pre-treating roads in northern districts on Monday evening and Tuesday morning in the southern districts and continues those operations. Continue monitoring www.511La.org for updates on roadways and other important information.

    “The disruption and danger of extreme weather conditions like we are experiencing cannot be underestimated” said Dr. Shawn Wilson, DOTD Secretary. “In addition to major closings of interstates across Louisiana, we have seen hundreds of vehicle accidents, including 18 wheeler accidents and even a death. Drivers should heed our call to stay put until the all clear is issued.”

    DOTD facts:

    • 1,204 employees have been deployed for 24 hour operations.
    • 134,600 hits to www.511La.org (which typically gets 2,500 hit per day).
    • 1.5 Million pounds of salt have been used on roadways statewide.
    • 25 Dump trucks.
    • 236 trucks with spreaders/sprayers.
    • 5 airports have been closed.

    GOHSEP activated its Crisis Action Team on Tuesday. The State Fire Marshall’s Office reminds everyone to use caution when operating space heaters or any other heating source in their homes. When using any type of heating source, whether it is a space heater or fireplace, homeowners should incorporate a “three-foot rule,” where there should be a space of at least three feet between a heating source and any combustibles such as furniture and décor. Ovens or open flame sources, such as candles, should never be used to heat homes.

    Click here to read the Emergency Declaration.

    Read more »
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    Rene honored with Above and Beyond Award

    A long-time Southern University Baton Rouge employee and former assistant mass communications professor was presented the December 2017 Above and Beyond Award.

    Robert Rene’, Ph.D, also has served as interim director and associate director of the Office of Recruitment and Admissions. Rene’ worked in television news before serving at Southern University.

    In his current role, Rene’ meets with students, parents, principals, counselors, and alumni to guide students’ academic futures. He recently participated in the fall 2017 California Community College Transfer to HBCUs Caravan that took place October 31 -November 8. The caravan began in Northern California Sacramento area and concluded nine days later in the Southern California — Long Beach area.

    “Dr. Robert Rene’ was such an asset to this year’s caravan. He brought such a wisdom and calm to the caravan. I am personally appreciative of his flexibility and support during the entire trip,” said Helen P. Young, project director, California Community Colleges Transfer Guarantee Agreement to Historically Black Colleges & Universities.

    “I humbly accept this award for the service I enjoy doing,” said Rene’.

    The Above and Beyond Award was established to help inspire and motivate SU employees to reach their maximum performance. One award is presented at the SU Board of Supervisors meetings each month.

    Recipients of the award are nominated by their peers. Nominations are forwarded to the Board of Supervisors chair and vice chair for selection.

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    Who to Watch 2018: McClanahan, Banks, Emery, Gilmore, and Harris in Baton Rouge

     

    Twelve Louisiana residents have been selected by The Drum’s publisher and staff as people to watch in 2018. In this issue, we introduce five: NAACP State President Michael McClanahan, councilwoman Chauna Banks, novelist Lynn Emery, anti-domestic violence activist Twahna Harris, and policy advisor James Gilmore Jr. Ph.D.

    Read their individual stories:

    Chauna Banks office

    Chauna Banks

    Michael McClanahan

    Michael McClanahan 

    WHO TO WATCH James Gilmore headshot

    James Gilmore, Ph.D.

    Who To Watch Twahna Harris headshot

    Twahna Harris

    Lynn's Promo Photo016[6]

    Lynn Emery

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    Who to Watch: Lynn Emery

    Author Lynn Emery’s romantic suspense novels and mystery fiction have won and been nominated for several literary awards, including Best Mul- ticultural Mainstream Novel by Romantic Times Magazine. Set in the swamps and bayou, Emery’s thrillers—a total of 22 to date—mix mystery and supernatural suspense with strong female leads and a huge dose of everything Louisiana.

    Her 1996 romantic suspense novel, After All, inspired a BET made-for-television movie with Holly Robinson Peete and DB Woodside starring as lead characters. In this novel, sparks fly between an ambitious Baton Rouge newswoman and the man she loves. Intrigue and scandal threaten to turn all of their hopes to dust unless they are able to trust each other to save their future and their love.

    Emery also won three Emma Awards for Kiss Lonely Goodbye as part of the Romance Slam Jam conference. She has sold 14 novels to four major publishers over the span of her literary career. Emery has been a contributing consultant to Today’s Black Woman magazine for three articles about contemporary relationships between Black men and women. She works full-time as a licensed social worker with a special interest in mental health is- sues as they affect women. With that, meet Lynn Emery.

    What should we expect from you in 2018: I plan to release two novels in 2018. Third Sight Into Darkness will be released January 26. I plan to write the fourth book in my Joliet Sisters psychic detectives series, Dead Ahead, for release later in 2018. I have planned to sign at New York Comic Con in 2018.

    Moves made from 2015 to 2017: I have written five novels during this period: Smooth Operator, Hunting Spirits, Pretty Dangerous, Into the Mist, and Dead Wrong. I designed and created a website for my publishing company, Lazy River Publishing. In October 2017, I exhibited at New York Comic Con and was a co-participant on one panel on how artists, writers, and creators can find and build their audiences.

    Personal resolution: My goal is to balance self-care with being of service to others.

    Life/business motto: Make excellence a habit.

    Business resolution: My goal is to increase knowledge of my brand and my novels.

    What is your #1 priority right now? To reach more readers who enjoy the kind of fiction I create.

    Best advice you’ve ever received? Several versions of the old saying, “Bloom where you’re planted.”

    Role models: Literary roles models include Agatha Christie, Ernest Gaines, J. California Cooper, and Maya Angelou.

    What has been a deciding moment or an experience that pushed you forward? My decision to write novels started when I was eleven years old. I read an Agatha Christie novel with a shocking twist at the end that blew my mind. Right then I decided to write my kind of mystery featuring smart women solving mysteries. I started my first novel, but didn’t finish it. I had a lot to learn! Fast forward twenty years, and I joined a writers group to stop just talking about writing novels and to finally do it. I attended a writers conference, met an editor, and sold my first book.

    What music are you listening/dancing to? Classic R&B and smooth jazz

    What are you reading? Mostly mystery fiction and sci-fi. Last favorite novels I read are The Seed Bearing Prince by Davaun Sanders, Lion’s Blood by Steven Barnes, and Fledgling by Octavia Butler

    What’s entertaining you? Streaming original series on television The Punisher, Broadchurch, Midsomer Murders, and Bosch, to name a few. I recently watched “What Happened to Monday,” a movie on Netflix, and loved it.

    Email: lynnemery@cox.net

    Social media: www.facebook.com/lynn. emery.author

    Twitter: LynnEmeryWriter Online: www.lynnemery.com

    Twelve Louisiana residents have been selected by The Drum’s publisher and staff as people to watch in 2018. In this issue, we introduce five: NAACP State President Michael McClanahan, councilwoman Chauna Banks, novelist Lynn Emery, anti-domestic violence activist Twahna Harris, and policy advisor James Gilmore Jr. Ph.D.

    Read more »
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    Scenes from MLK Festival of Services in Scotlandville

    A four-day event where The Walls Project and 100+ businesses and organizations reactivated two miles of historic Scenic Hwy in Scotlandville. Read more

     

    Photos by CondiB
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  • ,,

    Who to Watch: James Gilmore Jr., Ph.D

    On any given day, James Gilmore Jr, Ph.D., can be found actively push- ing a political issue, managing an athlete, marketing spa services, or fishing. Within his company, Bayard Management Group, he manages government relations, workforce development, and strategic planning for clients in healthcare, education, and private business. As a policy advisor, Gilmore has worked with Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome, Gov. John Bel Edwards, and former Gov. Kathleen Blanco, leading the Children’s Cabinet and Louisiana Housing Finance Agency. He is also a founding member of the Mentorship Digital Media Academy and the Mentorship Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Academy.

    Gilmore is a member of the Baton Rouge North Economic Development District where he works with a
    team tasked with bringing economic developments to the under-resourced area.

    Today, he maneuvers throughout the parish working with senior citizens in his role as chief administrative officer of the East Baton Rouge Council on Aging.

    What is your #1 priority right now? To ensure that Senior Citizens across East Baton Rogue Parish are provided the best quality of life and services via the East Baton Rouge Council on Aging.

    Moves made from 2015 to 2017: Director of Training for Our Lady of the Lake Hospital, Director of the Children’s Cabinet Office of Governor John Bel Edwards, Chief Administrative Officer Office of Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome.

    What to expect in 2018: I will monitor the performance of the recent $7.8 million annual millage passed in the 2016 election for the purposes of supporting senior citizens in East Baton Rouge Parish; strengthen police and community relations in East Baton Rouge Parish; host a Minority-Owned Business Expo in East Baton Rouge Parish; host an East Baton Rouge Parish Senior Expo; ensure that minorities have a more equitable share of City of Baton Rouge contract opportunities.

    Personal resolution: To live my best life daily

    Life/business motto: Stay organized and purposeful for high productivity.

    Business resolution: To ensure the success of my sports agency, spa, and work- force develop- ment training firm by hiring competent and reliable staff.

    Best advice you’ve ever received? Everyone does not think like me, respect differences, and be capable of using discernment in personal and professional decision-making.

    Role models: President Barack Obama and Honorable Louis Farrakhan.

    What music are you listening/dancing to? Ledesi, Smokie Norful, Big Krit, Chris Brown, Jeezy

    What are you reading? The Four Agreements by Don Ruiz

    Social media: James Gilmore (Facebook); Bayard_Sports (Instagram)

    Online: www.bayardmanagement. com and www.bayardsports.com 

    Twelve Louisiana residents have been selected by The Drum’s publisher and staff as people to watch in 2018. In this issue, we introduce five: NAACP State President Michael McClanahan, councilwoman Chauna Banks, novelist Lynn Emery, anti-domestic violence activist Twahna Harris, and policy advisor James Gilmore Jr. Ph.D.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Castine named New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center event manager

    Lauren Castine has been named event manager at the New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center–the sixth largest convention center in the nation. She will be responsible for managing all aspects of the event planning process. As a liaison between the Center and clients, she will guide clients through event preparation and show set-up, monitor in-house events and oversee all related activities to ensure successful events.”

    ONLINE: https://www.mccno.com/new-orleans-ernest-n-morial-convention-center-names-lauren-castine-event-manager/

    Read more »
  • ,

    Baton Rouge NAACP will host annual King Celebration, Jan 15

    The Baton Rouge NAACP will host its annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration on Jan. 15, 2018 at  Mt. Zion First Baptist Church, 356 East Blvd. , at  8 a.m. The guest speaker will be Judge John Michel Guidry. A reception will be held afterwards in the church  fellowship hall featuring food and various vendors. The event is free and open to the public. Due to the weather, the march to City Hall after the program has been cancelled.  

     

    Read more »
  • Who to Watch: Twahna Harris

    “Whatever you’re passionate about will write the legacy you leave to the world,” said Twahna P. Harris, whose passion in advocacy is writing an enduring legacy against domestic violence.

    Recognized statewide for the work she does to assist domestic violence survi- vors, Harris’s personal journey of abuse has equipped her to empower women and men of all ages to “stand up and speak out”. Her life story was included in The Pixel Project: The Survivor Stories 2015 in honor of Mother’s Day—the same year that she was nominated for the United States Women Summit. Harris is the founder and executive director of The Butterfly Society, a Zachary, La.-based, anti-domestic violence non-profit established in 2014.

    The Arnaudville, Louisiana, native has been a member of the Community Coordinated Responsive Team with Iris Domestic Violence Center and the TaskForce on the Prevention of Sexual Abuse of Children for the Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services.

    Last Fall, Harris was appointed by Gov. John Bel Edwards to the stateDomestic Violence Task Force Commision. Under her leadership, The Butterfly Society has estab ished memorial gardens in four Louisiana cities, partnered with barbershops for discussions with men, influenced domestic violence policies, and supported hundreds of survivors seeking escape or restoration. Twahna Harris, 47, is a person to watch.

    Moves made in 2015 to 2017: I have been appointed to Domestic Violence Task Force Commission for the State of Louisiana. The Butterfly Society is a household name. I’m blessed to be employed with them as the legislative assistant to East Baton Rouge Councilman Lamont Cole in District 7 .

    What to expect in 2018: GREATNESS!

    Personal resolution: Never forget to reach back.

    Life/Business Motto: Meeting people where they are.

    Business resolution: The work we do is never about ourselves but those we serve.

    Best Advice You’re Ever Received? Be who you are, not who people say you are.

    Role models: My mother Cecelia W. Porch, grandmother Mable D. White, my sister Wanda M. Porch, my aunt Elmira P. Jefferson, Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome, and my uncle Joseph L. White.

    What has been a deciding moment or experience that pushed you forward? Surviving domestic violence was a defining moment in my life. Making a commitment to help educate, engage, and empower communities to end domestic violence.

    What are you reading? Hacks by Donna Brazile

    What’s entertaining you? Blue Blood, Chicago PD, Law and Order Special Victim Unit

    What music are you listening/ dancing to? R & B, Zydeco

    Social media: Facebook: Twahna P Harris, TheButterflySociety14

    Twitter: @ butterflyorgLA

    Email: thebutterflysociety@gmail.com

    Online: www.thebutterflysociety.org

    Twelve Louisiana residents have been selected by The Drum’s publisher and staff as people to watch in 2018. In this issue, we introduce five: NAACP State President Michael McClanahan, councilwoman Chauna Banks, novelist Lynn Emery, anti-domestic violence activist Twahna Harris, and policy advisor James Gilmore Jr. Ph.D.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    White Hills Elementary fourth graders thank ‘Wonder’ donor

    Within two weeks of White Hills Elementary 4th grade teachers Lacy Aucoin (pictured at left) and Carlita Joseph-Gordon (right) requesting book donations on Facebook, Rachel Dickerson and Maranda Smith Williams mailed 26 copies of Wonder by R. J. Palacio to the students. Gordon, who is using the book to address core reading standards, said the books will help students jumpstart or continue building personal libraries. Other books on the teacher’s wish list are: Crossover by Kwame Alexander, Summer Saves Summer by Adara Gaston, and Tales of a 4th Grade Nothing by Judy Blume.

    Read more »
  • ,,,,

    Good Job workshop to teach how to get the job you really want

    Workshop will teach how to set goals and reach them this year 

    It’s a New Year and you’re still doing the same old thing. But it’s never too late to follow your dreams.

    The “Good Job workshop: How to get the job you really want in 2018” will teach you how to set your goals and reach them this year.  The workshop will be held Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018 from 10 a.m. to noon at the EpiCenter, business and event center, 6220 Florida Blvd. Suite B, in Baton Rouge. The cost is $20 in advance and $25 at the door. (Register online)

    As part of the workshop, participants will learn effective goal-setting techniques, how to develop a plan and work it and valuable tips and strategies for pursuing their passions and following their dreams.

    The seminar is sponsored by Michelle McCalope, president of On Assignment Media, and the EpiCenter, a business and event center. The former award-winning journalist, author, and entrepreneur has 30 years of experience in the media and business industry.

    The seminar is based on McCalope’s motivational books, Good Job: A Guide to Pursuing Your Passions and Following Your Dreams  and That Good Job: Strategies for Pursuing Your Passions and Following Your Dreams. She shares the lessons she’s learned along the way to help inspire others to follow their dreams and not just settle for a job that pays the bills.

    Registration starts at 9:30 a.m. Refreshments will be served. For more information, email onassignmentmedia@gmail.com

    ONLINE:  www.goodjobworkshop18.eventbrite.com

    Read more »
  • ,,

    City sees community pharmacies expand

    Following the closure of Community Pharmacy 1 Baton Rouge’s first Black-owned closed-door pharmacy, the city began to see an increase of pharmacies opening around the city and particularly in North Baton Rouge.

    Community Pharmacy focused on providing prescription drugs through health care providers like nursing homes and mental health facilities rather than directly to individual consumers. It wasn’t until 2008 that Baton Rouge customers would have other options for purchase medicine instead of at big-box pharmacies like Rite Aide and Walgreen’s. That year, Kimberly Murphy Paul, a registered pharmacist, opened Noah’s Pharmacy in Brusly, La. This has led the way to a type of surge in Black pharmacies opening in the city.

    According to state records, Belford Johnson and Duston Stacia, PharMD, became owners of Affordable Pharmacy in 2009. In 2015, Johnson and Jabari Alexander open a second location on Gardere Lane, Brent Landry opened Brent’s Pharmacy in Mid-City Baton Rouge. In February 2017, Eric Peters, PharMD, opened Lagniappe Pharmacy on Drusilla Lane while operating two locations in Gonzales since 2014.

    Each pharmacy has unique service or distinction. Noah’s Pharmacy has a digital app. Brent’s Pharmacy is a Health Mart franchise. Affordable Pharmacy, which offers free delivery, has earned AIDS Drug Assistance Programs credentials. All locations of Lagniappe Pharmacy has online prescription refills.

    The area will see its sixth Black-owned pharmacy, Parker’s Pharmacy, open in the Broadmoor Shopping Center on Florida Blvd this month. Owner Orlando J. Palmer Jr., Pharm, and brother Kyle will operate the new location which Orlando calls their “first”.

    Orlando Palmer is a graduate of Xavier University of Louisiana College of Pharmacy with a doctor of pharmacy.

    How would you describe what you do? As owner and Pharmacist in Charge, I am responsible for the day to day business aspects of the pharmacy. From filling patient prescriptions, counseling patients on their medication, training, coaching and managing employees.

    How did you get started? I’ve always known that one day I would start my own community pharmacy. My brother and I have been planning our vision for Parker’s Pharmacy for over two years. We both left Baton Rouge after high school to pursue college and professional goals. After 10 plus years away, we collectively decided that Baton Rouge was where we needed to be to continue our vision.Orlando Parker Pharmacy

    Where did your interest in pharmacy start? I always had an interest in healthcare growing up. I was going to be a pediatrician, anesthesiologist or pharmacist. The first two years of Pre-Med/Pre-Pharmacy college curriculum was the same. I decided to become a pharmacist and the rest is history.
    My pharmacy career consisted of retail pharmacy experience (Walgreen’s and CVS Pharmacy) and nuclear pharmacy experience (PETNET Solutions, a Siemens Company). Managing a nuclear manufacturer was very rewarding. Every single day, we assisted in the diagnosis and management of various cancer and Alzheimer’s disease patients.

    Why did you choose Baton Rouge? Baton Rouge is home, born and raised. My brother and I collectively made the decision to move back to Baton Rouge to grow our family and business.

    Why the Broadmoor area? The Broadmoor area needs a community pharmacy. It met all of our target site selection criteria. We have other Parker’s Pharmacy locations planned for the Baton Rouge area.

    What is most challenging aspect of your business? Poor service in business has been a documented issue. This include the retail/community pharmacy industry. It will be a challenge to decondition patients, to choose a better pharmacy experience, from the only thing they may currently know.

    What’s most rewarding? Improving patient health outcomes of family, friends and the community where I was born and raised.

    What are two things you wished everyone understood about pharmacy and medicine? Pharmacy, specifically prescription medications, is only one main component to improving and managing your health. Healthier food choices, diet, physical exercise, smoking cessation are also key components. The world of medicine will constantly evolve and Parker’s Pharmacy will be there for their patients to help guide them through those times.Parker family

    What do you think is the most important aspect of pharmacy? This is a tough question. I have gone back and forward with education and adherence as the most important aspects of pharmacy. Ultimately, I conclude education. Educating your patients on their new or current medication regimen and course of therapy. This includes directions, side effects, drug-drug interactions, drug-food interactions, any additional supplements needed, nutritional education, etc. The more time you take to educate your patients will ultimately improve adherence to medication. It’s a direct correlation to improved patient health outcomes.

    What are your goals or future plans? My goal is to provide an exceptional pharmacy experience to all patients. This includes customer service, education and awareness and improving the overall health of my community. We have plans for multiple Parker’s Pharmacy locations around the Baton Rouge metro area.

    Who works with you in the pharmacy? My brother Kyle Palmer is co-owner of Parker’s Pharmacy. His role is Director of Community Outreach Services. We also employ a team of pharmacist and pharmacy technicians.

    Should you (a pharmacist) be asked clinical questions? How do you handle clinical questions when asked? Every single day a pharmacist answers clinical questions. The intense college curriculum, clinical rotation requirements, national and state board exams and work experience allows pharmacist to continue to be one of the most trusted professionals. If a pharmacist is unable to pull up information from memory, there are ample clinical resources readily available.

    What unique business relationships or partnerships do you have in Baton Rouge? As we launched our business venture, we have partnered and aligned our services with many great organizations. These organizations are top notch when it comes to execution and results. Off the top of my head they include:
    1. The BYAN Group led by Courtney Scott for strategic planning and marketing
    2. The Baton Rouge Area Chamber for business development
    3. The Maxine Firm led by Ellen McKnight for nutritional support and logistics
    4. The CEO Foundation led by Jasiri Basel for community outreach
    5. Louisiana Healthcare Services led by Dr. Leah Cullins and Nicole Thomas for clinic services

    Why are you here? I love this question. This venture is way bigger than the impact of a neighborhood pharmacy on a community. My brother and I are here to build and strengthen our hometown community of Baton Rouge. We are here to provide HOPE to the community where we were born and raised, specifically 70805.

    ONLINE: parkersrx.com

    By Candace J. Semien
    Jozef Syndicate reporter

    Read more »
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    Who to Watch: Councilwoman Chauna Banks

    Chauna Banks has lived her entire life in Scotlandville district where she has served seven years as councilwoman. A graduate of Southern University Lab High School and Southern University, she has found her life’s purpose in being a public servant beyond her master’s degree in counseling and full-time job. She has argued for equitable resources for the northern part of Baton Rouge, saying the area “has been systematically subjected to political, economic, cultural or social degradation because its residents are majority Black. It is inflicted with several forms of discrimination: economic, recreation, retail, housing, media and infrastructure.” She moves into the final year of her second term with more recognition in part due to her fights to keep the Baton Rouge Zoo at Greenwood Park in North Baton, to end the contamination of Devil’s Swamp in Alsen, Louisiana, and to have Baton Rouge police

    release the 911 recordings on Alton Sterling. She continues to believe that there is a solution to every problem, and “when we work together, everybody wins.”

    MEET COUNCILWOMANCHAUNA BANKS, 56

    Moves made from 2015 to 2017:

    • Tasked the North Ba- ton Rouge Blue Ribbon Com- mission to work toward qual- ity of life assets in the north- ern portion of the parish, such as an emergency room and other healthcare options.

    • Organized the Alsen/St. Irma Lee Advisory Board to look at bringing resolve to the years of environmental justice.

    • Increased city-parish funding for Jewel J. Newman Community Center building and grounds upgrades.

    • Awarded several grants: The KaBOOM! In the amount of $15,000 towards a “Community Playground Build” Project, an annual ExxonMo- bil Grant of $2500, and just recently, the Capital Area United Way grant for $30,000 to operate the JJNCC TeenWorkPrepBR, $25,000 BRAF Flood Relief Grant to renovate JJNCC computer room.

    • Supplement revenues via an annual JJNCC Capital Campaign: Masquerade Ball, Back-to- School Rally, and Annual Senior Appreciation Luncheon.

    • This fall we added a GED Adult Education Program to offerings.

    What to expect in 2018 from you:

    • Maintaining the Baton Rouge Zoo at its current Thomas Road location and expanding the concept of “The Zoo at Greenwood Park” with sig- nificant upgrades.

    • Advocating for a middle class housing sub- division for young professionals with growing families.

    • Reducing the time for rehire of city-parish workers with a positive marijuana read from three years to one year.

    • My long-range goal is to have a performing arts theatre built in District 2.

    Personal resolution: My personal res- olution is to be dedicated to God by doing my best to exercise kingdom principles in earthly affairs.

    Life/business motto: Work smarter, not harder. Business resolu- tion: My business resolution is to maintain and promote a high standard of professional ethics and practice impartial- ity, fairness, and an equitable discharge of services without bias.

    What is your #1 priority right now? Maintaining the Baton Rouge Zoo at its current Thomas Road location and expand- ing the concept of “The Zoo at Greenwood Park” with significant recreational upgrades.

    Best advice you have ever received: Rules without relationships bring on rebellion.

    Role models: Both my grandmothers, my mother, and my aunts.

    What has been a deciding moment or an experience that pushed you forward? Rearing a male child as a single female parent propelled me to be a very responsible and involved parent.

    What music are you listening/dancing to? Contemporary Gospel is what I listen to daily, but I also like ‘70s R&B.

    What are you reading? HOLY BIBLE

    What’s entertaining you? CBS shows

    E-mail: cbanks@brgov.com

    Social media: Facebook/CouncilwomanChauna Banks

    Read more »
  • Cervical Health Awareness Month begins

    January is Cervical Health Awareness Month. Each year, more than 11,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer. HPV (human papillomavirus) is a very common infection that spreads through sexual activity, and it causes almost all cases of cervical cancer. About 79 million Americans currently have HPV, but many people with HPV don’t know they are infected.

    Learn how Cervical Health Awareness Month can make a difference here.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Study: Blacks work 30 jobs at high risk of automation

    Innovation is changing America, from self-checkout lanes in grocery stores to driverless cars. New jobs will emerge, like technicians who service these technologies. Other jobs will be eliminated, such as some cashiers and drivers.
    To what extent are Blacks—whose unemployment rates are already twice as high as those of Whites—currently represented in jobs at high risk to automation?

    According to a study by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, a Washington D.C.-based think tank, joblessness among Blacks is expected increase more because 30 jobs Blacks work in are at high risk of automation.

    “Twenty-seven percent of Black workers are concentrated in 30 occupations at high risk of automation. By comparison, these 30 occupations account for 24 percent of all white workers and 20 percent of all Asian-American workers,” according to the report Race and Jobs at High Risk of Automation.

    There are 3.3 million cashiers and 580,000 are Black or 3.22 percent of the Black workforce compared to 1.92 percent of the white workforce and 2.54 percent of the Asian workforce.

    There are 500,000 taxi drivers and chauffeurs and 143,000 are Black or 80 percent of the Black workforce compared to 21 percent of the white workforce and 87 percent of the Asian workforce.

    At risk are retail salespersons, cashiers, secretaries, administrative assistants, cooks, waiters, waitresses, laborers, freight and stock movers, hand construction laborers, accountants, auditors, receptionists, information clerks, grounds maintenance workers, office clerks, sales representatives, wholesale and manufacturing, food preparation workers, real estate brokers and sales agents, production workers, security guards, gaming surveillance officers, miscellaneous assemblers and fabricators, agricultural workers, inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers, weighers, insurance sales agents, industrial truck and tractor operators, shipping/receiving traffic clerks, taxi drivers and chauffeurs, sales workers and truck drivers, billing and posting clerks, paralegals and legal Assistants, bus drivers, fast food workers, operating engineers, and construction equipment operators.

    “While automation will create new types of jobs, the Black community faces a unique combination of well-documented challenges that make it particularly vulnerable in labor-market transitions,” the report said. “These challenges include: an average household net worth that is one-tenth of whites, making periods without income particularly difficult.”

    The study also noted that automation could increase the Black unemployment rate from 7.5 percent to more than 20 percent. However, the study reported that economic disruption can create new opportunities that address long-standing social inequities. The Joint Center is a research and policy analysis institution focused exclusively on issues concerning people of color.

    ONLINE: jointcenter.org

    By Cora Lester
    The Drum reporter

    Read more »
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    Southern University, LSBDC proclaim ‘Innovate now!’ with workshop series

    When innovation meets entrepreneurship, great things happen. The Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southern University and the Southern University Innovation Center are bringing to the capital region a series of trainings through an event called, “Innovate Now! When Innovation Meets Entrepreneurship” that will begin on January 16, 2018 at the Southern University Innovation Center located at 616 Harding Blvd, Baton Rouge, LA.

    Innovate Now! will build awareness and provide information to the small business community to inspire and inform aspiring and existing entrepreneurs about resources to help them succeed. This dynamic series addresses three major areas of focus: Innovation in Business, Product Innovation, and Innovation Globally.

    “Entrepreneurs want to be intellectually challenged, and want to make a difference in society while still obtaining financial gain,” said Ada Womack, LSBDC at Southern University interim director.

    Innovation is simply a new way of doing something, Womack said, and added that Innovation is defined as incremental, radical, and revolutionary changes in thinking, products, processes, or organizations.

    Entrepreneurship is “one who takes a risk to start a small business.” Womack said the well- known Innovation Equation model is Innovation = Creativity + Risk-Taking.

    “Southern University offers Innovation, Research and Entrepreneurship assistance all on one campus,” Womack said.

    Southern University has taken large steps towards developing its entrepreneurship and economic activity especially since the grand opening of its Innovation Center in September.

    Southern University Executive Director for Strategic Engagement Deanna Williams Smith said “we are equally as excited about the upcoming Innovate Now Campaign which allows the local business community to take advantage of the numerous resources offered in one stop.”

    “The SU Innovation Center provides attractive and affordable lease office space to small upcoming businesses as well as outreach programs for our students who are guided by an entrepreneurial spirit,” Smith said. “Through our partnership with the LSBDC, our business tenants have a unique opportunity to form critical partnerships, business training resources, and access to student and faculty engagement. It’s a great time to start the New Year with ideas and passion through innovation.”

    The Innovate Now! schedule:

    Tuesday, January 16, 2018 – Innovation in Business: 5 – 7 p.m.
    Speaker: Shakita Billups, Entrepreneur
    Anyone can be innovative. Innovation means coming up with new ways of doing things. During this session you will learn about bringing innovation into your business that can help you save time and money, and give you the competitive advantage to grow and adapt your business in the marketplace. Innovation can increase the likelihood of your business succeeding. Businesses that innovate create more efficient work processes and have better productivity and performance.

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018 – Product Innovation: 5 – 7 p.m.
    Speaker – Carlos Thomas
    What is product innovation? This session will provide an introduction to product innovation and the steps in creating your product or service that is new or significantly improved regarding characteristics or intended uses. These components are inclusive of significant improvements in technical specifications, components and materials, incorporated software, user friendliness or other functional characteristics. Product innovations may include both new products and new uses for existing products.

    Tuesday, January 30, 2018 – Innovation Globally: 5 – 7 p.m.
    Speaker: Mike Smith, CEO-OPEX
    My business is going global! Many businesses are aware that there are hidden opportunities in global innovation. Global operations is a treasure trove of ideas and capabilities for innovation. It can be challenging going global with your ideas or exploit the capabilities in global innovation projects. Some of the challenges of global projects are familiar: figuring out the right role for top executives, for example, or finding a good balance between formal and informal project management processes. In this session you will learn about the challenges and benefits of taking your business global.

    ONLINE: www.lsbdc.org.

    page2image14256 page2image14416 page2image14576 page2image14736

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  • ,,

    Tips to help women prepare for long-term healthcare

    Women spend much of their lives caring for others. As mothers and wives, they never seem to stop giving to their families and husbands.

    So who will take care of mom if she needs long-term care? Or will she plan ahead for her long-term care?

    It’s important that she does. Women typically outlive men by an average of about five years. According to aarp.org, more than two-thirds of Americans 85 or older are women. And about 79 percent of 65-year-old women will need long-term care during their lifetime, according to a study by the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute.

    Women often become long-term caregivers for their husbands or other family members. And as statistics show, they are also more likely to become widowed before needing long-term care themselves. Her husband’s needs may have further drained assets, leaving the widow with less financial wherewithal to apply to her own care.

    “Women too often don’t adequately plan ahead for LTC needs,” said Lisa Odoski, a financial professional focusing on women’s well-being and Vice President of the Fried Group, the parent company of TFG Wealth Management.

    “At the same time, research shows among unpaid care-givers in the U.S., two-thirds are women. They sacrifice a lot – sometimes their own careers or reducing their regular work hours.

    “Women today have a greater risk of needing LTC services and of becoming unpaid caregivers. It’s an important time for them to develop an LTC strategy that helps preserve their total financial future.”

    Odoski gives three tips to help women prepare for their long-term care:

    • Educate yourself. Family financial planning used to be almost exclusively the men’s turf. Those days are long gone, and with many houses running on two incomes and women outliving men, women need to make planning for their distant future more of a priority. But an AARP survey showed 60 percent of women hadn’t considered how they would pay for long-term care. “They should start by consulting an investment expert and financial planner,” Odoski said. “They need to get up to speed on senior care costs, insurance and savings plans.”

    • Know your retirement benefits and your spouse’s. Women should take advantage of their employer’s retirement plan and not delay in saving for their future, including the last years they may spend alone. It’s especially important, in the event of divorce or their spouse’s death, to know their spousal rights in regard to their spouse’s pension, Social Security or veteran’s benefits. “They don’t want to be in a position where most of their spouse’s benefits are going toward their own care,” Odoski said.

    • Think long-term with your budget. Women should have specific goals and a plan to save towardthem. The statistics say the goals should include a portion devoted to long-term care insurance, which covers a wide spectrum of products and services. “They should lay out all monthly and annual spending needs and crunch the numbers to determine what they’ll need in later years in order to maintain their familiar lifestyle,” Odoski said. “They need to look at all LTC options. Medicare and private insurance usually aren’t enough to cover long-term care anymore.”

    “After decades of taking care of others,” Odoski said, “women more than ever need to know how to take care of themselves.”

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Middle school engineers, teacher tackle water robotics

    When the buzzer sounds, the students in Ingrid Cruz’s eighth-grade marine robotics class hop into action. Their mission? Compete against other teams to guide a remote-controlled underwater vehicle along the bottom of a pool to recover critical equipment—using only the robot’s camera to see.

    Cruz’s students attend the Scotlandville Pre-Engineering Magnet Academy, a science, technology, engineering, art and math-focused middle school. Its curriculum offers courses such as game design, computer applications and multimedia production. The goal is to get students interested in science and math topics past middle school, planting the seed of encouragement to pursue these subjects further in high school and college.

    Though some of the robots developed by Scotlandville’s students have started earning them ribbons, it took a little trial and error for the course to gain its footing. “The first day of our marine robotics competition three years ago was the first time our robot had ever been in the water,” Mrs. Cruz said. “As soon as it got wet, everything fell apart.”

    Part of the issue was a lack of access to a pool where they could test their robot prior to competing. When leaders at the ExxonMobil YMCA learned the school needed access to water, they put in a plan to let them use the facility’s pool. ExxonMobil also provided grants so the students could take swimming lessons and water safety courses. “So now we get to test our robot in an actual pool, in the deep end, and we’re having more success because of that,” Cruz said.
    But it takes more than a pool to develop underwater robots. It’s crucial for the students to strategize and work as a team, skills they learn throughout the school year leading up to the competition.

    “The students absolutely must demonstrate teamwork,” Cruz said. “Building the robot is not easy, and when one student has an idea and somebody has a different idea, they have to learn to work together and test everyone’s ideas to see which one works best.” Cruz said it took her students about three months to build their last robot.

    The applications of the technology they test at the YMCA pool go well beyond marine applications. Just to name a few, fields like archeology, aviation, oil and gas, and even space exploration all use remotely operated robots.7 SPEMA Robot

    “The missions have relevance to real life,” Cruz said. “During one, the kids had to maneuver the robot inside a shipwreck and identify some of the packages inside the ship. In another, they had to open a power source and replace a battery inside, so they had to install a gripper on the robot.”

    It may be a few years before Scotlandville students start careers in robotics or engineering, but that hasn’t kept them from being exposed to some of the biggest names in remotely operated vehicles. After a 2016 competition, for instance, representatives from one local company were so impressed by the students’ enthusiasm, they asked one of Scotlandville’s teams to show their technology to some of their managers.

    “We’re making the robotics courses relevant to the kids, letting them know that this is a viable pursuit,” Cruz said. “Developing these underwater robots is a first step that could inspire our next generation of engineers and innovators.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Jones joins investment team for Congo TV Network

    Sports marketer Walter Jones joins investment team for Congo TV Network. Jones has come in as a Priority Investor in Congo TV Network. Jones will join about 12 other investors who have given Congo TV the stability needed to have a prosperous and record breaking year in 2018. According to The Wrights, a priority investor is someone who owns five or more shares of the network. Jones will join about 12 other investors who have given Congo TV the stability needed to have a prosperous and record breaking year in 2018.

    ONLINE: CongoTV

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    4th Annual MLK Festival of Service lasts Jan. 12 – 15

    The upcoming Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day presents a great opportunity for anyone to make a direct impact on Baton Rouge from a grassroots level. Together with Mayor-President Sharon Weston-Broome and the City of Baton Rouge, Southern University and CADAV, Inc., The Walls Project is hosting the 4th annual MLK Festival of Service from Friday, Jan. 12 to Monday, Jan. 15. In partnership with 100+ organizations, The Walls Project will reactive a two-mile stretch of historic Scenic Highway from Airline Highway to Swan Avenue.

    Throughout the weekend-long celebration, volunteers are able to participate in working together on projects that include painting, trash cleanup, gardening, and general beautification of Scenic Highway. This event poses an opportunity greater than logging in service hours, volunteers will work hand in hand with citizens from every part of the Baton Rouge community. By strengthening local relationships across the city, we create a more connected community.

    Pat McCallister-LeDuff, director of Community Against Drugs and Violence (CADAV), a longtime Scotlandville resident and business owner said this about the event, “Through the power of collaboration we will drive this charitable plan to create a significant change in our community together for a ‘Better Scotlandville.’”

    More than 50 professional artists from across Louisiana, Texas, Georgia and Florida will create murals on local businesses over the two mile stretch of highway.

    The event will also encompass landscape improvements, such as groves of bald cypress trees planted by BR Green, community garden sites to promote healthy living by SoulFresh Organics, Keep Baton Rouge Beautiful, and G.E.E.P.

    To celebrate the weekend of service, a community block party held on Monday, January 15, from 10am – 4pm, hosted by Build the Fire, BRidge Agency, Small World Int’l, Baton Rouge Music Studios, and BREC. The block party and resource fair  will allow volunteers to enjoy free music, connect to resources provided by local nonprofits, shop at an artists’ market and partake in the international food fair.

    Additionally, an open air town hall will be facilitated by The Drum Newspaper featuring Governor John Bel Edwards, Lt. Governor Billy Nungesser, and Mayor-President Sharon Weston-Broome, Senator Regina Barrow, and Councilwomen Chauna Banks and Tara Wicker.

    For those wanting to become involved with this event, visit www.thewallsproject.org/mlk-festival-of-service for more information, volunteer registration and donations.

     

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    Nearly 400 attended training centered on mentoring males

    On Saturday, January 6, nearly 400 community members attended the Urban Congress’ MentoringBR Community Training to learn practical ways to mentor African American male youth.

    The event, held at the EBR Council on Aging’s Event Center, was led by Brian Sales, a representative of the national mentoring partnership, MENTOR. The ultimate goal was to teach community members about the real and potential challenges Black males face daily and give them practical ways they can guide and inspire them.

    “What we want to do is to strengthen their awareness of how they engage with Black boys in our community,” said Raymond Jetson, president and CEO of MetroMorphosis.

    Among the attendees was a diverse assembly of community members, organizations active in mentoring, and faith-based groups.

    MentoringBR and the Urban Congress will connect those who are not part of a specific organization to opportunities to apply the skills they’ve learned on Saturday.

    Community members who missed the first training opportunity are encouraged to register for and attend the second and final training on Saturday January 20. Registration is open at mentoringbr.org. 

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  • COMMUNITY EVENTS: January in Baton Rouge and Ponchatoula

    Ongoing Events

    East Baton Rouge School Board. Each third Thursday, 650 N. Foster. 5pm. ebrschools.com

    Tangipahoa Parish School Board, each first Tuesday, Central Office Board Room 59656 Puleston Road, Amite, 6pm

    Ponchatoula City Council meets every second Monday, 6pm, Council Chambers, City Hall, 125 W. Hickory St.

    Ponchatoula Farmers’ Market. Every Sunday. Noon to 4 p.m., Country Market, 10 E. Pine St., Ponchatoula.

    Restore Louisiana Outreach Events. Representatives will answer questions to complete Restore Louisiana applications for homeowners affected by the 2016 floods.restore.la.gov. Held at local lbraries 2pm-6pm in East Baton Rouge, Livingston, Ponchatoula, Lafayette, Abbeville, and Monroe.

    St. Helena Parish Farmers’ Market. Every Wednesday. 8am – noon. Turner Chapel AME, Greensburg, Contact: Bianca Plant (225) 222-4136. EBT accepted.

    West Baton Rouge NAACP, every 2nd Tuesday, Hall’s & Sons Funeral Home, 1160 Louisiana Avenue, Port Allen, 6pm.

    Victims of Domestic Violence, meeting with the Iris Center hosts its Coordinated Community Response Team, last Tuesday of each month, West Baton Rouge Parish Library, 1pm. (225) 332-2509.

    January Events

    9 – Feb. 6. Black Minds Matter: Join the Conversation. Every Wednesday. 6:30. The Red Shoes. Government Street.

    11: Heritage Lecture: An Architecture Apart. The Significance of Separate African American Spaces. Old Governor’s Mansion, 502 North Blvd. 6pm. Free for members of the Foundation for Historical Louisiana. Others: $10.Speaker: Laura Blokker, Tulane School of Architecture. Refreshments provided.

    12: Won’t Bow Down: The Graduates. 7pm. The Graduates ensemble emerged out of a drama club inside The Louisiana Correctional Institute for Women in St Gabriel. They use personal experiences with the criminal justice system to create performances that reach out to young at-risk women, offer a window into incarceration’s effects on individual lives and encourage those who have the power to shift current policies to do so. Directed by Ausettua Amor Amenkum, artistic director of Kumbuka African Drum and Dance Collective; and Kathy Randels, artistic director of ArtSpot Productions and founder of The LCIW Drama Club.

    12- 15: MLK Festival of Service. Scenic Highway, Scotlandville. Vegan Village opens at 10 am, Jan. 15. Town Hall . www.thewallsproject.org/events.

    13: 2nd Annual NAACP Louisiana High School Senior Bowl Football Game. A.Mumford Stadium. Southern University. 1:30pm. NAACP All-Star Senior Band will perform. (225) 270-9729. naacplarec@yahoo.com

    14 I am Not Your Negro Documentary Screening. 6:30pm. Main Library. 7711 Goodwood Blvd. This Academy Award-nominated film explores the history of racism in the United States through James Baldwin’s reminiscence of civil rights leaders Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.

    15: Annual MLK March, Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 356 East Blvd, Sponsored by the NAACP State Conference.

    15 – 16: Polkadots: The Cool Kids Musical general auditions. 6pm nightly. New Venture Theatre. 427 Laurel st. 2nd floor.

    15: Freedom Garden Project. MLK Jr Daay of Service and Grandparents Day. The River Road African American Museum. 406 Charles St. Donaldsonville. 10am – 3pm. Tour museum and plant seeds in the Freedom Garden. melanie@aamuseum.org. (225) 474-5553.

    19-21: Baton Rouge Free Health Clinic. 10550 Veterans Boulevard. Free dental, vision, and medical services. 8am daily. batonrougefreeclinic.com or (225) 347- 0760.

    25: Homebuyers Seminar: Building Credit To Buy a New Home. 6pm. Eden Park Library. 5131 Greenwell Springs Road. Wells Fargo presenter. Hosted by UREC. www.urecbr.org.

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  • NAACP Louisiana State Conference host swearing-in ceremony

     The NAACP Louisiana State Conference will host a swearing-in ceremony to install its newly-elected officers.

    Former Baton Rouge NAACP President Mike McClanahan  has been sworn in as the new NAACP State President along with other executive officers. Southern University Law Center Chancellor John Pierre served as the guest speaker and Judge Don Johnson presided. Other elected officials from throughout the city and state were also in attendance.

    “We’re excited to start this new chapter and continue the legacy and the mission of the NAACP,” McClanahan said. The event was held on Saturday, Jan. 6 at the Louisiana State Archives, 3351 Essen Lane, in Baton Rouge at 1 p.m.

    The following people will be officially sworn in:

    Newly-elected officers of the NAACP Louisiana State Conference:

    ·         President                                Mr. Michael McClanahan

    ·         First Vice President                 Dr. Levon Leban

    ·         Treasurer                                Mr. Charles Heckard

    ·         Secretary                                Ms. Michelle Ratcliff

    ·         Vice President (District H)      Mr. Lloyd Thompson

    ·         Vice President (District G)      Ms. Wendy Calahan

    ·         Vice President (District F)       Rev. Edward “Chipps” Taylor

    ·         Vice President (District E)      Mr. Alfred Doucette

    ·         Vice President (District D)      Ms. Janelle Chargois

    ·         Vice President (District B)      Mr. Jerome Boykins

    ·         Vice President (District A)      Rev. Kevin Gabriel

    ·         Members at Large                  Ira Thomas and Vincent Alexander

    Photos by Condi B.
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    Historymaker: Landrum-Johnson named Chief Judge at Orleans Criminal Court

    In a historic appointment, Orleans Parish Criminal District Court Judge Keva Landrum-Johnson ascends to a higher role in the court. She will serve a two-year tenure as chief judge of criminal court, becoming the first Black woman to serve in that office. For the past 10 years, Landrum-Johnson has presided as judge of Section E of criminal court. She was first elected to that office in 2008, and is currently serving a second term. As chief judge, Landrum-Johnson will continue to preside over criminal trials and proceedings allotted to her section while also overseeing the administrative functions of the court and serving as an ex officio member on court committees. In 2007, she became the first African-American woman in Louisiana to serve as District. She also spent 10 years as an assistant district attorney in Orleans Parish. She worked in private practice, public defense, and as a criminal law professor at Southern University at New Orleans.

    ONLINE: Louisiana Weekly

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    LETTER: We Stand With the Most Effective People

    Our intentions never have been and never will be to hurt White people or any particular race for that matter. Strategically speaking, supporting the advancement of African Americans in Tangipahoa is supporting the overall growth of the entire parish considering about half the parish is African American. And there is absolutely no way that we can ensure what is in the best interests of our children with the mindset that we should hire unqualified Black people at the expense of losing effective individuals who are non-Black. The point is that we understand that to bring about the significant transformation spoken of by the board, the system has to make certain it hires the most effective individuals to lead in specific roles. We can no longer just hire people for purposes unrelated to bringing about success in our children first. Nor can we sit around and wait for an unknown superintendent while things continue to fall apart as one Board member hinted to as an option. Significant change means that even individuals on the board may need to be educated on exactly where the district falls short which should help guide them with “look fors” when determining who is best qualified for various roles so that the hire that may have happened in the case of Transportation can more likely be prevented.

    And as hurtful as the truth may be, we have fallen a little short with our children. Think about it. As per LDOE, students of color in Tangipahoa have a graduation rate of only 66%. This means that a whopping 34% did not even graduate. According to statistics, what is the likely outcome for these kids?  Ask Sheriff Daniel Edwards. Or, ask our Parish’s landlords. Not even discussed is the fact that the average ACT scores of students of color is a mere 16.5. We must do better. It all works together and begins with ensuring our kids are receiving a quality education.  Our concern is not about race if the individual has proven to be qualified and effective in advancing all kids, especially Black children which is definitely needed if we want to improve our parish long term. It cannot be.

    For the record, there have been many Black individuals whom the NAACP did not support in positions that directly affect our children. In fact, we recently expressed our non support for the following individuals prior to their selection and we will explain why:

    Walter Daniels 
    Walter Daniels has not only supported every single action made by the current superintendent, he has also made specific statements that belittle women. Just recently, Mr. Daniels stated that a “woman cannot handle the Director of Transportation job.”  It is 2017, and this is the sentiment of an actual School Board member. How will he inspire more African American girls to go into STEM fields with this mentality?

    Andrew Jackson – The role of the CDIO is to hold the system accountable to following the court order while doing what is in the very best interests of our children. We can recall that the system fought viciously against the current individual serving in this role for being unqualified for the position. The NAACP agreed with the system in this case.  Under his watch so far, the system has:

    1. Began with a salary of $40,000 annually; now according to the LLA Report has increased significantly.
    2. “Negotiated” a job for a long time female friend (colleague from Reynolds Institute) in a public school as an actual social worker although this individual was found to not even possess a license to serve in such a role, let alone deal with our children.
    3. Allowed the current superintendent to choose White candidates for positions in which more qualified Black candidates applied knowing these individuals were not the better candidate for bringing out the best in our kids. For instance, nothing was ever done about the Early Childhood Coordinator position.
    4. Allowed the superintendent to let Hammond High go a full year without being advertised while being run by someone who was a teacher less than a year ago.
    5. Did absolutely nothing about the removal of the hundreds of African American children from Eastside and Westside to Greenville Park and Woodland Park even after having been warned of the impact this would have on both school’s overall performance scores. This placed Black kids in a worse situation than previous.
    6. Knowingly allowed the superintendent to avoid advertising key positions for months at the expense of our children and an entire system that is already in educational crisis mode.
    7. Never followed through with the complaint challenging the actual credibility and validity of our system’s magnet programs due to so many that are believed to be magnets in name only. For instance, How is Westside Middle Magnet different from Natalbany Middle?  What is the specialized program and how has it benefited the kids?
    8. Never followed through with complaint of flawed evaluation system in which individuals like the same magnet supervisor responsible for the failing magnet programs and schools as a result may be underserved receiving high marks. We have yet to see evaluations as compared to performance.

    Byron Hurst
    We have all come to realize that doctorate degrees come “a dime a dozen” these days and we know from watching first hand poor leadership at some schools that things that look nice on paper seldom guarantee effectiveness. Therefore, we must look at an individual’s performance record in educating our kids. Byron Hurst was an ineffective school leader in St. Helena Parish. The school failed and he was later given a position as an Assistant Principal in Tangipahoa Parish. He then applied for a Principal position at Sumner High and was offered the Director post instead due to the superintendent wanting to place a White individual in that position. This decision making had absolutely nothing to do with children of course.  We will never support this unethical decision making. Now we have a failed principal overseeing the welfare of our kids. Again, significant change must take place.

    So, for those who have so long believed the NAACP to be anti-White, let our support for Kim Notariano teach an important lesson about our organization. Chuckling as I am writing this, she is definitely not paying us to stand for her. And she does not have to. We know that Kim. We know she loves children and takes her job seriously. Her record and credentials speak for themselves. Her knowledge of transportation, performance record as an actual parish bus driver, not to mention her business background far outweigh educational backgrounds in our opinion not to mention the fact the individual now in question did not even qualify for the position based on the system’s own advertised qualifications. If the board had hired the other candidate, then it would have followed the same pattern as discussed in the cases above. And if we are going to go ahead and pull together to bring about the significant changes spoken of that the people want, then the NAACP is taking the steps necessary to do our part. Children first!

    Patricia Morris
    President
    Greater Tangipahoa Parish Branch NAACP

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