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    Opportunities Outlook 2019 for DBEs in Construction starts Friday, Dec. 7

    The Urban League of Louisiana’s Contractor’s Resource Center will host its 2019 Opportunities Outlook for DBE Contractors on Friday, Dec. 7, 9am – noon, at the Urban League of Louisiana, 4640 S. Carrollton Avenue, Suite 110, New Orleans, LA 70119.

    This annual event is held to support contractors in preparing for the upcoming year by focusing attention on new opportunities for strategic growth and competitiveness. The event will feature updates on current opportunities and upcoming bids from procurement officers and prime contractors. Other programs and resources that support capacity-building and profitability for the contracting community will also be featured.

    Already confirmed:

    • City of New Orleans – Office of Supplier Diversity
    • New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center
    • New Orleans Regional Transit Authority
    • Veterans Administration
    • Broadmoor LLC
    • Landis Construction
    • Woodward Design + Build
    • Hernandez Consulting and Construction

    This event is free and open to all DBE firms. However, space is limited. Register to reserve your spot. Light refreshments will be served.

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    Gregory Pierson appointed assistant director of aviation

    Gregory Pierson was appointed assistant director of aviation of the Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport (BTR) by Mike Edwards, the director of aviation.

    Pierson has 12 years of airport management experience, and was serving as the Interim Assistant Director of Aviation. He was previously the BTR Airport Computer/Electronics Systems Manager (IT Manager). He first joined the Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport 15 years ago as a PC LAN Specialist. Within his first three years, he was promoted to a PC LAN Administrator. In his most recent role as IT Manager, his Airport-wide involvement afforded him the experience to identify and manage the expectations and needs of various stakeholders, while ensuring the decisions and processes related to the Technology division were in alignment with the overall mission of the Airport.

    Pierson holds a bachelor of science degree in computer science with a minor in business management from Southern University, and a masters of business administration from the University of Phoenix. He has an ITIL Foundation and Software House industry certification and is currently preparing for his AAAE Certified Member certification. He is also a member of the National Association of Tax Professionals (NATP), and is an IRS Registered Tax Preparer.

    “I am truly humbled and excited about the opportunity to serve in this new capacity. I look forward to continuing to do my part to make BTR the airport of choice, and to facilitate improvements in our community outreach efforts.”

    Greg grew up in the Baton Rouge Area, graduating from Scotlandville Magnet High School in Baton Rouge. He and his wife LaToya have three children, Alyvia, Dylan and Skylar.

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    Grambling State approved to offer cybersecurity degree

    NNPA Newswire–Grambling State University has been approved to offer the state’s first Bachelor of Science degree in cybersecurity. The University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors provided their approval and support for the university’s program, according to a news release. The next step in the process is approval from the Louisiana Board of Regents.

    Students will be eligible to begin enrolling in the program in fall 2019.

    “With the vision of your team and the support of this Board, we are confident Grambling is prepared to educate cybersecurity professionals the market is demanding,” said Board Chair Al Perkins. “These graduates will be equipped with highly sought-after skills to protect us as technology becomes more prevalent in our daily lives.”

    Grambling State faculty member, researcher and a member of the Louisiana Cybersecurity Commission Yenumula B. Reddy, Ph.D., has been spearheading the new program’s development.

    “We are excited about the work of Dr. Reddy and his team,” said Grambling State President Rick Gallot. “Their continuous innovation in research and the classroom are paving the way for this program. We are excited for the impact their leadership and our system-level support will have on our state and economy.”

    The news comes on the heels of an October report issued by the University of Louisiana System that said Grambling State University has doubled its fiscal health score since FY 2016, increasing from a 1.30 to a 2.60 as of the most recent report.

    The fiscal health score, developed by the Louisiana Board of Regents, measures overall organizational health, factoring in important components including debt, revenue, and ability to operate.

    “It’s been a team-wide effort,” Gallot said. “As a part of our commitment to innovation, we’ve engaged new talent and alumni from across the U.S. who not only understand our charge but offer us expert perspectives and thought leadership.”

    Leading the University’s fiscal health initiatives team is Martin Lemelle Jr. the University’s Chief Operating Officer and Interim Vice-President of Finance. The initiative also includes team members who offer experience from higher education, Silicon Valley, and public accountancy.

    “We’re an example of what’s possible when we partner,” said Lemelle. “The key to our successes has been a university-wide combination of collaboration and commitment. We’ve seen innovative ideas from every area, from our controller’s office to our academic units.”

    The outputs of these collaborative teams are having a direct impact on the institution’s bottom-line. Some of those outputs include:

    $1.2 million in annual savings through participating in the Department of Education’s Historically Black College and University Capital Financing Program;

    Overall expense reduction of more than $6 million;

    A 320 percent annual increase in grants from federal and state government initiatives; and

    Realizing new revenue opportunities that include an increase in third-party commissions and its “Look for the Label” program which focuses on increasing licensing royalties.

    “Grambling State University is experiencing a renaissance. Its vastly improved fiscal health is yet another indication of the effective leadership and hard work occurring at all levels of the institution,” University of Louisiana System President Jim Henderson said. “From its enrollment numbers to its operations, it’s exciting to see the rapid and significant advancement of this historic institution.”

    By Stacy M. Brown
    NNPA Newswire Correspondent

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    Don’t rush into a December divorce for tax reasons

    Nobody likes to rush in a divorce, but frequently things happen that may make a couple want to get it done more quickly than usual.
    This year, the reason may be taxes for some couples.  Since 1942, the person paying alimony got to take payments off of their income and the person receiving it had to declare alimony as income. This all will change with any divorce finalized on or after Jan. 1, 2019. After this date, neither party’s income will be adjusted for paying or receiving alimony.Lawyers are expecting December to be a busy month for divorces due to the change.  Any case settled before the end of the year will continue to follow the old rule.

    But that is not as important as taking your time to make sure everything about the divorce is properly handled.
    “The few dollars somebody may or may not save on their tax bill is not a reason to rush a divorce proceeding,” said Pegotty Cooper, co-founder of Divorce Coaching Inc., (www.certifieddivorcecoach.com), which both provides divorce coaching and trains divorce coaches.  “Frequently, in complicated divorces, issues surface halfway through the proceeding that will take time to investigate.”
    Cooper, a co-author of Taking the High Road in Divorce – Simple Strategies for Creating a Healthy Divorce, said it is in the best interest of both parties to focus on the divorce and make sure everything is done properly instead of trying to meet artificially induced deadlines.
    Cooper offers the following tips for those about to enter divorce proceedings:
    • Don’t forget who the decision makers are. The decision maker in the proceeding is not the judge or your attorney – it is you. More than 90 percent of cases never make it to trial, so don’t think the judge necessarily will set all the issues straight.
    • “My way or the highway” is the wrong attitude. Taking this attitude will be more costly, emotionally draining and time-consuming than you realize. The only one that will benefit is your attorney, who will rack up legal bills fighting tooth and nail for everything instead of negotiating.
    • Don’t throw in the towel. You may want to quit early in the divorce proceedings just to get it over with. This may result in forgetting about important things that you wanted to be resolved.
    • Don’t bet the farm on another relationship. Don’t give up on negotiating just because you have met somebody new and you want to end the divorce as quickly as possible.  Your focus should be on ironing out the details of an equitable agreement with your spouse, no matter how long it takes.
    “While it may be uncomfortable and even distressing to go through a divorce,” Cooper said, “it is rarely a good idea to try to speed up the process.”
    About Pegotty Cooper
    Pegotty Cooper (www.certifieddivorcecoach.com) is co-founder with her husband, Randall R. Cooper, of Divorce Coaching Inc., a firm that trains and certifies individuals to become personal divorce coaches. She is also a co-author of the recently released best-selling book Taking the High Road in Divorce – Simple Strategies for Creating a Healthy Divorce and of Divorce: Overcome the Overwhelm and Avoid the Six Biggest Mistakes. Cooper started her own coaching practice in 2003, after 25 years working in executive positions in large organizations. She has an MBA from Rutgers University and a BA from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.
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    Federal lawsuit accuses drug maker of intentionally withholding safer HIV drugs

    A new federal lawsuit against Gilead Sciences exposes how the pharmaceutical giant is putting profits over people, especially oppressed groups including Black and LGBT communities, said renowned civil rights attorney Ben Crump.

    Crump, along with co-counsel at the Hilliard Martinez Gonzales, Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro LLP, and Morgan & Morgan law firms, announced the lawsuit against Gilead Sciences, accusing the company of intentionally withholding a safer HIV drug from hundreds of thousands of patients in order to extend the profitability of the patent it held on an older, more risky drug. The tactic, Crump said, unjustly affected patients in the Black, minority, and LGBT communities.

    In the lawsuit, Crump and co-counsel Bob Hilliard and Steve Berman assert that Gilead withheld a second-generation HIV drug that was safer and produced fewer side effects and complications, in order to prevent competition with its harmful first-generation drug until its patent expires in 2021. Gilead’s first-generation drug, known as TDF, can cause life-threatening side effects such as bone demineralization and kidney toxicity. For a person already living with HIV/AIDS, these side effects and toxicities turn a manageable condition into one that is potentially life-threatening.

    The HIV epidemic is characterized by extraordinary disparity regarding minority groups. Despite representing less than 13% of the U.S. population, in 2017 Black and African-American residents made up 44% of those who were newly diagnosed with HIV. Similarly, while Hispanics and Latino Americans made up 17% of the U.S. population in 2015, they made up 22% of people living with HIV. African-Americans have the highest rate of new HIV diagnoses compared to other races and ethnicities. More than 70% of all new HIV diagnoses in 2017 were in gay and bisexual men, as well as transgender women, of all races.

    “Gilead’s chosen path of inaction is causing tremendous harm to persons with HIV, particularly black and LGBT minorities, by keeping drugs that would reduce deadly symptoms off the market and unavailable to those who need them the most,” said Crump. “This lawsuit is a major step in the right direction toward racial equity in communities unevenly affected by HIV and exploited by pharmaceutical Goliaths like Gilead.”

    Because Gilead willfully grips the market with its monopoly, it is able to charge exorbitant prices – more than $3,700 a month – at the expense of the populations who need it most.

    “This new lawsuit seeks justice for underrepresented communities, providing a voice to those who may not have ever received one otherwise,” Crump said. “As long as Gilead continues to cravenly value profits over people, people living with HIV/AIDS will suffer from a lower quality of life. This must stop.”

    ONLINE: http://www.tdflawsuit.com.

    Feature photo of Ben Crump taken by Mark Wallheiser

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    Plants for every room of your home

    Gardeners know the benefits of digging in the soil. It elevates a person’s mood, improves mental and physical well-being and the outcome is always good – added beauty or tasty nutritional food.  But many of us are stuck indoors for the winter, have a lack of space to garden outdoors or just can’t get enough of this healthful activity.  Adding greenery indoors expands our gardening opportunities and provides the many benefits of living with and tending plants.

    Let’s start with the kitchen. Boost the flavor and nutrition of winter meals by growing leafy greens and herbs in a sunny window or under a cabinet with the help of a Growbar LED light fixture.  Start plants from seeds or purchase transplants to grow indoors. Place your indoor kitchen garden in a brightly lit location, free of cold drafts and with easy access to harvest and use. Then enlist the whole family and even your guests into harvesting greens for their salad and herbs to season their meals. This is sure to turn family and friend gatherings into unique and memorable experiences.

    Include plants in your home or work office. Greenery helps reduce stress even when working at your desk or tackling homework at the end of a long day. Set a few plants on or near your desk or other workspace. And don’t let a lack of light stop you from growing a bit of green stress relief. Stylish energy efficient full spectrum plant lights, like the Felt Pendant Grow Light (modsprout.com), fit any décor, direct light where it is needed and promote healthy plant growth.

    Take advantage of your bathroom’s high humidity. Grow ferns, orchids, bromeliads and other humidity-loving plants in this space.  Consider these and other low light plants like cast iron, pothos and philodendron if natural light is limited. Imagine stepping out of the shower into a mini tropical zone. What a nice way to ease into your day.

    Get a good night’s sleep with a bit of homegrown aromatherapy in the bedroom. Grow lavender, rosemary, chamomile and other soothing herbs in your bedroom in front of a sunny window, on a shelf or other naturally or artificially lit, bright location. Just be sure to give the plants a tap to release their fragrance into the air before crawling into bed for a long restful sleep.

    Bring the garden to your living room. Create your own miniature tropical, moss or desert garden in a terrarium that serves as a focal point in any living space or centerpiece on the dining room table. Use an open terrarium for succulents and other plants that need airflow, lower humidity and space to grow. Enlist closed systems for moss and tropical plants that benefit from the high humidity and condensation that provides continual watering. Select systems like the Botanica Biodome that minimize maintenance and provide easy access for tending mini eco-systems.

    Now’s a great time to consider rethinking your home décor to include greenery in every space. You and your family will enjoy improved air quality, elevated moods, a reduction in stress and the many other benefits plants provide.

    By Melinda Myers
    Guest Columnist

    Melinda Myers is the author of more than 20 gardening books and host of The Great Courses’ How to Grow Anything DVD series.
    ONLINE: www.MelindaMyers.com

    Grow herbs or other leafy greens indoors under a Growbar LED light fixture or near a sunny window. Photo courtesy of Modern Sprout

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    Uncle Chess and The Groove to perform at Pit-N-Peel

    Uncle Chess and The Groove will perform at the Pit-N-Peel on Friday, November 30 from 6pm to 9pm. The venue is located at 2101 Government Street, Baton Rouge, LA 70806. Venue phone is 225-421-1488. No Cover.

    Uncle Chess and the Groove, known for their smooth Southern soul songs have appeared at The Baton Rouge Blues Festival, the Baton Rouge Mardi Gras and Soul Food festivals, and at the Henry Turner, Jr. Day Music Festival.

    The band is Uncle Chess on vocals, Burnell Palmer on drums, Randy Hamilton on percussion, Dameron Bates on bass, Bob Johnson on keyboard, and Ron Griffin on lead guitar.

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  • SU Land-Grant Campus set to raise scholarship funds during annual gala

    Tickets are now available for the Southern University Land-Grant Campus’ Annual Scholarship Gala. The fundraising event will be held at the Raising Cane’s River Center, 275 River Road South, on Saturday, Dec. 8 at 6:30pm.

    All proceeds from the event will be used to provide scholarships; assistantships; internships; study abroad, campus-based research and professional development opportunities for students in the College of Agricultural, Family and Consumer Sciences.

    Last year’s Gala raised more than $22,000 that were used to support internships, book scholarships and study abroad opportunities.

    Tickets are $50 for general admission, $650 for reserved tables. The price, which includes dinner and live entertainment, will increase to $60 for general admission after November 30.

    To purchase tickets or make a tax-deductible donation visit, https://foundation.sus.edu/agcentergala/ or contact Jasmine Gibbs at 225-771-2719.

    The Southern University Land-Grant Campus is also seeking sponsors for the Scholarship Gala.  For information on sponsorship opportunities, contact Aymbriana Campbell-Pollard at 225-771-2275.

    The Southern University Ag Center and the College of Agricultural, Family and Consumer Sciences together are called the Southern University Land-Grant Campus.

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    ‘Ms. Meta’ on frontline, empowering others facing HIV in Baton Rouge

    Meta Smith-Davis, 62, remembers the time she would sit on the porch saying, “You know they say that girl got that gangsta’?”

    “Yeah, she got AIDS,” she would say.

    Now, “Mrs. Meta” is the girl with HIV and a beloved counselor to hundreds of residents in and near Baton Rouge who are HIV-positive.

    Her message to them is clear: “There is nothing you can say to stop me. Nothing. You cannot stop me from loving you, from being here for you, for doing all I can to help you. There’s not any thing that you can tell me that I have not experienced personally, and​ I can tell you this, you do recover!”

    She is insistent with newly diagnosed clients, telling them, “You don’t have to die! People are living longer and fuller lives with HIV. Nothing in your life has to change when you take your meds and remain undetectable.”

    meta davis on screen

    As the assistant director of prevention for HAART: HIV/AIDS Alliance for Region Two, Smith-Davis is usually the first professional counselor​ to tell a client that they are HIV-positive. And she’s also the person who helps them develop a plan so that they are less afraid of living with HIV.

    “I do anything and everything that I have to do and can do to enhance the lives of someone living with HIV,” she said. Her commitment starts​ the moment she meets a client—whether their results are positive or not. Facing the results of an HIV test is frightening for many people and the team at HAART is focused on supporting people living with HIV/AIDS immediately.

    “We don’t let a client get out the door without helping them,” she said.

    Tim young

    Tim Young, HAART CEO

    This type of commitment is a standard the executive director, Tim Young, established at HAART. “He’s by far one of the finest men I’ve ever worked with. He’s fine human being,” she said. The non-profit organization is the largest in the state that offers a continuum of services for people with HIV/AIDS including primary health care, medications, housing, employment assistance, testing, and prevention education.

    Just after Smith-Davis was diagnosed in 2001, she walked into the HAART office for case management. She didn’t know anyone with HIV and needed help and support. “There was nobody. I felt disconnected from the world. (HAART) felt like home,” she said.

    She returned to HAART for ongoing care and to volunteer facilitating a workshop for women living with HIV. “Those women made me realize a sisterhood far greater than I knew I could have.” And it is that type of support and love that Smith-Davis said she sets to give every client. She goes to their medical appointments and helps them plan how to live their new life, especially if the client has to do so in secret.

    “I don’t care if they have to hide 30 pills in 30 different places in order to take the medicine, we will figure out how to keep them safe and how to keep them virally suppressed,” she said.

    She also shares strategies for safe sex based on the individual’s situation including same-gender sex. For one client she’d encourage them to use a condom correctly every time, for another the more realistic goal was to increase condom use by picking one day a week when they would always use a condom, then add days.

    Meta davis and menSmith-Davis, who is also a great, grandmother,  takes particular care of clients who appear to be in violent relationships. “Disclosing an HIV-positive diagnosis to a partner can add to or even start a violent relationship. So we counsel our clients very carefully. We don’t want a situation to escalate because one partner believes they can harm the other who is HIV-positive.”

    Her job, then, becomes to get the client to be as honest with her as possible. Especially, since it is required by law to disclose HIV-positive status prior to having sex. “This is required for the rest of their lives or they will face criminal charges and be labled a sex offender.” (Read: Things to understand about living with HIV)

    The self-described to’ up from the flo’ up, ex-con, drug-addicted, homeless Black woman living with HIV, said there’s nothing they can tell her that she has not dealt with personally. “That is truly one of the gifts God left me with coming from where I came from: I have the ability to relate to people in a whole different way,” she said. She uses this relatability to get youth—including her grandchildren—to talk about sex and HIV/AIDS. “We have to keep an open dialog or the streets will tell them all the wrong things.” She said the truth is no one has to get HIV. There are ways to prevent it.

    Meta davis award

    As the state co-chair of the Positive Women’s Network USA, Smith-Davis has met with politicians to advocate for better health services.

    After several sessions—even years—together, Smith-Davis and many of her HAART clients are now friends who she has helped reclaim their lives by getting healthier, pursuing education goals, having families, moving into apartments, and living open with HIV. She has worked with the Baton Rouge Stigma Index Project, and was named a Most Amazing HIV-Positive People of 2016 by HIV Plus magazine.

    She’s often celebrated as a hero for her work, but she said, “All I did was clean their mirror so they could see what I saw… All I did was clean the mirror so that they could do the work.” The work, she said, is being able to come to terms with an HIV-positive diagnosis and doing everything necessary to live a whole, healthy life.

    By Candace J. Semien
    Jozef Syndicate writer

    More stories like this:
    Who Would’ve Thought?
    Fact: Eliminating stigmas can reduce the spread of HIV
    With HIV rates topping the nation, Baton Rouge needs HAART, Open Health, and PreP

    Read more »
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    Family favorite frozen treats brand Rita’s Italian Ice will host 4-day grand opening event

    Rita’s Italian Ice Creamery is excited to announce they will be hosting a four-day grand opening celebration for the recently opened location in Baton Rouge beginning Thursday, November 15, 2018.  This new location is owned and operated by Maria Finley.

    Regular size Italian Ice and Gelati will be served from Thursday, November 15th to Sunday, November 18th at reduced prices of $1 and $2, respectively.  Also, beginning at11AM on Saturday, November 17th, the first 50 families in line at the grand opening will receive coupons for a year’s worth of Rita’s Italian Ice. Ice Guy, Rita’s loveable mascot, a face painter and balloon twister will be present at the celebration. Drawings for special prizes including an autographed football and jersey by LSU Football Coach Ed Orgeron will occur throughout the weekend.

    Maria Finley

    Maria Finley

    Finley enjoyed Rita’s for the first time while visiting her son in Washington, D.C. when she thought she was opening a new chapter and leaving Louisiana behind to pursue her master of law at Georgetown University.

    “I tasted Rita’s for the first time and immediately called my realtor and told him to take my house off the market because I was coming back to Louisiana to open my own Rita’s Italian Ice franchise.  I said to myself ‘what is this stuff and why don’t we have it in Louisiana?’ It was that good. I am so excited to bring handmade frozen custard and Italian Ice made fresh daily to Louisianans,” said Finley.

    After the great flood in August 2016, plans to open were slowed, but Finley is happy to finally hold the grand opening celebration and invite the community to experience the same fresh Italian Ice she did while visiting her son.

    She has been a practicing attorney in Baton Rouge for more than 17 years and is excited to bring another passion of hers to the community.  She shared that the business has become a family affair with her son Douglas, managing the location’s website and social media accounts, her other son Branden, being her presence in the store when she is still practicing law, and her grandson’s mother, Tatyana, managing the store operations.

    Rita’s is partnering with the American Cancer Society in honor of her friend, Allison Kleinpeter Smith, by collecting monetary donations and travel size toiletries at the grand opening celebration to benefit the Hope Lodge in New Orleans.  Cancer patients traveling from outside of the city of New Orleans receiving life-saving treatment can stay at Hope Lodge for free.  Guests are encouraged to lend their support for the organization during the grand opening even and enjoy delicious Italian Ice at the new store while benefiting this great cause.

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    Barrow, Peacock named State Senators of the Year

    The Childcare Association of Louisiana recently named Senator Regina Barrow and Senator Barrow Peacock as its 2018 State Senators of the Year.

    District 15 State Senator Regina Barrow was honored for her support of important legislative reform issues promoted by the association and her many other significant contributions on behalf of early childhood education. The association also noted her tireless work in ensuring the safety and education of the state’s youngest learners and her passion about early childhood education. Senator Barrow is currently enrolled in the Tulane University Early Childhood Policy Leadership Institute and will graduate in November 2018.

    Barrow Peacock

    Barrow Peacock

    District 37 State Senator Barrow Peacock was also selected for the award. He promoted legislation during the 2018 Regular Session of the Louisiana legislature to lower the cost of childcare. The association also noted his consistent support of early childhood education when selecting him for the award.

    The Childcare Association of Louisiana is a professional organization serving the needs of licensed childcare centers and early childhood education across the state. Its mission is to educate, advocate and collaborate to build a premier, proactive early childhood education industry for Louisiana families.

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    Gov. Edwards Launches Council on the Success of Black Men and Boys

    IMG_9628This week, Gov. John Bel Edwards hosted a reception to launch the start of the Council on the Success of Black Men and Boys. Edwards signed legislation creating the Council, Act 103, during the 2018 Regular Legislative Session earlier this year. The bill was authored by State Rep. Ted James of Baton Rouge.

    State Rep. Ted James

    State Rep. Ted James

     

     

    “I am excited that we are beginning the important work before us because we understand all of our children need champions,” said Edwards. “These members have been charged with recommending ways in which we can grow pathways of opportunity for more of our children to pursue higher education, develop job skills that are in high demand, connect with careers that can sustain families for a lifetime and live lives that they can be proud of.”

    The Council held its first meeting this week and will issue its first report by February 2019.

    Members include the following:
    Rep. Ted James – Chair of the Council
    Rep. Barbara Norton
    Rep. Royce Duplessis
    Sen. Wesley Bishop
    Sen. Yvonne Colomb
    Rev. Edward Alexander – President, Louisiana Missionary Baptist State Convention
    Dr. Adren Wilson – Deputy Chief of Staff, Office of the Governor
    Kenneth Burrell – Deputy Secretary,Louisiana Workforce Commission
    Matthew Butler – Director of Sales, CSRS Incorporated
    Ryan Clark – LSU alumnus and ESPN analyst
    Rick Gallot – President, Grambling State University
    Rev. Raymond Jetson- Chief Executive Catalyst, MetroMorphosis
    Eric Williams – Pastor, Beacon Light Church Baton Rouge
    Dr. Walter Kimbrough – President, Dillard University
    Victor Lashley – Vice President of Global Trade and Sales, JP Morgan
    Reginald Devold – District C Vice President, Louisiana NAACP
    Dr. Roland Mitchell – Dean of the College of Human Sciences and Education at LSU
    Judy Reese Morse – President and CEO, Urban League of Louisiana
    Terri Ricks – Deputy Secretary, Louisiana Dept. of Children and Family Services
    James Windom – Executive Director, Capitol Area Reentry Program

    Click here to read Act 103.

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    Dawn Mellion-Patin receives Iowa State’s 2018 George Washington Carver Distinguished Service Award

    Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center’s Vice Chancellor for Extension and Outreach Dawn Mellion-Patin, Ph.D., has been named the recipient of the 2018 George Washington Carver Distinguished Service Award by Iowa State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

    Patin has dedicated her career to educating and improving the lives of small farmers. In 2005, she developed the Southern University Ag Center’s Small Farmer Agricultural Leadership Training Institute, an intensive leadership development program that guides small, minority, socially-disadvantaged and limited-resource farmers through the process of becoming competitive agricultural entrepreneurs.

    Her work in the field of agriculture has also provided her with the opportunity to serve as a panel manager for United States Department of Agriculture (USDA); chair of the Southern Region- Agricultural and Natural Resources Program Leaders Committee; grant committee member for the USDA’s  National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA); 1890 representative on the National Extension Disaster Education Network Executive Committee and historian for the National Society of Minorities in Agricultural, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) organization.

    She has received the SU Ag Center’s Outstanding Specialist Award, Tuskegee University’s Distinguished Service Award, the Association of Extension Administrators Excellence in Extension Award and USDA NIFA Cooperative Extension System Outstanding Leadership Award.

    Patin earned a bachelor’s degree in plant and soil sciences and a master’s degree in educational agriculture, both from Southern University, and a doctoral degree in Agricultural and Life Sciences Education from Iowa State University.

    The George Washington Carver Distinguished Service Award was established in 2005. The award honors distinguished College of Agriculture and Life Sciences alumni who have demonstrated outstanding achievement or leadership by making significant, influential, or innovative contributions to society.

    Patin received the award during the annual Honors and Awards Ceremony on October 26.

    By LaKeeshia Lusk
    The Drum Contributing Writer

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    Ponchatoula Student Outreach celebrates second year

    The City of Ponchatoula again participated in the national “Lights On Afterschool” event with its “Family & Friends Night” at the Ponchatoula Community Center for a time of celebrating the growth and positive results of its own after-school program.
    Called “Ponchatoula Student Outreach,” the program’s motto is “From Afterschool to Bright Futures” and according to reports on improvement in behavior and grades, the future is looking much brighter for some who have needed that extra encouraging nudge.
    It was more like Thanksgiving with all the appreciation expressed by each speaker from the microphone as well as family members around the tables.
    Program Director May Stilley and Mayor Bob Zabbia kicked off the evening with warm welcomes and thanks to students, parents, and guardians, City Council members, principals, teachers, volunteers and sponsors who have been generous in time and means to help the City make it all possible. School board members Mike Whitlow and Rose Dominguez were in attendance and acknowledged.
    Stilley also paid special tribute to the school bus drivers who do not charge extra to bring the students from their respective schools to the Community Center for their classes and to Transportation Coordinator, Tessa Hills. At one table, Key Club members from Ponchatoula High School were recognized for their volunteering to help give one-on-one help.
    After a meal, guest speaker Superintendent of Tangipahoa Parish School System, Melissa Stilley, continued in the same positive manner, offering her gratitude for the way the people of Ponchatoula have responded in so many ways to the student outreach. She said, “This is evidence of what partnership is all about,” adding her wish for every community to have an after-school program.
    Starting the program in time for the 2017 school year required a lot of preparatory work by Human Resources Director, Lisa Jones, and May Stilley, aiding Mayor Zabbia in realizing a dream come true and supported by him and the City Council.
    This school year, first and second grades were added bringing the total enrollment to 50 students and it is stressed this is not a babysitting program. Classroom teachers recommend the students that would profit most from the extra help. Ponchatoula Student Outreach teachers are available to meet with parents and guardians when picking up their children after classes.
    Staff for 2018-19 are 1st and 2nd grades: Daphne Griffin and Charlotte Gordon; 3rd and 4th: Kimberly James and Elisha Perry; and 7th and 8th: Windy Haist and Jennifer Daigle.
    Classroom assistants are Shirley Creel, Cathy Colkmire, Annette Tullier, Leigh Burnthorne, Jenea Magee, and Kacey Martin.
    The advisory board is comprised of members from each school participating. They are Amber Gardner, Tucker Elementary; Tamaria Whittington, D.C. Reeves; Rosalyn Heider and Melissa Ryan, Martha Vinyard; Mary Beth Crovetto, Ponchatoula Junior High; and Shelly Ernst and Danette Ragusa, St. Joseph School.
    The program uses community resources for youth to see and connect with positive role models.
    For those interested in being a sponsor, mentor or volunteer to invest in the long-term future success of the students and the community as a result, call her at 985-401-2210.

    By Kathryn J. Martin

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    Young ‘lawyers’ win in high school competition

    The Southern University Law Center Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Project held its tenth annual Regional High School Moot Court Competition on November 2 and 3, 2018. Sixteen students from area high schools participated in the competition. The initial rounds of the competition were held at the Law Center.

    Four students advanced to the final round that was held at the First Circuit Court of Appeal. The finalists were Schyler Shelmire of McKinley High School (first place winner), Skyler Evans of McKinley High School (second place winner), Guevara Johnson of Southern University Laboratory High School (third place winner), and Myisha Hudson of Scotlandville Magnet High School (fourth place winner). The panel of judges that judged the final round was Trudy White, Judge, 19th Judicial District Court, Fred Crifasi, Judge, 19th Judicial District Court, and Wendy Shea, Professor of Law, Southern University Law Center.

    Pictured from left to right are Guevara Johnson, Myisha Hudson, Schyler Shelmire, Professor Wendy Shea, Skyler Evans, Judge Trudy White, and Judge Fred Crifasi.

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    Buddy Stewart Music Foundation honored during Henry Turner Jr Day Music Fest

    Henry Turner Jr. honored the Buddy Stewart Music Foundation’s Philliper Stewart, Sonia (Trudy) Stewart and Cardell Stewart with the 2018 Henry Turner Jr. Day Music Festival Community Award. A Certificate and Commemorative plaque of the “Baton Rouge Theme Song” were presented on Saturday, October 27 at the 2nd Annual Festival held at North Boulevard Town Square on the Galvez Plaza Crest Stage.African Queen Z Dance Troupe

    Henry Turner Jr.Day was established in 2017 to salute individuals, organizations and companies, in the greater Baton Rouge area, for their ongoing philanthropic efforts to improve the quality of life for people in the community.

    As a musician, bandleader, singer/songwriter, promoter, activist and musical entrepreneur Henry Turner Jr. is well known for mentoring musical talent. For his contributions both October 28, 2015, and October 28, 2017, were proclaimed Henry Turner Jr. Day by Mayor Presidents’ Kip Holden and Sharon Weston Broome. As a direct result of these honors Henry Turner Jr. Day now pays homage to others whose on-going efforts continue to make Baton Rouge a better place.

    The Buddy Stewart Music Foundation was chosen as it has served the Baton Rouge community for over 30 years. The former business was originally known as Buddy Stewart’s Rock Shop. It was, at one time, one of the largest minority family owned and operated music stores in South Louisiana. It came about as a result of Buddy’s passion for music. As a bandleader with a big band sound and the ability to sing, write, play and promote the art of music he understood the historical impact of music in people’s lives. Last year’s honoree was Families Helping Families.

    Lilli Lewis

    Lilli Lewis

    The festivals’ lineup included Louisiana Red Hot Records’ Lilli Lewis and featured Universal Music Groups Brett Barrow on guitar playing with Henry Turner, Jr. & Flavor. Additional performers included Clarence “Pieman” Williams and the Rouge Band along with Henry Turner Jr.s’ Listening Room All-Star’s April “Sexy Red” Jackson, Lee Tyme, Xavie Shorts, Uncle Chess and the Groove Band, Larry “LZ” Dillon, Dinki Mire and comedian Eddie Cool. Dance troupes included the Chinese Friendship Association of Baton Rouge, Yuan’s Dance Studio and African Queen Z. Famed drummer Joe Monk led a jam that closed the show and featured SmokeHouse Porter and Miss Mamie, Robert “The Juice” Lenore, Andrew Bernard of John Fred & his Playboy Band and 7 Goddess. Teddy “Lloyd” Johnson of Teddy Juke Joint served as Emcee.

    Feature photo: Henry Turner Jr. presenting the Buddy Stewart Music Foundation with the Henry Turner, Jr Day 2018 Community Award and Commemorative plaque of the “Baton Rouge Theme Song.”(L-R) Sonia (Trudy) Stewart, Philliper Steward, Cardell Stewart and Henry Turner, Jr.

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  • AKA, Lions Club partner to improve eye care

    Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, Gamma Eta Omega Chapter were guest speakers at the East Baton Rouge Lions Club International luncheon held on October 11, 2018. Candace Ford and Elle Virdure, Chairmen of the Gamma Eta Omega Chapter’s Lions Club International Committee, discussed Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated’s collaboration with the Lions Club International as part of the Global Impact Target. Gamma Eta Omega Chapter will coordinate with the Lions Club to implement activities and arrange for pick-up and delivery of donated eyeglasses. The Committee’s goal is to help decrease blindness, help to restore eyesight, and improve eye health and eye care for thousands of people around the world. Next, the Committee will work with the Louisiana Lions Eye Foundation by assisting with children’s eye screenings on October 30 and 31.

    Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated is an international service organization that was founded on the campus of Howard University in Washington, D.C. in 1908. It is the oldest Greek-lettered organization established by African-American, college-educated women. Alpha Kappa Alpha is comprised of more than 300,000 members in approximately 1,000 graduate and undergraduate chapters in the United States, Liberia, the Bahamas, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Germany, South Korea, Bermuda, Japan, Canada, South Africa, and the Middle East. Led by International President Dr. Glenda Glover, Alpha Kappa Alpha is often hailed as “America’s premier Greek-lettered organization for African-American women.” The President of the Gamma Eta Omega Chapter is Gwendolyn J. Thomas.

    ONLINE: www.aka1908.com.

    Submitted by LaMetrious Firven

     

    PHOTO: Elle Virdure, Zeke Dunaway, Tim LeBlanc, President of the local chapter of the Lions Club, and Candace Ford

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    E. Keith Cunningham of LHC earns Sterling Achievement Award

    The Council of State Community Development Agencies has recognized the Louisiana Housing Corporation for its efforts to house families displaced by the 2016 floods. The council recently presented LHC executive director E. Keith Cunningham Jr., with the Sterling Achievement Award during its Annual Meeting. “Receiving the Sterling Achievement Award is an incredible honor and accomplishment – one that recognizes our dedication to serving the citizens of Louisiana,” said Cunningham. “We have a dynamic team, who despite experiencing personal loss during the flood, demonstrated exemplary commitment and compassion for helping families impacted by the flood.” The Sterling Achievement Award recognizes state programs that demonstrate positive results in improving the lives of people who are experiencing homelessness or on the verge of being homeless. This award is presented annually to one state agency.

     

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    Baton Rouge leaders mix it up in Washington D.C.

    WASHINGTON DC—There is something to be said about leaders who push beyond boundaries to forge relationships and gain cooperation from others. For all intents and purposes, that’s what leaders from Baton Rouge are doing on a national scale following with a networking mixer held last month with leaders in Washington DC.

    A delegation of elected and appointed officials from Baton Rouge attended the Congressional Black Caucus Annual Legislative Conference to build allegiance around issues citizens face and find resources to bring to their Louisiana districts.

    Along with participating in many CBC conference activities, the Baton Rouge leaders attended the first “Baton Rouge Meets Washington D.C.” networking mixer hosted by the Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport, Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome’s office, the Southern University System, and the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development.

    One goal was “to build on national relationships and use resources to develop and fund programs and projects for Baton Rouge and Louisiana,” said Cleve Dunn Jr., chairman of the airport commission.IMG_4351

    “In particular, for the Baton Rouge Metro Airport, it is our goal to leverage those relationships to develop the land surrounding the airport, fund capital improvements projects, and enhance our air service development by increasing the number of direct flights that we offer at BTR.” As an organizer of the mixer, Dunn said he believed the Congressional Black Caucus Annual Legislative Conference would be a great place to start the national relationship building process for the Baton Rouge leaders in attendance.

    “Not only did I feel that our leadership team should attend the conference, but I also felt that we should create and host a Baton Rouge signature event that would promote the city of Baton Rouge, the parish of East Baton Rouge and several of the cities economic drivers,” he said.

    More than 100 leaders attended the networking mixer.

    “Governmental officials, elected officials, developers, private equity professionals, and business owners; all focused on how we can help the city of Baton Rouge and the parish of East Baton Rouge reach its fullest potential,” Dunn said.

    The Baton Rouge Airport heavily relies on grants and federal dollars to expand runways and to complete capital improvement projects. Likewise, the city of Baton Rouge, the state transportation office, and the Southern University System pull most of their resources from federal dollars and grants. Leaders in attendance said the event gave them all a platform in the nation’s capital to present upcoming projects and programs to Congressional delegates and to potential funders and partners.

    We asked attendees to tell us about what they expected from the mixer and its outcome.

    Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport’s interim director of aviation Mike Edwards and Gregory D. Pierson, interim assistant director of aviation, said: “Support for infrastructure funding and our new air service initiatives is always at the forefront when meeting with delegates from any industry. However, one key expectation was to promote the diverse development opportunities available at BTR. Through doing so, we were also able to begin some preliminary dialogue about partnerships with other institutions from other industries that can further stimulate land development and business opportunities within the North Baton Rouge area.”

    President/CEO of the Indigo Engineering Group, LLC, Delicia N. Gunn, said, “My sole CBC Conference expectation was to meet with executives of the Baton Rouge Airport Authority and Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development.”

    State Rep. Edmond Jordan (BR—District 29), said, “My expectation was to network with other African-American leaders throughout the nation to compare ideas related to creating wealth and building businesses within African American communities. Additionally, I was there to promote the Baton Rouge region to other attendees who are located throughout the U.S.”

    What was the outcome for you and your agency in DC?

    Edwards and Pierson said, “The Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport was able to establish some key contacts towards formulating a coalition for promoting targeted routes for direct air service. We were also able to promote our Aviation Business Park along with all the economic development incentives that accompany doing business at BTR.”

    Rep. Jordan said, “I was able to network with business owners and elected officials; as we shared ideas, strategies, and successes within our community. Specifically, there were seminars related to federal government contracting and accessing venture capital that were engaging and thought-provoking.”

    How were your outcomes met through the Baton Rouge Meets Washington DC Networking Mixer specifically and through other activities?

    Edwards and Pierson said, “Through our (BR airport’s) discussions with legislative officials and other government partners, the mixer afforded us with the platform to solicit support and funding for capital improvement projects that improve the safety, operation, and development opportunities at the Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport. We were also able to meet and connect with Disadvantaged Business Enterprises and Airport Concessions Disadvantaged Business Enterprises from other regions which will help us to continue to grow our DBE resource pool and further our outreach efforts.”

    Veneeth Iyengar, assistant chief administrative officer, at the City of Baton Rouge/Parish of East Baton Rouge, Office of Mayor-President, said, “From City-Parish’s perspective, any opportunity that we have to pitch and export “Baton Rouge and the Parish” is a huge win for the community. The event was very important for Mayor Broome’s administration to connect with organizations and groups, whether entrepreneurs, thought leaders, folks from non-profits and the Federal Government on how we collaborate and work together. The enthusiasm we saw based on the individual and group conversations at the mixer especially in wanting to help our community was great and we look forward to following up quickly on those offers for help.”

    Gunn said, “Although my Washington DC-based firm, Indigo Engineering, has had the privilege of providing engineering and construction management services for cities across my home state of Louisiana, my biggest desire was to work with my hometown city, Baton Rouge….The mixer’s presentation of its airport and city goals provided me with inspiration and information regarding upcoming business opportunities. The casual setting afforded me an opportunity to have in-depth industry conversations that are often stifled around a business table. The event was a perfect recipe for successful networking.”

    Rep. Jordan said, “Baton Rouge was represented in a positive light and promoted throughout DC. There is no doubt that the mixer will lead to business opportunities and an infusion of capital for the city; and hopefully, a direct flight from BTR to DC.”

    What’s next?

    Edwards and Pierson said, “As with most things, the follow-up and ongoing collaboration is critical. We must ensure we build upon the strategies discussed at the most recent event to leverage those relationships established at the mixer for all future initiatives.

    Gunn said, “My next steps are to build relationships and to create partnerships with Baton Rouge Airport Authority and Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. It is my desire that my firm becomes a trusted advisor and business partner to these two agencies. I seek to achieve this goal by sharing my life, work and play experiences in the nation’s Capitol with city planners to provide a unique, urban perspective for our growing metropolitan city of Baton Rouge. I also seek to leverage my established business relationships and contacts with private and government sectors to help the Baton Rouge Airport Authority and Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development meet its business and planning goals.”

    Rep. Jordan said, “As this was just the first step of many to come, we must continue to cultivate relationships while implementing some of the ideas gained from the conference. We can’t become complacent or lose the focus and energy gained from the conference. Otherwise, it will be lost opportunity. We are better than that. Baton Rouge is better than that. Now let’s prove it to the rest of the country.”

    Also in attendance were Baton Rouge Councilmembers Erika Green, LaMont Cole, Chauna Banks, and Donna Collins-Lewis;Metro Washington Airport Authority Vice Chairman Earl Adams, Jr. ; State Reps. Ted James, Rodney Lyons, and Randal Gaines; State Senator Ed Price; Metro Washington Airport Authority Rep. Kristin Clarkson;‎ Federal Aviation Administration Rep. Nick Giles;‎ US Department of Agriculture Rep. Danny Whitley;‎ BREC Commissioner Larry Selders; Makesha Judson with the ‎Mayor President’s Office; Louisana DOTD Chief Legal Counsel Josh Hollins; Former Southern University SGA President Armond Duncan; Perfect 10 Productions CEO T.J. Jackson; and Rise of the Rest Fund Partner David Hall.

    By A.G. Duvall II
    Drum Contributing Writer

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    Bell directs New Venture’s ‘Love, Whitney – A Choreoplay!’

    New Venture Theatre recently announced the cast of the upcoming Love, Whitney – A Choreoplay!, October 19-21 at the Hayden Hall at Southern University. An original production, conceived by Greg Williams Jr.,  as a way to pay honor and tribute to one of the great voices of our time. Performed only through dance, Love, Whitney is a celebration of one of America’s greatest talents, Whitney Houston! The show catalogs her career while expressing the themes behind her music and her story. The show features all her greatest hits, and will have you dancing in the aisles. The cast are: Trinity Star Alexander, Zaria Brown, Adaya Robertson, Aleriya Griffin, Ambre Porter, Dion Sideboard Jr., Elise Patin, Elisha Jenkins, Jamaal Edwards, Jamin Brock, Jasmine Elliott, Kali Jones, Karenna Mitchell, Kari Johnson, Kayla Mitchell, Kerrington Griffin, Kodie Danay Brown, Krystal Gomez, Kyle Smith, Mariyah Osborne, MiKesha Anderson, Navaeh Robertson, Omarion Jones, Queline Ketchens, Raymond Turner, Rontrevius Foreman, Shira Brown, Tameia Hayes, and Trinity Simmons. Dwight Bell is director and choreographer. ℜ

     

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    Dr. Joia Crear-Perry joins state commission for healthy babies

    Dr. Joia Crear-Perry of New Orleans, was appointed by Gov. John Bel Edwards to the Healthy Moms, Healthy Babies Advisory Council. Crear-Perry is an obstetrician and gynecologist and the President of the National Birth Equity Collaborative. She will serve as a representative of a community-based organization that works to prevent maternal mortality. The Healthy Moms, Healthy Babies Advisory Council was created to address racial and ethnic disparities in maternal health outcomes and incorporate a community-engaged, equity-focused lens into current programs and campaigns which seek to prevent maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity. The council shall promote safe and equitable care for every mother and every birth in this state.

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    Health department schedules statewide flu vaccine clinics

     With flu season starting, the Louisiana Department of Health is scheduling flu vaccination days to be held throughout the state. These one-day clinics will allow people to come in and get a flu shot at little or no cost to the patient.The flu causes approximately 500 deaths and nearly 3,000 hospitalizations each year in Louisiana. However, in Louisiana last year, there were more than 15,000 hospitalizations and more than 1,600 deaths from the flu. Of those more than 1,600 deaths, five were pediatric deaths.

    “Getting vaccinated not only protects you from the flu, but it also protects those around you, including those who are more vulnerable to serious flu illness,” said Dr. Frank Welch, immunization director for the Louisiana Department of Health. “A flu shot is your best defense in both reducing your chances of getting the flu and spreading it.”

    These community flu clinics are open to the public, and walk-ups are welcome. Wear short or loose-fitting sleeves and bring your private insurance, Medicaid or Medicare card with you. For those without insurance, the shot will cost $10.

    Click here for the listing of all clinics.

    Flu Shot Facts

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Louisiana Department of Health recommend a yearly flu shot for everyone over 6 months of age who does not have a complicating condition, such as a prior allergic reaction to the flu shot.

    A flu shot is especially crucial for people who may be at higher risk for serious complications. This includes babies and young children, pregnant women, people with chronic health conditions and people 65 years and older.

    The flu shot is safe for pregnant and breastfeeding women, who can pass on antibodies to their babies that will help protect them.

    The flu shot starts to offer partial protection immediately but takes about two weeks to offer full protection.

    Flu shots are also available at local pharmacies, clinics, doctor’s offices and federally qualified (community) health centers. Check flushot.healthmap.org for a flu shot provider near you.

    Visit www.ldh.la.gov/fighttheflu for more information and resources.

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    MLK III joins Urban Specialists, leaders in celebrating BR’s reduced violence

    On Sunday, October 14, 2018 a historic ceremony for the City of Baton Rouge will take place as community leaders, a host of celebrities and the entire community come together for a special CourseCon Baton Rouge “Thank You Baton Rouge” event. This first of its kind experience for the Louisiana city will take place at 6 p.m. at the Raising Cane’s River Center. More than 2,000 people are expected to attend, including students from Southern University, Louisiana State and other nearby universities, who will be brought in on chartered buses sponsored by Urban Specialists and Raising Cane’s. CourseCon Baton Rouge is free and open to the public who register at http://urbanspecialists.org/3c.

    CourseCon Baton Rouge will bring together to some of the most prominent activists, cultural influencers, corporate executives and celebrities to have a real conversation about Baton Rouge’s urban community, renewal opportunities and eradicating violence and poverty in neighborhoods. CourseCon Baton Rouge will also be an opportunity to thank and celebrate the citizens of Baton Rouge and strides that have been made in the area, particularly since Urban Specialists opened an office there and partnered with city leaders and law enforcement officials.

    CourseCon Baton Rouge will also be historic as the hearse that carried prominent civil rights leader, Martin Luther King Jr’s body, will be unveiled for the first time since his death more than 50 years ago. Todd Graves, owner and founder of Raising Cane’s, bought the hearse from the original owner and through its unveiling, wants to remind young people what Martin Luther King, Jr contributed to society. “It’s important that the next generation really understands how the contributions of Martin Luther King, Jr. changed the world,” said Graves. “These kids did not get a chance to hear MLK during his lifetime, so I am hoping they will be able to appreciate him through this tribute to honor his life.” Dr. King’s son and namesake, Martin Luther King III, will be in attendance to speak and help pay tribute to his father with the dedication of the hearse.

    Featured panelists and speakers for CourseCon Baton Rouge include, Omar Jahwar, CEO and founder of Urban Specialists; Todd Graves, CEO and founder of Raising Cane’s; Murphy J. Paul Jr., Chief of Police, Baton Rouge; Sharon Weston Broome, Mayor of Baton Rouge; LaMont Cole, Baton Rouge City Council Member – District 7; Clay Young, marketing executive, radio show host and community activist; Arthur “Silky Slim” Reed, former gang leader turned community advocate; Pastor Errol Dominique, senior pastor of Elm Grove Baptist Church; James Gilmore, Ph.D., city leader and former top aide to Baton Rouge Mayor; NFL Hall of Famer, Deion SandersCortez Bryant, COO, Young Money Entertainment and Co-CEO of The Blue Print Group; Antong Lucky, director of national invasion with Urban Specialists and former leader of the infamous Bloods gang in Dallas, Texas; and Andricka Williams, widow of Alton Sterling, who was killed in 2016 in a controversial shooting by two Baton Rouge police officers.
    The moderated forum, in partnership with Urban Specialists, Raising Cane’s and the City of Baton Rouge will provide an opportunity for residents, civic stakeholders and key influencers to gather for a civil discourse. The intention of CourseCon Baton Rouge is to facilitate an in-depth conversation about shared interests, ways to promote thriving communities and stop senseless violence. Omar Jahwar is just the right person to lead this critical conversation as he is widely known all over the world for his results-driven approach to ending violence and bringing about positive change in urban areas of high crime and poverty. In Dallas, Jahwar adopted sixteen streets in one of the most crime-ridden, impoverished neighborhoods in Dallas and through his leadership, there is a 58% decrease in crime in that area. He also adopted high schools in those neighborhoods and they have seen a 72% reduction in violent incidents in just one school year.

    “We are excited to bring this conversation to Baton Rouge,” said Omar Jahwar. “We opened an office in Baton Rouge in early 2018 and have already seen significant results. We have a proven method that has worked in other urban areas and look forward to continuing to implement those strategies to further decrease violence in Baton Rouge.”

    Omar Jahwar is an expert in urban culture and the leading voice around the country for eradicating senseless violence. His efforts to revive urban culture began over twenty years ago as the first state-appointed gang specialist in Texas. In this role, he negotiated peace terms between incarcerated rival gang members. He also brought over 400 gang members together and negotiated the first peace treaty between the infamous Blood and Crip gangs in Dallas.

    Urban Specialists is taking CourseCon around the country to help activate change in urban neighborhoods.

    Read more »
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    Fashion’s next big designers–Christopher John Rogers, Oonarissa Brown-Bernard–hail from Baton Rouge

    When it comes to fashion destinations Baton Rouge is city that could be at the bottom of the list, but Christopher John Rogers and Oonarissa Brown-Bernard are changing that.

    Besides dominating the charts this year?  What do Cardi B and Sza have in common? They turn to Rogers for his ‘80s glamour meets punk rock inspired designs to make sure their style, just like their music, reigns supreme.

    While Rogers, who made his New York Fashion Week debut this year, is poised o be this season’s breakout designer he said this collection’s inspiration comes from a number of sources rather than one single theme. “I really like to allow my mind to wander,” he said. This year’s collection had a variety of influences ranging from 1930s French couture to 1970s West African photography.

    Brown-Bernard, the designer behind the labels OonaNicole and DoubleOSeven, is already preparing for her fashion debut on both coasts in 2019.

    “What I hope to gain from the experience is to increase exposure for my brand and ultimately have my garments sold in retail stores and boutiques”, said Brown-Bernard

    As many will begin 2019 with resolutions, Brown-Bernard will beginning the new year with a debut both coasts at New York Fashion Week and in Los Angeles at Style Fashion Week.

    As Brown-Bernard resides in Austin and Rogers has put down roots in Brooklyn, the two designers take the time away from their studios to discuss, their inspirations, design processes and most importantly the effect a Louisiana upbringing had on their careers.

    10 OonaNicole

    What inspired you to pursue a career as a designer?

    ROGERS: All of the greats — Todd Oldham, Issac Mizrahi, John Galliano. Also anime, manga, cartoons — the idea of clothing being a transformative vehicle and allowing the wearer to tap into a certain power that they’ve always had.

    BROWN-BERNARD: My mom who taught me how to sew when I was 12 years old, however, my husband is the reason I am pursuing my career as a designer.  I started out as an actress and I was ultimately pursuing a career as an actress.

     

    Did you study fashion and if so where?

    ROGERS: I graduated from Baton Rouge Magnet High School and then I went to Savannah College of Art and Design

    BROWN-BERNARD: I graduated from Southern University Lab School and then I studied fashion at The Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles, California

     

    What would you say is the biggest misconception people have about those who work in the fashion industry?

    ROGERS: That everyone’s super materialistic and doesn’t go deeper than face value.

    BROWN-BERNARD: The biggest misconception people have about those who work in the fashion industry is that anybody can be in the fashion industry.  Many people think that one style of fashion is suitable for everyone and that’s not true. Each person has his or her own individual style.  You have to have an eye for fashion to be able to decipher what will look good on each body type but also represent the individual’s personal style.  Not everyone has a full understanding of what it takes to create a garment from scratch.  They think its simple like 1, 2, 3 and for basic design it is, but once the garment gets detailed its a totally different ball game.

     

    You made your New York Fashion Week debut this year, what was that experience like and what do you hope to gain from it?

    ROGERS: Hah, super overwhelming! I learned a lot about sticking to time lines, being ridiculously organized, and how to directly communicate your vision with as much clarity as possible. We’re working on building an actual business; so increased visibility towards stores was the goal.

     

    Where do you find inspiration?

    ROGERS: Mostly through color, and the idea of treating it like an object as opposed to just an abstract concept placed onto other things.

    Brown-Bernard:  I am a retro, vintage type of designer.  I love classics so I get my inspiration from the costuming in certain films.  Jackie O, Chanel, Audrey Hepburn, Christian Dior, and Alexander McQueen inspire me. I’m also inspired by the thought of being the first well-known African American female menswear designer.

     

    How do you see the fashion industry changing over the next few years?

    ROGERS: A sense of increased accountability and transparency that’s come with the proliferation of social media. I think it allows artists and brands to be more direct with what we say through our work and connect with people who actually understand what we’re trying to say.

     

    Brown-Bernard: I am not sure because fashion is forever changing as the world keeps evolving. It’s a cycle. What is old to us is new to the new generation with just a different name.  I would really like to see fashion return to a place where you don’t have to expose your body to be sexy.

     

    Did living in Louisiana have an influence on your designs? Is there anything you miss about it? 

    ROGERS: For sure! A sense of needing comfort in clothing (depending on the garment), and understanding that things have to function. I absolutely miss my family, 100%.

    Brown-Bernard: Living in Louisiana did not have an influence on my designs; however, it influenced me to be a great designer because of where I come from and always pushing to be better. I definitely miss my family and the good food.

     

    If an aspiring designer came to you from Baton Rouge and said they wanted to follow in your footsteps, what would be your advice?

    ROGERS: Work as hard as you possibly can, and then work harder than that. It’s all about the end game, so learn as much as you can and always say “yes”.

    Brown-Bernard: My advice would be intern or work under a reputable designer and learn as much as you can. This would be very difficult to accomplish in Louisiana, so my next bit of advice would be to travel and attend networking events so you can see what fashion looks like outside of Louisiana. Work on your craft and build your resume, and most importantly don’t give up. It’s a long and rough journey, but if you’re serious about fashion it’s worth it to see it through.ℜ

     By Cameron James
    Special to The Drum

     

    ONLINE:

    www.christopherjohnrogers.com

    @christopherjohnrogers

    @oonanicole007

     

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  • Time again to shop for the best Medicare deal

    Now’s the time for Louisiana residents with Medicare to check their health and drug coverage for 2019.

    Medicare’s open enrollment period runs from Oct. 15 to Dec. 7.

    Open enrollment is the best time to make sure your health and drug plans still meet your individual needs, especially if you’ve had any changes in your health.

    By now insurers should have notified you of any adjustments in your health or drug plan coverage or any changes in your out-of-pocket costs for next year.

    Even if you’ve been satisfied with your health and drug coverage, you may benefit from reviewing all your options. Shopping around may save you money or improve your coverage.

    Medicare Advantage remains a strong alternative for people who prefer to receive care through a private insurer rather than through Medicare’s original fee-for-service program. Most plans include drug coverage.

    The number of people buying Medicare Advantage plans is expected to grow by 11.5 percent to 22.6 million nationwide in 2019. Thirty-four percent of Louisiana residents with Medicare now opt to get their health care benefits this way.

    Many Advantage plans charge a separate premium on top of the Part B premium you’ll pay for Medicare’s medical insurance. Nationally, the average monthly cost for that separate Medicare Advantage premium will be $28 in 2019 — $1.81 less than this year.

    Louisiana residents in Medicare’s traditional fee-for-service program who want to add prescription drug coverage can choose from 26 drug plans with monthly premiums ranging from $16.90 to $88.10 – about the same premium range as a year ago. Nationally, the average premium for a basic drug plan in 2019 will drop by $1.09 to $32.50 per month.

    Look beyond premiums, though. The only way to determine the true cost of your drug coverage is to consider other factors like deductibles, co-payments and coinsurance.

    Medicare’s website – www.medicare.gov – has the best tool for helping you narrow your search for a new health or drug plan. Just click on “Find Health and Drug Plans.”

    After entering your ZIP code and the list of your prescriptions, you can use the “Medicare Plan Finder” tool to compare your coverage and out-of-pocket costs under different plans.

    The quality of a health or drug plan’s customer service should be considered, too. To help you identify the best and worst, the Plan Finder provides star ratings for each plan. The ratings range from five stars (excellent) to one star (poor); three stars are average.

    Higher-rated plans deliver a higher level of care, such as managing chronic conditions efficiently, screening for and preventing illnesses, and making sure people get much-needed prescriptions. Higher-rated plans also have fewer complaints or long waits for care.

    Besides using Medicare.gov, you can call Medicare’s toll-free help line at 1-800-633-4227 or consult your “Medicare & You 2019 Handbook,” which you should have received in the mail in the last few weeks.

    One-on-one benefits counseling is also available through your State Health Insurance Assistance Program. In Louisiana, you should call 1-800-259-5300.

    Medicare’s drug benefit continues to improve. You’ll enjoy more savings on your prescriptions. The “doughnut hole,” or coverage gap, will go away for brand-name drugs in 2019, which means you’ll receive a 75 percent break on those drugs after you pay your annual deductible and until you reach the threshold for catastrophic coverage, when you’ll pay substantially less.

    The coverage gap for generic drugs will remain for only one more year and will kick in for you once you and your drug plan have spent $3,820 in 2019. At that point, you’ll receive a 63 percent discount on your generics – a bigger discount than this past year.

    If you’re having difficulty affording your medications, you may qualify for extra help with your drug coverage premiums, deductibles and co-payments.

    The amount of help depends on your income and resources. But, generally, you’ll pay no more than $3.40 for each generic drug and $8.50 for each brand-name drug in 2019.

    Thirty-nine percent of Louisiana residents with Medicare’s drug coverage now get such a break.

    To learn more about whether you qualify for extra help, visit www.socialsecurity.gov/prescriptionhelp or call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213.

    There’s no better time to check your Medicare health and drug coverage. Any changes you make will take effect on Jan. 1.

    By Bob Moos/Southwest
    Public affairs officer
    U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

    Read more »
  • ,,

    State expands medical marijuana treatments

    Three years ago, the Louisiana Legislature approved medical marijuana as a treatment option for certain health conditions.

    The drug is expected to become available to patients this year.

    The number of people who could qualify has grown to about 100,000, after the Legislature expanded the program.

    A previous rule by the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners limited doctors to recommending medical marijuana to just 100 patients each. But the state board voted  last month to eliminate that patient cap, out of concern that it would make the drug too difficult to access.

    Only a limited number of specially-licensed pharmacies will distribute medical marijuana  Louisiana has not legalized recreational marijuana.

    LSU and Southern University’s agriculture centers are growing the plant and will process the medicine into different forms, like oils, edibles or pills.

    Medical marijuana does not include the inhalation or vaping of cannabis. According to the law it cannot be in raw form or smoked.

    Around 30 physicians in Louisiana have been approved to recommend the drug.

    The list of debilitating conditions that will be eligible for treatment include:

    • Cancer
    • HIV+ status
    • AIDS
    • Wasting syndrome
    • Seizure disorders
    • Epilepsy
    • Spasticity
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Muscular dystrophy,
    • Glaucoma
    • Parkinson’s disease
    • Severe muscle spasms
    • Intractable pain
    • Post traumatic disorder
    • Some conditions associated with autism spectrum disorder.

    ONLINE: ldh.la.gov

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  • Black enrollment, faculty at public universities worse in La.

    Black citizens are underrepresented as undergraduates and on the faculties of America’s four-year public universities, according to a new report card by the University of Southern California’s Race and Equity Center.

    Nowhere is the problem worse than in Louisiana. The report found that traditional-age (18-24) Black students are under-enrolled at three-fourths of public universities compared to their population in that state, and that graduation rates for Black students continue to lag behind other students. States were given an overall “equity index” grade based on how well Black students and faculty were represented public institutions. Louisiana’s was the lowest.

    According to Inside Higher Ed’s interview with Shaun Harper, the center’s executive director, said many institutions are “failing Black students.” “I think that this makes painstakingly clear that the failure is systemic. That it’s not just a handful of institutions,” he said, adding that blame around Black students’ shortcomings is often placed on the students, not universities.

    By The Louisiana Budget Project

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    Bone and Joint Health to be the focus of workshop, Oct 12

    The Southern University Ag Center’s Family and Human Development Unit will host a free personal health history workshop from 9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. on October 12 at the Smith-Brown Memorial Student Union, on Southern University’s campus.

    This workshop will feature sessions on managing rheumatoid arthritis and other bone and joint conditions, eating healthy for bones and joints, weatherizing your home and emergency preparedness.

    There will also be a fire extinguisher demonstration.

    This is the third personal health history workshop hosted by the SU Ag Center. The previous workshops focused on developing a health journal to keep track of an individual’s person health history, proper foot care, how blood pressure and blood sugar levels respond to dietary factors, and low impact exercises.

    Preregistration for the workshop is required no later than October 10. To request a registration form or to preregister, email Milissia_jbaptiste@suagcenter.com or delores_johnson@suagcenter.com, or call 225-771-2583 or 225-771-3704.

    The Southern University Ag Center and SU College of Agricultural Land-Grant Campus together are called the Southern University Land-Grant Campus.

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  • SPLC: ‘Racial profiling in law enforcement is widespread across Louisiana’

    Evidence suggests that racial profiling – the unconstitutional practice of law enforcement that targets people because of their skin color – is widespread in Louisiana, according to a report the Southern Poverty Law Center.

    Further, the report states, law enforcement agencies across the state have failed to create policies and procedures to prevent or stop racial profiling.

    The report, “Racial Profiling in Louisiana: Unconstitutional and Counterproductive,” analyzes the lack of detailed racial profiling policies at law enforcement agencies across the state. The adverse effects of racial profiling are widely known and contribute to Louisiana’s high incarceration rate and disproportionate imprisonment of people of color.

    However, more than one-third of the state’s law enforcement agencies lack any policy on racial profiling at all, and existing policies at the other law-enforcement agencies generally fail to give officers and deputies the tools they need to understand what racial profiling is or what conduct is prohibited.

    “Racial profiling is pervasive and insidious. It creates profound distrust between over-policed communities and law enforcement, thereby endangering public safety,” said Lisa Graybill, deputy legal director for the SPLC. “Without in-depth racial profiling policies, law enforcement officers across Louisiana are missing a major tool to help them fairly and effectively protect and serve all communities. To ignore this problem is to condone it, and that has to stop.”

    There are two common types of racial profiling: unreasonable suspicion, in which a law enforcement officer assumes that a person is committing a crime based solely on that person’s race or ethnicity; and unequal enforcement, in which an officer stops a person for a minor infraction, even though he or she would not have stopped a person of another race or ethnicity for the same violation.

    The SPLC requested racial profiling policies from 331 law enforcement agencies throughout Louisiana; 310 responded. Of those, 109 agencies admitted to having no racial profiling policy at all. One of those agencies, the Bernice Police Department, provided a conclusory one-sentence response: “We have no written policies on racial profiling since we do not racially profile.”

    Policies provided by 89 law enforcement agencies across the state are not broad enough to prohibit both unreasonable suspicion and unequal enforcement, according to the report. Another 112 agencies provided policies that do cover both types of racial profiling, but many of those policies are short, vague, or fail to clearly explain what racial profiling is, and what actions are not permitted. A handful of agencies provided irrelevant documents, such as policies on workplace harassment and equal employment opportunities.

    “It is unacceptable that so many law enforcement agencies throughout Louisiana are operating with little to no guidance on racial profiling,” said Jamila Johnson, senior supervising attorney for the SPLC. “The absence of detailed racial profiling policies has almost certainly contributed to Louisiana’s high incarceration rate, and without question has resulted in disproportionate policing of people of color. The only way to hold law enforcement officials accountable and ensure that the laws are being enforced equally across all demographics is to implement comprehensive racial profiling policies and require detailed data collection.”

    The report states that Louisiana police officers’ unequal focus on people of color also means that they are disproportionately ticketed, arrested, prosecuted, and ultimately imprisoned. In 2016, Black adults comprised only 30.6 percent of the state’s adult population, but accounted for 53.7 percent of adults who were arrested. That same year, Black people were 2.9 times more likely than white people to be arrested for marijuana possession in Louisiana, even though Black adults are statistically less likely than white adults to use marijuana.

    In Gretna, Black people made up two-thirds of the city’s arrests in 2016 but only one-third of the city’s population. The Gretna Police Department does not have a racial profiling policy. It did provide the SPLC with its mission statement, code of ethics, workplace harassment policy and an arrest policy that states its legal obligations under federal and state non-discrimination laws to “treat all individuals equally and fairly without regard to race, religion, sex, nationality or handicap.”

    Between 2011 and 2017, the Baton Rouge Police Department made more than 1,600 traffic stops enforcing a local ordinance that makes it a misdemeanor to “disturb the peace” by playing loud music from a vehicle. A majority of those stops were in predominantly Black neighborhoods, raising the concern that officers may be using the ordinance to unfairly stop Black drivers. The Baton Rouge Police Department did provide the SPLC with its racial profiling policy, but the policy does not clearly state what conduct is prohibited under the policy.

    The SPLC’s report includes recommendations for law enforcement agencies, the state Legislature and the Louisiana Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Criminal Justice to help agencies maintain adequate policies, provide appropriate training, and record sufficient data to prevent racial profiling. Those recommendations include adopting policies that ban all forms of racial profiling. They also include mandating the collection and publication of data for all traffic and pedestrian stops, uses of force, arrests and complaints.

    Read more »
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    Floor of Hammond’s Historic St. James AME Church succumbs to termites

    HAMMOND—On March 26, of last year, the Greater St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church celebrated their 150th anniversary. St James was the first Black church in Hammond.
    During a funeral on September 10, the floor of the historical church foyer collapsed with about a dozen of people falling in the hole.
    “I was scared. My husband immediate jump in the hole helping seniors out,” said Stephanie Turner.
    “It was chaos for a short time, the young people panic and forgot about the older peoples,” said the Reverend Carl Turner. The Hammond Fire Department arrived and completed the rescue, he said.
    Later reports stated ternite damages was the cause.

    Hole in church floor

    Hole in church floor

    St. James was organized by Rev. Charles Daggs, who served the church faithfully until his death. As a coal burner after the Civil War in New Orleans, his work brought him to Hammond. Upon his arrival, he and a small band of worshippers went “from house to house holding prayer meetings.” After finding there was no place for Blacks to worship, he sought to organize a church for Blacks.

    Antoinette Harrell

    Antoinette Harrell

    After a period, they were given permission to worship in a small school house. According to historian Antoinette Harrell, the band then moved on a site that was donated by Charles Cates, a wealthy citizen of Hammond.
    Under the leadership of Daggs, the first church was erected.
    Naming the church was easy. It church was named in honor of Daggs’ home church in New Orleans. When, Daggs came to Hammond, that name was deeply rooted in his heart. He desired the same spirit in the newly erected Hammond church, said Harrell.
    According to Harrell, in 1923 the present site of the church, 311 East Michigan Street, was bought by two of the church members, Israel Carter and Albert Gibson, who mortgaged their homes. The architect,

    Alexander Cornelius Evans, and the builder, John Noble, were also church members. Church construction was completed in 1925. In August 2, 2017, St James was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

    By Eddie Ponds
    The Drum Founding Publisher
    ONLINE: nuturingourroots.blogspot.com

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    Paris McClain wins Louisiana National American Miss Jr. Preteen

    Nine-year-old Paris McClain has won the title of 2018 Louisiana National American Miss Jr Preteen.  She also won 1stRunner Up Actress and 3rdRunner Up Talent, Overall Best Resume, and Overall Best Thank You Letter in her age group. Her hobbies include volleyball, softball, dance, acting and arts. She also enjoys participating in the Destination Imagination STEM Club at Baton Rouge Center for Visual and Performing Arts School. Paris also loves to volunteer at the food bank, feeding the homeless, and collecting clothing for girls in need.

    As the 2018 Louisiana National American Miss Jr Preteen, she received an $1,000 cash award, the official NAM crown and banner, a bouquet of roses, and air transportation to compete in the national pageant at Disneyland® in California the week of Thanksgiving. She will also be touring the famous streets of Hollywood while in California as part of her prize package.

    She said she plans to share her platform with girls all over the state. Paris wants to encourage young ladies to believe in themselves and always chase their dreams, just as she does.

    The National American Miss Pageant system is the largest in the nation. The focus of this organization is to create future leaders and to equip them with real-world skills to make their dream a reality.  The program is based on inner beauty, as well as poise and presentation, and offers an “All-American spirit of fun for family and friends.” Emphasis is placed on the importance of gaining self-confidence and learning new skills, such as good attitudes about competition, as well as setting and achieving personal goals. The Louisiana pageant was held June 2, 2018 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. National American Miss is a pageant system for girls ages four through 18. Contestants competed in four overall categories including Formal Wear Modeling, Personal Introduction, Interview, and Community Service Project.  National American Miss also offers optional contests such as the Top Model Search, Talent, and Actress.

     

     

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  • ,,

    School board selects Kenyetta Nelson-Smith to lead

    The seven-member East Baton Rouge Parish School Board unanimously selected Kenyetta Nelson-Smith Ph.D., as vice-president of the board following the resignation of Rep. Connie Bernard last month. Nelson-Smith has represented District 3 in North Baton Rouge since 2011. She is the assistant professor/program leader of child development at Southern University and an assistant specialist of community and economic development with the Ag Center. She will hold the vice president position through Nov. 6 when she seeks re-election.

     

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  • Celebrating 80 years!

    The Drum’s founding publisher Mr. Eddie Ponds is 80 YEARS YOUNG and is publishing the 500th issue of The Drum this fall. Help us celebrate!

    Take over an eighth of a page or a half of a page within the print issue of The Drum and place your photo, company logo, and words of congratulations in color. Your congratulations will be posted on our website, Drum Beats eblast, and social media pages through December 31st We invite you to congratulate Mr. Ponds on his 80th birthday and for publishing 500 issues of The Drum.  Email for more.

     

    Reserve your space now in the November issue.

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    Fact: Eliminating stigmas can reduce the spread of HIV

    The fact remains: There are still many stigmas around HIV/AIDS which are critical barriers to preventing the disease from spreading. In a city like Baton Rouge where new HIV diagnoses register as some of the highest in the nation, prevention is critical to stopping the disease and saving lives, said Tim Young, executive director of the HIV/AIDS Alliance for Region Two Inc., or HAART.

    When HAART opened its doors more than 20 years ago, the organization could only hope to save the lives of residents who were HIV positive. Now, people are living longer—and in many cases— living healthier with the virus that causes AIDS.

    “It’s been an uphill challenge from the beginning,” said Young.

    A large percentage of that battle has stemmed from stigmas people hold about the disease, said Eugene Collins, director of prevention for HAART.

    According to Collins, minimizing and eliminating stigmas can contribute to slowing the spread of HIV.  Once sex is discussed in non-condemning manners, behaviors and practices that put people at risk can be talked about and addressed. In Baton Rouge, a large population of new diagnosis are men who have sex with men. This behavior may be open or in secret. “Needle sharing now has a lower impact” said Collins who said it’s important to have conversations “around the dinner table” about safe sex practices just like the nation has done around needle use. These conversations aren’t happening, he said, because families still do not want to address homosexuality, premarital sex, or promiscuity. “The attitude is that these behaviors are wrong so the risks around them aren’t talked about in homes or schools or churches,” Collins said.

    A March 2018 report from the Louisiana Department of Health showed 4,080 people living with HIV in Baton Rouge.

    “This is an epidemic,” said State Rep. Kenny Cox, (D-Natchitoches) earlier this year during the legislative session, “HIV/AIDS destroys families, homes, communities.”

    “As a nation and a community, many of us have been quick to judge those with HIV, saying their infection was some kind of retribution for certain behavior. But, we don’t say people with other kinds of viruses, a common cold for example, deserved their illness,” said Young.

    “We shun the things we fear, and in the beginning, there was a lot to fear from HIV.  At first, scientists weren’t even able to prove it was transmitted sexually. That’s why we employ people with HIV when we can, and train all of our employees on how they can’t acquire or transmit HIV to or from our patients or others.”

    “As a community, we should reduce stigma around HIV. Without education, we may fear someone with HIV.  Without that stigma, those who are undiagnosed would be less fearful about learning they may test positive and how others around them may react to that news. We harm our community when we create fear in people which prevents them from being tested and accessing treatment,” Young said.

    Collins insists that these discussions cannot only lead to prevention but can also lead people to primary care at younger ages.  Because HAART has established an extensive referral system, residents can be connected to a network of service providers to get support. And, if testing shows that the person is HIV-positive, HAART refers them to a provider and secures medical treatment at its Baton Rouge facility, Open Health Care Clinic at 3901 North Blvd.

    “Open Health Care Clinic believes that addressing adolescent healthcare needs is essential to promoting healthier behaviors into adulthood, thereby bridging the gap between pediatric and adult primary care,” stated Lori Lauve, Open Health’s director of development.

    Open Health is a federally qualified health center which provides provide advanced medical services for every phase of a person’s life regardless of their financial or insurance status, Lauve stated in a news release. The services include pediatrics, dental, behavioral health, infectious diseases, preventive care, and endocrinology. It has extended hours, and is open for weekend appointments and walk-ins.

    The clinic provides primary care services to the entire Baton Rouge community with special care for people who are HIV-positive or who have been diagnosed with AIDS. “It’s whole care for the whole community,” said Young.

    He and Collins agree that community education and frank discussions about sexual behaviors are key to decreasing stigmas around HIV/AIDS and ultimately preventing the spread of the disease. Another tool for prevention is a medication called pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). It is known by its brand name Truvada and can prevent people who are at high risk of contracting HIV from getting infected. PrEP assistance is provided at Open Health, HAART, AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Baton Rouge Black Alcoholism Council,  CareSouth, Planned Parenthood, and Emerging Care of Louisiana. They also provide free HIV testing.

    Advances in prevention and treatment are bringing us closer to ending HIV, said Young. “I foresee a future when (Baton Rouge) finally has zero HIV transmissions reported in a year. That will be something for all of us to celebrate.”

    ONLINE:  http://www.haartinc.org/
    www.ohcc.org

    By Candace j Semien
    Jozef Syndicate reporter
    @jozefsyndicate

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  • Prevent Child Abuse Louisiana provides free training at Night Out Against Child Sexual Abuse

    Prevent Child Abuse Louisiana will offer the Stewards of Children workshop for free at the St. Tammany Parish Hospital’s Parenting Center, 1505 N. Florida St., in Covington, on Thursday, Oct. 11 from 6 to 8 p.m. as part of their Night Out Against Child Sexual Abuse. Interested community members can register atwww.pcal.org.

    “We’ve all seen the headlines nationally and locally about children who have been sexually abused by someone they trust, and as an organization we wanted to offer this workshop for parents, grandparents and anyone who wants to learn more about how to keep children safe,” said Amanda Brunson, Prevent Child Abuse Louisiana executive director.

    Darkness to Light’s Stewards of Children is a two-hour workshop that equips attendees first to recognize sexual abuse and respond appropriately, but also to prevent it by talking to children and minimizing opportunities for abuse to occur. The normal cost to attend is $10, but it is free for the Night Out Against Child Sexual Abuse thanks to a grant from a donor who wishes to remain anonymous.

    The workshop will be offered in nine cities across the state at the same time the evening of Oct. 11. Due to the sensitive nature of the material, the workshop is for adults only; child care is not provided.

    “I hope folks across the state take advantage of this chance to learn and be more empowered to protect the children in their lives,” noted Brunson. “We know that preventing child abuse and neglect before it occurs saves our state money, but more importantly it prevents future risks of societal ills such as human trafficking, substance abuse, depression, intimate partner violence and suicide.”

    Since 1986 Prevent Child Abuse Louisiana has been dedicated to preventing the abuse and neglect of children throughout Louisiana by focusing on programs and training, advocacy and engagement, and research and evaluation. As the local affiliate of Prevent Child Abuse America, PCAL is the only statewide nonprofit organization dedicated to the prevention of child abuse and neglect. For more information, to donate or to volunteer, visit www.pcal.org.

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  • Free bus driver training offered in October

    Responding to a critical need for qualified school bus drivers, Tangipahoa Parish School Superintendent Melissa Stilley announced this week that the district will offer free classes to train new drivers.

    The TPSS will offer a 30-hour pre-service training course to help potential drivers gain the skills needed to become certified Louisiana School Bus Operators. The class is free and open to anyone age 21 and up who holds a Louisiana driver’s license.

    “If you’ve ever thought about driving a school bus, our team is ready to help you complete the prerequisite 30-hour classroom portion of the program in just eight short days, starting next week,” Stilley said.

    Applicants should bring paper and pen/pencil to take notes and must attend all sessions of the course, which will be offered nightly October 1-4, from 4-8 p.m., and October 8-11, from 4-8 p.m., at the TPSS Technology Center, which is located at 795 S. Morrison Boulevard in Hammond.

    Candidates who successfully complete the course must also obtain a Class A or B commercial driver’s license with the “S” and “P” endorsements and air brake certification.

    “Tangipahoa Parish School System bus drivers earn health insurance and retirement benefits, get summers and legal holidays off, work a five hour work day, and gain on-going training year-round. If you’re at least 21-years-old, have received your high school diploma or GED, in good health, and of good character, we have a place for you  here at the TPSS. Give us a call and learn how you can become part of our team,” Stilley said

    Registration for the free bus driver training course is preferred but not required. For additional information, call (985) 748-2423.

    Read more »
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    Gotcha gets state support to launch first public bike share program

    Gotcha has been selected by Mayor Sharon Weston Broome to launch the first public bike share program in Baton Rouge early next year. Gotcha’s bike share services will include the siting, installation, operation, maintenance, and ongoing management of the program in partnership with the City-Parish. The system will encompass approved locations within the city, Louisiana State University, and Southern University.

    Launching in early 2019, the bike share program will include 500 GPS-enabled e-bikes and 50 hubs across the city. Riders can locate and reserve bikes through Gotcha’s app. The system promises to be an affordable, accessible, and sustainable form of transportation for the Baton Rouge community.

    “Launching bike share in Baton Rouge continues our commitment to expanding transportation alternatives for our citizens. Throughout this process, we were seeking a partner with the expertise to serve both the community and local universities with integrated, multi-modal forms of environmentally-friendly transportation,” said Mayor Broome. “I am excited that this system increases alternative forms of transportation, reduces parking issues, and promotes an active, vibrant City-Parish.”

    “We’re excited to partner with the City-Parish of Baton Rouge to provide convenient and efficient ways for residents to reduce vehicle usage. Gotcha is committed to enhancing the health, mobility, and landscape of our partner communities and the leaders of the city share this commitment,” said Sean Flood, CEO of Gotcha.

    Gotcha was selected after a competitive RFP process conducted by the City-Parish of Baton Rouge and a third-party partner, Bantam Strategy. Details about the bike share system including name, hub locations, pricing plans, and bike design will be unveiled in the coming months.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Bayou Classic TV agreement with NBCSN extended through 2021

    NBC Sports Group, Grambling State University, and Southern University have reached an agreement to extend their three-decade partnership for three more years, keeping the annual Bayou Classic on NBCSN through 2021.

    Since 1991, NBC Sports has served as the exclusive home of the Bayou Classic, an annual college football tradition featuring Grambling State University and Southern University that is played on Thanksgiving weekend at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, La. At the end of this new extension, NBC Sports will have televised 31 Bayou Classics.

    The 2018 game will mark the 45th consecutive meeting between the Tigers and Jaguars, a rivalry that originated in 1974. The first-ever Bayou Classic, won 21-0 by Grambling, was played in New Orleans’ Tulane Stadium.

    “The Bayou Classic is a college football staple, and one we’re proud to have broadcast for three decades at the end of this agreement,” said Gary Quinn, vice president of programming and owned properties with NBC Sports Group. “We look forward to showcasing this annual Thanksgiving tradition for the next three years to avid college football fans across the country on NBCSN.”

    The Grambling Tigers lead the overall series, 23-21, and have won three consecutive games, including seven of the past 10 meetings overall. Over the course of 44 years, the Bayou Classic has featured some of the most prominent figures in college football history, including NFL Hall of Fame defensive back and Southern alum Aeneas Williams, Super Bowl-winning quarterback and Grambling alum Doug Williams and former Tigers head coach Eddie Robinson, whose 408 career wins rank third all-time in NCAA Division I history.

    The annual telecast of the Bayou Classic is headlined by the renowned “Battle of the Bands” halftime show, which pits the marching bands of both Southern University and Grambling State against each other in a musical display of talent.

    The game is also streamed live on NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app.

    Read more »
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    Council n Aging to distribute emergency kits Sept. 28

    The East Baton Rouge Council on Aging (EBRCOA) announced today that after the AARP and AARP Foundation emergency kit packing event, the agency will be distributing the prepared kits, Friday, September 28 at the EBRCOA Capital City Event Center  at 6955 Florida Blvd, Baton Rouge, LA 70806. The agency would like to thank its partners: the AARP Foundation and the Louisiana Department of Health, Center for Community Preparedness for their donation of supplies.  The drive-thru event will begin at 9:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. while supplies last.

    Recipients must be 50 years of age or older, preferably low to moderate income and residents of East Baton Rouge Parish, in order to receive an emergency preparedness kit.

    With the peak of hurricane season upon us, the EBRCOA wants to remind seniors that staying “emergency-ready” is essential.  Keep essentials items such as: medicine, water, vital documents, flashlights, batteries and an overnight bag in case of an emergency evacuation.

    “This distribution of emergency preparedness kits is a part of our commitment to serve the seniors of East Baton Rouge Parish in every capacity.  We would like to thank AARP and AARP Foundation and the Office of Public Health for their support,” said COA chief executive officer Tasha Clark-Amar.

    “For vulnerable older adults, a natural disaster complicates the challenges they already experience. As storms surge, so do the hardships for those struggling to make ends meet. That’s why AARP and AARP Foundation are mobilizing volunteers to assemble thousands of bags filled with emergency preparedness supplies to seniors in Baton Rouge,” said Marc McDonald, VP grants and external initiatives, AARP Foundation.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    COMMENTARY: Getting to the heart of America’s diabetes crisis

    About 30 million Americans have diabetes, and an estimated 1.5 million more are diagnosed each year. More than 25 percent of seniors have diabetes, and minority populations are at the greatest risk of developing this disease. African Americans, for instance, have a 77 percent higher risk of developing diabetes compared to White Americans. Hispanic Americans have a 66 percent higher risk.

    Most meticulously monitor their blood sugar, as they know that failing to keep diabetes in check can damage the kidneys, eyes, and feet. But even so, about 50,000 Americans start dialysis each year because of diabetes-induced kidney failure. More than three million Americans with diabetes experience partial vision loss. And over 70,000 undergo limb amputations due to diabetic ulcers.

    The disease also threatens the heart. People living with diabetes are more than twice as likely to develop a heart problem — and up to four times as likely to die from cardiovascular disease. Yet half of people living with diabetes aren’t aware of this risk.

    That needs to change. Educating doctors and patients about the connection between diabetes and heart disease could save millions of lives and billions of dollars.

    Type 2 diabetes changes how the body processes glucose — a sugar found in foods. This results in chronically high levels of blood sugar, which can lead to life-threatening health problems.

    People with type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to be hospitalized because of heart problems. And an estimated 68 percent of people with diabetes age 65 or older lose their lives to heart disease.

    People with diabetes also often develop high levels of bad cholesterol, low levels of good cholesterol, and high triglycerides — a situation that is often associated with coronary heart disease. And many struggling with diabetes are also obese, which puts the heart at greater risk.

    The combination of diabetes and cardiovascular disease is a major driver of healthcare spending. Diabetes alone costs our nation $245 billion a year in medical spending and lost productivity. Heart complications account for a quarter of the medical costs.

    Raising awareness of this diabetes-heart connection can motivate change that America needs to chip away at the increasing burden of chronic disease.

    Medical professionals play a crucial role in educating people about the diabetes-heart connection, recommending changes needed to manage diabetes, protect the heart, and following progress.

    People with diabetes and their families play a role, too — supporting healthier, active lifestyles, tracking and managing glucose levels, asking their healthcare providers about diabetes and heart health, and following through on treatment recommendations.

    Policymakers can also help. State and federal funds are used to educate the public about diabetes and heart disease. Making sure that efforts to address diabetes or cardiovascular disease effectively raise awareness of the linkage between them would spark impactful action.

    Getting to the heart of America’s diabetes crisis is long overdue. It’s time to make the diabetes-heart connection and save millions of lives and dollars in the process.

    By Ken Thorpe 
    Kenneth E. Thorpe is a professor of health policy at Emory University and chairman of the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease.

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  • ,,

    With HIV rates topping the charts, Baton Rouge needs HAART, PrEP, and Open Health

    The HIV AIDS Alliance for Region Two, Inc., or HAART, is the 19th largest nonprofit in the state, with a budget of more than $25 million. But with an HIV AIDS population of more than 5,000 people in the nine-parish Baton Rouge region, and more than 20,000 people in state, the need for HAART services far surpasses its budget.

    “We have been assisting those with HIV for nearly three decades and it’s been an uphill challenge from the beginning, said Tim Young, HAART CEO.

    In 1995 when HAART first opened its doors, the medical community was focused on keeping people with HIV alive. Since then, doctors and researchers have learned to treat HIV more effectively, which means fewer people are dying and people are living longer with their disease, said Young.

    “When I began working at HAART, new medications were literally getting people out of their death beds,” he said.

    Many people were seeing health improvements from the new medications that were becoming available, but many still were not, and even those who did often experienced serious side effects.  Today, the medications are so effective that someone who acquires HIV can have a normal life expectancy if they adhere to an effective medication regimen.

    “Now, we are learning how to assist people who have been living with HIV for as long as HAART has been in existence. That’s an amazing advancement. We assist many to cope with the challenges of helping to raise their grandchildren, something many thought would never be possible,” Young said.

    HAART’s original role was to anticipate the services people living with HIV needed and weren’t receiving and to serve as the fiscal agent for Ryan White funding in the Baton Rouge area with other organizations to provide direct services. “The first thing we did was to recognize the need for a larger network of providers to serve an increasing number of people who were living with HIV disease with the advent of new effective medications.  In the late ‘90s, we added Volunteers of America, Family Service of Greater Baton Rouge, and Care South to the network of Ryan White funded providers.”

    These relationships aid HAART in providing medical treatment, medication assistance, and case management to assist patients in navigating the health care system. HAART also provides medical transportation, dental services, and mental health services. HAART has established Baton Rouge’s Open Health Care Clinic, located at 3801 North Blvd., to expand medical services and serve the wider community. “Over the past three decades years we’ve built an enduring community asset and positioned it to become an integral part of the health care network for decades to come,” Young said.  “HAART has grown from a small organization, coordinating funding for a network of providers for a single disease, to one of the largest community health centers in the state, poised to grow its own network of clinics across the city, serving both children and adults from every walk of life.”

    “The day of novel treatments is actually already here. Early on, patients had a complex medication regimen that was difficult to achieve and often had side effects, some almost as serious as the disease itself.  Multiple pills, some with and some without food, every four hours meaning interrupted sleep and other complications were normal. Now, for most with HIV, treatment is one pill once a day. That’s remarkable when you consider how far we’ve come in a relatively short period of time, although a lifetime for some and sadly too late for others.  And they achieve complete viral suppression, so no more damage can be done to themselves by the virus and they can’t transmit it to others,” Young said.

    But, in a city with the highest rates of newly diagnosed HIV cases in the nation, is HAART positioned to slow down the spread of the virus that cause AIDS? Young explained, “Despite the educational messages, many continue to participate in risky behaviors which expose themselves and others to HIV transmission.  We’ve always relied on people changing their behavior and now we have a biomedical preventative that can protect them even if they don’t take other measures to protect themselves.

    The newest weapon against HIV is a one-a-day pill called PrEP. This Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis pill is a daily dosage of the HIV medication Truvada.

    “It works a little like birth control (pills) where a person takes it everyday to stop the virus from attaching to the immune system if they become exposed,” said Eugene Collins, director of prevention for HAART.

    “HIV disease is not just a threat to those who acquire it, but to potentially much larger numbers of people if left unchecked. It’s our responsibility to assist persons with HIV, not only to improve their personal health, but to ensure they don’t pass it on to others,” Young said.

    After testing positive, Baton Rouge residents are provided services through HAART’s Red Carpet linkage program that gets them connected “immediately” with medical and mental health appointments, employment assistance, and housing. “We provide a total continuum of care, medically and socially,” said Collins.

    According to Young, the strongest tools for HAART are the dedication and commitments of the non-profit’s board and staff. “We bring strong technical skills in the areas of medicine, psychology, finance, and marketing to bring awareness about the epidemic in our community and the solutions to limit and reduce its growth. Our new PrEP program, our new opioid-abuse outreach program ,and the broad spectrum of health and wellness services we bring to our patients are our strengths, thereby strengthening the community,” he said.

    HAART has survived for 22 years despite the constantly changing health care environment, and HIV care changes even more than health care in general.

    “We’ve been successful as a health care resource because we’ve been guided by a strong community-based board of directors, made up of experienced professionals who help us to look ahead and chart a successful vision for the future. Health care will continue to evolve and HAART will adapt to change so we may continue to pursue our mission and commitment to our community.  I’m confident of that,” said Young who is also CEO of Open Health Clinic. ℜ

     By Candace J. Semien
    Jozef Syndicate reporter
    @jozefsyndicate

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    Scotlandville Interfaith Community Health Fair a success

    SUBMITTED NEWS–The 2018 Scotlandville Interfaith Community Health Fair was a huge success in the Baton Rouge Community.  Four churches, one common goal.  Theme: “Behold I will bring it health and cure, I will cure them, and will reveal unto them the abundance of peace and truth.” Jeremiah 33:6.

     

    Hosted and sponsored by Allen Chapel AME Church, Pastor Demetrese Phillips, Camphor Memorial United Methodist Church, Pastor Elenora Mackey Cushenberry, Greater Mount Carmel Baptist Church, Pastor Clee E. Lowe and Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Pastor Thoma F. Clark, Sr., and congregation initiated, coordinated and planned the 2018 Scotlandville Interfaith Community Health Fair.

    Representation from all four hosted churches served as committee members.  Camphor Memorial United Methodist Church located at 8742 Scenic Highway, Baton Rouge, Louisiana was the site for the 2018 Health Fair held from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.  The Faith Walk was from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.  Several health care practitioners/providers, medical pharmacy were available.   Exhibits/Exhibitors; on- site examinations; educational information; blood pressure checks; cancer awareness; cardiovascular-heart healthy tips; immunizations; mental health counseling; diabetes tests and consultations; cholesterol-glucose screening; foot examinations (podiatry); hearing screenings; nutrition consultation; oral health; prescription medication management; vision; and tobacco use dangers.  Insurance cards were accepted for vaccinations.  Healthy snacks, fruit, nutrition bars, water was provided to all in attendance.

    Door prizes were giveaways.  The Children’s Village was at the Camphor Memorial United Methodist Church located at the Outreach Center adjacent to the church.  Mr. Robbyn Matthews, Chair, Dr. Dell Mars, Co-chair of the CMUMC Health and Welfare Ministries, CMUMC served as the 2018 Health Fair hosted church.  The host church of the 2019 Health Fair will be Allen Chapel AME Church.  All the 2018 Health Fair Committee Members worked very diligently and hard in making this endeavor a huge success.

    Written by Mada McDonald
    Submitted by Katrina Spottsville

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  • $4 million to go to Southern University’s science and engineering building

    Entergy has partnered with Southern University and A&M College to further support their mutual commitment to developing engineering talent for the future. A $2 million grant to Southern University from Entergy and the Entergy Charitable Foundation will support classroom and lab infrastructure improvements, as well as curriculum and faculty professional development for the university’s engineering program. During today’s grant press conference, Gov. John Bel Edwards announced a $2 million match.

    This multi-year initiative will focus on enhancing Southern’s engineering curriculum and staff development as well as state of the art improvements to labs and classrooms to enable students to obtain hands-on experience.  In addition, the grant will also fund the creation of internship and mentoring programs to enhance and strengthen the relationship between Entergy and Southern University.

    “As a national leader in educating minority and women engineers and STEM professionals, Southern University is an ideal partner for Entergy to continue to build on our investments in growing a diverse workforce,” said Leo Denault, Entergy chairman and chief executive officer. “Entergy has a long history of working with universities within the Gulf South to develop the professional and technical employees that can support the continued economic development across the region as well as Entergy’s internal long-term workforce needs.”

    Entergy has an extensive track record of supporting the communities it serves, and the company believes that reinvesting in these cities and neighborhoods will enhance the quality of life for everyone. Entergy also works to attract talented, diverse employees through its college recruiting efforts and relationships with minority professional organizations. Having contributed more than $2.3 million over the past five years to historically black colleges and universities in the company’s service territory, Entergy hopes to continue to play a key role in keeping talented graduates employed in our region.

    41513676_2123512174326507_7127266127679324160_n“When we invest in our students, we are investing in their future and the future of Louisiana,” said Gov. John Bel Edwards. “As career opportunities continue to grow in the STEM fields, it is necessary that we prepare our students to meet the needs of employers and be competitive in the global market, which is exactly what Southern University is doing while also ensuring African-American students receive the high quality education necessary for developing a diverse workforce. The long standing partnership between Entergy and Southern University is a successful blueprint for both industry and higher education.”

    “Our ongoing partnership with Southern University is an example of how industries and universities can work together to advance common goals,” said Phillip May, president and CEO of Entergy Louisiana. “Entergy Louisiana’s diverse and talented workforce includes some of the best and brightest engineers. We are committed to supporting programs that will help develop and enhance the next generation of engineering innovators.”

    “Southern University is one of the top producers of African-American engineers in the state of Louisiana and beyond,” said Ray L. Belton, Southern University System president. “This partnership with Entergy will ensure that we not only continue this great legacy, but that we also expand opportunities so that students are poised to make valuable contributions to our global society through STEM disciplines.”

    Take a look at the event gallery here.

     

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    Who to Watch: Barbara W. Green

    Baton Rouge counselor Barbara Green said she discusses everything with Seniors, parents, and social workers. At 71, Green manages a full time practice, host trainings and seminars, teaches in ministry, and publishes children’s books along with spiritual reflections. A native of Shreveport, Green has spoken to audiences that number in the thousands and consistently fills them with wisdom, hope, and clear instructions to move forward in their lives. She has been married to Henry Green of Belle Chasse, Louisiana for 48 years.

    Green is a licensed professional Christian counselor and marriage and family therapist who has been in private practice since 1989. She established Inner Reflections Counseling for “the purpose of helping people to help themselves.”

    Barbara W. Green shares "The Great One" with excited fifth graders in Baton Rouge.

    Barbara W. Green shares “The Great One” with excited fifth graders in Baton Rouge.

    She has recently taken her teachings on God’s call of parenting and family dynamics to groups across the state and nation through online podcast interviews. These teachings are written in her books: The Parent Anointing and The Great One.

    “Evangelist Barbara W. Green’s story The Great One will inspire readers to ensure that each generation’s history is properly passed down to equip the next generation for life’s journey. Although, the characters are dogs, their humanistic approach to spirituality and community is one we can all relate to. In this beautiful story, you will find disparity, hope, inspiration, and a quest to salvage your own family history and hold on to the greatness of family histories,” wrote Ellen Sudderth, the host of ESPresents in Virginia.

    Moves made from 2015 to 2017:  Sponsored workshops and a weekend retreat for women. Launched The Parent Anointing seminar for parents, guardians, and individuals who work with children. Conducted workshops for the EBR School System and area churches. Conducted weekly workshop for East Baton Rouge Council on Aging for the elderly citizens who were affected by The Great Flood in August 2016. Published my first children’s book, The Great One, with illustrator Antoine Mitchell.

    What to expect in 2018 from you: Trainings and webinars in emotional intelligence, married couples enrichment, and Sister-to-Sister.

    Personal resolution: To leave this natural world empty so that I might enter the spiritual world full.

    Life/business motto: “Helping Others to Help Themselves”

    Business resolution: To better my clients emotionally so that they might live their best lives.

    What is your #1 priority right now?  Service!

    Best advice you’ve ever received?  Live Your Best Life Now!

    Role Model: Maya Angelou

    What has been a deciding moment or an experience that pushed you forward?
    A deciding moment always comes on the heels of challenge. With that being said I think many of my deciding moments  have come when I felt I had little choice other than to choose to try. During the times of sickness, fear of consequences or getting beyond challenges that would inadequately define me if I failed, or just plain pride are the unctions that made me move forward to conquer the challenge. After the victories I knew that it was God who presented the URGE to give the challenge my best shot at conquest. The results have produced much humility in the recognition that it is God who gets the glory for every victory, beginning with the decision to even attempt the conquest of the challenge in the first place.

    What music are you listening/dancing to? Gospel

    What are you reading?  Butterfly Rising in my Soul by D. Renee Hamilton

    What’s entertaining you?  I go to the moves regularly. I like to watch “The Good Doctor” series.

    ONLINE: www.barbaragreenministries.org 

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    Searching for the Louisiana Young Heroes of 2019

    Louisiana Public Broadcasting and the Rotary Club of Baton Rouge are looking for the 2019 Louisiana Young Heroes. A Young Hero is an exceptional young person who has excelled in academics, given significantly of themselves through public service, overcome adversity, or inspired others through their deeds and strength of character.

    Nominations are now being accepted for the 24th annual Louisiana Young Heroes.

    Nominees must be Louisiana students enrolled in an academic institution or homeschool program, and cannot be older than 18 years of age. Nominations and supporting materials are submitted through the online form at lpb.org/heroes. Previous winners are not eligible. The deadline for entries is November 30, 2018. Louisiana Young Heroes Day will be Monday, April 15, 2019. This year’s honorees will receive a $1,000 tuition assistance grant and other special awards.

    Submit a nomination at lpb.org/heroes.

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    COMMENTARY: Teachers need more community, parental support

    The latest data from the Center for American Progress shows that the average salary for an attorney is more than two times that of elementary and middle school educators. The Washington Post reported last week that nearly 1 in 10 hosts who rent out their apartments, homes and spaces on Airbnb are teachers. Low salaries, compared with other college graduates, may inhibit highly-effective professionals from pursuing a career in education; specifically for people of color who currently make up just seven percent of public school teachers.

    I come from a family of educators. My mother, both of my grandmothers, and one of my sisters were teachers. However, the family tradition of educating children ended after me. None of my daughters, nieces, or nephews decided to pursue a career in education. Data comprised from surveys completed during the NNPA’s National Black Parents’ Town Hall Meeting echoed this sentiment. When asked what they believed is needed to close the academic achievement gap, respondents selected community participation and funding over the acquisition of highly-effective teachers.

    Many reasons have led to frustrations with teaching in the United States. Work-to-pay ratio, a lack of resources, and an increased focus on standardized testing has made it increasingly difficult for teachers to be highly-effective.

    This year, teacher strikes broke out in several states concerning school funding and teacher pay. Teachers in Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma, Kentucky, and West Virginia left the classroom for the state house to protest the lack of resources in the profession. NPR reported in April that teachers have begun to seek support outside of the educational bureaucracy; forming “supply shops” where teachers can swap educational materials for free or at a dramatically reduced cost.

    A first-year teacher who attended the National Black Parents’ Town Hall Meeting in Norfolk, VA, said that she stepped into the role of teaching, initially excited, but found by the end of the year she was extremely drained physically and emotionally. “I stepped into the role, mid-year, with no lesson plan. What can be done to keep teachers teaching and encourage new teachers coming into the program? I really want to teach, but there is very little support.”

    Highly-effective teachers require competitive pay, professional support, and access to innovative resources. President Barack Obama signed the current national education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in December 2015 with educators in mind. Title II of ESSA provides program grants to states and districts that can be used for teacher preparation, recruitment, support, and continued learning. ESSA also ends the requirement of states to set up teacher evaluation systems based significantly on students’ test scores which should reduce the pressure teachers feel to teach to the test. The Teacher and School Leader Innovation Program provides grants to districts that want to try out performance pay and other teacher quality improvement measures. ESSA became effective this 2018-2019 school year.

    With data compiled from 26 school districts, the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) found that on average there were small differences in the effectiveness of teachers of high- and low-income students, hiring patterns and teacher transfer patterns were consistent, with only minor differences, between high- and low-income students, and that in 3 of the 26 chosen districts there was meaningful inequity in access to effective teachers in math. Data showed that access to highly-effective teachers was relatively equal across the board. Yet, inequities in educational outcomes between low-income students and students from wealthier families persist throughout the United States.

    As a new teacher, the constant challenge for me was parental engagement. A working parent’s schedule often left little time during school hours to participate in their child’s education and those who were free during school hours, failed to realize the importance of their presence and participation. Today, meaningful parental engagement remains a challenge for educators.

    So, this is a call to action for all parents. Let’s listen to teachers. They are calling for more support and increased pay. Let’s attend to school meetings to find out how to provide them additional support. Let’s attend city and the state meetings to advocate for competitive pay. Let’s vote for leaders who support the academic advancement of our children through access to additional resources.

    By Elizabeth Primas, Ph.D.

     

    Elizabeth Primas, Ph.D., is an educator, who spent more than 40 years working towards improving education for children of diverse ethnicities and backgrounds. She is the program manager for the NNPA’s Every Student Succeeds Act Public Awareness Campaign. Follow her @elizabethprimas.

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    Sandbag locations open in preparation for rain

    In anticipation of Tropical Storm Gordon, the Baton Rouge City-Parish announces additional sandbag pickup locations, below. Residents are advised to bring their own shovels.

    City-Parish maintenance crews are currently checking major out falls throughout the parish for drainage canal blockages. Tree crews are prepared to respond in the event of fallen trees.

    At this time, river stages are not predicted to rise above flood stage. However, drainage crews are closely monitoring river levels throughout the parish.

    For more information, follow @RedStickReady on Facebook and Twitter and download the Red Stick Ready mobile application – free on Apple and Android devices.

    WHERE:

    Airline Highway Park
    17200 Airline Highway
    Baton Rouge, LA 70810

    Alsen Park
    601 Old Rafe Meyer Road
    Baton Rouge, LA 70807

    Doyles Bayou Park
    7801 Port Hudson-Pride Road
    Zachary, LA 70791

    Flannery Road Park
    801 Flannery Road
    Baton Rouge, LA 70815

    Hartley/Vey Park
    1702 Gardere Lane
    Baton Rouge, LA 70820

    Lovett Road Park
    13443 Lovett Road
    Central, LA 70818

    Memorial Sports Complex
    1702 Foss Street
    Baton Rouge, LA 70802

    St. George Fire Department Headquarters
    14100 Airline Highway
    Baton Rouge, LA 70817

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    Women! A Week-Long Celebration kicks off October 5 in Baton Rouge

    The Women’s Council is a network of organizations and individuals committed to enhancing our community by connecting, promoting and empowering women. Women’s Week is a week long celebration October 5-14th. There are 115 free events during the week dealing with important issues including healthcare, education, family, community, economics, business, sports, arts and humanities as well as offering fun and interesting activities.
    With the kickoff luncheon being held October 5th from the Marriott Hotel in Baton Rouge, this year’s theme, “Coming TogetHER,” promotes collaboration, partnerships, and to strengthen the links of the chain of women who have continued to make our city/state dynamic!

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    Should jury convictions be unanimous? and other questions head to Louisiana voters Nov. 6

    Senator J.P. Morrell

    Senator J.P. Morrell

    Like the rest of the nation, Louisiana voters will head to the polls November 6 for mid-term elections. But, here, voters will also decide on six constitutional amendments including one that has garnered national attention from criminal justice activists, entertainers, and legal organizations. It is the question of if  jury convictions be unanimous?

    Clearly one of the most discussed political and legal policies of the recent legislature, the non-unanimous juries were proven to vestiges of Jim Crow policies that unfairly lead to mass incarceration and voter suppression statewide.  Originally a senate bill  authored by Senator. J.P. Morrell (D-New Orleans), the law goes to vote in November. Voters will decide the fate of a new law and change in the constitution to require juries in felony cases to reach a unanimous verdict. Right now, only 10 of 12 jurors are needed, even on some murder cases.

    Angela Allen-Bell

    Angela Allen-Bell

    “We are sending people to prison (for felonies) routinely without the unanimous vote of 12,” law professor Angela Allen-Bell told Eric Hatfield and Perry Daniels, hosts of Louisiana All American Sports Show on WYBR 96.9FM. “This is historic. This is important. This is going to be the greatest piece of criminal justice legislature to impact any of us in our lives because of the far-reaching effects of this.” She started public discussion on the topic in 2015 at Southern University Law Center. Allen-Bell, a legal analyst, said the damage of the unjust, non-unanimous jury law is extensive.

    In two months, voters will also decide if convicted felons can be allowed to run for office, if certain funds can be used for traffic control, and if increased property taxes be phased in. Here are the amendments as they will appear at the polls:

    Proposed Amendment No. 1 : Act 719 of the 2018 Regular Session of the Louisiana Legislature proposing to add Article I, Section 10.1 to the Louisiana Constitution.

     “Do you support an amendment to prohibit a convicted felon from seeking or holding public office or appointment within five years of completion of his sentence unless he is pardoned?”

    Proposed Amendment No. 2: Act 722 of the 2018 Regular Session of the Louisiana Legislature proposing to amend Article I, Section 17(A) of the Louisiana Constitution.

     “Do you support an amendment to require a unanimous jury verdict in all noncapital felony cases for offenses that are committed on or after January 1, 2019?”

    Proposed Amendment No. 3:  Act 717 of the 2018 Regular Session of the Louisiana Legislature proposing to amend Article VII, Section 14(B) of the Louisiana Constitution.

    “Do you support an amendment to permit, pursuant to written agreement, the donation of the use of public equipment and personnel by a political subdivision upon request to another political subdivision for an activity or function which the requesting political subdivision is authorized to exercise?”

    Proposed Amendment No. 4: Act 720 of the 2018 Regular Session of the Louisiana Legislature proposing to amend Article VII, Section 27(B)(1) of the Louisiana Constitution.

    “Do you support an amendment to remove authority to appropriate or dedicate monies in the Transportation Trust Fund to state police for traffic control purposes?”

    Proposed Amendment No. 5:  Act 721 of the 2018 Regular Session of the Louisiana Legislature proposing to add Article VII, Sections 18(G)(6), 21(K)(4) and (M)(4) of the Louisiana Constitution.

    “Do you support an amendment to extend eligibility for the following special property tax treatments to property in trust: the special assessment level for property tax valuation, the property tax exemption for property of a disabled veteran, and the property tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a person who died while performing their duties as a first responder, active duty member of the military, or law enforcement or fire protection officer?”

    Proposed Amendment No. 6: Act 718 of the 2018 Regular Session of the Louisiana Legislature proposing to amend Article VII, Section 18(A) and (F) of the Louisiana Constitution.

    “Do you support an amendment that will require that any reappraisal of the value of residential property by more than 50%, resulting in a corresponding increase in property taxes, be phased-in over the course of four years during which time no additional reappraisal can occur and that the decrease in the total ad valorem tax collected as a result of the phase-in of assessed valuation be absorbed by the taxing authority and not allocated to the other taxpayers?”

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    10-year-old Leah Flynn plays violin tribute to Aretha Franklin

    Leah Flynn, a 10-year-old violin extraordinaire, is going viral for her recent tribute performance of “Natural Woman” to the late Aretha Franklin (Watch the YouTube Video). Leah has largely captivated audiences around the world with her God-given musical talent and a pure heart of gold.

    Her journey as a violinist extraordinaire is an inspirational story of tragedy turned triumph. When Leah’s mom was just three months pregnant with her, her dad, Lennox, had a stroke – forcing him to transition into the role of a stay-at-home dad and music coach. Leah has been playing the violin for five years now.

    Flynn aspires to inspire other children to love and appreciate music as much as she does through the organization Heart For Strings, founded by her parents Lennox and Paula Flynn. Leah’s goal is to inspire other children, especially African-American children, to love and appreciate music as much as she does.

    In today’s orchestras, less than 2% of the players are African-American, and Leah desires to be the first African-American to tour the world and perform alongside major symphonies, much like her favorite violinist Sarah Chang. As a classical violin soloist, Leah comments, “I would inspire so many children to play the violin or another instrument as well”.

    Born in Brooklyn, Flynn resides with her parents in Central Florida. She has performed alongside the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, at the NAACP 2016 and 2017 national conventions, The White House 2016 Christmas Holiday Tours, churches and at various galas.

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    Who to Watch: Niki’ H. Morrow

    As a child growing up in Lake Charles, Niki’ H. Morrow wanted to “save the world.” It is a passion that she said has led her to earn a degree in sociology from LSU and to hold a career in social services. “It has been my passion since a very young age,” said Morrow who has recently been selected as one of 30 professionals to participate in the state’s Adverse Childhood Experience Educator Program. The program will train-the-trainers on the impact of childhood adversity and traumatic experiences such as abuse, neglect, or sexual assault.

    A case manager for a local nonprofit, Morrow also mentors young girls at Star Hill Baptist Church. She often used craftmaking to release stress and express herself creatively. But, what began as a hobby has become a growing business in Baton Rouge.

    “My father, who was an entrepreneur, always wanted me to follow in his footsteps, but I refused not knowing it would be my saving grace in life years later,” she said. HarloweHearts

    In 2015, Morrow, established Harlowe Enterprises LLC and Harlowe Hearts Custom Designs. “Harlowe Hearts is a lifestyle brand that takes pride in bringing you exclusive custom made designs and products that fit every occasion in your life. Our staff has an amazing eye for detail, vast knowledge of products, and constant growing proficiency in the latest printing methods,” said the 37-year-old.

    Moves made: Harlowe Hearts Custom Designs opened in 2015. Since that time, we have grown into a full-service custom design boutique that offers screenprinting, vinyl designs, and embroidery.

    What to expect from you: We will begin to provide embroidered school uniforms and expand services provided to business such as promotional items and uniforms.

    Personal resolution: Constantly strive for growth and excellence

    Life/business motto: Let’s make something amazing together.

    Business resolution: To double our company’s net worth by the end of the year.

    What is your #1 priority right now? Growing Harlowe Hearts into a full-service, brick and mortar embroidery boutique.

    Best advice you’ve ever received? NO simply means “Next Opportunity.”

    Role Models:  My father, Lawrence Morrow, founder and owner of Gumbeaux Magazine, and my mother, Jacqueline Malveaux

    What has been a deciding moment or an experience that pushed you forward? The joy and excitement we get from our customers.

    What music are you listening/dancing to? Trevor Jackson, Ella Mae, and Shamar Allen

    What are you reading? The Art & Science of Respect by J. Prince and  Year of Yes by Shonda Rhimes

    What’s entertaining you? Ted Talks

    ONLINE: www.harlowehearts.com and @harlowehearts

     

    Read more »
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    ‘Finding Your Voice’ opens Sept. 6 featuring local artist in juried show

    LOCAL GALLERY TO FEATURE NATIONAL JURIED SHOW: FINDING YOUR VOICE

    Kelwood Contemporary Art, the Baton Rouge studio/gallery opened in 2015 by artist Jennifer Carwile, will hold a show called Finding Your Voice, featuring socially inspired work by forty seven artists from around the country. The public is invited to opening night, Thursday, Sept. 6 from 5-9 pm. The gallery is located at 8202 Kelwood Ave.

    Carwile’s inspiration for the show came with the realization that we are living in a period where it seems like people are finding their voice, and yet there is no conversation. The dialogue between disparate voices is not happening. Art can provide an opening to the discourse by showing issues through a new perspective and telling stories through a voice you hadn’t yet heard. The intention with this show is to give voice to the full spectrum of stories and experience. Through a series of gallery talks and community discussions she hopes to start dialogues to promote understanding.

    Local artists include Keith Douglas, Therese Knowles, Monica Santaella, David Hernandez, and Jennifer Esnault from Baton Rouge; Pippin Frisbie-Calder, Barriane Franks, and Antoine Prince from New Orleans; Elisa Gauthreaux from Covington; and Taylor Overby from Lafayette.

    Kelwood Contemporary Art is open from 1-5 Monday, Wednesday, and Friday and by appointment. The public is invited to the following events:
    Show Opening Reception, Thursday, September 6 5-9 pm
    Gallery Talk : A Brief History of Art as Social Commentary, Sunday, September 23
    Gallery Talk: Exploring Identity through Art, October 7 from 2-4 pm.

    Image: Racial Profiles; Traci Mims; 2017

    Read more »
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    University View Academy promotes Michelle Clayton to Superintendent

    The University View Academy Board of Directors voted to promote Michelle Clayton, Ph.D., to Superintendent of the K-12 statewide online charter school at the first meeting of the 2018-19 school year.

    Over the past seven years, the school has grown from originally serving 500 K-12 students to a current enrollment of 3100 students from every parish of the state using an innovative model of online instruction by certified Louisiana teachers.

    Clayton has served as associate superintendent of University View for the past year under the leadership of Lonnie Luce, Ph.D., who move to a new leadership role as the school’s chief officer.

    Clayton’s prior experience includes serving as deputy superintendent of East Baton Rouge Parish School System and as the executive director of academics for the Zachary Community School System.

    “I am very excited about the opportunity to help students across the state and be part of the innovative delivery model at University View Academy,” said Clayton. “The school has a tradition of academic achievement, and I will continue to build on that strong foundation. Innovation resonates with who I am as an educator.”

    She is a graduate of Louisiana State University and earned a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from University of Louisiana Lafayette and a doctorate from Southern University in science and mathematics education.

    Read more »
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    Study looks at whether exercise improves older African-Americans’ memory

    Scientists at LSU Pennington Biomedical Research Center are recruiting participants for a study on dementia prevention in older African Americans.

    The project is unique because few studies to date specifically developed behavior change interventions for older African Americans that target preventing dementia, said Robert Newton Jr., who designed the project with Owen Carmichael, Ph.D.

    “The goal of Program for the African American Cognition and Exercise (PAACE) study is to increase our knowledge of the effects of behavior change programs on dementia prevention,” Newton said. Study participants will be randomly assigned (flip of a coin) to one of two behavior change programs:

    • A 12-week physical activity program, which includes weekly physical activity sessions; or
    • A 12-week successful aging program, which includes weekly small group seminars.

    Each program will take place in a community setting.

    Pennington

    Pennington

    “African Americans experience dementia, or severe problems with thinking skills that impact the ability to live independently at a higher rate than members of other ethnic and racial groups. Behavior change programs are safe, well-tolerated, and have shown some promise in reducing risk factors for dementia,” Newton said. “We hope to reduce people’s risk of developing dementia.”

    However, before Newton and Carmichael could study the effects of behavior change interventions, they first had to develop a program in which older African-American adults would participate. While there have been several interventions developed for African-American adults, those plans were not specifically designed for older African Americans.

    “Our first aim is to gather information directly from older African Americans, aged 65-85, about the kinds of activities they want to engage in and use this information to develop behavior-change programs,” Newton said. “Our next aim is to determine if the interventions will be effective in a group of older African Americans.”

    If the behavior change programs work as intended, Carmichael and Newton may be able to achieve their final aim – determining if the intervention affects participants’ thinking skills.

    Newton is an associate professor and director of the Physical Activity and Ethnic Minority Health Laboratory at Pennington Biomedical. His primary focus is examining how physical activity and exercise training interventions affect the health of African-American adults and children.

    Carmichael is an associate professor and director of biomedical imaging at Pennington Biomedical. His research focuses on brain aging.

    Funding for the study was provided by BrightFocus Foundation, a nonprofit supporting research on Alzheimer’s disease, macular degeneration and glaucoma.

    For more information about the study or to participate, visit here, call 225-763-3000 or email clinicaltrials@pbrc.edu.

     

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Tax advisor wins nearly $1 millions IRS appeal case

    Celebrity tax advisor Jayson Thornton, founder of Thornton Tax, announces winning his appeal case, representing a client served with a $957,553.20 tax deficiency notice from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The St. Louis-based accountant shares tips on how to go up against the IRS and win. His practice helps clients with IRS tax compliance cases including audits, collections and appeals.

    At just 35-years old, Thornton has built an accounting firm dedicated to defending overwhelmed taxpayers. He says, “I love fighting for the underdog, and when it comes to the IRS everyone is an underdog.”

    Thornton has been recognized by the U.S. Department of Treasury for his “Outstanding Contributions” in tax counseling, and in 2017 was voted one of the best accountants in the City of St. Louis by St. Louis Small Business Monthly. He was also honored as one of 20 outstanding African American professionals under the age of 40 by the St. Louis American Foundation.


    About Thornton Tax Firm, LLC
    Thornton Tax is a St. Louis, MO-based accounting firm that specializes in tax law for clients in the Sports and Entertainment industry in tax compliance cases, tax preparation and IRS tax debt settlements. ONLINE: www.ThorntonOffice.com.


    About Jayson Thornton
    Jayson M. Thornton is a tax advisor and enrolled to practice by the United States Department of Treasury. He is also a certified public accountant candidate for the State of Missouri. Thornton earned his associate degree in accounting from St. Louis Community College, and bachelor’s degree in 2006 from Missouri Valley College as an honors graduate.

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  • ADL, Urban League speak against New Orleans school hair policy

    The Anti-Defamation League, South Central Region, and the Urban League of Louisiana joined in voicing concern about Christ the King School in New Orleans disciplining an African American student for wearing hair extensions under its racially insensitive grooming policy.  Requiring students to only wear “natural hair,” the policy prohibits “extensions, wigs, hair pieces of any kind …”
    Aaron Ahlquist, ADL South Central Regional Director, and Erika McConduit, President and CEO of the Urban League of Louisiana issued the following statement:
    “ADL and the Urban League are deeply troubled by the policy in question as well as the manner in which the school is disciplining students of color under this policy. The policy shows racial insensitivity and bias by the administration to students and their families.  While we understand that many private and public schools have dress and grooming policies intended to foster learning and health, this policy discriminates against Black girls by forbidding hair extensions and requiring only ‘natural hair.’
    As such, we are immediately calling for the school to revise the policy, withdraw current disciplinary action issued under it, and apologize to the impacted students. It should also implement reasonable grooming standards that foster learning while respecting diversity, as well as institute cultural competence and anti-discrimination training for all staff.
    There is an opportunity for the Archdiocese of New Orleans and Christ the King School to take a reflective and introspective look at the impact of this policy and work in ways to be more accepting and inclusive of their students, regardless of race.  We stand ready to assist in this process by helping to work towards building a school environment which promotes success and equal opportunity for all students.”
    ADL is the world’s leading anti-hate organization. Founded in 1913 in response to an escalating climate of anti-Semitism and bigotry, its timeless mission is to protect the Jewish people and to secure justice and fair treatment for all. Today, ADL continues to fight all forms of hate with the same vigor and passion. A global leader in exposing extremism, delivering anti-bias education, and fighting hate online, ADL is the first call when acts of anti-Semitism occur. ADL’s ultimate goal is a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate.
    ONLINE: adl.org.
    Celebrating 80 years of service, the Urban League of Louisiana works to enable African-Americans and other communities seeking equity to secure economic self-reliance, parity and civil rights. The Urban League’s three Centers of Excellence are focused in the areas of education and youth development, workforce and economic development, and public policy and advocacy.
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  • ,

    Congressman says Democrats who want to win in November must advertise in the Black Press

    While there’s at least a perceived growing number of Democrats who say they want to replace California Rep. Nancy Pelosi as the Democratic leader in the House of Representatives, South Carolina Rep. Jim Clyburn has emerged as a favorite among his peers to become the first African American to hold that position.

    In an exclusive interview with the NNPA Newswire, the 25-year congressman said that, while he’s ready for the challenge, Democrats currently have much bigger fish to fry.

    “The first order of business is to win the [midterm] elections on November 6,” Clyburn said. “That’s what I’ve been concentrating on.”

    Clyburn and Congressional Black Caucus Chair Cedric Richmond each told the NNPA Newswire that they’ve identified 37 districts across the country they believe can be won by Democrats this year, which would wrest control of the House from Republicans.

    “We feel, with the right kind of effort, we can win,” Clyburn said.

    Clyburn listed three keys to success this November.

    The first key, Clyburn said, is to prioritize the Black vote; Democrats can’t afford to take the African American vote for granted.

    The secondly, the Democrats shouldn’t rely on an anti-President Donald Trump wave to get out the vote. Finally, Clyburn said that candidates must advertise in the Black Press , if they want to win in November.

    “We are also talking about districts where Barack Obama won twice and where Hillary Clinton also won, but these voters don’t turn out for the so-called ‘off-year elections,’” Clyburn said. “We can’t let these voters feel like we’re taking them for granted.”

    Clyburn, 78, said he was recently taken aback by one candidate, who said that he could win the Black vote by running on an anti-Trump platform.

    “Wait one second,” Clyburn said that he told the individual. “We can’t just go around being ‘Republican-light.’ We have to be out there putting forth an alternative message, for our base, and we have to reach out to Black voters and let them know we’re not taking them or any of our base for granted.”

    To that end, Clyburn said advertising campaigns must largely include the Black Press.

    “It’s very, very important…Chairman Richmond and I have had candidates in and we’ve been telling them that one of the best ways to demonstrate that you’re not taking the Black vote for granted is to advertise in the Black Press,” Clyburn said.

    The National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) is the oldest and largest trade group representing the Black Press, comprised of more than 200 Black-owned newspapers operating in the the United States.

    “I’ve been in [the Black Press]. My daughter and I ran a newspaper down South, so I know that candidates tend to take Black media for granted,” Clyburn said. “They tend to judge Black media the same way they do other media and you just can’t do that, because the business model is totally different.”

    Each Sunday after attending Morris Brown A.M.E. Church in Charleston, S.C., Clyburn said he and other churchgoers habitually pick up the local Black-owned newspaper.

    “People tend to pay attention to the headlines, the stories and the ads in the Black Press so it’s vitally important that candidates know this,” Clyburn said.

    A former history teacher, Clyburn said Trump’s obsession with dismantling Obama’s legacy is reminiscent of tactics employed by Andrew Johnson to demean his predecessor, Abraham Lincoln.

    Johnson, who was impeached by House, had a vision of America as a White man’s government, according to historians.

    “If you remember, it’s the same kind of reaction Johnson had to Lincoln and I remember sitting alone once in the Oval Office with Obama and I told him that this would be the kind of reaction he could expect,” Clyburn said.

    “[Obama] was never going to get the kind of respect for his presidency that was shown to presidents before him,” Clyburn said. “The narrative that exists in this country is that there are certain things that Black folks are not supposed to do and one of those things is becoming the president of the United States and [President Trump] and his administration, feel they have to do whatever they can to wipe out any semblance that Barack Obama was ever president of the United States.”

    Clyburn continued: “[Trump] has a deep-seated hatred for people of color and it manifests itself every day.”

    Though he doesn’t support or agree politically with former Trump aide Omarosa Manigault Newman, Clyburn said he was deeply troubled when Trump referred to her as a “low life” and a “dog.”

    “I’m the father of three daughters and I’m deeply insulted by the president of the United States referring to an African American women the way he referred to her,” he said. “Politics aside, I’m insulted that the president of the United States would denigrate the office in this way.”

    Clyburn continued: “The president asked an important question when he was running, ‘What do we have to lose?’ Well, we have lost dignity and the respect of the presidency, because of his coarseness in the office. When you lose respect, you’ve lost about everything there is to lose.”

    While he still supports Pelosi, Clyburn said that if the Democrats take back the House, he’s up for the job as speaker.

    “I have always supported her, but I have always remembered a sermon I heard my father give a number of times,” Clyburn said. “That sermon stayed with me and he said, ‘keep your lamps trimmed and burning to be ready when the bridegroom comes.’ My point is, I’ve never forgotten that sermon so I keep my lamp burning so I’m ready.”

    Stacy Brown is an NNPA Newswire Contributor and co-author of “Michael Jackson: The Man Behind the Mask: An Insider’s Story of the King of Pop.” Follow Stacy on Twitter @stacybrownmedia.

    This article was originally published on BlackPressUSA.com.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    School’s in, drivers need to be vigilant

    The start of a new school year in Louisiana also means drivers need to be vigilant through school zones and around school buses.

    School zone times vary around the state but generally are in effect anytime from 6 a.m. to 8 a.m. and from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Fines for speeding through a school zone can be steep, especially if the driver also is talking, listening or texting on a cell phone.
    “In addition to a fine of up to several hundred dollars for speeding through a school zone, a driver using a cell phone in a school zone also can be fined up to $500,” said Lisa Freeman, executive director of the Louisiana Highway Safety Commission. “A driver who engages in multiple violations of cell phone usage in a school zone can further risk a fine of up to $1,000 and be exposed to a driver’s license suspension as well. If a driver is involved in a crash in a school zone while using a cell phone, fines can be doubled.
    “The idea behind stiff fines is to keep our school zones safe, and sometimes it takes a high penalty to make that point,” Freeman noted.
    Freeman also urged drivers to understand the laws regarding when a driver must stop for a bus that is flashing red lights, which indicates it is loading or unloading children.
    • On a two-lane road, all vehicles in both directions must stop.
    • On a three-lane road with a center turning lane, all vehicles in both directions must stop.
    • On a four-lane road with no median or other physical barrier between the lanes, all vehicles in both directions must stop.
    • On a divided highway with a grass median or other physical barrier, vehicles moving in the same direction as the bus must stop; oncoming traffic should proceed with caution.
    • On a highway that has a center turning lane with two travel lanes on each side, vehicles moving in the same direction as the bus must stop; oncoming traffic should proceed with caution.
    The chart above, courtesy of the state Department of Transportation and Development and Louisiana State Police, is a handy reminder of the school bus laws.
    Read more »
  • ,,,,

    Lashley means business in the Big Apple

    Growing up in Franklin, La., LSU graduate Victor Lashley may have come from a small town, but he’s making a name for himself in New York City.

    “My very first day in New York City was the day I moved here for my summer internship. I packed my bags, got in a cab and pretended to know the address that I gave my taxi driver,” said Lashley.

    Lashley said the internships and connections he made at LSU set him on a path for success.

    “The College of Business has a lot of good partnerships with a lot of different companies, so they would come into the Finance Club and with a lot of opportunities for internships or careers and JP Morgan was on my radar. I just worked with the Olinde Career Center to be a qualified candidate. I applied and started interning when I was a sophomore.”

    During Lashley’s first summer at JP Morgan, he worked in the prime brokerage operation within their investment bank. Lashley returned to JP Morgan for a second summer, this time working in treasury services. After graduating from LSU in 2012, he became an official employee of JP Morgan, working as a sales associate.

    “Every 6 months I went to a different role, so during my first two years I had four different jobs. And then after that program finished, I placed permanently in trade finance and that involves importing, exporting, and working capital transactions internationally.”

    Lashley has since worked his way up to vice president of global trade at JP Morgan.

    “The day-to-day responsibilities are connecting U.S. customers with either a buyer or seller in an international market. So, (working with) a U.S. manufacturer selling to an emerging market or a U.S. company that’s sourcing or purchasing somewhere overseas,” Lashley said.

    While a student at LSU, Lashley majored in business marketing with a minor in leadership development.

    “I did a program in the Honors College called LASAL (Louisiana Service and Leadership), which is all about partnering with Louisiana locally to address poverty and coastal land loss, so it was a combination of two unrelated topics that gave me a very diverse experience in terms of class and activities.”

    Lashley said that experience at LSU, along with everything he learned through his various internships, has helped him get where he is today. And he’s not the only LSU graduate who is enjoying success in New York City.

    “LSU gives you the world in South Louisiana. It’s definitely very cultural, very rich in spirit and the LSU brand will stay with you for the rest of your life. I meet people in New York City who may recognize my class ring, or maybe purple and gold when I wear it, and it’s a connection that’s always there.”

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Historic Tangipahoa Parish Training School–nation’s first vocational school for Blacks–to be auctioned

    KENTWOOD, La–The Tangipahoa Parish desegregation lawsuit, filed over 51 years ago in the federal courts in New Orleans, has still not been resolved.

    In 1911, the Tangipahoa Parish Training School opened as the first Black training school in the nation. Vocational and industrial education offered students specialized training. The school provided teacher training so that the graduated could staff the Black schools in rural towns throughout the South. The training school was the beginning of secondary public education for Black in South.

    Professor Armstead Mitchell Strange was born in 1884 in Waterproof, Louisiana. He earned his college degree from Alcorn College, where he finished in 1902. Strange came to Tangipahoa Parish via Collins, Mississippi. He came to Kentwood, LA in 1910. Strange joined several local white businesses, and donated money to establish Kentwood Industrial School for Blacks. He raised the money, purchased land, and erected the building, one of which was named for him. The scholastic year 1911-12, marked the beginning of the Training School Movement as far the Slater Fund is concerned. Professor A.M. Strange wrote to Dr. James H. Dillard, general agent for the John F. Slater Fund (a philanthropic fund for the advancement of Negro education), soliciting aid for a Black school that would be located in Kentwood, Louisiana. Professor Strange established Kentwood’s first training school for Blacks.

    O.W. Diillon

    O.W. Diillon

    In 1917, Professor Oliver Wendell Dillon came to Kentwood to take charge of the one-room, one-teacher, two months a year school. That year Dillon received $1,000 from the Brooks Scanlon Lumber Co. and the Natalbany Lumber Co. in order to hire three other teachers and extend the school term to a full nine months for 200 students. In 1919 the school board appropriated $1,000 to construct a two-story, five-classroom building at the school. Another $1,200 was spent to purchase 85 acres adjoining the school.

    Professor Dillon appealed to the local board to buy a machine, and to make cement blocks. After securing the machine he implored Black people in the area to supply labor. They made 40,000 cement blocks, one at a time and erected a building for educating area children.

    According to the genealogy research of Leonard Smith III and local historian Antoinette Harrell, Professor Strange was one of seventeen children born to Tillman and Millie Hunter Strange. His brother Tillman moved to Chicago and became a physician. Professor Strange started other schools and colleges in the South. He helped many young Black students get their education.

    Harrell’s research revealed that the greatest gospel singer Mahalia Jackson performed at the school in the ’60s. Many of the students who attended the school were the children of sharecroppers and farmers who wanted their children to get an education. Having the school auction would create a massive void in the community.

    Deon Johnson, executive director of O.W. Dillon Preservation Organization, attended every meeting to address this situation with the Tangipahoa Parish School Board and hasn’t had much success. “How could they auction off our legacy?” He asked. “Our ancestor worked with the sweat, tears, and blood to build this school,” said Deon.

    Basketball star LeBron James opened the free “I Promise” school in Akon, Ohio. The school offers free uniforms, transportations, access to a food pantry for their family. Professor Strange and Professor Dillon did the same thing in Kentwood. They solicited the support of the community who gave their resources and labor to build the oldest Training School for Blacks in the Nation.

    “Today the school is up for auction and has caused a great deal of pain and heartaches for the African American community,” said  Johnson. “A lot of sweat and hard work built this school,” he said. “Professor Oliver Wendell Dillon and men of the community made the very bricks and mortar to build the school. Please help us to keep this historic school and preserve our legacy.”

    ONLINE: owdillonpreservation.org

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Who to Watch: Steven C. Baham

    Steven C. Baham, 40, is a computer scientist and owner of Baham Laboratories, LLC, in Baton Rouge. A native of Slidell, Baham is the son of Les and Eva Baham. As a child, he and his brother, Michael, wanted a Nintendo game system, but their father wanted them to build computers to play video games instead. Since 1994, Baham has been gradually building clientele as a technology consultant. He established Baham Laboratories, LLC in 2004, and today the company has more than 600 clients and nearly 30 business IT service agreements in Baton Rouge, Hammond, New Orleans, and Slidell.

    Moves made from 2015 to 2017: The 2016 flood was challenging because with my home office damaged, I had to learn to operate with a small amount of equipment with minimal space. Even so, we were able to build a custom e-mail cloud server for Baham Labs clients with special security features, recover valuable data for clients who had their office computer flooded.

    What to expect in 2018 from you? My biggest topic I keep reinforcing is digital security. I think most people don’t take it seriously until something really bad happens to them. It’s my job to help protect and educate people/organizations on how to protect themselves. When you’re a person like me who sees the worse things happen to some people online, it makes it easier to explain to others the steps they should be taking. I still have a few surprises for 2018 that I can’t reveal yet, but watch our social media accounts in the next couple months.

    Baham Laboratories

    Baham Laboratories

    Role models: My parents are my main role models.

    What is your #1 priority right now? I have a small team finishing the data wiring for the new Geico building in Baton Rouge. That’s my priority since the next business steps will take place after that.s complete.

    Best advice you’ve ever received? Prepare yourself for what you want to do in the future, as well as prepare yourself the best you can for what might happen.

    What has been a deciding moment or an experience that pushed you forward? It took me missing a wedding anniversary, and my daughter’s birthday one year because a client didn’t follow my advice… which lead to a system crash which they expected me to fix on those days respectively. I think when I realized that I could tell people what they HAD to do to improve their data systems, and if they refused, I could tell them to sign off on a form showing that I wasn’t liable for what might happen, was when I realized I had more power over how I could run my business.

    Personal resolution: More vacation time

    Business motto: “We organize digital chaos.”

    What music are you listening/dancing to? I’m enjoying my 80s station on XM radio.

    What are you reading? Currently a lot of technical information online.

    What’s entertaining you? I love going to the movies! I’m also a Marvel movie fan, and a lifelong Star Wars fan.

    ONLINE: www.bahamlabs.com 

     

    Read more »
  • ,

    QUALIFIED!

    Meet the candidates vying for votes in Tangipahoa’s November 6 election

     

    Secretary of State

    (One to be elected)

    R. Kyle Ardoin, Baton Rouge, Republican, White Male

    Heather Cloud, Turkey Creek,Republican, White Female

    ‘Gwen’ Collins-Greenup, Clinton, Democrat, Black Female

    A.G. Crowe, Pearl River, Republican, White Male

    ‘Rick’ Edmonds, Baton Rouge, Republican, White Male

    Renee Fontenot Free, Baton Rouge, Democrat, White Female

    Thomas J. Kennedy III, Metairie, Republican, White Male

    Matthew Paul ‘Matt’ Moreau, Zachary, No Party, White Male

    Julie Stokes, Metairie, Republican,  White Female

     

    U. S. Representative 1st Congressional District

    (One to be elected)

    Lee Ann Dugas, Kenner, Democrat, White Female

    ‘Jim’ Francis, Covington, Democrat, White Male

    Frederick ‘Ferd’ Jones, Ponchatoula, Independent, White Male

    Howard Kearney, Mandeville, Libertarian, White Male

    Tammy M. Savoie, New Orleans, Democrat, White Female

    Steve Scalise,Jefferson, Republican, White Male

     

    U. S. Representative 5th Congressional District

    Ralph Abraham Archibald, Republican, White Male

    Billy Burkette, Pride, Independent,  American Indian Male

    Jessee Carlton Fleenor, Loranger, Democrat, White Male

    Kyle Randol, Monroe, Libertarian, White Male

     

    Member of School Board – District A

    (One to be elected)

    Walter Daniels, Amite, Democrat, Black Male

    Jonathan Foster, Amite, Democrat, Black Male

    Janice Fultz Richards, Fluker, Democrat, Black Female

     

    Member of School Board – District B

    (One to be elected)

    Rodney Lee, Loranger, Independent, White Male

    ‘Tom’ Tolar, Kentwood, Republican, White Male

     

    Member of School Board – District C

    (One to be elected)

    Robin Abrams, Independence, Republican, White Female

    Janice Reid Holland, Independence, Democrat, Black Female

     

    Member of School Board – District D

    (One to be elected)

    Terran Perry, Hammond, Democrat, Black Male

    Phillip David Ridder Jr., Tickfaw, Republican, White Male

    Glenn Westmoreland, Hammond, Republican, White Male

     

    Member of School Board – District F

    (One to be elected)

    ‘Randy’ Bush, Ponchatoula, Republican, White Male

    Christina ‘Chris’ Cohea, Hammond, No Party, White Female

    E. Rene Soule, Hammond, Democrat, Black Male

    ‘Mike’ Whitlow, Ponchatoula, Republican, White Male

     

    Member of School Board – District G

    (One to be elected)

    Alvon Brumfield, Hammond, No Party, White Male

    Jerry Moore, Hammond, Democrat, Black Male

    Betty C. Robinson, Hammond, Democrat, Black Female

     

    Member of School Board – District I

    (One to be elected)

    Rose Quave Dominguez, Ponchatoula, Republican, White Female

    Arden Wells, Ponchatoula, Republican, White Male

    John H. Wright Jr., Ponchatoula, Democrat, Black Male

     

    Mayor City of Hammond

    (One to be elected)

    Oscar ‘Omar’ Dantzler, Hammond, Democrat, Black Male

    Jim ‘J.’ Kelly Jr., Hammond, Democrat, Black Male

    Peter Michael Panepinto, Hammond, Republican, White Male

     

    Mayor Town of Kentwood

    (One to be elected)

    Rochell Bates, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Male

    Irma Thompson Gordon, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Female

    Michael ‘Mike’ Hall, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Male

    Herbert Montgomery, Kentwood, No Party, Black Male

     

    Chief of Police – Town of Kentwood

    (One to be elected)

    Gregory ‘Big’ Burton, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Male

    Michael Kazeroni, Kentwood, Republican, Black Male

     

    Council Member District  1, City of Hammond

    (One to be elected)

    Kiplyn ‘Kip’ Andrews, Hammond, Democrat, Black Male

    Carl R. Duplessis, Hammond, No Party, White Male

    ‘Chris’ McGee Sr.,Hammond, Democrat, Black Male

     

    Council Member District  2, City of Hammond

    (One to be elected)

    Carlee White Gonzales, Hammond, Republican, White Female

    Craig Inman, Hammond, Republican,White Male

    ‘Josh’ Taylor, Hammond, Republican, White Male

     

    Council Member District  3, City of Hammond

    Janice Carter, Hammond, Democrat, Black Female

    Devon Wells, Hammond, Democrat, Black Male

    ‘Brad’ Wilson, Hammond, Democrat, Black Male

    Council Member District  4, City of Hammond

    (One to be elected)

    Sam Divittorio, Hammond, Republican, White Male

    Justin Thornhill, Hammond, Republican, White Male

     

    Council Member District  5, City of Hammond

    (One to be elected)

    Louise Bostic, Hammond, No Party, White Female

    Steven Leon, Hammond, Republican, White Male

     

    Council Member(s) Town of Kentwood

    (Five to be elected)

    Gary Callihan, Kentwood, Democrat, White Male

    Irma Clines, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Female

    Tre’von D. Cooper, Kentwood, Independent, Black Male

    Xavier D. Diamond, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Male

    Antoinette Harrell, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Female

    Terrell ‘Teddy’ Hookfin, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Male

    Shannon R. Kazerooni, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Female

    William Lawson, Kentwood, Republican, White Male

    James Robbins, Kentwood, No Party, Black Male

    Michael L. Sims, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Male

    Steven J. Smith, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Male

    Paul Stewart, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Male

    Tonja Thompson, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Female

    John Williams, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Male

    Audrey T. Winters, Kentwood, Democrat, Black Female

     

    Council Member(s) Village of Tickfaw

    (Three to be elected)

    ‘Mike’ Fedele, Tickfaw, Other, White Male

    ‘Steve’ Galofaro, Tickfaw, Other, White Male

    Guy J. Ribando, Tickfaw, Democrat, White Male

    Jimmy Sparacello, Tickfaw, No Party, White Male

     

    Read more »
  • La. based social network expects to bring $26 billion back into urban communities

    BELLE CHASSE, La.–Building Economic Advancement Network (BEAN) is aligning strategic investments, incentivized business transactions and cutting-edge technology to increase economic power in urban communities.

    The company is scheduled to launch the intuitive BEAN app this fall.

    According to BlackNews.com, this launch sets a precedent as the first social network dedicated to the economic advancement of urban communities by leveraging commerce and blockchain technology.

    “The platform allows users to easily connect with businesses and professionals from all over the world that are committed to making a positive economic impact in urban communities. BEAN’s intuitive app leverages the latest breakthroughs in blockchain technology, enabling users to monitor their daily economic impact, while earning BEAN coins for their transactions,” states a corporate press release.

    BEAN is founded by Darren Walker, 33, of Belle Chasse, a real estate investor who oversees a multi-million dollar portfolio. He recently starred in the DIY Network’s show, ‘Louisiana Flip N Move,’ where he and his wife, Lucy, demonstrated their real estate and renovation prowess throughout Louisiana.

    His partner Derek Fitzpatrick is a designer, technology expert and application developer who has led multiple, award-winning studios as a creative director. His deep understanding of design and technology is at the forefront of BEAN’s platform.

    Fitzpatrick’s expertise in branding, 3D/2D, animation, motion graphics, visualization, architecture and industrial design has been instrumental in producing creative, animated and branding assets for major corporations, new products, business services and start-ups.

    BEAN partner Michael Long is a corporate attorney who specializes in corporate and securities law, venture capital, joint ventures, real estate development, debt, mergers and acquisitions, and various areas of corporate law.

    Walker said, “BEAN is at the forefront of an economic shift. We are leveraging resources, partnerships and investors from diverse backgrounds and demographics to drive economic advancement in urban communities. African Americans have the 16th largest buying power in the world and are major contributors to the United States GDP, yet so much of that economic power is not realized where it matters most – in African American neighborhoods. BEAN’s social network will counter that trend by connecting consumers and businesses in a manner that positively impacts urban communities.”

    BEAN expects to facilitate $26 billion back into urban communities by using its platform to redirect a minimum of 2% of African American spending.

    BEAN has set aside 16% of its shares for private investment. Now through December 31, 2018, individuals and investors can purchase BEAN shares with equity in accordance with the U.S. Securities Exchange Commission’s (SEC) rules under the Jobs ACT, Title III, Regulation Crowdfunding (Reg. CF).

    BEAN is offering shares for a minimum investment of $250 and maximum investment of $107,000. Facilitating BEAN’s Reg. CF offering is truCrowd, a U.S. crowdfunding portal authorized by the SEC. For every investment during the initial Reg. CF offering, investors will also receive BEAN Coin tokens, which will be used as cryptocurrency on BEAN’s social network.

     

    ONLINE:www.trucrowd.com.

    ONLINE:iambean.us.

     

    Read more »
  • ,

    Letter to the Editor: Mr. President and the art of the deal

    The U.S, President claims to be such a great deal maker. He even has an autobiography titled The Art of the Deal. Does anyone other American citizen wonder why any time Trump meets with a foreign dictator, there are no note takers, and consequently, no official record? Is there any concern by any other American citizen that Trump has secret calls with Putin, and the only way we find out about these secret calls in the United States is through Russian media?

    Is there any concern by any other American citizen that man who said that he would declare China a currency manipulator in November of 2015, is now so concerned about Chinese jobs being lost that he is willing to ease restrictions on the notorious Chinese phone company, ZTE? By the way, ZTE is considered by United States intelligence to be a security risk, so much so that the company is not allowed to sell goods on United States military bases. Why are all of his deals with foreign dictators done in secrecy?

    From the information that is subsequently released after one of these secret meetings or phone calls where there is no note taker, it seems that Trump’s greatest art is genuflection. That is why he left the summit in Singapore with nothing but empty commitments. North Korea left with a promise to halt joint military exercises, and according to North Korea run media, an ease in sanctions. That is why after a secret phone call with Putin, Trump wants Russia back in the G-7, although Russia was ejected for their annexation of Crimea. That is why Trump is concerned with the loss of Chinese jobs and wants to ease restrictions on ZTE in spite of the security concerns of United States intelligence.

    There was a time in America when we demanded candor from our elected officials. Under Trump, a mendacious liar, that has changed. Trump insults our nation’s traditional allies such Justin Trudeau of Canada, Emmanuel Macron of France, and Angela Merkel of Germany. He genuflects to foreign strong men like Vladimir Putin, Kim Jong Un, and Xi Jinping. Trump’s next book should be entitled “The Art of the Kneel”.

    By Darryl Robertson
    Baton Rouge

    Read more »
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    Local campers visit Baton Rouge City Hall, Mayor Broome

    2018 Camp U. N. I. T. E. D. participants visiting Baton Rouge City Hall and Mayor Sharon Weston Broome.  Standing on bottom row from left to right: Kayleigh Tran and Heaven Adams; Second row left to right:  McKenzie Milton and Madison Lathers; Third row left to right:  Aarionna Barg, Tyra Porter, and Haven Franklin (Teen Volunteer);  Fourth row left to right:  Brooke Butler, Nyrielle Davis, and Adelay Smith.

    2018 Camp U. N. I. T. E. D. participants visiting Baton Rouge City Hall and Mayor Sharon Weston Broome. Standing on bottom row from left to right: Kayleigh Tran and Heaven Adams; Second row left to right: McKenzie Milton and Madison Lathers; Third row left to right: Aarionna Barg, Tyra Porter, and Haven Franklin (Teen Volunteer); Fourth row left to right: Brooke Butler, Nyrielle Davis, and Adelay Smith.

    Several local campers spend a summertime of learning and fun by participating in a local program called, Camp U.N.I.T.E.D. over the past few weeks. Camp U. N. I. T. E. D. (Uplifted, Nurtured, and Inspired Together Each Day), they had the opportunity to participate in daily workshops that focused on leadership development, healthy nutrition and body image, time management skills, communication skills, internet safety, and community/public service.  The girls’ primary focus was on the three paths to empowerment as they start their journey into middle school.  Their unique journeys began with discovering their individual personal power or the power within.  Then, they moved to the power of team or the power of reaching across to work with others.  The final path was the power of community/public service or the power of reaching out.  The highlights of their camp were a 90 minute SKYPE session with girls their age in Migosi, Kenya, Africa and a field trip to City Hall to meet with Mayor Sharon Weston Broome, Councilwoman Tara Wicker, and Councilman Chandler Loupe.  Each girl received a certificate of commendation signed by Mayor Broome and was also given the opportunity to visit the new Metro-Council chambers where they were allowed to participate in a mock Metro-Council meeting.  These girls have experienced a unique summer filled with awesome opportunities.

    Read more »
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    New business comes to the Village of Tangipahoa

    Village of Tangipahoa Mayor Trashica Robinson along with the board of aldermen and special guests gathered July 17 to break ground on a Big Boss Travel Plaza and Bella Rose Estates, a combination convenience store and restaurant to be located off Highway 440.

    “We’ve worked hard for the past two years to bring new business to the Village of Tangipahoa,” said Robin son.

    “It’s been more than 20 years since a new business came to the Village. New business means more sales tax,” said Robinson. “In the process (the businesses)create some local jobs.”

    She said, “This is a good location, travelers can leave the interstate get a quick breakfast, gas up, and continue to work.”

    “When this project is completed it will bring economic benefit to the town, she said. ℜ

    Read more »
  • Nominate Baton Rouge area volunteer activists by August 10

     

    Nominations are now open for the 47th annual Baton Rouge Area Volunteer Activist awards. Nominations can be completed online at www.emergela.org/events and are due by August 10. Nominations should include details of individual’s volunteer activities, which organizations they have volunteered for, and how their service has impacted the community.

    Hosted by The Emerge Center, the awards luncheon honors those who give of their time and talents to organizations across our community, above and beyond typical volunteer requirements. These individuals possess a sense of service and community that impacts the Greater Baton Rouge area in a positive and meaningful way.   This year’s event will honor a special Emerging Activist. This award will recognize a young individual who has independently made considerable contributions to the Baton Rouge community. The Emerging Activist may be an advocate for a cause, have recently created a new community initiative, or participates in substantial volunteer activities. Individuals must be 18 years of age or younger to be considered as an honoree.

    The 2018 event will be held on Friday, November 16, at the Renaissance Hotel located at 7000 Bluebonnet Boulevard in Baton Rouge.

    The Baton Rouge Area Volunteer Activists luncheon benefits The Emerge Center for Communication, Behavior, and Development – a 59 year old non-profit organization that empowers children with autism and individuals with communication challenges to achieve independence through innovative and family-centered therapies.

    For more information on nominations or the event, please contact Brandi Monjure at bmonjure@emergela.org or 225-343-4232 ext. 1897.

    Read more »
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    Local businesswoman to be featured in Avon campaign

    Baton Rouge-local and Avon Representative Starsky Clark will be starring in iconic beauty brand Avon’s upcoming campaign. From top-sellers to accomplished leaders, Avon’s Campaign 19 will feature all real-life Avon Representatives as models in their newest catalog, launching August 21.  A former Marine, Clark works as a full-time pharmacist.

    Starsky’s tips for success:

    1.  Be passionate about your business by using the products yourself, and share your authentic, personal anecdotes with others to build personal relationships and special connections with your customers.
    2. Always give samples – customers love to touch and feel before purchasing, and it makes them feel special to be able to try new products before they buy. 
    3. Invest your earnings back into your business by supporting, motivating, and mentoring your team! 

     

     

    Read more »
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    NAACP honors Stewart with Cobb Award

    On July 16, Louisiana Center for Health Equity President Alma C. Stewart received the NAACP Dr. William Montague Cobb Award “For her outstanding efforts to advance health policy, health advocacy, and social justice in the State of Louisiana.” The award was presented at the NAACP Annual Convention in San Antonio. This award is given annually in recognition of the legacy of Dr. William Montague Cobb, who served as the President of the NAACP from 1976 to 1983, to honor individuals and organizations that have made a significant impact in the field of health.

    Stewart has served as the state health committee chair for the Louisiana State Conference of the NAACP since 2014. She also organized the statewide, multi-year Campaign for Healthcare for Everyone Louisiana in 2013. The goal of this campaign was to advocate for statewide policy change and build grassroots momentum to implement Medicaid expansion by 2016.

    In an effort to address Louisiana’s high rate of uninsured adults, keeping the Louisiana State Conference of the NAACP and HCEL partner organizations engaged, over the course of three years Stewart organized public testimony at legislative hearings, rallies, press conferences and prayer vigils under the mantra of “Dying for Coverage” as part of a movement to bring attention to this issue on a state and national level. HCEL was successful in shaping public opinion about Medicaid expansion which polls favorably in Louisiana despite cascading contributions from well-financed conservative out-of-state organizations that have opposed it. She coordinated the hosting and production of a gubernatorial candidate forum on healthcare that was televised and livestreamed across the state in 2015. Alma has personally penned numerous articles and delivered countless speeches and presentations.

    On January 12, 2016, Governor John Bel Edwards signed an executive order expanding Medicaid in Louisiana on his first day in office making Louisiana the first state in the Deep South to expand Medicaid. Not only was this a win for Stewart and her organization, the Louisiana State Conference of the NAACP and others, but also for the hundreds of thousands of people who gained health insurance when this law went into effect on July 1, 2016. “Many of the more than 470,180 Louisiana citizens who now have health insurance coverage, in rural and urban areas, under the Medicaid expansion are doing so for the first time, and are receiving preventive care, early diagnosis and treatment for cancer, diabetes, mental health conditions, and addictions. Early diagnosis and access to care both help reduce costs to the state and the healthcare system,” said Stewart.

    The infusion of federal dollars for Medicaid expansion created and supported 19,200 jobs that have brought in state and local tax receipts of $103 million and $74.6 million, respectively, according to a March 2018 report by the Louisiana State University’s Public Administration Institute. Medicaid expansion saved the state $199 million in fiscal year 2017, according to a 2017 report from the Louisiana Department of Health. The reasons include the state spending match is lower under Medicaid expansion than it was before, both for most Medicaid populations and for supplemental payments to hospitals. The decrease in the uninsured population has also reduced “disproportionate share payments” to hospitals for people without coverage who receive treatment.

    “Medicaid expansion has benefitted Louisiana in several ways and there is growing evidence to support the fact that it is working. Moreover, it is saving lives. That’s why the NAACP Dr. William Montague Cobb Award means so much to me,” said Stewart.

    About Louisiana Center for Health Equity

    Louisiana Center for Health Equity which is a statewide 501(c) (3) tax-exempt organization, dedicated to the mission of addressing health and healthcare disparities, and fostering health equity in Louisiana. Founded in January 2010, the organization has partnered with over forty other Louisiana organizations on a state, local and national level to eliminate health disparities caused by poverty, lack of access to quality health care, and unhealthy environmental conditions.

    Read more »
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    Plenty of Time!

    New Venture Theatre continues its 11th season with the impactful play, Plenty of Time! In 1968, a spoiled, southern debutante and a Black Panther fall in love, though forbidden by class and principle. Corey and Christina meet in Oak Bluffs-a black section of Martha’s Vineyard. Christina is 17 years old and from an upper-class family. Corey is 22 and a member of the Black Panther Party. Despite their obvious differences, they are sexually attracted and share a passionate night together. The next morning, however, they begin to talk and their conflicting worlds unfold. Once a year for the next 43 years they return to the small private beach house to meet, and bring with them their personal growth and experiences. Their time-elapsed relationship reveals how each is affected by the changing world around them.
    WHERE:
    LSU Studio Theatre
    Louisiana State University
    105 Music and Dramatic Building
    Baton Rouge, LA 70803

    CAST:
    COREY: Obatiye Dent
    CHRISTINE:  Taylor Randall
    PERFORMANCES:
    Friday, August 24 at 7:30 pm
    Saturday, August 25 at 7:30 pm
    Sunday, August 26 at 3:00 pm
    BOX OFFICE:
    225-588-7576 or NVTARTS.ORG

     

    Read more »
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    Inaugural Black Out Loud Conference releases full schedule

     Black Out Loud Conference, LLC in conjunction with the Urban Congress on African American Males in Baton Rouge has released the full schedule of events for the inaugural Black Out Loud Conference, to be held in Baton Rouge, Aug. 10-12. Led by local poet, activist and teaching artist Donney Rose, the three-day event is designed to celebrate Black visibility in the realm of the arts, media and activism. Online conference registration has ended, but patrons may pay for weekend or single day packages during any conference day. Details are available at BlackOutLoudBR.com.

    The conference will kick off on Aug. 10 at the Healthcare Gallery & Wellness Spa, 3488 Brentwood Drive, Suites 102 & 103, with performances by comedian Howard Hall, a video presentation on the power of voice/advocacy, and a networking cocktail hour. On Aug. 11, attendees will convene at the McKinley Alumni Center, 1520 Thomas H. Delpit Drive, for workshops and panel discussions featuring subject matter experts in the fields of arts, media and activism sharing best practices on controlling their narratives and ensuring theirs struggle are not dismissed. The keynote address will be given by Van Lathan of TMZ. The conference will end on Aug. 12 at the McKinley Alumni Center with a brunch featuring a moderated talk on media and activism by Maxine Crump of Dialogue on Race.

    Other confirmed speakers and panelists include Michael “Quess” Moore – co-founder of Take Em Down NOLA; Deborah D.E.E.P. Mouton – Poet-Laureate of Houston; Rodneyna Hart – Exhibitions Manager, Louisiana Arts & Science Museum/Curator and Art Manager, The Healthcare Gallery; Janene Tate – director of communications, Southern University and A&M College System; Mwende “FreeQuency” Katwiwa – 2018 Women of the World Poetry Slam champion; Abraham Felix – award-winning independent film director; and Ada Goodly – movement lawyer/creator of the INPOWER “Know Your Rights Initiative”. A full list of speakers, panelist, and performers can be found at BlackOutLoudBR.com.

    The Black Out Loud Conference is sponsored by The Healthcare Gallery & Wellness Spa; Love Alive Church; DivaStating PR; Class Act Entertainment Group; The Bluest Ink, LLC; Solid Ground Innovations, LLC; RENEE MARIE; EKD Ministries; WTAA Engineers; Design Baton Rouge; East Baton Rouge Parish Library Central Library; Southern University and A&M College; beBatonRouge; The Rouge Collection; DEVAink; Parker’s Pharmacy; Maturity Productions; Councilwoman Erika L. Green; and Louisiana Healthcare Services.

     

    SCHEDULE 

     

    Friday, August 10 (Healthcare Gallery and Wellness Spa)

    7 p.m.  Doors open to conference kick off
    7:30 p.m.  Welcome/Greeting

    7:35 p.m.  Howard Hall comedy set #1

    7:50 p.m.  Video presentation (related to the power of voice/advocacy)

    8 p.m.  Howard Hall comedy set #2

    8:15 p.m.  Mixer w/DJ Automatik

    9:30 p.m. Closing remarks/announcements

     

    Saturday, August 11 (McKinley Alumni Center)

    10 a.m.  Doors open for conference
    10:15 a.m.  Welcome/Overview of Day

    10:20 a.m.  Transition to break out workshops/Children’s Zone

    10:30 a.m. Workshop session #1 (Arts workshop, Activism workshop)

    11:10 a.m.  Transition

    11:15 a.m.  Workshop session #2 (Arts workshop, Media workshop, Activism workshop)

    Noon  Welcome from Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome

    12:10 p.m.  Lunch/Marketplace/Networking

    1:10 p.m.  Performances (Toi Sibley, KP Soul, Truth Universal)

    2 p.m.  Arts, Media & Activism Panel discussion

    3 p.m.  Keynote Address by Van Lathan

    3:45 p.m. Closing remarks/announcements

     

    Sunday, August 12 (McKinley Alumni Center)

    11 a.m.  Doors open for brunch

    11:10 a.m. Welcome

    11:15 a.m.  Brunch served/Written Reflections

    Noon  Media Talk With Maxine Crump

    12:45 p.m. Closing remarks/dismissal

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    Baton Rouge native participates in world’s largest international maritime warfare exercise

    PEARL HARBOR – A 2017 Scotlandville Magnet High School graduate and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, native is serving in the U.S. Navy as part of the world’s largest international maritime warfare exercise, Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC).

    Seaman Apprentice Crystal Paul is a culinary specialist aboard USS Dewey, currently operating out of San Diego, California.

    A Navy culinary specialist is responsible for cooking for the entire crew.

    Paul said she applies the lessons she learned from Baton Rouge to her work in the Navy.

    “I learned how to deal with different people and not to overreact to everything which helps me in the Navy every day,” said Paul.

    As the world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring safety at sea and security on the world’s oceans. RIMPAC 2018 is the 26th exercise in the series that began in 1971.

    The theme of RIMPAC 2018 is Capable, Adaptive, Partners. The participating nations and forces exercise a wide range of capabilities and demonstrate the inherent flexibility of maritime forces. These capabilities range from disaster relief and maritime security operations to sea control and complex warfighting. The relevant, realistic training program includes, gunnery, missile, anti-submarine and air defense exercises, as well as amphibious, counter-piracy, mine clearance operations, explosive ordnance disposal and diving and salvage operations.

    “I’m looking forward to meeting new people during this exercise,” said Paul.

    This is the first time Israel, Sri Lanka and Vietnam are participating in RIMPAC. Additional firsts include New Zealand serving as sea combat commander and Chile serving as combined force maritime component commander. This is the first time a non-founding RIMPAC nation (Chile) will hold a component commander leadership position.

    Twenty-six nations, 46 surface ships, five submarines, and more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel will participate in the biennial Rim of the Pacific Exercise. This year’s exercise includes forces from Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, the United Kingdom, the United States and Vietnam.

    As a member of the U.S. Navy, Paul and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

    “I never saw myself as a risk taker, but being here showed me that I am,” said Paul.

    Additional information about RIMPAC is available at http://www.cpf.navy.mil

    By Electa Berassa
    Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class
    Navy Office of Community Outreach
    Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Theodore Quintana

    Read more »
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    Commissioner Kim Hunter Reed to deliver LSU Fall Commencement keynote address, Aug. 3

    LSU alumna and Louisiana Commissioner of Higher Education Kim Hunter Reed will deliver the keynote address at LSU’s summer commencement ceremony on Friday, Aug. 3, in the Pete Maravich Assembly Center.

    Reed, who received both a bachelor’s and master’s degree from the university, was named the Louisiana Commissioner of Higher Education in April. Prior to being named commissioner, Reed served as executive director of the Colorado Department of Higher Education. She also served in President Barack Obama’s administration as deputy undersecretary at the U.S. Department of Education.

    “We are proud to welcome alumna Kim Hunter Reed back to campus to speak at commencement, and back to Louisiana to serve as the Commissioner of Higher Education at the Board of Regents,” said LSU President F. King Alexander. “Kim has a deep love for and commitment to higher education, and we have no doubt that she will both inspire and motivate our graduates with her message.”

    A Lake Charles native, Reed chaired Louisiana’s higher education transition team in 2015 and served as the state’s policy director. Reed also served as chief of staff and deputy commissioner for public affairs for the Louisiana Board of Regents and executive vice president of the University of Louisiana System.

    Reed received a doctorate in public policy from Southern University, a master’s degree in public administration and a bachelor’s degree in broadcast journalism from LSU. She has received numerous honors, including LSU Alumna of the Year, Public Administration Institute; and Mom of the Year, Jack and Jill of America, Baton Rouge Chapter. She has been featured in Daughters of Men, a national publication highlighting outstanding African American women and their fathers.

    “I am honored to celebrate the accomplishments of these new LSU graduates at my alma mater, a place that was so integral to my success,” Reed said. “There is nothing more rewarding than joining families and faculty at commencement as we applaud our students hard work and focus on increased talent development in Louisiana.”

    Commencement will begin with the procession at 8:45 a.m., with the graduation ceremony beginning at 9 a.m. There will be no separate diploma ceremonies for August commencement.

    Read more »
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    Henry Turner Jr. to receive Slim Harpo Music Award

    Blues, soul and funk musician Henry Turner Jr. has used his musical platform to celebrate philanthropists and musicians in the Baton Rouge area. The city is awarding him with the 2018 Slim Harpo Blues Award, Thursday, November 15 at 6 p.m. at Time Out in Baton Rouge.

    Turner was named an “Ambassador” for his efforts to represent and share his enthusiasm for blues with music enthusiasts. It is an incredible honor that he shares with other 2018 recipients, Shannon Williford (“Legend”) and Mamie & Smokehouse Porter (“Pioneers”). Previous recipients of the Slim Harpo Music Award include Van Morrison, Keith Richards, Alvin Batiste, Buddy Guy and many others.

    Henry Turner, Jr. and his band, & Flavor, have released nine CDs and seventeen singles. Henry Turner & Flavor have toured the United States, Canada and Japan. In 2014, he opened Henry Turner Jr.’s Listening Room and Heritage Museum in Baton Rouge to celebrate and support touring musicians.

    Read more at OffBeeat Magazine

    Read more »
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    EVENT: Library schedules August activities for all ages

    The following FREE East Baton Rouge Parish Library programs will be held for all ages throughout August. The asterisks indicate which programs require pre-registration.

    Children’s End of Summer Reading Party

    It’s time to par-tay! Kids ages 3-11 are invited to the Main Library at Goodwood at 10 a.m. Wednesday, August 1, to celebrate the end of summer with games, spacewalk, a funny clown, prizes and delicious refreshments for everyone! The party will last about one hour. Registration is required for groups. For more information and to register, call the Main Library Children’s Room at (225) 231-3760.

    Teen Summer Film Camp Premiere

    New Orleans Video Access Center in Baton Rouge (NOVACBR) partnered with your Library during a FREE filmmaking summer camps for teens in grades 6-12! During the camp, students learned the basics of video production including design, storyboarding, production, post-production, effects and more, through the hands-on process of creating a music video under the guidance of an experienced local filmmaker. Final projects from each camp will premiere at the Main Library at Goodwood in the Large Meeting Room at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, August 2. Family and friends are invited to attend!

     

    Teen End of Summer Reading Parties

    Come enjoy games, prizes, snacks and more when you celebrate the end of summer with other teens at the Library! For more information and to register, call the Library location directly. Check out the remaining schedule below.

    • Noon Wednesday, August 1, Main Library at Goodwood
    • 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, August 1, River Center Branch
    • 6 p.m. Tuesday, August 7, Zachary Branch

     

    Decluttering is Mind Over Matter with Sarah Cooper

    Local designer and personal organizer Sarah Cooper will be at the Main Library at Goodwood at 10 a.m. Saturday, August 11, to offer a FREE seminar for adults on decluttering any space! She’ll share her insights for living a clutter-free life in a uniquely informative presentation that will cover topics like why people clutter their space, and an understanding of the obstacles that hinder getting organized. With robust experience founded in design, Cooper has worked to help people downsize, up-size or simply remodel and repurpose any space. If you’re looking for real tools to help you better organize your home or work spaces don’t miss this interesting and engaging workshop!

     

    Bluebonnet Regional Branch Library, 9200 Bluebonnet Blvd., (225) 763-2250

    A Porcupine Named Fluffy Story/Craft

    Join other kids ages 3-6 at the Bluebonnet Regional Branch at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, August 4, for a reading of A Porcupine Named Fluffy by Helen Lester. After the story, we’ll make a paper plate porcupine craft.

     

    Welcome to Teens!

    Hey teens in grades 6-12! Come to the Teen Room at the Bluebonnet Regional Branch at 6 p.m. Wednesday, August 22, and 2 p.m. Saturday, August 25, to see what the Library has just for you. Parents of teens also are welcome to attend. Light refreshments will be served.

     

    Epic Graphics Book Club

    Do you like to read comic books or graphic novels, and dislike reading chunky books without pictures? If you said yes, you’ll want to come hang out with other adults ages 18 and older at the Bluebonnet Regional Branch at 7 p.m. Tuesday, August 28, for an Epic Graphics Book Club meeting! During our first gathering, we’ll discuss favorite comic book titles, scavenge the Library’s bookshelves and Digital Library for fun graphic novels to read, and then announce a comic book for everyone to read and discuss as a group at the next meeting.

     

    Carver Branch Library, 720 Terrace St., (225) 389-7450

    *Two ACT Practice Exam Sessions for Teens

    Gearing up for college entry? Start strong by completing a FREE simulated practice exam for the American College Test (ACT®) through the Library’s Learning Express resource. Teens are invited to the Carver Branch at 10 a.m. Tuesday, August 7, to experience this full-length practice test and find out what you can expect when you take the official exam. A second session will begin at 1:30 p.m. the same day. The practice covers each of the four categories that appear on the official exam including English, math, reading and science, as well as the same question types, format and time-allotted. Registration is required and limited to eight participants per session.

     

    Home & Personal Safety Informational Session

    Adults and teens ages 16 and up can come to the Carver Branch at 2 p.m. Thursday, August 9, for a FREE home and personal safety informational session led by deputies of the East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff’s Office. Come learn how to keep our communities safer!

     

    Fairwood Branch Library, 12910 Old Hammond Hwy., (225) 924-9385

    *Back to School Time Story/Activity

    Children ages 3-7 can get ready for school at the Fairwood Branch! Come to the Library at 4 p.m. Thursday, August 2, to hear readings of What George Forgot by Kathy Wolff and Kindergarten is Cool by Linda E. Marshall. After the story, we’ll take turns completing four activities including fun with shapes, puzzles and more! All children must be accompanied by an adult.

     

    Summertime: The ‘Write’ Time!

    Calling all writers! Join other adults at the Fairwood Branch at 1 p.m. Saturday, August 25, to link up with other writers in the area, get inspired and learn how to craft the perfect page turner.

     

    Greenwell Springs Road Regional Branch Library, 11300 Greenwell Springs Rd., (225) 274-4450

    *Crumb Snatchers with Author Brandi Worley

    Adults, teens and lovers of a good story about the underdog will want to head over to the Greenwell Springs Road Regional Branch at 2 p.m. Saturday, August 18, for a FREE book talk and podcast with Brandi Worley, author of the Crumb Snatchers series. The LIVE podcast will be hosted by the Blerd-ish podcast duo Keith Cooper and Mark Wallace. Audience silence will be required during the live podcast recording. A question-and-answer period will follow. For more information about author Brandi Worley or the Crumb Snatchers series, visit the website at http://crumbsnatchersbooks.com/.

     

    *Multicultural Flag Drawing

    Have you ever wanted to learn about the world’s flags? Here’s your chance! Come to the Greenwell Springs Road Regional Branch at 11 a.m. Saturday, August 25, to hang out with other kids ages 4-6 and hear facts and history about other places in the world from Flags of the World by Sylvie Bednar. We’ll also take a look at the wordless book Draw the Line by Kathryn Otoshi, and try to draw some flags of our own.

     

    Jones Creek Regional Branch Library, 6222 Jones Creek Rd., (225) 756-1150

    *Eggplant, Eggplant, Where Are You?

    Adults can join us at the Jones Creek Regional Branch at 10 a.m. Saturday, August 11, for a FREE cooking demonstration featuring a variety of eggplant dishes with author and former cooking show host Loretta Duplantis. Attendees also will have the chance to enjoy samples. Door prizes will be awarded!

     

    Kaleidoscope of Quilts: Public Participation Day

    The Sassi Strippers Quilt Guild will be at the Jones Creek Regional Branch from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Saturday, August 18, for the Kaleidoscope of Quilts public participation day for all ages! There will be quilting demonstrations, children’s activities, stuffing teddy bears for the Our Lady of the Lake Children’s Hospital and balloting for favorite quilts. The Guild also will have their quilts on display throughout the branch during August.

     

    Main Library at Goodwood, 7711 Goodwood Blvd., (225) 231-3750

    *How to Play Magic: The Gathering

    Lovers of make-believe and method gaming can join other adults and teens ages 14 and up at the Main Library at Goodwood at 2 p.m. Saturday, August 11, for a beginner’s introduction to Magic: The Gathering, a card game that combines strategy and fantasy. We will review the basic rules and play practice hands to help players familiarize themselves with the types of cards and gameplay. This event is geared towards those who are new to the game or need a refresher, and participants will receive a starter deck to learn with, instructions and a box to store decks in.

     

    Tales from the Archives

    Archivist Melissa Eastin will present three stories from Baton Rouge’s past at the Main Library at Goodwood at 7 p.m. Wednesday, August 15. The presentation for adults will cover Baton Rouge’s first and only female sheriff, the touching story of “Sonny Boy”, a care taker who became part of an elderly couple’s family when they needed him most, plus a look into the life of petty criminal Dewey Key, who could never seem to get his life on the right track!

     

    *Job Search Letters 

    You know how to write a résumé, but what about all the other letters involved in a job search? What kind of cover letter will get hiring managers’ attention? What needs to be contained in a thank-you letter after an interview? How can you reach out to a friend and ask for help with your job search? These questions and more will be answered in a FREE seminar for adults in Room 102 at the Main Library at Goodwood at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, August 22. Certified Professional Résumé Writer Lynnette Lee of the Career Center will lead the presentation. Registration is required. To register, visit https://www.careercenterbr.com/events/.

     

    *Dependable Strengths: How to Find & Grow the Best within You 

    If you are ready to take your job, career or life in a new and more fulfilling direction, we want to help! Adults are invited to Room 102 at the Main Library at Goodwood from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Saturday, August 25, for a FREE workshop that will aim to help you identify your own unique potential for excellence. Certified facilitator Mike Cragin will teach you ways to discover your strengths and offer help with making a plan to develop them. Registration is required. For more information, call the Career Center at (225) 231-3733. To register, go online to www.careercenterbr.com/events/.

     

    Scotlandville Branch Library, 7373 Scenic Hwy., (225) 354-7550

    Teen Film Club: Marvel Movie Day

    Get ready to take a trip to the African kingdom of Wakanda when you watch this year’s highest-grossing film from Marvel! Teens are invited to the Scotlandville Branch at 3:30 p.m. Monday, August 6, to see this exciting story unfold. After T’Challa, the king of Wakanda rises to the throne, his claim is soon challenged by a ruthless stranger. Enjoy thematic activities while and refeshments while you watch! Refreshments will be served.

     

    After School Anime

    Anime lovers unite! Come to the Scotlandville Branch at 3:30 p.m. Monday, August 20, to vote for and watch your favorite anime shows on the Library’s Crunchyroll account. Snacks will be served!

     

    Zachary Branch Library, 1900 Church St., (225) 658-1850

    *The Kissing Hand Story/Craft

    Children ages 4-6 are invited to the Zachary Branch at 11 a.m. Wednesday, August 8, to hear a reading of The Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn. Later, each child will cut out their handprints and decorate them with hearts and other craft items. All supplies will be provided.

     

    *Read to Nola: Therapy Dog Reading Buddy

    Handler Tina Morgan and therapy dog Nola will be at the Zachary Branch at 3 p.m. Saturday, August 18, to listen to children read. Dogs are great listeners, don’t interrupt and are fun to be around! Register to meet and read to Nola by calling the Children’s Room at (225) 658-1860.

     


    For more information about or to register for all the programs listed, call the branch where the event is scheduled directly or visit www.ebrpl.com. Can’t visit any of our 14 locations, which are open seven days a week? The Library is open 24 / 7 online at www.ebrpl.com.
     For general information about the Library, call (225) 231-3750

     

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    Airport commission chair nominated for two Catalyst awards

    Chairman Cleve Dunn has been nominated for two Catalyst awards by the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC). The AMAC Catalyst awards honor persons who have made outstanding contributions to furthering the goals of AMAC. 

    Dunn’s nominations include:
    AMAC Advocate of the Year Award:This award recognizes an individual within the industry who has been an outstanding spokesperson, educator, innovator, advocate, and strategic partner with AMAC for diversity inclusion in the field of aviation, aerospace (Aeronautical influences such as pilots, airlines, aerospace, educators in the field), or corporate leaders that contribute and encourage minority opportunities and growth in these areas.   

    AMAC Inclusive Leader Award: This award honors an organization that has demonstrated diversity inclusion within its corporate structure of procurement and employment. Nominees are viewed within the industry as a leader for supplier diversity, best practices and fostering business capacity with its diverse partners. Nominees should demonstrate support of AMAC’s goals and mission. 

    “I am honored to receive the Catalyst Award nominations from such a prestigious organization as AMAC. I want to thank the AMAC Catalyst Award nominating committee for valuing and recognizing the work that many of us do around the country to promote minority-owned businesses, and increase contracting opportunities and professional advancement for minorities in the aviation and aerospace industries,” said Dunn. “I do not accept these award nominations alone. I also accept them on the behalf of all the current and former Baton Rouge Metro Airport Board of Commissioners that have advocated for minority-owned and disadvantaged businesses while serving on our commission. Finally, I’d like to thank the Baton Rouge Metro Airport Administration and numerous staff members who have been committed to inclusion and increasing the participation of minority-owned and disadvantaged business enterprises.” 

    Award winners will be announced at the 2018 AMAC Airport Diversity Conference in Seattle the third week of August.

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    COMMUNITY EVENT: Virginia College Back to School Event, August 2

    Virginia College in Baton Rouge will host a Back to School Event for the community Thursday, Aug. 2 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the campus located at 9501 Cortana Place. The event is free and open to the public and will feature refreshments and candy for kids, a spelling bee, photobooth, campus tours, a scavenger hunt, backpack and school supply giveaways while supplies last and more. Additionally, attendees 18 and older can enter to win gift cards and other prizes.

    The event will also allow attendees to explore programs offered through Virginia College, including: Business Administration, Culinary Arts, Medical Assistant, Medical Office Specialist, Network Support Technician, Network and System Administration, Electrical Technician, HVAC-R Technician, Pastry Arts, Pharmacy Technician and Surgical Technology.

    WHAT: Virginia College Back to School Event
    WHEN: Thursday, Aug. 2 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    WHERE: Virginia College in Baton Rouge – 9501 Cortana Place, Baton Rouge, LA 70815
    PHONE: (225) 236-3900

    “With the start of a new school year comes a great deal of excitement and anticipation, promise and possibility,” says Campus President Joe Dalto. “No matter your age or stage of life, we want to celebrate education and the aspirations of all members of our community. We invite everyone to come by our Back to School Event and say hello, and for those interested in pursuing a new career, talk with a member of our staff about the fast and focused career training we offer at our campus.”

    The event is part of Virginia College parent company Education Corporation of America’s national Back to School Events being held at 62 other Virginia College, Brightwood Career Institute and Brightwood College locations throughout 17 states.

    ONLINE: vc.edu/batonrouge.

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    Black clergy shackled, jailed for prayer protest at the Supreme Court

    Faith and prayer have been the backbone of the African American community since we came upon these shores. We have counted on our faith leaders (the roll call would include Revs. Richard Allen, Absalom Jones, James Walker Hood, Martin Luther King, Jr., Wyatt Tee Walker, Jesse L. Jackson, William Barber, Vashti McKenzie, Barbara Williams Skinner and many others) to articulate the justness of our cause and to mobilize us to work for the justice that is called for in the New Testament, especially in Matthew 25: 35-45.

    Our ministers are revered leaders who often stand in the face of injustice. We are not surprised, and indeed, encouraged, when their firm stands in the face of oppression lead to collisions with the law. Still, when faith leaders are treated harshly, it forces us to examine the injustice in our system. When Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote the “Letter from the Birmingham Jail” in 1963, he chided White ministers who made a public statement about his methods, suggesting that segregation should be fought in the courts, not in the streets. His letter moved the White faith community to confront some of the injustices of segregation and to form alliances with the Civil Rights movement.

    King spent eleven days in the Birmingham jail in extremely harsh conditions. However, the oppressor does not learn from its excesses. On June 12, nine faith leaders were shackled and held for 27 hours after being arrested for praying at the Supreme Court.

    The multicultural group of men and women are part of Rev. William Barber’s Poor People’s Campaign ( A National Call for Moral Revival). Their effort is to bring attention to the amazing inequality and moral bankruptcy of our nation. Their prayers at the Supreme Court were extremely timely given the court’s recent actions to make it more difficult for people to vote in Ohio, and given the injustices, this court continues to perpetuate.

    Like Dr. King, the nine who were arrested—Poor People’s Campaign co-chair the Rev. Liz Theoharis, D.C. clergy the Revs. Jimmie Hawkins, Graylan Hagler and William Lamar IV, and the Revs. Rob and Hershey Stephens from the Fort Washington Collegiate Church in New York City)—were subjected to extremely harsh conditions. No threat to anyone, they were shackled, placed in handcuffs and leg irons, confined to roach-infested cells with nothing to rest their heads on, but a metal slab. This is the 21st century, but you wouldn’t know it by the way these clergies were treated. Yet, their actions and those of the Poor People’s Campaign are writing the contemporary letter from the Birmingham jail. Their brief incarceration, in the name of justice, is part of a larger movement to bring attention to increasing poverty and injustice, even in the face of economic expansion. Like Dr. King’s Poor People’s campaign, this 21st century Poor People’s Campaign, launched fifty years later, is an attack on poverty, racism, and militarism, and also ecological devastation and our nation’s “moral devastation.”

    At the 2018 Rainbow PUSH International convention on June 15, Rev. Barber railed against interlocking injustices that did not begin with our 45th President, but have been exacerbated by the depravity he represents. In a rousing address that wove humor, statistics, public analysis and a scathing attack on our nation’s immorality, Barber argued that “the rejected,” which may comprise more than half of our nation, will lead to the revival of our nation.

    Who would have thought that nine faith leaders would be among the rejected? Who would have thought that Dr. King would have been? But Dr. King eagerly embraced the status of “rejected.” He once preached, “I choose to identify with the underprivileged. I choose to identify with the poor. I choose to give my life for the hungry. I choose to give my life for those who have been left out of the sunlight of opportunity.” Rev. Liz Theoharis told Democracy Now’s Amy Goodman that the conditions she and fellow clergy experienced, while uncomfortable, were the same conditions poor inmates experienced. That’s the power, in some ways, of the Poor People’s Campaign. Clergy and others are forcing the issue, lifting their voices, making connections, claiming the discomfort and pain of the rejected, embracing the fact that they, too, are among the rejected.

    To shackle clergy simply for praying is to exhibit a peculiar form of cruelty and inhumanity. Shackling is reminiscent of enslavement; shackling is a method of humiliation; shackling is an attempt to use the harsh lash of unjust law on the backs of those who pray for just law. Rev. William Lamar IV, who has been arrested on three consecutive Mondays for protest action said that the June 12 arrests and treatment were the harshest, he has yet experienced. In Washington, D.C., people who are arrested for protesting are usually given a ticket that requires a court appearance and a likely fine. What did the shackling say about the hallowed sacredness of the “Supreme” Court?

    Shackling clergy for praying is like condemning the Sun for shining. Unjust law enforcement can shackle arms and legs, but not movements. Harsh treatment of leaders in the Poor People’s Champaign only strengthens resistance against injustice, racism, poverty, and ecological devastation. 

    By Julianne Malveaux
    NNPA columnist
    @drjlastword

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    Slave cemetery video released

    As the River Road African American Museum approaches twenty five years of preserving the history of the formerly enslaved and their descendants in Louisiana’s sugarcane plantation country, one of the greatest accomplishments this year is a successful collaboration with SHELL Convent to protect the African burial grounds found near the Tezcuco refinery.

    Watch the video here.

    Submitted news

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    COMMUNITY EVENTS: Scotlandville Interfaith Community Health Fair, August 4

    The Scotlandville Interfaith Community Health Fair is scheduled for Saturday, August 4, 8am – 1pm at Camphor Memorial United Methodist Church located at 8742 Scenic Highway, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

    There will be a Faith Walk to begin the event at 8am.

    The Health Fair will promote preventive health care services, to bring about awareness to the services that are available and to assist people in making improved health decisions for their family. The fair will also provide healthful information and practices to the Scotlandville Community.

    The Scotlandville Interfaith Community Health Fair will include on site examinations, educational information, blood pressure checks; cancer awareness; cardiovascular-heart healthy tips; immunizations, mental health counseling; diabetes tests and consultation; cholesterol-glucose screening; foot examinations (podiatry); hearing screenings; nutrition consultations; oral health; prescription medication management; vision; and tobacco use dangers. There will be drawings for gift cards and door prizes.

    The Baton Rouge Community is invited to attend.

    Submitted by Mada McDonald

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    COMMENTARY: Medicare steps up its fight against diabetes

    Diabetes affects as many as one in four older adults with Medicare. It costs hundreds of billions of dollars to treat and results in the loss of tens of thousands of lives every year.

    If we could better control diabetes, we’d be taking a huge leap toward creating a healthier America.

    Diabetes occurs when your body doesn’t make enough insulin or doesn’t respond to the insulin it does make. Insulin is what your body uses to process sugar and turn it into energy.

    When too much sugar stays in your blood, it can lead to serious complications and even life-threatening problems, including heart disease, strokes and kidney damage.
    Medicare is committed to fighting the diabetes epidemic.

    If you’re on Medicare and at risk for diabetes, you’re covered for two blood sugar screenings each year at no out-of-pocket cost to you. Risk factors include high blood pressure, a history of abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride levels, obesity or a history of high blood sugar.

    If you’re diagnosed with diabetes, Medicare will help pay for blood sugar self-testing equipment and supplies, as well as insulin and other anti-diabetic drugs. In the event of diabetic foot disease, it will also help pay for therapeutic shoes or inserts as long as your podiatrist prescribes them.

    Because living with diabetes can pose day-to-day challenges, Medicare covers a program to teach you how to manage the disease. With a written order from your physician, you can sign up for training that includes tips for monitoring blood sugar, taking medication and eating healthy.

    If you’d like to learn more about how to control diabetes, visit Medicare’s website at www.medicare.gov or call Medicare’s 24/7 help line at 1-800-633-4227 and visit with a counselor.

    In addition to the 30 million Americans with diabetes, another 86 million live with a condition known as pre-diabetes, where blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis.

    Pre-diabetes is treatable. But only one in 10 people with the condition will even know they have it. Left untreated, one in three will develop the full-blown disease within several years.

    Confronted with those statistics, Medicare is ramping up its efforts to prevent diabetes among the millions of Medicare beneficiaries who are at a heightened risk of developing it.

    Several years ago, Medicare partnered with YMCAs nationwide to launch an initiative for patients with pre-diabetes. The pilot project showed that older people could lose weight through lifestyle counseling and regular meetings that stressed healthy eating habits and exercise.

    About half of the participants shed an average of 5 percent of their weight, which health authorities say is enough to substantially reduce the risk of full-blown diabetes. Through adopting a healthier lifestyle, people diagnosed with pre-diabetes can delay the onset of the disease.

    Based on the trial program’s encouraging results, Medicare is now expanding its coverage for diabetes prevention. Using the pilot project as a model, it will help pay for a counseling program aimed at improving beneficiaries’ nutrition, increasing their physical activity and reducing stress.

    If you have Medicare’s Part B medical insurance and are pre-diabetic, you’ll be able to enroll in a series of coaching sessions lasting one to two years and conducted by health care providers as well as community organizations like local senior centers. There will be no out-of-pocket cost.

    Medicare is currently recruiting partners to offer the program so that it will be widely available to beneficiaries.

    Diabetes can be a terribly debilitating disease. It can mean a lifetime of tests, injections and health challenges. Every five minutes in this country, 14 more adults are diagnosed with it. And in the same five minutes, two more people will die from diabetes-related causes.

    If we can prevent more diabetes cases before they even start, we can help people live longer and fuller lives, as well as save money across our health care system. 

    By Bob Moos
    Southwest public affairs officer
    U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

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    Trading Black Histories: Louisiana, California middle schoolers meet by chance while competing in national research contest

    SILVER SPRINGS, MD—In life, there are many times when things happen and very few words can convey what’s occurred. That’s exactly what happened when two studentsfrom opposite ends of the United States happened to cross paths while competing in the 2018 National History Day contest held at the University of Maryland, College Park.

    The young researchers had an interesting experience that will likely be etched in their memory for the rest of their lives when Condoleezza Semien, of Louisiana, and Thiana Aklikokou, of California,  met.

    Both women share a fervent love for Black history and research which led to them winning National History Day contests at their school, district, and state levels in order to advance to the semi-finals in Maryland.

    More than 3,000 students from across the nation and countries like Guam, Korea, and China advanced to the final competition, which was held June 10-14 to culminate a year-long academic program focused on historical research, interpretation and creative expression for 6th to 12th grade students. Of those students was Semien, a seventh grader, and Aklikokou, an eighth grader.

    In April, Semien placed first in the state NHD junior presentation division with the oral presentation, “But You Claim that I’m Violent: A Lesson on Influence and the Black Panther Party for Self Defense of 1966.”

    “I wanted to relay the truth about the Black Panther Party and how their actions turned into programs and policies for our nation,” Semien told national judges. “We’re not taught these things in school. When a group came to Baton Rouge to protest the Alton Sterling shooting, I wanted to know why they were trying to connect themselves to the Panthers when their messages where drastically different.”

    Founded in California during the racially-charged 1960s Civil Rights Movement, the Black Panther Party for Self Defense galvanized as a response to police brutality in California. While the Black Panther Party maintained a focus on armed self-defense, the organization did not uphold resorting to violence to resolve issues, Semien explained.

    “Historical texts do not record this truth,” Semien said before explaining that the Black Panther Party’s relentless efforts ultimately impacted federal food and health policies.

    “They developed more than 30 social programs over the span of 10 years and are actually responsible for many of the federal food, head start, and sickle cell anemia programs still being utilized today,” she said.

    The Black Panthers thrived, expanding to more than 63 U.S. chapters that provided free clothing, grocery, and breakfast programs, community protection patrol to combat violence and police brutality, free health clinics, political education classes, ambulatory services, and screening people for sickle cell disease, free libraries that primarily housed works by Black authors, legal assistance and early education programs.

    “But you claim that they’re violent!” Semien said ending her presentation during the semi-finals. One judge responded, “You really did a great job dispelling myths surrounding the Black Panthers!”

    The 12-year-old was later told she’d earned National Honorable Mention and placed second in her class of competitors—just shy of reaching the final rounds, said Adam Foreman, NHD state representative and student programs specialist at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans.

    On the same day, Aklikokou, 14, presented a historical paper on the 1953 Baton Rouge Bus Boycott–Semien’s hometown.

    While touring the United States Capitol as guests of Congressman Garret Graves, Aklikokou and Semien met.

    “My grandmother remembered seeing (Thiana) on television talking about her research, and she introduced us to each other. She was excited, telling Thiana about my research and telling me about Thiana’s,” Semien said.

    There, the girls shared their amazement that so few people knew the history that they had researched about each other’s states. In 2015, Semien danced in the Manship Theatre’s production of “The Fading Line: A Commemoration of the 1953 Baton Rouge Bus Boycott.”

    “I wasn’t surprised that people in California didn’t know, but I came to Baton Rouge and people still had no clue what I was talking about; it was a little surprising,” said Aklikokou.

    Most history books only detail the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott which has often been regarded as the first large-scale United States demonstration against segregation. However, it actually wasn’t the first of its kind.

    In 1953, Blacks in Baton Rouge and the Reverend T. J. Jemison organized the first large-scale boycott of a southern city’s segregated bus system. Two and a half years later, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. conferred with Jemison about tactics used in Baton Rouge, and King applied those lessons when planning the bus boycott that ultimately defeated segregation.

    “I found it interesting that nobody talked about it at all. It was always the Montgomery (bus) boycott. But no one ever talked about what Baton Rouge did which was set it up for Montgomery,” she said.

    Earlier this month, Aklikokou traveled through Louisiana and Mississippi for more in-depth research on her topic of choice just before heading to Maryland.

    Aklikokou and Semien’s chance encounter in the nation’s capitol proves that spontaneous moments in life are often much sweeter than the ones strategically planned.

    By Meaghan Ellis
    The Drum Contributing Writer

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    Edwards announced his appointments to several Louisiana boards and commissions

    Gov. John Bel Edwards announced his appointments to several Louisiana boards and commissions.

    St. Bernard Port, Harbor and Terminal District
    The Board of Commissioners of the St. Bernard Port, Harbor and Terminal District Board has complete jurisdiction to regulate all domestic, coastwise, and intercoastal commerce and traffic of the district, and all commerce and traffic within the district where such is conducted by or a facility wholly owned by the district.

    William T. “Bill” Bergeron, of Arabi, was appointed to the St. Bernard Port, Harbor and Terminal District. Bergeron is a managing member of Bergeron Resources, LLC. As required by statute, he was nominated by a majority of the St. Bernard Parish legislative delegation.

    Patient’s Compensation Fund Oversight Board
    The purpose of the Patient’s Compensation Fund Oversight Board is to guarantee that affordable medical malpractice coverage is available to all Louisiana private healthcare providers and to provide a certain, stable source of compensation for legitimate injured parties of medical malpractice.

    Corey J. Hebert, M.D., of New Orleans, was appointed to the Patient’s Compensation Fund Oversight Board. Hebert is a physician and the president and Chief Executive Officer of Hebert Medical Consulting, Inc.

    Louisiana Emergency Response Network Board
    The Louisiana Emergency Response Network Board serves to defend the public health, safety and welfare by protecting the people of the State of Louisiana against unnecessary deaths and morbidity due to trauma and time-sensitive illness.

    Gerald A. Cvitanovich, M.D., of Metairie, was reappointed to the Louisiana Emergency Response Network Board. Cvitanovich is a physician and the Chief Medical Officer of MHM Urgent Care. As required by statute, he was nominated by and will serve as a representative of the Louisiana State Coroner’s Association.

    William W. Lunn, M.D., of New Orleans, was reappointed to the Louisiana Emergency Response Network Board. Lunn is a physician and the Chief Executive Officer of the Tulane Health System. As required by statute, he was nominated by and will serve as a representative of the Tulane Health System.

    Paul B. Gladden, M.D., of New Orleans, was appointed to the Louisiana Emergency Response Network Board. Gladden is a physician and Chief of Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery at Tulane University. As required by statute, he was nominated by and will serve as a representative of the Louisiana State Medical Society.

    Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners
    The Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners (LSBME) protects the health, welfare, and safety of Louisiana citizens against the unprofessional, improper, and unauthorized practice of medicine by ensuring that those who practice medicine and other allied health professions under its jurisdiction are qualified and competent to do so.   In addition, the Board serves in an advisory capacity to the public and the state with respect to the practice of medicine.

    Christy L. Valentine, M.D., of New Orleans, was reappointed to the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners. Valentine is a physician and Medical Director with Anthem, Inc. As required by statute, she was nominated by the Louisiana Medical Association.

    Roderick V. Clark, M.D., of Lafayette, was reappointed to the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners. Clark is a physician with Acadiana Renal Physicians. As required by statute, he was nominated by the Louisiana State Medical Society.

    J. Kerry Howell, M.D., of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners. Howell is a physician in private practice and a veteran of the United States Air Force. As required by statute, he was nominated by Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center.

    Louisiana State Board of Examiners of Psychologists
    The Louisiana State Board of Examiners of Psychologists is responsible for licensure and regulation of psychologists within the state.

    Gregory K. Gormanous, Ph.D., of Alexandria, was appointed to the Louisiana State Board of Examiners of Psychologists. Gormanous is a licensed psychologist and Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Louisiana State University – Alexandria. He is also a veteran of the United States Army. As required by statute, he was nominated by the Louisiana Psychological Association.

    Louisiana Board of Pharmacy
    The Louisiana Board of Pharmacy serves to protect the public health, safety and welfare by the effective control and regulation of the practice of pharmacy; the licensure of pharmacists; and the licensure, permitting, certification, registration, control and regulation of all persons and sites, in or out of this state, that sell drugs or devices to consumers and/or patients, or assist in the practice of pharmacy, within the state. The board also serves as the controlled substance authority for the state, issuing controlled dangerous substance licenses to all qualified applicants desiring to manufacture, distribute, prescribe or dispense controlled dangerous substances within the state. Further, the board monitors its clients for compliance with the laws and rules relative to their activities with controlled dangerous substances.

    J. Robert Cloud, PharmD, of Chatham, was appointed to the Louisiana Board of Pharmacy. Cloud is a pharmacist and the Director of Pharmacy at the Glenwood Regional Medical Center. He will serve as a representative of the 5th Pharmacy Board District.

    Kevin LaGrange, of Lafayette, was appointed to the Louisiana Board of Pharmacy. LaGrange is a pharmacist at Professional Arts Pharmacy. He will serve as a representative of the 7thPharmacy Board District.

    Robert C. “Rock” LeBas, of Opelousas, was appointed to the Louisiana Board of Pharmacy. LeBas is a pharmacist and the owner of Glenn’s Family Pharmacy. He will serve as a representative of the 8th Pharmacy Board District.

    Rhonny K. Valentine, of Natchitoches, was reappointed to the Louisiana Board of Pharmacy. Valentine is a pharmacist who provides relief work for retail pharmacies. He will serve as a representative of the 4th Pharmacy Board District.

    Blake P. Pitre, of Houma, was reappointed to the Louisiana Board of Pharmacy. Pitre is a pharmacist and the owner of B&J Pitre Pharmacy. He will serve as a representative of the 3rdPharmacy Board District.

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    COMMENTARY: Death in a EBR parish prison–too common

    Death in a local jail is pretty rare unless you are housed in the East Baton Rouge Parish Prison. The disturbing part of that sentence is the unfiltered sad, truth that 25 people died in this prison between 2012 and 2016. And these deaths were known and not investigated by any independent entity. What should be the safest, most secure place in the parish is instead by all involved, an unacceptable, destabilized, broken system that doesn’t offer either public safety for the general public or those employed in or those exposed to this system. More than 25 individuals whose lives had meaning to God, their families and their friends deserve this situation to be addressed. Many claim it is too hard but nothing could be further from the truth.

    For those families able to muster the resources to get legal representation they can sue but what remains most frightening is the false narrative that continues to live that everyone housed in the East Baton Rouge Parish Prison is a hardened felon who has been convicted of a violent crime. The truth is that 89% of all individuals held in the East Baton Rouge Parish Prison have not been adjudicated. That is a fancy way of saying they haven’t been convicted of anything. Many people are incarcerated because of minor non-violent offenses and a very large percentage of those who cannot afford to make bail will plea not because they are guilty but because that is the only way for them to be released. We do indeed have an active and thriving debtors prison system.

    Some of the deaths were caused be purposeful cruelty such as inadequate basic protections such as socks and blankets. Some of the deaths were caused by policy and procedures that disrespected the most basic protocols for treating healthcare (including mental illness). Almost all the deaths to some degree were caused by the care and feeding of a mass incarceration industry that specifically requires bodies in the building to make payroll and profit. And none of these deaths should have occurred.

    On Thursday, July 19th family and friends gathered at the levee in downtown Baton Rouge for a vigil to call for action and recognition. These individuals deserved each of their deaths to have an independent investigation as a standard practice of law and policy. Each person who loses their freedom under the authority of the state still retains their right to be treated with dignity. And none of the individuals who died had been sentenced to the death penalty EXCEPT they did receive the death penalty. To learn more about changing the narrative please check out the East Baton Rouge Parish Prison Reform Coalition.

    Rev. Alexis Anderson
    PREACH
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana

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  • Southern University Baton Rouge maintains accreditation

    During its June meeting, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges removed a warning sanction from Southern University and A&M College in Baton Rouge. The University satisfied all issues raised by the accreditation agency during its last review in June 2017.

    “This is great news for not only the institution and students, but for our alumni and other supporters,” said Ray L. Belton, Southern University System president-chancellor. “Our team of dedicated faculty and staff have worked tirelessly to ensure that we demonstrated compliance with the principles of accreditation so that we are able to continue fulfilling our mission of providing a high-quality educational experience.”

    The SACSCOC peer reviewers evaluated the university’s Fifth-Year Interim Report in 2016, and identified four areas for improvement: faculty adequacy, institutional effectiveness, student complaints, and student achievement. To address these areas, University leaders developed strategic solutions that has ultimately laid a solid foundation for continuous improvement. The University anticipates its accreditation to be reaffirmed for the next 10 years.

    “We are delighted that we have met this challenge,” said James H. Ammons, Ph.D., executive vice president/executive vice chancellor. “Our team has worked really hard and we will continue to make making progress in demonstrating compliance in all areas.”

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  • Restore La. task force meets July 13 in Baton Rouge

    Task force to consider resolution to expand homeowner reimbursement award
    The Restore Louisiana Task Force will meet Friday, July 13 at 9:30 a.m. in House Committee Room 5 at the State Capitol. Members will consider a resolution proposed by Gov. John Bel Edwards to expand the Restore Homeowner Assistance Program tiered reimbursement award to 100 percent for all eligible homeowners. It’s currently set at 50 percent. View the Governor’s press release here. The Office of Community Development will provide updates on the Restore Homeowner Assistance, Rental Housing, Economic Development and Infrastructure Programs. Additionally, the Task Force will receive a presentation on the Louisiana Watershed-Based Floodplain Management Program by the Council on Watershed Management. The Council was established by Gov. Edwards earlier this year to look at ways to implement a statewide floodplain management program to mitigate future risks to communities impacted by frequent flooding and severe weather events.

    The meeting will be livestreamed on the Louisiana Legislature’s website at www.legis.la.gov which will be shared on restore.la.gov and the Restore Louisiana Facebook page. All Task Force documents are available at Restore Louisiana Task Force Resources.

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    Public Notice of Meeting of the Baton Rouge North Economic Development District, July 12

    The regular meeting of the Baton Rouge North Economic Development District will be held at the LSU Health Baton Rouge North Clinic Urgent Care located at 5439 Airline Hwy, Baton Rouge, LA 70805. The date of the meeting is July 12,2018

    The meeting will begin at 6pm in the community meeting room located at the front entry of the main building.

    Any questions contact Rinaldi Jacobs Sr (225)771-4359 or  email rjacobs@brnedd.com.

     

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    Southern University alumni ‘come home’ for biennial conference, July 19-22

    The Southern University Alumni Federation will host its biennial conference July 19-22 in Baton Rouge. The Federation, which includes thousands of members across the nation and aboard, is hosting several events that celebrate tradition, innovation and achievement.

    “This year’s conference is packed with substantive and timely speakers and panel discussions related to Southern University and the surrounding community,” said Preston Castille, Federation president. “We will focus greatly on the University’s new Imagine 20,000 initiative to grow student enrollment, improve our infrastructure, and expand Southern’s footprint in Baton Rouge. We also look forward to showcasing some of the capital city’s fantastic attractions.”

    Activities include campus tours, professional development workshops, the inaugural “40 Under 40” awards ceremony, and the “Circle of Achievement” gala featuring national media personality Roland Martin. Among speakers and facilitators for the three-day conference are Baton Rouge Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome and Kim Hunter Reed, Louisiana Board of Regents commissioner.

    ONLINE: www.sualumni.org

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    Harris, first Black to walk in space, visits Baton Rouge

    On June 26, Dr. Bernard Harris, CEO of the National Math + Science Initiative (NMSI), visited Baton Rouge to kick off NMSI’s Laying the Foundation Teacher training at Woodlawn High School.  With ongoing support from ExxonMobil, the popular training program was recently expanded to an additional 400 teachers across the state, doubling the number of teachers from last year.  In addition to his role at NMSI, Dr. Harris is the founder of The Harris Foundation, a nonprofit organization that supports math and science education programs for America’s youth.  Harris worked at NASA for 10 years, where he conducted research in musculoskeletal physiology and disuse osteoporosis.  During his career at NASA, Harris became the first Black person to walk in space.  A veteran astronaut for more than 18 years, he has logged more than 438 hours and traveled more than 7.2 million miles in space.

    Dr. Bernard Harris talks with Summer STEM Lab campers .

    Dr. Bernard Harris talks with Summer STEM Lab campers .

    Dr. Bernard Harris autographs a space mural in North Baton Rouge at Kuttin’ Kornerz Barbershop.

    Dr. Bernard Harris autographs a space mural in North Baton Rouge at Kuttin’ Kornerz Barbershop.

    While in town, Dr. Harris joined ExxonMobil for a tour of the local community.  He interacted with North Baton Rouge students at Summer STEM Lab, a BREC summer camp designed to curb effects of summer learning loss and to increase interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics topics and careers.  Campers were inspired by Harris to realize their potential through problem solving skills learned in STEM courses.

    Dr. Bernard Harris New Orleans artist, Lionel Milton, at Kuttin’ Kornerz Barbershop stand in front of a space-themed mural in North Baton Rouge.

    Dr. Bernard Harris New Orleans artist, Lionel Milton, at Kuttin’ Kornerz Barbershop stand in front of a space-themed mural in North Baton Rouge.

    Following the camp visit, he autographed a space-themed wall mural painted by New Orleans artist, Lionel Milton, at Kuttin’ Kornerz Barbershop.  He wrapped up his tour of Baton Rouge at Knock Knock Children’s Museum where he participated in space related pop-up activities with museum guests.

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    Southern University System Board approves student fee increases across campuses

    The Southern University System Board of Supervisors has approved an increase in student fees. The average increase of 4.95 percent affects Southern University Baton Rouge, Southern University New Orleans, Southern University Shreveport and the Southern University Law Center.

    “The Southern University System’s core mission is to provide an accessible, affordable and dynamic educational experience to all students,” said Ray L. Belton, Southern University System president on July 5. “While we recently celebrated the Legislature’s passage of a standstill budget — not to be confused with full funding —  for higher education, this budget does not take into account mandated costs and the formula put forth by the state Board of Regents. Without an increase, which is our last resort, the System’s ability to advance its scope and mission would be severely compromised.”

    Belton cited the more than $40 million decline in state funding the Southern University System has experienced over the past 10 years. The per-semester fee increases for full-time students result from House Bill 113 (Act 293) of the 2017 Regular Legislative Session. Each campus will allocate not less than 5 percent of the revenues realized from these fees to need-based financial assistance to students of eligible to receive a Pell Grant. Fees at the flagship Baton Rouge campus will increase by $217 for undergraduate students and $250 for graduate students; at New Orleans $169 for undergraduate students and $209 for graduate students; at Shreveport $100; and $393 at the Law Center. 

    The additional funds generated from this increase will be used to assist with situations such as offsetting the cost of unfunded mandates, operational costs and the 2018-2019 budget reduction resulting from formula implementation. The System encourages those in need of financial assistance to examine and apply for scholarships and grants through the Southern University System Foundation.

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    Documentary explores controversial death of Victor White III while in New Iberia police custody

    Discovery Communication’s Investigation Discovery is exploring the controversial death of a New Iberia man who police say shot himself while handcuffed in the backseat of a patrol car.

    The show, “Sugar Town” will investigate the circumstances surrounding the death of Victor White III, who was 22, on March 2, 2014,

    Called the “Houdini Handcuff Case” by some in the state, White’s killing has brought simmering racial tensions to a boil in the small town known for its sugar cane production.

    New Iberia residents are separated by railroad tracks—residents to the north of the tracks are predominantly white, while largely Black neighborhoods lie to the south.

    Kimberly Nordyke reported in The Hollywood Reporter, “The tracks created a strong history of racial divide predating the American Civil War in New Iberia, and many residents would argue that a Jim Crow south is still very much alive.”

    “Sugar Town” will focus on the central mystery of what might have happened to White and chronicles the family’s search for justice for their son’s suspicious death while in police custody.

    The investigation also reveals “a larger story of power, corruption and racial injustice nestled within a divided southern town, with Iberia Parish Sheriff Louis Ackal — a man shrouded in controversy — at the center,” according to the network.

    “Victor White III was a father, a son, a brother — and sadly, I fear, a victim of injustices rooted in New Iberia,” said Henry Schleiff, group president for Investigation Discovery, Travel Channel, American Heroes Channel and Destination America. “Tragedies like these unfortunately catapult people into becoming activists, and we are humbled to share the White family’s crusade for answers in Sugar Town. We are reminded that corruption and racism exist in our society, today, and we hope that ID’s airing of this documentary will help spark informed dialogue about larger social injustices to ensure that White’s death was not in vain.”

    White’s family members, including his father, the Reverend Victor White; mother, Vanessa; and two of his eight siblings, sister Lakeisha and brother L.C. are featured in the documentary along with local radio journalist Tony Brown, The Daily Iberian journalist Dwayne Fatheree, and activist Donald Broussard. Anthony Daye, who said he experienced  brutality at the hands of New Iberia’s law enforcement, civil rights attorney Clayton Burgess, and the White family’s attorney, Carol Powell Lexing are interviewed in the documentary.

    The two-hour program premieres at 7pm CST on Monday, Aug. 6.

    ONLINE: Investigationdiscovery.com

     

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    Jordan joins Urban Congress on African American Males

    The Urban Congress on African American Males welcomes James “Jay” Jordan who is currently interning with the organization. He is a second-year student pursuing his doctorate in LSU’s Sociology Department. His research interests include: African-American self-government, food security education, and community supported agriculture. Before moving to Baton Rouge, James led an organic gardening program at an elementary school in San Francisco. After falling in love with this work, he moved to Baton Rouge to create child-centered gardening programs and to study the benefits that they offer to people living in food deserts. Given his passion for teaching young children lessons associated with their health and happiness, James will be supporting Urban Congress Goal #3: Expand the number of African American boys entering kindergarten who are ready to learn and who are able to advance annually at or above their grade level. Jordan said he’s very grateful to have the opportunity to work with the Urban Congress because it enables him to join forces with people who are committed to empowering the marginalized citizens of Baton Rouge.

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    Businesses can access new Vendor Self Service Portal for Baton Rouge procurement opportunities

    East Baton Rouge Mayor’s office has launch of the Vendor Self Service portal, a new website that streamlines the processes used by vendors to register and do business with the City-Parish. 

    Vendors can access the VSS portal at http://brla.gov/vss. Those who have not done business with City-Parish previously can register as a new vendor. Existing City-Parish vendors will be mailed the information needed for them to create an account in VSS. After registering for an account in VSS, vendors will have the ability to electronically update their contact information, upload tax forms, set communication preferences, and select the goods and/or services they provide. In addition, vendors will now be able to access a variety of purchase order and payment activities that will allow the vendor to find out if a purchase order has been issued, an invoice has been received, or a check has been written. All of this can be done through the VSS portal without having to contact City-Parish via phone or email.

    “We have heard from numerous businesses about the obstacles they face when searching bids and competing for City-Parish contracts. Based on feedback from these companies, we began listing upcoming procurement opportunities on the City-Parish website,” said Broome. “Our next step is this launch which makes the process more streamlined and efficient for vendors who do business, or wish to do business, with the City-Parish. This new functionality is a result of the City-Parish’s deployment of a modern enterprise resource planning system which replaced a 20-year-old financial and procurement system.”

    For more information on becoming a vendor with the City-Parish, visit http://brla.gov/vendors.  To access the City-Parish’s listing of upcoming procurement opportunities, visit http://city.brla.gov/dept/purchase/purfops.asp.

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    Son shares father’s legacy of Cook’s Theatre

    The North Baton Rouge Blue Ribbon Commission hosted “Meet and Greet with Dr. James Cook Jr., son of Cook’s Theatre founder, the late James Cook Sr.​, at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Scotlandville, June 10.
    Dr. Cook, a cardiologist in Medford, Oregon, discussed the history of his family, local community, and the theatre business. According to Councilwoman Chauna Banks, the event “brought back great memories of Cook’s Theatre and the legendary entrepreneurial spirit that was alive and well in the Scotlandville community.”
    Submitted by Rachel Emmanuel Ph.D.
    Feature photograph is of Myrtly Ricard, Lyle Mouton, Natalie Ricard, and Dr. James Cook
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  • Passenger volume up in May at Baton Rouge Metro Airport

    Passenger enplanements, or departing passengers, were up 3.2% at Baton Rouge Metro Airport in May over the same month in 2017. Deplanements, or arriving passengers, were up 5.3%. Total passenger volume for May was 72,578, the second highest among Louisiana airports.

    2018 year-to-date BTR passenger volume is up 4.9%. Passenger volume for 2017 was up 4%. American Airlines had the top BTR passenger share in May at 38%, followed by Delta at 35% and United at 25%.

    “With the increase in airline seating capacity at BTR, and the new, nonstop VIA Air flights to Orlando and Austin beginning in September, we look forward to continued passenger growth,” said Jim Caldwell, BTR’s marketing, public relations and air service development manager.

    Interim director of aviation Mike Edwards said, “The critical piece going forward is making sure we fill these additional seats and flights. If they are successful with above-average load factors, it dramatically increases our prospects for more service.”

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  • Black Restaurant Week celebrates African, Caribbean-inspired cuisine in New Orleans

    New Orleans Black Restaurant Week (NOLABRW) will take place  July 1 – 8, in New Orleans, LA celebrating the flavors of African-American, African, and Caribbean cuisines. Black Restaurant Week, created in Houston, TX, is introducing its culinary series of taste-filled festivities to New Orleans. For 10 days, foodies and local influencers will satisfy their culinary cravings with signature events and restaurant menu specials.

    Due to the huge success of the annual culinary series in other cities, BRW has decided to expand to New Orleans. Diners can enjoy casual dining options for $15 – $25 per person, and fine dining options from $35 to $45 per person.
    Foodies will be able to enjoy options for brunch, lunch and dinner from the following list of participating black-owned restaurants:

    • Willie Mae’s Scotch House
    • The Praline Connection 
    • Neyow’s Creole Cafe
    • Louisiana Bayou Bistro
    • Beaucoup Eats 
    • Tasty Treat Food Truck and Restaurant 
    • Heard Dat Kitchen 
    • We Dat’s Chicken & Shrimp
    • Sassafras Creole Kitchen
    In addition to its staple showcase of new and well-known restaurants, BRW is known for its exciting lineup of hot-ticket events including:
    Nosh: Culinary Showcase | Thursday, July 5, 2018
    An evening of culinary excitement and live demonstrations featuring an All-Star lineup of local Executive Chefs. Nosh presents tastings and competitions featuring New Orleans top Caterers and Executive Chefs, presented by Verizon, and in partnership with New Orleans Jazz Orchestra.
     
    Power of The Palate: Bartender Competition | Thursday, July 5, 2018
    New Orleans top Black Bartenders create craft cocktails with the freshest ingredients, while attendees indulge in their delicious creations. Presented at the exciting Nosh event, this popular competition sponsored by Martell provides guests an even tastier and thirst-quenching experience.
    As an extension to NOLABRW’s commitment to the agricultural community, NOLABRW has partnered with F.A.R.M.S. (Family. Agriculture. Resource. Management. Services.), a national nonprofit organization supporting family farmers through education and retail market expansion, while relieving hunger in the farmers’ community.

    Restaurants, caterers, and bartenders interested in participating in NOLABRW can find more information here.

    Featured photo of Caribbean Jerk Salmon Topped with Shrimp from Star Fusion Restaurant.
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    Embattled School Board Member Mike Whitlow will not seek a second term

    Mike Whitlow came under fire a few months ago from the Tangipahoa Black community after he posted a story on his Facebook page that included a screen shot of a hangman’s noose.

    Whitlow posted this on Facebook,”It has been a pleasure serving the citizens of District F on the Tangipahoa Parish School Board. I want thank my constituents for the confidence placed in me to help improve our school system to ensure our children’s future. I will serve out my current term which ends on Dec. 31 of this year and will not seek reelection on Nov. 6. My plan is to fully retire to spend more quality time with my wife, family and friends.”

    Fellow School Board Member Tom Tolar posted,”I want to thank Mike Whitlow for his service on the Tangipahoa Parish School Board. He has endured more than his share of hatred, but he has never stopped working to improve our schools..This is a hard job, and it takes a toll on you. As the only board member north of Amite, I feel the pressure to advocate for our local schools. I will continue to fight with all my might to represent our local schools and I look forward to seeing what is in store for us under our new superintendents leadership. We work for you!!”

    School Board Vice-President Sandra Simmons posted, “It is sad to see you leave but l understand you wanting to spend more time with your loved ones. You have served faithfully, wisely and sincerely.”

    The election for all 9 school board members is set for November 6. Candidates will qualify in a few weeks on July 18-20.

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    Changes coming for 5 Hammond, Independence schools

    A revised student assignment plan is expected to go into effect for students in the Hammond and Independence schools, just in time for the start of the 2018-19 school year.

    The Tangipahoa Parish School Board on Wednesday filed a joint motion with plaintiff’s counsel, at the recommendation of Court Compliance Officer Donald Massey, in the longstanding Joyce Marie Moore federal desegregation lawsuit to modify the student assignment plan which went into effect with the start of the 2016-17 school year. Although the federal court document system does not indicate any judicial action has been recorded beyond the filing of the motion, the school system appears to be preparing a “Plan A” and “Plan B” for the five schools that will be impacted by these changes, which will start this August.

    Proposed to “address and resolve certain issues in the Hammond attendance zone,” the newly-modified student assignment plan will also “combine” the current Independence Magnet and Independence Leadership Academy school zones into a single attendance zone, reinstating the traditional grade configurations at those schools. Independence Leadership Academy would house pre-K through 4th grade students while Independence Magnet will enroll students in grades 5-8. The modified plan would allow Independence Magnet to remain a communications magnet school.

    If the newest version of the modified plan is approved by Judge Ivan Lemelle, there would be significantly more changes in store for three Hammond schools (Woodland Park Magnet, Greenville Park Leadership Academy, and Hammond Eastside Magnet) starting this upcoming 2018-19 school year:

    *New principals would be assigned at the Greenville Park and Woodland Park schools. By federal court order, those principals would likely be laterally-transferred from other TPSS schools or from the Central Office itself, and the individuals selected would be required to hold proper administration certificates, have previous experience as school principals, and “have a proven record of effectiveness in all areas of school administration.” The new appointees will be compensated according to the district salary schedule but granted a $10,000 annual stipend above and beyond their compensation package to be paid “semi-annually for as long as the principal remains at GPLA or WPM.”

    *Woodland Park and Greenville Park will change their grade configurations. For the 2018-19 school year, Greenville Park will remain a pre-K to 8th grade campus, but Woodland Park will serve students in grades pre-K to 6 only. 7th and 8th grade students who were previously assigned to the Woodland Park zone will automatically transfer to Hammond Eastside for the upcoming school year.

    *School choice transfers will be offered for Woodland Park 7th and 8th graders who do not want to go to Hammond Eastside. Woodland Park parents who do not want to send their 7th or 8th grader to Hammond Eastside will be able to utilize a “school choice transfer” to send their students to Greenville Park, but they must file a transfer application before July 19, 2018, to make that happen. Any Woodland Park 7th or 8th grade student who does not have a school option transfer application on file by July 19 will be sent to Hammond Eastside for the 2018-19 school year.

    *Reconstituted faculties: In 2018-19, the new leadership teams at Woodland Park and Greenville Park will “be given the opportunity to select their administrative teams and will be allowed first pick in filling any uncertified positions with certified teachers who wish to transfer from other schools or from the list of newly certified teacher applicants.” The faculty and leadership teams at these two schools will receive a $3,000 stipend on top of their compensation package, and that stipend will remain in effect, paid semi-annually, for as long as those teachers remain at the schools.

    *Woodland Park and Greenville Park will remain magnet schools, but the schools will receive additional funding for student activities. Woodland Park continues as a communications magnet school and Greenville Park will remain a STEM school. Greenville Park will continue to implement Teacher Advancement Program (TAP) with the current payout formula remaining in place.The district will offer additional instructional resources for both schools, including an extra $25,000 added to their school activity funds for this year and an additional $15,000 for school activity funds in future years.

    *Other enhancements for 2018-19 school year:
    -Greenville Park and Woodland Park will also begin offering Spanish effective this upcoming school year and will continue to do so moving forward.
    -Greenville Park will also receive support from the district’s science resource teacher at least once a week to work with science teachers and their STEM specialist to improve the school’s implementation of STEM.
    -Starting in October, 2018, Central Office staff will begin meeting monthly with the leadership of Woodland Park and Greenville Park to discuss progress at their schools, address additional resources that may be necessary, and to tweak any potential modifications to the student assignment plan that may be included for the 2019-2020 school year.

    *Priority admissions: With regard to early childhood education, African American students from the Woodland Park attendance zone and specifically students in the Magazine Street, M.C. Moore Street, and Martin Luther King Street areas of Hammond will also be given priority admission for up to one-third of the total early childhood program enrollment in Hammond Eastside’s pre-K program. The court order specifies “pre-K classes at Hammond Eastside Magnet School shall be racially diverse.”

    Moving into 2019-2020, the plan calls for even greater improvements in the Hammond school district:
    *Reconstituted schools: In 2019-20, Woodland Park and Greenville Park students will be assigned to the same school zone. Students in grades pre-K to 3 will attend Woodland Park while students in grades 4-8 will attend Greenville Park. Woodland Park 7th students who transferred to Hammond Eastside for 2018-19 will have the option to remain at Hammond Eastside for their 8th grade year or transfer to Greenville Park.

    In addition to these changes at the five elementary schools, the modified plan calls for enhanced professional development for all teachers, and that training will offer emphasis on cultural diversity and equity. The first phase of professional development will be completed before May 1, 2019, with follow-up and ongoing professional development offered to all system employees. Phase two will include all teachers and support staff, with a goal of completing that training no later than December of 2019. At that point, cultural diversity training and equity training will be offered annually to all TPSS employees.

    Action 17 News

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  • SU System Board meets June 22

    The Southern University System Board of Supervisors will hold its regular meeting Friday, June 22 at 9 a.m., in the Millie M. Charles School of Social Work Auditorium on the campus of Southern University New Orleans (6400 Press Dr.).

    The agenda and other documents can be found at:http://www.sus.edu/page/su-board-current-month-packet.

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