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    Tangipahoa library plans meetings to discuss March 24 tax renewal

    The Tangipahoa Parish Library will host seven town hall meetings to discuss their upcoming millage renewal leading up to the March 24 proposition election.

    Starting Jan. 16, the Library system will hold public hearings at each of their six branches to answer questions and outline plans for the millage renewal.

    Currently, the Library receives three mills for “improving, maintaining, operating and supporting the Tangipahoa Parish Library and its branches.” The 10-year tax has been on the books for decades and has been critical to provide library services for the public.

    Scheduled meeting dates and locations are as follows:
    Amite Branch: Jan. 16 at 5 p.m.
    Kentwood Branch: Jan. 29 at 5 p.m.
    Loranger Branch: Feb. 5 at 5 pm.
    Ponchatoula Branch: Feb. 20 at 5 p.m.
    Independence Branch: Feb. 26 at 5 p.m.
    Hammond Branch: March 1 at 5 p.m., and March 17 at 10 a.m.
    For more information on the March 24 Tangi Library tax renewal, go to www.TangiLibrary.com.

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    Gov. Edwards declares State of Emergency, Crisis Action Team activated Wednesday due to freezing weather

    Gov. John Bel Edwards issued an Emergency Declaration Wednesday, Jan. 17, due to the freezing precipitation and low temperatures throughout Louisiana. The Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness, Dept. of Transportation and Development and other state agencies have been activated in response to this emergency.

    “The weather conditions are extremely dangerous, and while it may be tempting to venture outside, it is critical that everyone stay off the frozen highways and streets and heed all state and local warnings in order to be safe,” said Edwards. “Parts of all major interstates in Louisiana have closed because of the icy conditions and unfortunately, one life has already been claimed by this extreme weather. Our state Crisis Action Team and DOTD have been working around the clock responding to emergencies, salting roadways and providing resources to those who need assistance. Until the freezing temperatures lift, I urge everyone to take the necessary precautions, remember to check on people, pets and pipes, and stay warm and remain patient.”

    DTsog0tX4AEnRF0.jpg-large

    The winter weather has caused major road closures throughout the state. DOTD began salting and pre-treating roads in northern districts on Monday evening and Tuesday morning in the southern districts and continues those operations. Continue monitoring www.511La.org for updates on roadways and other important information.

    “The disruption and danger of extreme weather conditions like we are experiencing cannot be underestimated” said Dr. Shawn Wilson, DOTD Secretary. “In addition to major closings of interstates across Louisiana, we have seen hundreds of vehicle accidents, including 18 wheeler accidents and even a death. Drivers should heed our call to stay put until the all clear is issued.”

    DOTD facts:

    • 1,204 employees have been deployed for 24 hour operations.
    • 134,600 hits to www.511La.org (which typically gets 2,500 hit per day).
    • 1.5 Million pounds of salt have been used on roadways statewide.
    • 25 Dump trucks.
    • 236 trucks with spreaders/sprayers.
    • 5 airports have been closed.

    GOHSEP activated its Crisis Action Team on Tuesday. The State Fire Marshall’s Office reminds everyone to use caution when operating space heaters or any other heating source in their homes. When using any type of heating source, whether it is a space heater or fireplace, homeowners should incorporate a “three-foot rule,” where there should be a space of at least three feet between a heating source and any combustibles such as furniture and décor. Ovens or open flame sources, such as candles, should never be used to heat homes.

    Click here to read the Emergency Declaration.

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    Rene honored with Above and Beyond Award

    A long-time Southern University Baton Rouge employee and former assistant mass communications professor was presented the December 2017 Above and Beyond Award.

    Robert Rene’, Ph.D, also has served as interim director and associate director of the Office of Recruitment and Admissions. Rene’ worked in television news before serving at Southern University.

    In his current role, Rene’ meets with students, parents, principals, counselors, and alumni to guide students’ academic futures. He recently participated in the fall 2017 California Community College Transfer to HBCUs Caravan that took place October 31 -November 8. The caravan began in Northern California Sacramento area and concluded nine days later in the Southern California — Long Beach area.

    “Dr. Robert Rene’ was such an asset to this year’s caravan. He brought such a wisdom and calm to the caravan. I am personally appreciative of his flexibility and support during the entire trip,” said Helen P. Young, project director, California Community Colleges Transfer Guarantee Agreement to Historically Black Colleges & Universities.

    “I humbly accept this award for the service I enjoy doing,” said Rene’.

    The Above and Beyond Award was established to help inspire and motivate SU employees to reach their maximum performance. One award is presented at the SU Board of Supervisors meetings each month.

    Recipients of the award are nominated by their peers. Nominations are forwarded to the Board of Supervisors chair and vice chair for selection.

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    Who to Watch 2018: McClanahan, Banks, Emery, Gilmore, and Harris in Baton Rouge

     

    Twelve Louisiana residents have been selected by The Drum’s publisher and staff as people to watch in 2018. In this issue, we introduce five: NAACP State President Michael McClanahan, councilwoman Chauna Banks, novelist Lynn Emery, anti-domestic violence activist Twahna Harris, and policy advisor James Gilmore Jr. Ph.D.

    Read their individual stories:

    Chauna Banks office

    Chauna Banks

    Michael McClanahan

    Michael McClanahan 

    WHO TO WATCH James Gilmore headshot

    James Gilmore, Ph.D.

    Who To Watch Twahna Harris headshot

    Twahna Harris

    Lynn's Promo Photo016[6]

    Lynn Emery

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    Who to Watch: Lynn Emery

    Author Lynn Emery’s romantic suspense novels and mystery fiction have won and been nominated for several literary awards, including Best Mul- ticultural Mainstream Novel by Romantic Times Magazine. Set in the swamps and bayou, Emery’s thrillers—a total of 22 to date—mix mystery and supernatural suspense with strong female leads and a huge dose of everything Louisiana.

    Her 1996 romantic suspense novel, After All, inspired a BET made-for-television movie with Holly Robinson Peete and DB Woodside starring as lead characters. In this novel, sparks fly between an ambitious Baton Rouge newswoman and the man she loves. Intrigue and scandal threaten to turn all of their hopes to dust unless they are able to trust each other to save their future and their love.

    Emery also won three Emma Awards for Kiss Lonely Goodbye as part of the Romance Slam Jam conference. She has sold 14 novels to four major publishers over the span of her literary career. Emery has been a contributing consultant to Today’s Black Woman magazine for three articles about contemporary relationships between Black men and women. She works full-time as a licensed social worker with a special interest in mental health is- sues as they affect women. With that, meet Lynn Emery.

    What should we expect from you in 2018: I plan to release two novels in 2018. Third Sight Into Darkness will be released January 26. I plan to write the fourth book in my Joliet Sisters psychic detectives series, Dead Ahead, for release later in 2018. I have planned to sign at New York Comic Con in 2018.

    Moves made from 2015 to 2017: I have written five novels during this period: Smooth Operator, Hunting Spirits, Pretty Dangerous, Into the Mist, and Dead Wrong. I designed and created a website for my publishing company, Lazy River Publishing. In October 2017, I exhibited at New York Comic Con and was a co-participant on one panel on how artists, writers, and creators can find and build their audiences.

    Personal resolution: My goal is to balance self-care with being of service to others.

    Life/business motto: Make excellence a habit.

    Business resolution: My goal is to increase knowledge of my brand and my novels.

    What is your #1 priority right now? To reach more readers who enjoy the kind of fiction I create.

    Best advice you’ve ever received? Several versions of the old saying, “Bloom where you’re planted.”

    Role models: Literary roles models include Agatha Christie, Ernest Gaines, J. California Cooper, and Maya Angelou.

    What has been a deciding moment or an experience that pushed you forward? My decision to write novels started when I was eleven years old. I read an Agatha Christie novel with a shocking twist at the end that blew my mind. Right then I decided to write my kind of mystery featuring smart women solving mysteries. I started my first novel, but didn’t finish it. I had a lot to learn! Fast forward twenty years, and I joined a writers group to stop just talking about writing novels and to finally do it. I attended a writers conference, met an editor, and sold my first book.

    What music are you listening/dancing to? Classic R&B and smooth jazz

    What are you reading? Mostly mystery fiction and sci-fi. Last favorite novels I read are The Seed Bearing Prince by Davaun Sanders, Lion’s Blood by Steven Barnes, and Fledgling by Octavia Butler

    What’s entertaining you? Streaming original series on television The Punisher, Broadchurch, Midsomer Murders, and Bosch, to name a few. I recently watched “What Happened to Monday,” a movie on Netflix, and loved it.

    Email: lynnemery@cox.net

    Social media: www.facebook.com/lynn. emery.author

    Twitter: LynnEmeryWriter Online: www.lynnemery.com

    Twelve Louisiana residents have been selected by The Drum’s publisher and staff as people to watch in 2018. In this issue, we introduce five: NAACP State President Michael McClanahan, councilwoman Chauna Banks, novelist Lynn Emery, anti-domestic violence activist Twahna Harris, and policy advisor James Gilmore Jr. Ph.D.

    Read more »
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    Scenes from MLK Festival of Services in Scotlandville

    A four-day event where The Walls Project and 100+ businesses and organizations reactivated two miles of historic Scenic Hwy in Scotlandville. Read more

     

    Photos by CondiB
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    Who to Watch: James Gilmore Jr., Ph.D

    On any given day, James Gilmore Jr, Ph.D., can be found actively push- ing a political issue, managing an athlete, marketing spa services, or fishing. Within his company, Bayard Management Group, he manages government relations, workforce development, and strategic planning for clients in healthcare, education, and private business. As a policy advisor, Gilmore has worked with Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome, Gov. John Bel Edwards, and former Gov. Kathleen Blanco, leading the Children’s Cabinet and Louisiana Housing Finance Agency. He is also a founding member of the Mentorship Digital Media Academy and the Mentorship Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Academy.

    Gilmore is a member of the Baton Rouge North Economic Development District where he works with a
    team tasked with bringing economic developments to the under-resourced area.

    Today, he maneuvers throughout the parish working with senior citizens in his role as chief administrative officer of the East Baton Rouge Council on Aging.

    What is your #1 priority right now? To ensure that Senior Citizens across East Baton Rogue Parish are provided the best quality of life and services via the East Baton Rouge Council on Aging.

    Moves made from 2015 to 2017: Director of Training for Our Lady of the Lake Hospital, Director of the Children’s Cabinet Office of Governor John Bel Edwards, Chief Administrative Officer Office of Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome.

    What to expect in 2018: I will monitor the performance of the recent $7.8 million annual millage passed in the 2016 election for the purposes of supporting senior citizens in East Baton Rouge Parish; strengthen police and community relations in East Baton Rouge Parish; host a Minority-Owned Business Expo in East Baton Rouge Parish; host an East Baton Rouge Parish Senior Expo; ensure that minorities have a more equitable share of City of Baton Rouge contract opportunities.

    Personal resolution: To live my best life daily

    Life/business motto: Stay organized and purposeful for high productivity.

    Business resolution: To ensure the success of my sports agency, spa, and work- force develop- ment training firm by hiring competent and reliable staff.

    Best advice you’ve ever received? Everyone does not think like me, respect differences, and be capable of using discernment in personal and professional decision-making.

    Role models: President Barack Obama and Honorable Louis Farrakhan.

    What music are you listening/dancing to? Ledesi, Smokie Norful, Big Krit, Chris Brown, Jeezy

    What are you reading? The Four Agreements by Don Ruiz

    Social media: James Gilmore (Facebook); Bayard_Sports (Instagram)

    Online: www.bayardmanagement. com and www.bayardsports.com 

    Twelve Louisiana residents have been selected by The Drum’s publisher and staff as people to watch in 2018. In this issue, we introduce five: NAACP State President Michael McClanahan, councilwoman Chauna Banks, novelist Lynn Emery, anti-domestic violence activist Twahna Harris, and policy advisor James Gilmore Jr. Ph.D.

    Read more »
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    Castine named New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center event manager

    Lauren Castine has been named event manager at the New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center–the sixth largest convention center in the nation. She will be responsible for managing all aspects of the event planning process. As a liaison between the Center and clients, she will guide clients through event preparation and show set-up, monitor in-house events and oversee all related activities to ensure successful events.”

    ONLINE: https://www.mccno.com/new-orleans-ernest-n-morial-convention-center-names-lauren-castine-event-manager/

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    Baton Rouge NAACP will host annual King Celebration, Jan 15

    The Baton Rouge NAACP will host its annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration on Jan. 15, 2018 at  Mt. Zion First Baptist Church, 356 East Blvd. , at  8 a.m. The guest speaker will be Judge John Michel Guidry. A reception will be held afterwards in the church  fellowship hall featuring food and various vendors. The event is free and open to the public. Due to the weather, the march to City Hall after the program has been cancelled.  

     

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  • Who to Watch: Twahna Harris

    “Whatever you’re passionate about will write the legacy you leave to the world,” said Twahna P. Harris, whose passion in advocacy is writing an enduring legacy against domestic violence.

    Recognized statewide for the work she does to assist domestic violence survi- vors, Harris’s personal journey of abuse has equipped her to empower women and men of all ages to “stand up and speak out”. Her life story was included in The Pixel Project: The Survivor Stories 2015 in honor of Mother’s Day—the same year that she was nominated for the United States Women Summit. Harris is the founder and executive director of The Butterfly Society, a Zachary, La.-based, anti-domestic violence non-profit established in 2014.

    The Arnaudville, Louisiana, native has been a member of the Community Coordinated Responsive Team with Iris Domestic Violence Center and the TaskForce on the Prevention of Sexual Abuse of Children for the Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services.

    Last Fall, Harris was appointed by Gov. John Bel Edwards to the stateDomestic Violence Task Force Commision. Under her leadership, The Butterfly Society has estab ished memorial gardens in four Louisiana cities, partnered with barbershops for discussions with men, influenced domestic violence policies, and supported hundreds of survivors seeking escape or restoration. Twahna Harris, 47, is a person to watch.

    Moves made in 2015 to 2017: I have been appointed to Domestic Violence Task Force Commission for the State of Louisiana. The Butterfly Society is a household name. I’m blessed to be employed with them as the legislative assistant to East Baton Rouge Councilman Lamont Cole in District 7 .

    What to expect in 2018: GREATNESS!

    Personal resolution: Never forget to reach back.

    Life/Business Motto: Meeting people where they are.

    Business resolution: The work we do is never about ourselves but those we serve.

    Best Advice You’re Ever Received? Be who you are, not who people say you are.

    Role models: My mother Cecelia W. Porch, grandmother Mable D. White, my sister Wanda M. Porch, my aunt Elmira P. Jefferson, Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome, and my uncle Joseph L. White.

    What has been a deciding moment or experience that pushed you forward? Surviving domestic violence was a defining moment in my life. Making a commitment to help educate, engage, and empower communities to end domestic violence.

    What are you reading? Hacks by Donna Brazile

    What’s entertaining you? Blue Blood, Chicago PD, Law and Order Special Victim Unit

    What music are you listening/ dancing to? R & B, Zydeco

    Social media: Facebook: Twahna P Harris, TheButterflySociety14

    Twitter: @ butterflyorgLA

    Email: thebutterflysociety@gmail.com

    Online: www.thebutterflysociety.org

    Twelve Louisiana residents have been selected by The Drum’s publisher and staff as people to watch in 2018. In this issue, we introduce five: NAACP State President Michael McClanahan, councilwoman Chauna Banks, novelist Lynn Emery, anti-domestic violence activist Twahna Harris, and policy advisor James Gilmore Jr. Ph.D.

    Read more »
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    White Hills Elementary fourth graders thank ‘Wonder’ donor

    Within two weeks of White Hills Elementary 4th grade teachers Lacy Aucoin (pictured at left) and Carlita Joseph-Gordon (right) requesting book donations on Facebook, Rachel Dickerson and Maranda Smith Williams mailed 26 copies of Wonder by R. J. Palacio to the students. Gordon, who is using the book to address core reading standards, said the books will help students jumpstart or continue building personal libraries. Other books on the teacher’s wish list are: Crossover by Kwame Alexander, Summer Saves Summer by Adara Gaston, and Tales of a 4th Grade Nothing by Judy Blume.

    Read more »
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    Good Job workshop to teach how to get the job you really want

    Workshop will teach how to set goals and reach them this year 

    It’s a New Year and you’re still doing the same old thing. But it’s never too late to follow your dreams.

    The “Good Job workshop: How to get the job you really want in 2018” will teach you how to set your goals and reach them this year.  The workshop will be held Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018 from 10 a.m. to noon at the EpiCenter, business and event center, 6220 Florida Blvd. Suite B, in Baton Rouge. The cost is $20 in advance and $25 at the door. (Register online)

    As part of the workshop, participants will learn effective goal-setting techniques, how to develop a plan and work it and valuable tips and strategies for pursuing their passions and following their dreams.

    The seminar is sponsored by Michelle McCalope, president of On Assignment Media, and the EpiCenter, a business and event center. The former award-winning journalist, author, and entrepreneur has 30 years of experience in the media and business industry.

    The seminar is based on McCalope’s motivational books, Good Job: A Guide to Pursuing Your Passions and Following Your Dreams  and That Good Job: Strategies for Pursuing Your Passions and Following Your Dreams. She shares the lessons she’s learned along the way to help inspire others to follow their dreams and not just settle for a job that pays the bills.

    Registration starts at 9:30 a.m. Refreshments will be served. For more information, email onassignmentmedia@gmail.com

    ONLINE:  www.goodjobworkshop18.eventbrite.com

    Read more »
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    City sees community pharmacies expand

    Following the closure of Community Pharmacy 1 Baton Rouge’s first Black-owned closed-door pharmacy, the city began to see an increase of pharmacies opening around the city and particularly in North Baton Rouge.

    Community Pharmacy focused on providing prescription drugs through health care providers like nursing homes and mental health facilities rather than directly to individual consumers. It wasn’t until 2008 that Baton Rouge customers would have other options for purchase medicine instead of at big-box pharmacies like Rite Aide and Walgreen’s. That year, Kimberly Murphy Paul, a registered pharmacist, opened Noah’s Pharmacy in Brusly, La. This has led the way to a type of surge in Black pharmacies opening in the city.

    According to state records, Belford Johnson and Duston Stacia, PharMD, became owners of Affordable Pharmacy in 2009. In 2015, Johnson and Jabari Alexander open a second location on Gardere Lane, Brent Landry opened Brent’s Pharmacy in Mid-City Baton Rouge. In February 2017, Eric Peters, PharMD, opened Lagniappe Pharmacy on Drusilla Lane while operating two locations in Gonzales since 2014.

    Each pharmacy has unique service or distinction. Noah’s Pharmacy has a digital app. Brent’s Pharmacy is a Health Mart franchise. Affordable Pharmacy, which offers free delivery, has earned AIDS Drug Assistance Programs credentials. All locations of Lagniappe Pharmacy has online prescription refills.

    The area will see its sixth Black-owned pharmacy, Parker’s Pharmacy, open in the Broadmoor Shopping Center on Florida Blvd this month. Owner Orlando J. Palmer Jr., Pharm, and brother Kyle will operate the new location which Orlando calls their “first”.

    Orlando Palmer is a graduate of Xavier University of Louisiana College of Pharmacy with a doctor of pharmacy.

    How would you describe what you do? As owner and Pharmacist in Charge, I am responsible for the day to day business aspects of the pharmacy. From filling patient prescriptions, counseling patients on their medication, training, coaching and managing employees.

    How did you get started? I’ve always known that one day I would start my own community pharmacy. My brother and I have been planning our vision for Parker’s Pharmacy for over two years. We both left Baton Rouge after high school to pursue college and professional goals. After 10 plus years away, we collectively decided that Baton Rouge was where we needed to be to continue our vision.Orlando Parker Pharmacy

    Where did your interest in pharmacy start? I always had an interest in healthcare growing up. I was going to be a pediatrician, anesthesiologist or pharmacist. The first two years of Pre-Med/Pre-Pharmacy college curriculum was the same. I decided to become a pharmacist and the rest is history.
    My pharmacy career consisted of retail pharmacy experience (Walgreen’s and CVS Pharmacy) and nuclear pharmacy experience (PETNET Solutions, a Siemens Company). Managing a nuclear manufacturer was very rewarding. Every single day, we assisted in the diagnosis and management of various cancer and Alzheimer’s disease patients.

    Why did you choose Baton Rouge? Baton Rouge is home, born and raised. My brother and I collectively made the decision to move back to Baton Rouge to grow our family and business.

    Why the Broadmoor area? The Broadmoor area needs a community pharmacy. It met all of our target site selection criteria. We have other Parker’s Pharmacy locations planned for the Baton Rouge area.

    What is most challenging aspect of your business? Poor service in business has been a documented issue. This include the retail/community pharmacy industry. It will be a challenge to decondition patients, to choose a better pharmacy experience, from the only thing they may currently know.

    What’s most rewarding? Improving patient health outcomes of family, friends and the community where I was born and raised.

    What are two things you wished everyone understood about pharmacy and medicine? Pharmacy, specifically prescription medications, is only one main component to improving and managing your health. Healthier food choices, diet, physical exercise, smoking cessation are also key components. The world of medicine will constantly evolve and Parker’s Pharmacy will be there for their patients to help guide them through those times.Parker family

    What do you think is the most important aspect of pharmacy? This is a tough question. I have gone back and forward with education and adherence as the most important aspects of pharmacy. Ultimately, I conclude education. Educating your patients on their new or current medication regimen and course of therapy. This includes directions, side effects, drug-drug interactions, drug-food interactions, any additional supplements needed, nutritional education, etc. The more time you take to educate your patients will ultimately improve adherence to medication. It’s a direct correlation to improved patient health outcomes.

    What are your goals or future plans? My goal is to provide an exceptional pharmacy experience to all patients. This includes customer service, education and awareness and improving the overall health of my community. We have plans for multiple Parker’s Pharmacy locations around the Baton Rouge metro area.

    Who works with you in the pharmacy? My brother Kyle Palmer is co-owner of Parker’s Pharmacy. His role is Director of Community Outreach Services. We also employ a team of pharmacist and pharmacy technicians.

    Should you (a pharmacist) be asked clinical questions? How do you handle clinical questions when asked? Every single day a pharmacist answers clinical questions. The intense college curriculum, clinical rotation requirements, national and state board exams and work experience allows pharmacist to continue to be one of the most trusted professionals. If a pharmacist is unable to pull up information from memory, there are ample clinical resources readily available.

    What unique business relationships or partnerships do you have in Baton Rouge? As we launched our business venture, we have partnered and aligned our services with many great organizations. These organizations are top notch when it comes to execution and results. Off the top of my head they include:
    1. The BYAN Group led by Courtney Scott for strategic planning and marketing
    2. The Baton Rouge Area Chamber for business development
    3. The Maxine Firm led by Ellen McKnight for nutritional support and logistics
    4. The CEO Foundation led by Jasiri Basel for community outreach
    5. Louisiana Healthcare Services led by Dr. Leah Cullins and Nicole Thomas for clinic services

    Why are you here? I love this question. This venture is way bigger than the impact of a neighborhood pharmacy on a community. My brother and I are here to build and strengthen our hometown community of Baton Rouge. We are here to provide HOPE to the community where we were born and raised, specifically 70805.

    ONLINE: parkersrx.com

    By Candace J. Semien
    Jozef Syndicate reporter

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    Who to Watch: Councilwoman Chauna Banks

    Chauna Banks has lived her entire life in Scotlandville district where she has served seven years as councilwoman. A graduate of Southern University Lab High School and Southern University, she has found her life’s purpose in being a public servant beyond her master’s degree in counseling and full-time job. She has argued for equitable resources for the northern part of Baton Rouge, saying the area “has been systematically subjected to political, economic, cultural or social degradation because its residents are majority Black. It is inflicted with several forms of discrimination: economic, recreation, retail, housing, media and infrastructure.” She moves into the final year of her second term with more recognition in part due to her fights to keep the Baton Rouge Zoo at Greenwood Park in North Baton, to end the contamination of Devil’s Swamp in Alsen, Louisiana, and to have Baton Rouge police

    release the 911 recordings on Alton Sterling. She continues to believe that there is a solution to every problem, and “when we work together, everybody wins.”

    MEET COUNCILWOMANCHAUNA BANKS, 56

    Moves made from 2015 to 2017:

    • Tasked the North Ba- ton Rouge Blue Ribbon Com- mission to work toward qual- ity of life assets in the north- ern portion of the parish, such as an emergency room and other healthcare options.

    • Organized the Alsen/St. Irma Lee Advisory Board to look at bringing resolve to the years of environmental justice.

    • Increased city-parish funding for Jewel J. Newman Community Center building and grounds upgrades.

    • Awarded several grants: The KaBOOM! In the amount of $15,000 towards a “Community Playground Build” Project, an annual ExxonMo- bil Grant of $2500, and just recently, the Capital Area United Way grant for $30,000 to operate the JJNCC TeenWorkPrepBR, $25,000 BRAF Flood Relief Grant to renovate JJNCC computer room.

    • Supplement revenues via an annual JJNCC Capital Campaign: Masquerade Ball, Back-to- School Rally, and Annual Senior Appreciation Luncheon.

    • This fall we added a GED Adult Education Program to offerings.

    What to expect in 2018 from you:

    • Maintaining the Baton Rouge Zoo at its current Thomas Road location and expanding the concept of “The Zoo at Greenwood Park” with sig- nificant upgrades.

    • Advocating for a middle class housing sub- division for young professionals with growing families.

    • Reducing the time for rehire of city-parish workers with a positive marijuana read from three years to one year.

    • My long-range goal is to have a performing arts theatre built in District 2.

    Personal resolution: My personal res- olution is to be dedicated to God by doing my best to exercise kingdom principles in earthly affairs.

    Life/business motto: Work smarter, not harder. Business resolu- tion: My business resolution is to maintain and promote a high standard of professional ethics and practice impartial- ity, fairness, and an equitable discharge of services without bias.

    What is your #1 priority right now? Maintaining the Baton Rouge Zoo at its current Thomas Road location and expand- ing the concept of “The Zoo at Greenwood Park” with significant recreational upgrades.

    Best advice you have ever received: Rules without relationships bring on rebellion.

    Role models: Both my grandmothers, my mother, and my aunts.

    What has been a deciding moment or an experience that pushed you forward? Rearing a male child as a single female parent propelled me to be a very responsible and involved parent.

    What music are you listening/dancing to? Contemporary Gospel is what I listen to daily, but I also like ‘70s R&B.

    What are you reading? HOLY BIBLE

    What’s entertaining you? CBS shows

    E-mail: cbanks@brgov.com

    Social media: Facebook/CouncilwomanChauna Banks

    Read more »
  • Cervical Health Awareness Month begins

    January is Cervical Health Awareness Month. Each year, more than 11,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer. HPV (human papillomavirus) is a very common infection that spreads through sexual activity, and it causes almost all cases of cervical cancer. About 79 million Americans currently have HPV, but many people with HPV don’t know they are infected.

    Learn how Cervical Health Awareness Month can make a difference here.

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    Study: Blacks work 30 jobs at high risk of automation

    Innovation is changing America, from self-checkout lanes in grocery stores to driverless cars. New jobs will emerge, like technicians who service these technologies. Other jobs will be eliminated, such as some cashiers and drivers.
    To what extent are Blacks—whose unemployment rates are already twice as high as those of Whites—currently represented in jobs at high risk to automation?

    According to a study by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, a Washington D.C.-based think tank, joblessness among Blacks is expected increase more because 30 jobs Blacks work in are at high risk of automation.

    “Twenty-seven percent of Black workers are concentrated in 30 occupations at high risk of automation. By comparison, these 30 occupations account for 24 percent of all white workers and 20 percent of all Asian-American workers,” according to the report Race and Jobs at High Risk of Automation.

    There are 3.3 million cashiers and 580,000 are Black or 3.22 percent of the Black workforce compared to 1.92 percent of the white workforce and 2.54 percent of the Asian workforce.

    There are 500,000 taxi drivers and chauffeurs and 143,000 are Black or 80 percent of the Black workforce compared to 21 percent of the white workforce and 87 percent of the Asian workforce.

    At risk are retail salespersons, cashiers, secretaries, administrative assistants, cooks, waiters, waitresses, laborers, freight and stock movers, hand construction laborers, accountants, auditors, receptionists, information clerks, grounds maintenance workers, office clerks, sales representatives, wholesale and manufacturing, food preparation workers, real estate brokers and sales agents, production workers, security guards, gaming surveillance officers, miscellaneous assemblers and fabricators, agricultural workers, inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers, weighers, insurance sales agents, industrial truck and tractor operators, shipping/receiving traffic clerks, taxi drivers and chauffeurs, sales workers and truck drivers, billing and posting clerks, paralegals and legal Assistants, bus drivers, fast food workers, operating engineers, and construction equipment operators.

    “While automation will create new types of jobs, the Black community faces a unique combination of well-documented challenges that make it particularly vulnerable in labor-market transitions,” the report said. “These challenges include: an average household net worth that is one-tenth of whites, making periods without income particularly difficult.”

    The study also noted that automation could increase the Black unemployment rate from 7.5 percent to more than 20 percent. However, the study reported that economic disruption can create new opportunities that address long-standing social inequities. The Joint Center is a research and policy analysis institution focused exclusively on issues concerning people of color.

    ONLINE: jointcenter.org

    By Cora Lester
    The Drum reporter

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    Southern University, LSBDC proclaim ‘Innovate now!’ with workshop series

    When innovation meets entrepreneurship, great things happen. The Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southern University and the Southern University Innovation Center are bringing to the capital region a series of trainings through an event called, “Innovate Now! When Innovation Meets Entrepreneurship” that will begin on January 16, 2018 at the Southern University Innovation Center located at 616 Harding Blvd, Baton Rouge, LA.

    Innovate Now! will build awareness and provide information to the small business community to inspire and inform aspiring and existing entrepreneurs about resources to help them succeed. This dynamic series addresses three major areas of focus: Innovation in Business, Product Innovation, and Innovation Globally.

    “Entrepreneurs want to be intellectually challenged, and want to make a difference in society while still obtaining financial gain,” said Ada Womack, LSBDC at Southern University interim director.

    Innovation is simply a new way of doing something, Womack said, and added that Innovation is defined as incremental, radical, and revolutionary changes in thinking, products, processes, or organizations.

    Entrepreneurship is “one who takes a risk to start a small business.” Womack said the well- known Innovation Equation model is Innovation = Creativity + Risk-Taking.

    “Southern University offers Innovation, Research and Entrepreneurship assistance all on one campus,” Womack said.

    Southern University has taken large steps towards developing its entrepreneurship and economic activity especially since the grand opening of its Innovation Center in September.

    Southern University Executive Director for Strategic Engagement Deanna Williams Smith said “we are equally as excited about the upcoming Innovate Now Campaign which allows the local business community to take advantage of the numerous resources offered in one stop.”

    “The SU Innovation Center provides attractive and affordable lease office space to small upcoming businesses as well as outreach programs for our students who are guided by an entrepreneurial spirit,” Smith said. “Through our partnership with the LSBDC, our business tenants have a unique opportunity to form critical partnerships, business training resources, and access to student and faculty engagement. It’s a great time to start the New Year with ideas and passion through innovation.”

    The Innovate Now! schedule:

    Tuesday, January 16, 2018 – Innovation in Business: 5 – 7 p.m.
    Speaker: Shakita Billups, Entrepreneur
    Anyone can be innovative. Innovation means coming up with new ways of doing things. During this session you will learn about bringing innovation into your business that can help you save time and money, and give you the competitive advantage to grow and adapt your business in the marketplace. Innovation can increase the likelihood of your business succeeding. Businesses that innovate create more efficient work processes and have better productivity and performance.

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018 – Product Innovation: 5 – 7 p.m.
    Speaker – Carlos Thomas
    What is product innovation? This session will provide an introduction to product innovation and the steps in creating your product or service that is new or significantly improved regarding characteristics or intended uses. These components are inclusive of significant improvements in technical specifications, components and materials, incorporated software, user friendliness or other functional characteristics. Product innovations may include both new products and new uses for existing products.

    Tuesday, January 30, 2018 – Innovation Globally: 5 – 7 p.m.
    Speaker: Mike Smith, CEO-OPEX
    My business is going global! Many businesses are aware that there are hidden opportunities in global innovation. Global operations is a treasure trove of ideas and capabilities for innovation. It can be challenging going global with your ideas or exploit the capabilities in global innovation projects. Some of the challenges of global projects are familiar: figuring out the right role for top executives, for example, or finding a good balance between formal and informal project management processes. In this session you will learn about the challenges and benefits of taking your business global.

    ONLINE: www.lsbdc.org.

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    Tips to help women prepare for long-term healthcare

    Women spend much of their lives caring for others. As mothers and wives, they never seem to stop giving to their families and husbands.

    So who will take care of mom if she needs long-term care? Or will she plan ahead for her long-term care?

    It’s important that she does. Women typically outlive men by an average of about five years. According to aarp.org, more than two-thirds of Americans 85 or older are women. And about 79 percent of 65-year-old women will need long-term care during their lifetime, according to a study by the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute.

    Women often become long-term caregivers for their husbands or other family members. And as statistics show, they are also more likely to become widowed before needing long-term care themselves. Her husband’s needs may have further drained assets, leaving the widow with less financial wherewithal to apply to her own care.

    “Women too often don’t adequately plan ahead for LTC needs,” said Lisa Odoski, a financial professional focusing on women’s well-being and Vice President of the Fried Group, the parent company of TFG Wealth Management.

    “At the same time, research shows among unpaid care-givers in the U.S., two-thirds are women. They sacrifice a lot – sometimes their own careers or reducing their regular work hours.

    “Women today have a greater risk of needing LTC services and of becoming unpaid caregivers. It’s an important time for them to develop an LTC strategy that helps preserve their total financial future.”

    Odoski gives three tips to help women prepare for their long-term care:

    • Educate yourself. Family financial planning used to be almost exclusively the men’s turf. Those days are long gone, and with many houses running on two incomes and women outliving men, women need to make planning for their distant future more of a priority. But an AARP survey showed 60 percent of women hadn’t considered how they would pay for long-term care. “They should start by consulting an investment expert and financial planner,” Odoski said. “They need to get up to speed on senior care costs, insurance and savings plans.”

    • Know your retirement benefits and your spouse’s. Women should take advantage of their employer’s retirement plan and not delay in saving for their future, including the last years they may spend alone. It’s especially important, in the event of divorce or their spouse’s death, to know their spousal rights in regard to their spouse’s pension, Social Security or veteran’s benefits. “They don’t want to be in a position where most of their spouse’s benefits are going toward their own care,” Odoski said.

    • Think long-term with your budget. Women should have specific goals and a plan to save towardthem. The statistics say the goals should include a portion devoted to long-term care insurance, which covers a wide spectrum of products and services. “They should lay out all monthly and annual spending needs and crunch the numbers to determine what they’ll need in later years in order to maintain their familiar lifestyle,” Odoski said. “They need to look at all LTC options. Medicare and private insurance usually aren’t enough to cover long-term care anymore.”

    “After decades of taking care of others,” Odoski said, “women more than ever need to know how to take care of themselves.”

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    Middle school engineers, teacher tackle water robotics

    When the buzzer sounds, the students in Ingrid Cruz’s eighth-grade marine robotics class hop into action. Their mission? Compete against other teams to guide a remote-controlled underwater vehicle along the bottom of a pool to recover critical equipment—using only the robot’s camera to see.

    Cruz’s students attend the Scotlandville Pre-Engineering Magnet Academy, a science, technology, engineering, art and math-focused middle school. Its curriculum offers courses such as game design, computer applications and multimedia production. The goal is to get students interested in science and math topics past middle school, planting the seed of encouragement to pursue these subjects further in high school and college.

    Though some of the robots developed by Scotlandville’s students have started earning them ribbons, it took a little trial and error for the course to gain its footing. “The first day of our marine robotics competition three years ago was the first time our robot had ever been in the water,” Mrs. Cruz said. “As soon as it got wet, everything fell apart.”

    Part of the issue was a lack of access to a pool where they could test their robot prior to competing. When leaders at the ExxonMobil YMCA learned the school needed access to water, they put in a plan to let them use the facility’s pool. ExxonMobil also provided grants so the students could take swimming lessons and water safety courses. “So now we get to test our robot in an actual pool, in the deep end, and we’re having more success because of that,” Cruz said.
    But it takes more than a pool to develop underwater robots. It’s crucial for the students to strategize and work as a team, skills they learn throughout the school year leading up to the competition.

    “The students absolutely must demonstrate teamwork,” Cruz said. “Building the robot is not easy, and when one student has an idea and somebody has a different idea, they have to learn to work together and test everyone’s ideas to see which one works best.” Cruz said it took her students about three months to build their last robot.

    The applications of the technology they test at the YMCA pool go well beyond marine applications. Just to name a few, fields like archeology, aviation, oil and gas, and even space exploration all use remotely operated robots.7 SPEMA Robot

    “The missions have relevance to real life,” Cruz said. “During one, the kids had to maneuver the robot inside a shipwreck and identify some of the packages inside the ship. In another, they had to open a power source and replace a battery inside, so they had to install a gripper on the robot.”

    It may be a few years before Scotlandville students start careers in robotics or engineering, but that hasn’t kept them from being exposed to some of the biggest names in remotely operated vehicles. After a 2016 competition, for instance, representatives from one local company were so impressed by the students’ enthusiasm, they asked one of Scotlandville’s teams to show their technology to some of their managers.

    “We’re making the robotics courses relevant to the kids, letting them know that this is a viable pursuit,” Cruz said. “Developing these underwater robots is a first step that could inspire our next generation of engineers and innovators.

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    Jones joins investment team for Congo TV Network

    Sports marketer Walter Jones joins investment team for Congo TV Network. Jones has come in as a Priority Investor in Congo TV Network. Jones will join about 12 other investors who have given Congo TV the stability needed to have a prosperous and record breaking year in 2018. According to The Wrights, a priority investor is someone who owns five or more shares of the network. Jones will join about 12 other investors who have given Congo TV the stability needed to have a prosperous and record breaking year in 2018.

    ONLINE: CongoTV

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    4th Annual MLK Festival of Service lasts Jan. 12 – 15

    The upcoming Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day presents a great opportunity for anyone to make a direct impact on Baton Rouge from a grassroots level. Together with Mayor-President Sharon Weston-Broome and the City of Baton Rouge, Southern University and CADAV, Inc., The Walls Project is hosting the 4th annual MLK Festival of Service from Friday, Jan. 12 to Monday, Jan. 15. In partnership with 100+ organizations, The Walls Project will reactive a two-mile stretch of historic Scenic Highway from Airline Highway to Swan Avenue.

    Throughout the weekend-long celebration, volunteers are able to participate in working together on projects that include painting, trash cleanup, gardening, and general beautification of Scenic Highway. This event poses an opportunity greater than logging in service hours, volunteers will work hand in hand with citizens from every part of the Baton Rouge community. By strengthening local relationships across the city, we create a more connected community.

    Pat McCallister-LeDuff, director of Community Against Drugs and Violence (CADAV), a longtime Scotlandville resident and business owner said this about the event, “Through the power of collaboration we will drive this charitable plan to create a significant change in our community together for a ‘Better Scotlandville.’”

    More than 50 professional artists from across Louisiana, Texas, Georgia and Florida will create murals on local businesses over the two mile stretch of highway.

    The event will also encompass landscape improvements, such as groves of bald cypress trees planted by BR Green, community garden sites to promote healthy living by SoulFresh Organics, Keep Baton Rouge Beautiful, and G.E.E.P.

    To celebrate the weekend of service, a community block party held on Monday, January 15, from 10am – 4pm, hosted by Build the Fire, BRidge Agency, Small World Int’l, Baton Rouge Music Studios, and BREC. The block party and resource fair  will allow volunteers to enjoy free music, connect to resources provided by local nonprofits, shop at an artists’ market and partake in the international food fair.

    Additionally, an open air town hall will be facilitated by The Drum Newspaper featuring Governor John Bel Edwards, Lt. Governor Billy Nungesser, and Mayor-President Sharon Weston-Broome, Senator Regina Barrow, and Councilwomen Chauna Banks and Tara Wicker.

    For those wanting to become involved with this event, visit www.thewallsproject.org/mlk-festival-of-service for more information, volunteer registration and donations.

     

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    Nearly 400 attended training centered on mentoring males

    On Saturday, January 6, nearly 400 community members attended the Urban Congress’ MentoringBR Community Training to learn practical ways to mentor African American male youth.

    The event, held at the EBR Council on Aging’s Event Center, was led by Brian Sales, a representative of the national mentoring partnership, MENTOR. The ultimate goal was to teach community members about the real and potential challenges Black males face daily and give them practical ways they can guide and inspire them.

    “What we want to do is to strengthen their awareness of how they engage with Black boys in our community,” said Raymond Jetson, president and CEO of MetroMorphosis.

    Among the attendees was a diverse assembly of community members, organizations active in mentoring, and faith-based groups.

    MentoringBR and the Urban Congress will connect those who are not part of a specific organization to opportunities to apply the skills they’ve learned on Saturday.

    Community members who missed the first training opportunity are encouraged to register for and attend the second and final training on Saturday January 20. Registration is open at mentoringbr.org. 

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  • COMMUNITY EVENTS: January in Baton Rouge and Ponchatoula

    Ongoing Events

    East Baton Rouge School Board. Each third Thursday, 650 N. Foster. 5pm. ebrschools.com

    Tangipahoa Parish School Board, each first Tuesday, Central Office Board Room 59656 Puleston Road, Amite, 6pm

    Ponchatoula City Council meets every second Monday, 6pm, Council Chambers, City Hall, 125 W. Hickory St.

    Ponchatoula Farmers’ Market. Every Sunday. Noon to 4 p.m., Country Market, 10 E. Pine St., Ponchatoula.

    Restore Louisiana Outreach Events. Representatives will answer questions to complete Restore Louisiana applications for homeowners affected by the 2016 floods.restore.la.gov. Held at local lbraries 2pm-6pm in East Baton Rouge, Livingston, Ponchatoula, Lafayette, Abbeville, and Monroe.

    St. Helena Parish Farmers’ Market. Every Wednesday. 8am – noon. Turner Chapel AME, Greensburg, Contact: Bianca Plant (225) 222-4136. EBT accepted.

    West Baton Rouge NAACP, every 2nd Tuesday, Hall’s & Sons Funeral Home, 1160 Louisiana Avenue, Port Allen, 6pm.

    Victims of Domestic Violence, meeting with the Iris Center hosts its Coordinated Community Response Team, last Tuesday of each month, West Baton Rouge Parish Library, 1pm. (225) 332-2509.

    January Events

    9 – Feb. 6. Black Minds Matter: Join the Conversation. Every Wednesday. 6:30. The Red Shoes. Government Street.

    11: Heritage Lecture: An Architecture Apart. The Significance of Separate African American Spaces. Old Governor’s Mansion, 502 North Blvd. 6pm. Free for members of the Foundation for Historical Louisiana. Others: $10.Speaker: Laura Blokker, Tulane School of Architecture. Refreshments provided.

    12: Won’t Bow Down: The Graduates. 7pm. The Graduates ensemble emerged out of a drama club inside The Louisiana Correctional Institute for Women in St Gabriel. They use personal experiences with the criminal justice system to create performances that reach out to young at-risk women, offer a window into incarceration’s effects on individual lives and encourage those who have the power to shift current policies to do so. Directed by Ausettua Amor Amenkum, artistic director of Kumbuka African Drum and Dance Collective; and Kathy Randels, artistic director of ArtSpot Productions and founder of The LCIW Drama Club.

    12- 15: MLK Festival of Service. Scenic Highway, Scotlandville. Vegan Village opens at 10 am, Jan. 15. Town Hall . www.thewallsproject.org/events.

    13: 2nd Annual NAACP Louisiana High School Senior Bowl Football Game. A.Mumford Stadium. Southern University. 1:30pm. NAACP All-Star Senior Band will perform. (225) 270-9729. naacplarec@yahoo.com

    14 I am Not Your Negro Documentary Screening. 6:30pm. Main Library. 7711 Goodwood Blvd. This Academy Award-nominated film explores the history of racism in the United States through James Baldwin’s reminiscence of civil rights leaders Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.

    15: Annual MLK March, Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 356 East Blvd, Sponsored by the NAACP State Conference.

    15 – 16: Polkadots: The Cool Kids Musical general auditions. 6pm nightly. New Venture Theatre. 427 Laurel st. 2nd floor.

    15: Freedom Garden Project. MLK Jr Daay of Service and Grandparents Day. The River Road African American Museum. 406 Charles St. Donaldsonville. 10am – 3pm. Tour museum and plant seeds in the Freedom Garden. melanie@aamuseum.org. (225) 474-5553.

    19-21: Baton Rouge Free Health Clinic. 10550 Veterans Boulevard. Free dental, vision, and medical services. 8am daily. batonrougefreeclinic.com or (225) 347- 0760.

    25: Homebuyers Seminar: Building Credit To Buy a New Home. 6pm. Eden Park Library. 5131 Greenwell Springs Road. Wells Fargo presenter. Hosted by UREC. www.urecbr.org.

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  • NAACP Louisiana State Conference host swearing-in ceremony

     The NAACP Louisiana State Conference will host a swearing-in ceremony to install its newly-elected officers.

    Former Baton Rouge NAACP President Mike McClanahan  has been sworn in as the new NAACP State President along with other executive officers. Southern University Law Center Chancellor John Pierre served as the guest speaker and Judge Don Johnson presided. Other elected officials from throughout the city and state were also in attendance.

    “We’re excited to start this new chapter and continue the legacy and the mission of the NAACP,” McClanahan said. The event was held on Saturday, Jan. 6 at the Louisiana State Archives, 3351 Essen Lane, in Baton Rouge at 1 p.m.

    The following people will be officially sworn in:

    Newly-elected officers of the NAACP Louisiana State Conference:

    ·         President                                Mr. Michael McClanahan

    ·         First Vice President                 Dr. Levon Leban

    ·         Treasurer                                Mr. Charles Heckard

    ·         Secretary                                Ms. Michelle Ratcliff

    ·         Vice President (District H)      Mr. Lloyd Thompson

    ·         Vice President (District G)      Ms. Wendy Calahan

    ·         Vice President (District F)       Rev. Edward “Chipps” Taylor

    ·         Vice President (District E)      Mr. Alfred Doucette

    ·         Vice President (District D)      Ms. Janelle Chargois

    ·         Vice President (District B)      Mr. Jerome Boykins

    ·         Vice President (District A)      Rev. Kevin Gabriel

    ·         Members at Large                  Ira Thomas and Vincent Alexander

    Photos by Condi B.
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    Historymaker: Landrum-Johnson named Chief Judge at Orleans Criminal Court

    In a historic appointment, Orleans Parish Criminal District Court Judge Keva Landrum-Johnson ascends to a higher role in the court. She will serve a two-year tenure as chief judge of criminal court, becoming the first Black woman to serve in that office. For the past 10 years, Landrum-Johnson has presided as judge of Section E of criminal court. She was first elected to that office in 2008, and is currently serving a second term. As chief judge, Landrum-Johnson will continue to preside over criminal trials and proceedings allotted to her section while also overseeing the administrative functions of the court and serving as an ex officio member on court committees. In 2007, she became the first African-American woman in Louisiana to serve as District. She also spent 10 years as an assistant district attorney in Orleans Parish. She worked in private practice, public defense, and as a criminal law professor at Southern University at New Orleans.

    ONLINE: Louisiana Weekly

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    LETTER: We Stand With the Most Effective People

    Our intentions never have been and never will be to hurt White people or any particular race for that matter. Strategically speaking, supporting the advancement of African Americans in Tangipahoa is supporting the overall growth of the entire parish considering about half the parish is African American. And there is absolutely no way that we can ensure what is in the best interests of our children with the mindset that we should hire unqualified Black people at the expense of losing effective individuals who are non-Black. The point is that we understand that to bring about the significant transformation spoken of by the board, the system has to make certain it hires the most effective individuals to lead in specific roles. We can no longer just hire people for purposes unrelated to bringing about success in our children first. Nor can we sit around and wait for an unknown superintendent while things continue to fall apart as one Board member hinted to as an option. Significant change means that even individuals on the board may need to be educated on exactly where the district falls short which should help guide them with “look fors” when determining who is best qualified for various roles so that the hire that may have happened in the case of Transportation can more likely be prevented.

    And as hurtful as the truth may be, we have fallen a little short with our children. Think about it. As per LDOE, students of color in Tangipahoa have a graduation rate of only 66%. This means that a whopping 34% did not even graduate. According to statistics, what is the likely outcome for these kids?  Ask Sheriff Daniel Edwards. Or, ask our Parish’s landlords. Not even discussed is the fact that the average ACT scores of students of color is a mere 16.5. We must do better. It all works together and begins with ensuring our kids are receiving a quality education.  Our concern is not about race if the individual has proven to be qualified and effective in advancing all kids, especially Black children which is definitely needed if we want to improve our parish long term. It cannot be.

    For the record, there have been many Black individuals whom the NAACP did not support in positions that directly affect our children. In fact, we recently expressed our non support for the following individuals prior to their selection and we will explain why:

    Walter Daniels 
    Walter Daniels has not only supported every single action made by the current superintendent, he has also made specific statements that belittle women. Just recently, Mr. Daniels stated that a “woman cannot handle the Director of Transportation job.”  It is 2017, and this is the sentiment of an actual School Board member. How will he inspire more African American girls to go into STEM fields with this mentality?

    Andrew Jackson – The role of the CDIO is to hold the system accountable to following the court order while doing what is in the very best interests of our children. We can recall that the system fought viciously against the current individual serving in this role for being unqualified for the position. The NAACP agreed with the system in this case.  Under his watch so far, the system has:

    1. Began with a salary of $40,000 annually; now according to the LLA Report has increased significantly.
    2. “Negotiated” a job for a long time female friend (colleague from Reynolds Institute) in a public school as an actual social worker although this individual was found to not even possess a license to serve in such a role, let alone deal with our children.
    3. Allowed the current superintendent to choose White candidates for positions in which more qualified Black candidates applied knowing these individuals were not the better candidate for bringing out the best in our kids. For instance, nothing was ever done about the Early Childhood Coordinator position.
    4. Allowed the superintendent to let Hammond High go a full year without being advertised while being run by someone who was a teacher less than a year ago.
    5. Did absolutely nothing about the removal of the hundreds of African American children from Eastside and Westside to Greenville Park and Woodland Park even after having been warned of the impact this would have on both school’s overall performance scores. This placed Black kids in a worse situation than previous.
    6. Knowingly allowed the superintendent to avoid advertising key positions for months at the expense of our children and an entire system that is already in educational crisis mode.
    7. Never followed through with the complaint challenging the actual credibility and validity of our system’s magnet programs due to so many that are believed to be magnets in name only. For instance, How is Westside Middle Magnet different from Natalbany Middle?  What is the specialized program and how has it benefited the kids?
    8. Never followed through with complaint of flawed evaluation system in which individuals like the same magnet supervisor responsible for the failing magnet programs and schools as a result may be underserved receiving high marks. We have yet to see evaluations as compared to performance.

    Byron Hurst
    We have all come to realize that doctorate degrees come “a dime a dozen” these days and we know from watching first hand poor leadership at some schools that things that look nice on paper seldom guarantee effectiveness. Therefore, we must look at an individual’s performance record in educating our kids. Byron Hurst was an ineffective school leader in St. Helena Parish. The school failed and he was later given a position as an Assistant Principal in Tangipahoa Parish. He then applied for a Principal position at Sumner High and was offered the Director post instead due to the superintendent wanting to place a White individual in that position. This decision making had absolutely nothing to do with children of course.  We will never support this unethical decision making. Now we have a failed principal overseeing the welfare of our kids. Again, significant change must take place.

    So, for those who have so long believed the NAACP to be anti-White, let our support for Kim Notariano teach an important lesson about our organization. Chuckling as I am writing this, she is definitely not paying us to stand for her. And she does not have to. We know that Kim. We know she loves children and takes her job seriously. Her record and credentials speak for themselves. Her knowledge of transportation, performance record as an actual parish bus driver, not to mention her business background far outweigh educational backgrounds in our opinion not to mention the fact the individual now in question did not even qualify for the position based on the system’s own advertised qualifications. If the board had hired the other candidate, then it would have followed the same pattern as discussed in the cases above. And if we are going to go ahead and pull together to bring about the significant changes spoken of that the people want, then the NAACP is taking the steps necessary to do our part. Children first!

    Patricia Morris
    President
    Greater Tangipahoa Parish Branch NAACP

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    Edwards makes board appointments to Children’s Trust Fund, polygraph, others

    Gov. John Bel Edwards announced his appointments to several Louisiana boards and commissions.

    Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board
    The Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board provides funds for non-profit and public agencies throughout the state for the prevention of child abuse and neglect.

    Alicia C. Kober, M.D., of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board. Kober is a pediatrician at Ochsner. As required by statute, she will serve as the representative of the Louisiana State Medical Society.

    Shailindra M. “Lynn” Farris (photographed), of Baker, was appointed to the Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board. Farris is a licensed clinical social worker and a Title IV-E Director at Southern University Baton Rouge. As required by statute, she will serve as the representative of the Louisiana Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers.

     

    Sabine River Authority
    The Sabine River Authority’s mission is to provide for economic utilization and preservation of the waters of the Sabine River and its tributaries by promoting economic development, irrigation, navigation, improved water supply, drainage, public recreation, and hydroelectric power for the citizens of Louisiana.

    Dayna F. Yeldell, of Zwolle, was appointed to the Sabine River Authority. Yeldell is a real estate broker and the owner of First Choice Real Estate Services, LLC. She will serve as a resident of Sabine Parish.

    Byron D. Gibbs, of Hackberry, was reappointed to the Sabine River Authority. Gibbs is a retired teacher, coach, and administrator with the Cameron Parish School Board and a veteran of the United States Air Force. He will serve as a resident of Cameron Parish.

     

    Louisiana State Polygraph Board
    The Louisiana State Polygraph Board issues polygraph examiners licenses and monitors the continuing education of polygraph examiners in the state of Louisiana.

    Don A. Zuelke, of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Louisiana State Polygraph Board. Zuelke is a licensed polygraphist and the owner of Don A. Zuekle & Associates.

     

    Fluoridation Advisory Board
    The Fluoridation Advisory Board assists public water systems with obtaining funding to implement water fluoridation, assists the director of the state Oral Health Program with the educating of the general public, and advises the state Fluoridation Program.

    Alicia C. Kober, M.D., of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Fluoridation Advisory Board. Kober is a pediatrician at Ochsner. As required by statute, she will serve as the representative of the Louisiana State Medical Society.

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    BUSINESS EVENT: Monthly Pitch Competition Networking Mixer

    Best 30 second PITCH wins $250 in FREE marketing & advertising

    Our Purpose
    Build business and personal relationships through recurring networking events.

    Our Vision
    Be the most sought-after networking group in Lousiana.

    Our Mission
    Make each event better than the last by asking for feedback and help.

    Our Goal
    Have each attendee bring at least one of their most trusted and respected professional contacts as a new guest every time they come back to an event.

    We host Networking Events monthly on a Thursday from 6-8PM. We regularly have 1 complimentary drink for each preregistered guest and use the events to promote charitable causes.

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    Masquerade Ball, Silent Auction planned Feb. 10

    The Jewel J. Newman Community Center Annual Masquerade Ball and Silent Auction is planned for Saturday, February 10, 8pm until 12 midnight.  The optional black tie/cocktail attire affair is set to be a great time for everyone, said Baton Rouge Councilwoman Chauna Banks.
    “Come celebrate a night of masked mystery, fun, games, prizes, and dancing. Masks purchased at the door (limited quantity available). Appetizers, beverages, and desserts provided by Victory Catering included in the cost of your ticket.”
    All donations go to Jewel J. Newman Community Center efforts to continue to provide outreach, activities, and funding for needed community center improvements.   Individual tickets ($40) and table of 8 tickets ($300) can be purchased by contacting the Jewel J. Newman Community Center at (225) 775-3935 or 77-JEWEL or email jjncc@brgov.com.
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    Law enforcement looking for drunk drivers during holiday weekend

    Law enforcement agencies across Louisiana are working overtime to put drunk drivers in jail as the long New Year’s weekend approaches, according to the Louisiana Highway Safety Commission.
    Through the end of 2017, law enforcement agencies on the state and local levels are partnering with the LHSC in a Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over enforcement mobilization to get drunk drivers off the road and to spread the word about the dangers of impaired driving.
    During the long New Year’s Eve holiday weekend in 2016, 76 people were injured and 5 people died in crashes involving alcohol on Louisiana roads, according to data from the Highway Safety Research Group at LSU. In all, there were 56 crashes across the state during the New Year’s Eve holiday that involved an impaired driver in 2016.
    The LHSC and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration offer these tips for New Year’s Eve:
    • It is never okay to drive drunk. If you plan to drink, also plan to designate a sober driver or use public transportation to get home safely.
    • Download NHTSA’s SaferRide mobile app, available on Google Play for Android devices and Apple’s iTunes Store for iOS devices. SaferRide allows users to call a taxi or a predetermined friend and identifies the user’s location so he or she can be picked up.
    • If you see a drunk driver on the road, contact your local law enforcement agency.
    • Have a friend who is about to drink and drive? Take the keys away and make arrangements to get your friend home safely.
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  • Community trains to mentor 1,000 males

    MentoringBR is a network of entities dedicated to strengthening the quality of mentoring provided to Black males in Baton Rouge. Organizers said the ultimate goal is to significantly increase the number of active mentors by training 1,000 community members during National Mentoring Month on Jan 6 and 20.

    ONLINE: mentoringbr.org

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    Mission to help Baton Rouge kids move more

    Three quarters of children in the United States are not meeting physical activity recommendations, according to a recent report authored by concerned health experts from around the country and by scientists from Baton Rouge at LSU’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center. The report, compiled by the National Physical Activity Plan Alliance, indicates that nearly 63 percent of children are exceeding screen time guidelines, meaning that a majority of kids are sitting more and moving less. These habits put our country’s children at risk for obesity, diabetes and related chronic disease as they get older.

     Here in Louisiana, one out of every two children is considered overweight or obese*. That statistic is unacceptable to Amanda Stain, Ph.D., an assistant professor of research in the Pediatric Obesity and Health Behavior Lab at Pennington Biomedical, who is working to find creative ways to improve children’s health.

    “We know that if we can help children develop healthy habits such as moving more when they are younger, they are more likely to continue those habits past adolescence into adulthood,” said Staiano.

    According to Staiano, the first step to helping kids move more is understanding why they aren’t already moving enough. That’s why she is leading the TIGER Kids research study, which is researching ways to increase kids’ physical activity and decrease sedentary behavior to improve their overall health.

    During the course of the study, Staiano and her team are using state-of-the-art technology like activity trackers and global positioning systems (GPS) to follow kids’ physical activity patterns for seven days to learn more about what prevents them from being active and what motivates them to move more. Kids in the study will also use a mobile phone app to share more information with researchers about who they are with and what they are doing—for example, spending time at the park with friends—when they are most physically active.web tigerkids_poster 9.75x9.75

    “This is a great way for me to teach my daughter about healthy habits,” said Brandy Davis, whose daughter, Ariamarie, is participating in the TIGER Kids study. “Both my son and I have been a part of research studies at Pennington Biomedical before, and we have really gotten some great health information from participating in those studies. My daughter was so excited to be a part of the TIGER Kids study because she is fascinated by the activity trackers and all the great information she’ll get about her own activity levels.”

    Staiano said the TIGER Kids study is still looking for children between the ages of 10 and 16 to participate in the study. In addition to great health information they can share with their doctor, participants who complete the study will also receive compensation for their time.

     

    TIGER Kids Study with Pennington Biomedical

    Study Purpose

    The TIGER Kids research study will evaluate ways to: increase kids’ physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior (help kids move more and sit less), encourage healthy eating, and assess other factors that may influence school performance, body image, stress and mood.

    TIGER Kids participants will also receive valuable health information at no cost. Each participant is eligible to receive a copy of:

    • their lab work; including blood sugar and cholesterol tests;
    • a printout of their DXA scan, which includes total body fat, total muscle mass, total lean mass and bone density readings; and
    • a copy of body measurement data including height, weight, waist circumference, body mass index, blood pressure and heart rate.

    Study Qualifications

    To qualify, participants in this study should:

    • Be between 10 and 16 years old
    • Not be on a restrictive diet

    Compensation

    Total compensation for the completion of this study is $100.

    Study Contact

    Parents, are you ready to see if your child qualifies for the TIGER Kids study? Visit http://www.pbrc.edu/TIGERKids to screen online or call 225-763-3000.

     

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    John Gray to marshal Mid City Gras parade

    Acclaimed jazz musician and music teacher John Gray has been chosen as grand marshal of the inaugural Mid City Gras parade, which rolls Feb. 4, at 1pm, from North Blvd to Baton Rouge Community College.

    The McKinley High School and Southern University graduate is a full-time teacher at The Dunham School. He also performs professionally with The JGrayJazz Trio, The Michael Foster Project, The Soul Jukeboxx, The Uptown Jazz Orchestra and The Treme Brass Band.

    Gray has been named one of The Drum’s People to Watch, Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra’s Teacher of the Year, and a Top 40 Under 40 Black Entrepreneur.

    He is also a recipient of Dunham’s Master Teacher Award and The LINK’s Role Model of the Year award, one of Louisiana Life Magazine’s Louisianans of the Year, and an Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge Arts Ambassador.

    To apply for Mid City Gras, see the Parade Application Tab at www.midcitygras.org or  email hello@midcitygras.org.

    ONLINE: midcitygras.org

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    Grambling student, Adrian Wilson, named to La. Board of Regents

    Adrian Williams, of Ruston, has been appointed to the Louisiana Board of Regents. He is in his third year as a Liberal Arts and Theatre major at Grambling State University. Williams has served as the 2014-2015 Student Government Association (SGA) Freshman Class President, the 2015-2016 SGA Sophomore Class President, the 2016-2017 SGA Chief of Staff, a Student Ambassador, a member of the University Concert Choir, the NAACP, and the Floyd L. Sandle Players Club.  He is a brother of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity of America, Inc. and currently serves as the 2017-2018 SGA President. Williams has aspirations to become a professional performer, lawyer, and political figure.  Following graduation, he plans to attend graduate school for performing arts and law school.

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    Wilbert Pryor named to Board of Regents

    Wilbert Pryor, of Shreveport, has been appointed to the Louisiana Board of Regents. Pryor is the chief deputy district attorney for Caddo Parish  for the Honorable James E. Stewart, Sr., Caddo Parish District Attorney.  He formerly served as an ad hoc Shreveport City Court judge and was in private law practice. A native of Shreveport, Pryor is a graduate of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN, where he was a football letterman, and the Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center.  He has served on the Louisiana Lottery Corporation Board of  Directors and the Louisiana Commission on Human Rights.  He presently serves on the Family Justice Center of Northwest Louisiana Board of Directors, the Pathways to Education  Board of Directors, and the Zion Baptist Church, Board of Deacons. For his efforts to improve the community, Mr. Pryor was awarded the 2016 NAACP Shreveport branch Dr. Jesse N. Stone Pioneer Award.

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    Oil and gas industry challenged to engage STEM talent in Black communities

    WASHINGTON DC–When it comes to preparing the next generation for careers in science, technology engineering and mathematics, also known at STEM, Jack Gerard, the president and CEO of the American Petroleum Institute, said that leaders in the oil and natural gas industry have to answer the “awareness question.”

    “There are many people out there, today, that don’t really understand the oil and natural gas industry or the opportunities that it can present for them, their families and for well-paying careers,” said Gerard. “It’s incumbent upon us, as an industry, to have this dialogue more often and to intensify this discussion, so that people really understand,” the connection between the oil and natural gas industry and their everyday lives.

    The American Petroleum Institute and the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, recently hosted a panel discussion focused on increasing diversity and inclusion in STEM careers and in the oil and natural gas industry. API, the only national trade group representing all facets of the oil and natural gas industry, according to the group’s website, supports 10.3 million jobs in the United States and nearly 8 percent of the U.S. economy.

    The panel discussion coincided with the release of a new RAND report titled, “Postsecondary Education and STEM Employment in the United States.” The report, which was prepared for API, examined national education trends and the relationship between degree attainment and employment and wages, specifically in STEM fields.

    “Many of tomorrow’s best paying careers, at all levels, will require some kind of training or education in a STEM discipline,” said Gerard.

    STEM degrees can lead to higher earnings and can help to close the wage gap between Blacks and Whites. Those higher earnings are even more pronounced in the oil and gas industry.

    Blacks with STEM bachelor’s degrees earn $45.15 in hourly wages in the oil and natural gas industry, compared to Blacks with non-STEM bachelor’s degrees, who make $28.10 per hour, according to the RAND report.

    Whites with STEM bachelor’s degrees make slightly more per hour than Blacks with STEM degrees working in the oil and natural gas industry ($45.26 vs. $45.15).

    The hourly wage gap is higher between Whites and Blacks with non-STEM degrees that work in the oil and gas industry ($37.73 vs. $28.10).

    According to the 2016 report titled, “Minority and Female Employment in the Oil & Natural Gas and Petrochemical Industries, 2015-2035” by IHS Global prepared for API, “nearly 1.9 million direct job opportunities are projected through 2035 in the oil and natural gas and petrochemical industries” and “African Americans and Hispanics will account for over 80 percent of the net increase in the labor force from 2015 to 2035.”

    Gerard said that over the next 10 years about 50 percent of the oil and natural gas workforce is going to “turnover.”

    According to the IHS Global report on minority and female employment in the oil and natural gas industry, Blacks accounted for 6.7 percent of the total workforce.

    Gerard said that as the current workforce reaches retirement age, the industry will need a rising generation to fill those jobs. Understanding the demographic shifts the industry has to get more aggressive in addressing that challenge, added Gerard.

    “If we’re going to do the things that are necessary to move the needle to impact those 1.9 million jobs, we have to go where most people don’t want to go and that’s in the Black and brown communities,” said Calvin Mackie, Ph.D., founder of STEM NOLA. “We often talk about STEM in a way that a common man and common woman really can’t grasp.”

    Mackie, who is an engineer in New Orleans, said that millions of Black and brown boys play football and basketball every Saturday, dreaming of making it to the NFL or NBA, even though their chances of achieving that goal are statistically low.

    “If we’re going to solve this problem, we have to go to the communities and make sure that on every Saturday there are a million Black and brown kids doing STEM, hoping and believing that, 15 years later, they will become,” millionaires and billionaires, said Mackie.

    Mackie runs a program that exposes elementary and high school students from underserved communities to STEM principles and STEM careers.

    Gerard said that leaders of the oil and natural gas industry recognize that they have to engage more effectively with minority communities, in order to build relationships and train and recruit their future workforce.

    “We need help from people who have been on the frontlines for many years,” said Gerard.

    Overton said that working with groups like the National Newspaper Publishers Association can improve the oil and natural gas industry’s outreach in the Black community.

    Overton also shared an anecdote about the African American women who were depicted in the movie “Hidden Figures.”

    African American NASA mathematician Dorothy Vaughan predicted that an incoming IBM computer would displace “human computers” in the 1960s. In anticipation, she learned the computer language Fortran, and she taught it to her team of Black women mathematicians. When the IBM arrived, the team was ready and took over new jobs operating the IBM, Overton said.

    “We are in this moment of rare opportunity…we can be proactive instead of reactive, like those women in ‘Hidden Figures,’” said Spencer Overton, the president of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies.

    Mackie said that in order to increase awareness about STEM careers in the oil and natural gas industry, programs have to be culturally and environmentally relevant.

    “When we start talking about STEM education…sometimes it’s disenfranchising our children, because it’s not exposing them to the possibility of the hundreds of thousands of jobs in the oil and gas industry,” said Mackie.

    Mackie said that the nature of work is rapidly changing, driven by innovation and technology; that rapid change has the power to change lives for those individuals who have access to the resources to harness those tools.

    Some education advocates fear that Black children, oftentimes don’t have access to those resources.

    “America is in trouble,” said Mackie. “We have to make sure that we expose every kid to the possibility of STEM, because the future will belong to those that can play in it and create it and all of our kids deserve that possibility.”

    Gerard noted that the oil and natural gas industry contributes to the production of the energy efficient screens found on windows, the paint on the walls in our homes and offices, the fiber composites in the carpet, and the plastic components in smartphones.

    “We have to make our industry more relevant in those conversations, so that rising generations realize that there are vast opportunities up and down the continuum,” said Gerard. “So, we don’t scare them with the STEM conversation, but we teach them that everything that they do is grounded in this industry and the opportunity within that space is very significant.”

    Gerard continued, “If we can work on this together, we’re going to see a lot of opportunities out there, because people will start making those connections between [the oil and natural gas industry] to things they take for granted and to well-paying careers.”

    By Freddie Allen 
    NNPA Editor-In-Chief

     

    PHOTO CAPTION: Calvin Mackie,Ph.D., engineer and founder of STEM NOLA, talks about diversity and inclusion in the oil and natural gas industry, during a panel discussion at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. (Freddie Allen/AMG/NNPA)

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    ‘The Talented Ribkins’ wins 11th Annual Ernest Gaines Award

    New Orleans writer Ladee Hubbard’s novel, The Talented Ribkins, has been named winner of the 2017 Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence.

    Now in its 11th year, the Gaines Award is a nationally acclaimed $10,000 prize given annually by Baton Rouge Area Foundation donors to recognize outstanding work from rising African-American fiction writers, while honoring Louisiana native Ernest Gaines’ extraordinary contribution to the literary world.

    The award will be presented to Hubbard at 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 18 at the Manship Theatre at the Shaw Center for the Arts in downtown Baton Rouge. Doors open at 6 p.m. The ceremony is free and open to the public, although reservations are requested at gainesaward@braf.org. 

    The Talented Ribkins is Hubbard’s first novel. It was inspired by the essay “The Talented Tenth,” written in 1903 by civil rights sociologist W.E.B. Du Bois, calling for exceptional men to step up to help save their race. The novel follows Johnny Ribkins and his family who are on a race to dig up stolen money stashed all over Florida before Johnny’s former mobster boss finds him. Luckily, Johnny’s family hold unusual superpowers that help him in his search although the superpowers get in the way from time to time. The novel incorporates race, class and politics, and the unique gifts that bind the Ribkins family together.The-Talented-Ribkins-grey-232x300

    Hubbard earned a bachelor’s degree from Princeton University, a master’s of fine arts in dramatic writing from New York University and a master’s of fine arts in creative writing from the University of Wisconsin. She earned a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. While attending Princeton, she was mentored by Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. Hubbard is a professor of African studies at Tulane University.

    The national panel of judges for the 2017 Gaines Award are: Edward P. Jones, Pulitzer Prize winner for his 2003 novel, The Known World; Anthony Grooms, a critically acclaimed author and creative writing professor at Kennesaw State University; renowned author Elizabeth Nunez, professor of English at Hunter College-City University of New York; Francine Prose, author of more than 20 books, including Blue Angel, a nominee for the 2000 National Book Award; and Patricia Towers, former features editor for O, The Oprah Magazine and a founding editor of Vanity Fair magazine.

    Due to the exceptional quality of entries, judges for the Gaines Award short-listed three books for commendation this year – New People, by Danzy Senna, What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky by Lesley Nneka Arimah, and What We Lose by Zinzi Clemmons.

    Previous winners of the Ernest J. Gaines award include Crystal Wilkinson for Birds of Opulence, T. Geronimo Johnson for Welcome to Braggsville, Attica Locke for The Cutting Season, Stephanie Powell Watts for We Are Taking Only What We Need, and Dinaw Mengestu for How to Read the Air.

    Ernest Gaines, a native of  Pointe Coupee Parish and a literary legend, has received a National Medal of Arts (2013), a MacArthur Foundation’s Genius Grant, and the National Humanities Medal. He is a member of the French Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. His critically acclaimed novel The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman was adapted into a made-for-TV movie that won nine Emmy awards. His 1993 novel A Lesson Before Dying won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction.

     

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  • Former legislator Roy Burrell, others named to state commissions

     Gov. John Bel Edwards announced his appointments to several Louisiana boards and commissions.

    Louisiana Citizens Property Insurance Commission

    The Louisiana Citizens Property Insurance Corporation is a nonprofit organization created to provide insurance products for residential and commercial property applicants who are in good faith entitled, but unable, to procure insurance through the voluntary insurance marketplace.

    Brian E. Chambley, of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Louisiana Citizens Property Insurance Commission. Chambley is the Director of Agency Development and the Specialty Products Sales Manager for Southern Farm Bureau Casualty Insurance Company. As required by statute, he was nominated by Farm Bureau Insurance Companies.

    College and Career Readiness Commission
    The College and Career Readiness Commission makes recommendations for the development of statewide policies, guiding principles, and programs that address the current and future economic needs of the state and promotes student success in high school and in life beyond secondary education.

    Melinda W. Mangham, of Lafayette, was appointed to the College and Career Readiness Commission. Mangham is the Interim Director of Middle School for Ascension Episcopal School. Additionally, she operates her own education consulting firm, Mangham Academic Planning Strategy.

     

    Early Identification of Hearing Impaired Infants Advisory Council
    The Early Identification of Hearing Impaired Infants Advisory Council advises the Office of Public Health on various aspects of the development and implementation of the Early Identification of Hearing Impairment in Infants Law, which includes making recommendations on risk factors for hearing loss, program standards and quality assurance, program integration with community resources, materials for distribution, and program implementation and follow-up.

    Marbely D. Barahona, of Jefferson, was appointed to the Early Identification of Hearing Impaired Infants Advisory Council. Barahona is a Parent Guide for Louisiana Hands & Voices.

    Ashley J. Nielsen, of Covington, was appointed to the Early Identification of Hearing Impaired Infants Advisory Council. Nielsen is an Inclusive Education Specialist for Northshore Families Helping Families.

     

     

    Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board
    The Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board provides information and recommendations from the perspective of advocacy groups, service providers, and trafficking victims to the Human Trafficking Prevention Commission.

    Taneka Harris Blacknell, of Prairieville, was appointed to the Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board. Blacknell is a Special Agent for the Federal Bureau of Investigation. As required by statute, she will serve as a representative with expertise in advocacy for adult victims of human trafficking.

    Stacie S. LeBlanc, of Gretna, was appointed to the Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board. LeBlanc is an attorney and the Executive Director of the New Orleans Children’s Advocacy Center and Audrey Hepburn CARE Center. As required by statute, she was nominated by the Louisiana Children’s Advocacy Centers.

    Richard M. Pittman, of Gonzales, was appointed to the Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board. Pittman is an attorney and the Director of Juvenile Defender Services for the Louisiana Public Defender Board. As required by statute, he will serve as a public defender and was nominated by the Louisiana Public Defender Board.

    Kathleen S. Richey, of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board. Richey is an attorney and the Chief Executive Officer for LouisianaChildren.org. She will serve as the organization’s representative on the board.

    Rafael F. Salcedo, Ph.D., of Folsom, was appointed to the Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board. Salcedo is a clinical psychologist in private practice. As required by statute, he will serve as a licensed psychologist with experience related to exploitation and was nominated by the Louisiana State Board of Examiners of Psychologists.

     

    Oilfield Site Restoration Commission
    The Oilfield Site Restoration Commission serves to: (1) approve and evaluate a priority list for site restoration annually; (2) approve lists of Contractors acceptable to conduct site assessment and site restoration; (3) review administration of site restoration activities and review the adequacy of site restoration assessments and reopen the funding needs and arrangements for site-specific trust accounts every four years; and (4) provide general administration and management of the Oilfield Site Restoration Fund and all site-specific trust accounts.

    Cynthia G. Dupree, of Lafayette, was appointed to the Oilfield Site Restoration Commission. Dupree is a member of the Louisiana Landowners Association’s Board of Directors and will serve as its representative on the commission.

     

    Southern Rail Commission
    The Southern Rail Commission serves to promote the safe, reliable and efficient movement of people and goods to enhance economic development along rail corridors; provide transportation choices; and facilitate emergency evacuation routes. The SRC engages and informs public and private rail interests to support and influence southeast rail initiatives.

    John M. Spain, of New Roads, was reappointed to the Southern Rail Commission. Spain is the Executive Vice President for the Baton Rouge Area Foundation. Additionally, he is a veteran of the United States Army.

    Roy W. Woodruff Jr., of Metairie, was reappointed to the Southern Rail Commission. Woodruff is an Adjunct Instructor at Tulane and a former District Fire Chief with the New Orleans Fire Department. He is also a veteran of the United States Navy.

     

    Louisiana Economic Development Corporation
    The board of directors is responsible for governing the Louisiana Economic Development Corporation, which serves as the single review board for all financial assistance loans, incentives or inducements, customized workforce training, investment programs, and any related appropriations, grants, or joint ventures administered by the Department of Economic Development, excluding those financial incentive programs administered by the state Board of Commerce and Industry or programs only authorized by the Secretary, the Governor, and/or the Joint Legislative Committee on the Budget.

    Todd O. McDonald, of New Orleans, was appointed to the board of directors of the Louisiana Economic Development Corporation. McDonald is the Vice President of Strategy at Liberty Bank and Trust Company. As required by statute, he was nominated by the Louisiana Workforce Investment Council and will serve as its representative on the board.

     

    Water Resources Commission
    The Water Resources Commission is responsible for working with the Commissioner of Conservation to prevent waste of ground water resources and to prevent or alleviate damaging or potentially damaging subsidence of the land surface caused by withdrawal of ground water.

    Glenn L. Brasseaux, of Carencro, was reappointed to the Water Resources Commission. Brasseaux is the Mayor of the City Carencro and a veteran of the United States Army Reserve. As required by statute, he was nominated by and will serve as the representative of the Louisiana Municipal Association on the commission.

     

    Louisiana Rehabilitation Council
    The Louisiana Rehabilitation Council’s duties include reviewing, analyzing, and advising the Louisiana Rehabilitation Services within the Louisiana Workforce Commission regarding the performance of its responsibilities relating to eligibility, extent, scope, and effectiveness of services provided. The Council also reviews functions performed by state agencies that affect or that potentially affect the ability of individuals with disabilities in achieving employment.

    Brian C. Wood, of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Wood is an intern with the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs. He will serve as a former recipient of Vocational Rehabilitation Services on the council.

    Nanette J. Magness, of Shreveport, was reappointed to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Magness is the Program Director and Clinical Director for the Low Vision Rehabilitation Center of the Louisiana Association of the Blind. She will serve as a former recipient of Vocational Rehabilitation Services on the council.

    Alexis D. Young, of Minden, was appointed to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Young is a licensed clinical social worker and Webster Cares Grant Counselor for the Webster Parish School Board. She will serve as a former recipient of Vocational Rehabilitation Services on the council.

    Marvin R. Rush, of DeRidder, was appointed to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Rush is a former educator. He will serve as a former recipient of Vocational Rehabilitation Services on the council.

    Susan G. Killam, of New Orleans, was reappointed to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Killam is the Transition and Employment Initiatives Director with LSU Health’s Human Development Center. She will serve as a representative of individuals with disabilities who have difficulty representing themselves.

    Nicole D. Walker, of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Walker is the Executive Director of UpLIFTD, an organization which assist persons with disabilities and the disadvantaged in achieving their goal of self-sufficiency through their desired employment. She will serve as a representative of service providers for the community rehabilitation program.

     

    Louisiana Manufactured Housing Commission
    The Louisiana Manufactured Housing Commission functions to: (1) License manufacturers, retailers, developers, salesmen, and installers; (2) Work with manufactured home consumers, manufacturers, retailers, developers, salesmen, and installers to hear complaints and make determinations relating to construction defects, warranty issues, and service complaints; and (3) conduct hearings on any violation of the provisions of the law.

    James Douglas Anderson, of Lake Charles, was appointed to the Louisiana Manufactured Housing Commission. Anderson is a Performance and Learning Consultant with Clayton Homes and a veteran of the United States Air Force. He will serve as an at-large representative.

     

    Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council
    The Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) was established to support the efforts of our citizens with disabilities to live independently in the community of their choice. Some of the specific duties of the Statewide Independent Living Council are: (1) jointly develop a State Plan for Independent Living; (2) monitor, review, and evaluate implementation of the state plan; and (3) develop strong positive partnerships with the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council and other members of the disability community.

    Kandy S. Baker, of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council. Baker is a licensed clinical social worker and a Program Coordinator for the Louisiana Workforce Commission. She will serve as the representative of the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council.

    Rosemary M. Morales, of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council. Morales is a Program Manager for the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities within the Louisiana Department of Health.

     

    Workers’ Compensation Advisory Council
    The Workers’ Compensation Advisory Council is responsible for monitoring and reporting to the governor and the legislature on the implementation and administration of laws pertaining to the administration of workers’ compensation claims and making specific recommendations thereon.

    Jennifer L. Marusak, of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Workers’ Compensation Advisory Council. Marusak is the Vice President of Governmental Affairs for the Louisiana State Medical Society and will serve as its representative on the council.

     

    Louisiana State Board of Private Investigator Examiners
    The Louisiana State Board of Private Investigator Examiners licenses private investigators and businesses in the state of Louisiana in order to contribute to the safety, health, and welfare of the people of Louisiana.

    Paul C. Dugas, of Schriever, was appointed to the Louisiana State Board of Private Investigator Examiners. Dugas is a licensed private investigator and the Owner and President of Dugas Legal Investigative Services, LLC. He will serve as the representative of the 2nd Public Service Commission District.

     

    Louisiana Workforce Investment Council
    The Louisiana Workforce Investment Council serves to develop a strategic plan to coordinate and integrate a workforce development delivery system to assure efficiency and cooperation between public and private entities by advising the governor on the needs of Louisiana’s employers and its workforce as well as being responsible for occupational forecasting, which is used for driving programs and funding for job training.

    Leigh D. King, of Ferriday, was appointed to the Louisiana Workforce Investment Council. King is the Vice President of Cox Business. He will serve as a representative of the general business community on the council.

    Melissa H. Mann, of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Louisiana Workforce Investment Council. Mann is the Director of Governmental Affairs for CenturyLink. She will serve as a representative of Louisiana’s information technology sector on the council.

     

    Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports
    The Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports serves to develop, foster, and coordinate services and programs of physical fitness and sports for the people of Louisiana. The Council encourages local governments and communities to develop local physical fitness programs and amateur athletic competitions.

    Benjamin J. Berthelot, of Lafayette, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Berthelot is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Lafayette Convention and Visitors Commission.

    Robert W. Boudreaux, of Broussard, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Boudreaux is the State Office Administrator for the Knights of Columbus Louisiana State Council.

    John B. Boyer, of Gretna, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Boyer is retired. He is a USA Track and Field Certified Official.

    Pamela G. Carey, of Atlanta, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Carey is the Sports and Recreation Consultant and GUMBO Coordinator for Families Helping Families at the Crossroads in Rapides Parish.

    Katherine F. “Kathy” Hill, of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Hill is an Adjunct Professor of Kinesiology at LSU.

    Kenneth W. Jenkins, of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Jenkins is retired. He is the former Director of Student Activities for the East Baton Rouge Parish School System.

    Joseph N. “Joey” Odom, of Lake Charles, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Odom is the Manager at Sports Productions. He formerly served as the Director of Public Relations and Parks for the City of Lake Charles.

    Charles W. “Bill” Skinner, of Hammond, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Skinner is a retired educator.

    Rani Gregory Whitfield, M.D., was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Whitfield is a board certified family physician with a Certificate of Added Qualification in Sports Medicine.

     

    Red River Waterway Commission
    The Red River Waterway Commission was created for the purpose of establishing, operating, and maintaining the Red River Waterway, a navigable waterway system, extending from the vicinity of the confluence of Red River with Old River and the Atchafalaya River northwestward in the Red River Valley to the state boundary.

    Roy A. Burrell, of Shreveport, (photographed above) was appointed to the Red River Waterway Commission. Burrell is the President of Best Communications Management Services and a former member of the Louisiana State House of Representatives. He will serve as an at-large member on the commission.

     

    Capital Area Groundwater Conservation District
    The mission of the Capital Area Ground Water Conservation District is to provide for the efficient administration, conservation, orderly development, and supplementation of groundwater resources in the parishes of East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, Pointe Coupee, West Baton Rouge and West Feliciana. The board develops, promotes, and implements management strategies to provide for the conservation, preservation, protection, recharging, and prevention of waste of the groundwater resources over which it has jurisdictional authority.

    Jens P. Rummler, of Oscar, was reappointed to the Capital Area Groundwater Conservation District. Rummler is a USDA-certified master farmer and a Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry certified master cattle producer. As required by statute, he was nominated by and will serve as a representative of Pointe Coupee Parish.

    Nelson L. Morvant, of Gonzales, was reappointed to the Capital Area Groundwater Conservation District. Morvant is a licensed professional geoscientist and a Senior Environmental Analyst at Entergy Services, Inc. As required by statute, he was nominated by and will serve as a representative of industrial water users in the district.

     

    Red River Levee and Drainage District
    The Red River Levee and Drainage District was established to construct and maintain levees, drainage, and levee drainage, and to do all other things incidental thereto.

    Carl W. Carpenter, of Pelican, was appointed to the Red River Levee and Drainage District. Carpenter is the owner and operator of CWC Services. As required by statute, he was nominated by a legislator representing the district.

     

    Jimmy D. Long Sr. Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts
    The Board of Directors for the Jimmy D. Long Sr. Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts functions to establish and maintain the School and to provide the highest quality of instruction for the children of the School.

    Jimmy D. Berry, of Natchitoches, was appointed to the Jimmy D. Long Sr. Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts. Berry is a retired educator and principal for the Natchitoches Parish School Board and Northwestern State University.

     

    Louisiana Board of Drug and Device Distributors
    The Louisiana Board of Drug and Device Distributors issues licenses for and regulates the distribution of legend drugs and legend devices by distributors within and into the state of Louisiana in order to safeguard life and health and to promote the public welfare.

    Chad D. Gielen, of Crowley, was reappointed to the Louisiana Board of Drug and Device Distributors. Gielen is the President and CEO of Louisiana Wholesale Drug Co., Inc. As required by statute, he was nominated by the Louisiana Association of Wholesale Drug Distributors.

    Randall D. Brooks, of Prairieville, was reappointed to the Louisiana Board of Drug and Device Distributors. Brooks is the Facility Manager of PetNet Solutions. As required by statute, he was nominated by the Louisiana Association of Wholesale Drug Distributors.

     

    Parish Boards of Election Supervisors
    The purpose of the board in each parish is to oversee and supervise all elections within the parish to ensure the safety and accuracy of the democratic process. The Board of Election Supervisors oversees the preparation and conducting of each election in the parish. Each parish’s board is composed of the parish’s registrar of voters, the parish’s clerk of court, the chairman of the parish executive committee of each recognized political party, and one member appointed by the governor.

    Wilkie J. “Jo” Travis, of Kentwood, was appointed to the St. Helena Parish Board of Supervisors. Travis is a retired dairy owner.

    Robert R. Gentry, of Many, was appointed to the Sabine Parish Board of Election Supervisors. Gentry is the retired publisher and owner of The Sabine Index Newspaper and a veteran of the Louisiana National Guard.

    Margie D. Bass, of Jonesville, was reappointed to the Catahoula Parish Board of Election Supervisors. Bass is a loan teller with Catahoula LaSalle Bank.

     

    Medicaid Pharmaceutical & Therapeutics Committee
    The Medicaid Pharmaceutical & Therapeutics Committee is responsible for developing and maintaining a preferred drug list (PDL) in conjunction with a prior approval process relating to the Medicaid drug program.

    Marty R. McKay, of Woodworth, was appointed to the Medicaid Pharmaceutical and Therapeutics Committee. McKay is the owner of Pearson Drugs #7. As required by statute, he was nominated by the Louisiana Independent Pharmacies Association.

     

    Louisiana State Polygraph Board
    The Louisiana State Polygraph Board issues polygraph examiners licenses and monitors the continuing education of polygraph examiners in the state of Louisiana.

    Judith C. Goodman, of Metairie, was reappointed to the Louisiana State Polygraph Board. Goodman is a licensed polygraph examiner and the owner and President of Professional Security Training.

    Calvin T. Bowden, of Denham Springs, was appointed to the Louisiana State Polygraph Board. Bowden is a licensed polygraph examiner and a detective with the Livingston Parish Sheriff’s Office.

     

    Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board
    The Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board provides funds for non-profit and public agencies throughout the state for the prevention of child abuse and neglect.

    Angela S. Breidenstine, Ph.D., of New Orleans, was appointed to the Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board. Breidenstine is a licensed clinical psychologist and Assistant Professor at Tulane University School of Medicine’s Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. She will serve as a representative of the Louisiana Psychological Association.

    Yolanda T. Motley, of New Orleans, was appointed to the Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board. Motley is the Senior Administrator of Kingsley House, Inc. She is serve as a representative of the early childhood community.

     

    New Orleans Center for Creative Arts
    The Board of Directors for the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts oversees the management of the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (NOCCA). The Board oversees the hiring of the President/CEO, the fiscal operations of the facility, and the development of policies necessary to operate the center. NOCCA is a state agency whose mission is to provide arts training for high school age students who aspire to be professional artists.

    Troy J. Broussard, of Prairieville, was reappointed to the Board of Directors for the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts. Broussard is the Associate State Director of Advocacy and Outreach for AARP and a veteran of the United States National Guard.

     

    Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council
    The Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) was established to support the efforts of our citizens with disabilities to live independently in the community of their choice. Some of the specific duties of the Statewide Independent Living Council are: (1) jointly develop a State Plan for Independent Living; (2) monitor, review, and evaluate implementation of the state plan; and (3) develop strong positive partnerships with the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council and other members of the disability community.

    Roszella J. Viltz, of Lafayette, was reappointed to the Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council. Viltz is a Children’s Special Health Services Parent Liaison for the Louisiana Department of Health. She will serve as an advocate for individuals with disabilities.

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    28th Annual Kwanzaa Celebration, Dec. 30, focus on Nia principles

    The Afrocentric Focus/Maat Study Group of Baton Rouge invites the public to the 28th annual Kwanzaa Celebration at 5 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 30. Kwanzaa is a celebration of family, community and culture observed for seven days beginning Dec. 26. This year’s Kwanzaa Celebration is being held on the fifth day of Kwanzaa, which focuses on the fifth principle of Nia.

    Representing purpose the principle Nia, guides the community to “make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.”

    The event will be held at Southern University in T.T. Allain Hall’s Global Conference Room (room 313) with James L. Conyers, Ph.D., as the featured speaker. Vendors will be available with African heritage clothing, jewelry, art and books.

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    State task force established to review sexual harassment, discrimination policies in agencies

    Gov. John Bel Edwards issued an executive order announcing the Governor’s Task Force on Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Policy.  The seven member board is tasked with reviewing current harassment and discrimination policies within every state agency that falls under the executive branch, as well as researching and identifying the most effective ways to create work environments that are free from any form of harassment or discrimination.

    “Every person, whether they work in state government or private industry, should be able to do their jobs without fear of being sexually harassed or discriminated against,” said Gov. Edwards. “There is no circumstance under which harassment or discrimination of any kind will be tolerated by my administration. This task force will help us identify which current policies are effective and which ones are not, whether new ones need to be implemented and whether additional changes need to be made in these areas. The goal is to ensure state employees are safe at work and have the confidence in knowing that any allegation made will be taken seriously and that there are adequate procedures in place to address those complaints. The work has already begun, and we will have helpful discussions and feedback in very short order.”

    The duties of the task force members include the following:

    • Review the sexual harassment and discrimination policies of each state agency within the executive branch.
    • Research and identify the most effective mode of training to prevent workplace sexual harassment and discrimination and evaluate the effectiveness of the existing video state employees are required to view each year.
    • Develop a protocol for sexual harassment and discrimination policy orientation for new employees, those participating in any state sponsored training academy and employees promoted to supervisory positions.
    • Research and identify the specific conduct that should be prohibited by sexual harassment and discrimination policies.
    • Research and identify a clear reporting process when an allegation is made as well as the most appropriate action that should be taken once an investigation is completed.

    The task force will make specific recommendations to ensure uniformity of sexual harassment and discrimination policies across the agencies and submit a report to the governor regarding its findings no later than March 1, 2018.

    Further, before January 1, 2018, all state agencies within the executive branch are to review their policies relative to sexual harassment and discrimination and submit a detailed report to the commissioner of administration.

    ONLINE: executive order.

     

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    Judge Faith Jenkins to be SU fall commencement speaker

    Southern University Baton Rouge has invited Faith Jenkins to be its fall commencement speaker. Jenkins is the host of Judge Faith – a nationally televised court TV show now entering its fourth season.
    Originally from Shreveport, Jenkins  graduated with a bachelor’s degree in political science from Louisiana Tech University (where she was also the first Black woman to win the title of Miss Louisiana Tech University) and a J.D. from Southern University Law Center where she ranked #1 in her law class. She went on to become Miss Louisiana in the year 2000 and represent the state in the Miss America pageant where was first runner up to Miss America.
    Jenkins started her legal career in New York in the litigation group at Sidley Austin. After five years as a commercial litigator, she became a prosecutor at the Manhattan District attorney’s office. As a prosecutor, Jenkins  handled hundreds of criminal cases and was the lead attorney in numerous jury trials. Her work included indicting and prosecuting a multitude of violent crimes such as gang assaults, robberies, burglaries, kidnapping, drug sales, and firearms cases.
    Jenkins  is also known for her legal and social commentary on television. Prior to signing as a legal analyst exclusively with MSNBC, she appeared regularly on CNN, Fox News, and HLN to analyze the nation’s most high profile cases and legal issues.
    During the George Zimmerman trial in Florida, Jenkins analyzed the trial daily on all three major news networks. She appeared nightly – from jury selection to verdict — on MSNBC’s PoliticsNation to discuss witness testimony and opine on the trial’s overall progress each day.
    Southern University will be conferring degrees for more 500 graduates commencing bachelor’s, graduate, and doctoral programs. Jalen Wagner, senior biology major, will be the chief student marshal for the commencement. The program is set for Friday, December 15, at 10am in the F.G. Clark Activity Center.
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    Baton Rouge sailor reflects on year of recruiting in America’s Navy

    First Class Jalisa Green, a recruiter assigned to Navy Recruiting District San Antonio, shows that not shying away from hard work and responsibility does not go unnoticed.
    Green, a Louisiana native, longed to travel and see the world beyond her hometown of Baton Rouge.  She believed joining the Navy would give her that opportunity.
    After enlisting in 2009, she was stationed in Yokosuka, Japan, serving on USS Cowpens with follow-on assignments on USS Spruance  and USS William P. Lawrence.
    “Working on a ship was challenging; it meant long hours, a lot of sweat, dirt, and wrench-cranking, but I loved it,” said Green, a gas turbine system technician (mechanical).
    Although her passion is to travel as much as possible, early in her career she knew one day she would transition to shore duty as a recruiter.
    “I had a great recruiter, who has been a positive influence from day one in my decision to become a recruiter, and continues to support me throughout my career,” said Green.
    Recruiters are representatives of America’s Navy and act as ambassadors in their communities.  To become one requires previous experience in the Navy or other branch of the military, an outgoing personality, creativity, initiative, and strong organizational and time-management skills, among other skills.
    For some Sailors, transitioning from the fleet to recruiting can be challenging.  Many find it difficult adapting to office work after spending time in more operational rates on a ship.
    “For me the biggest difference was all the paperwork,” said Green.  “But the long hours and dedication you have to put in are the same.  Ship life had already groomed me for that.”
    Green has proven her strength and ability to adapt within the recruiting world.  As a second class petty officer, she was given the position of leading petty officer (LPO) for her division, a role that is traditionally given to a first class petty officer.
    “Becoming a LPO was a tough experience.  I had to make sacrifices in my personal life for my career,” admits Green.  “It was hard, at first, to find that balance and to remember to take care of myself and make time for other goals, like college.”
    Green says she finds strength through her many mentors in the recruiting community as well as through her family.
    “I reach out often to my chief, division leading chief petty officer, and my first class petty officers,” said Green.  “They all encourage me to never back down and to always strive for more from myself and my recruiters.”
    Green’s grit and strong work ethic made her a standout Sailor within the recruiting community and lead to her meritorious advancement to first class petty officer through the Meritorious Advancement Program  on June 30.
    Earning meritorious advancement was a huge milestone for Green, who says she was completely surprised by her selection.
    “I honestly did not think it was an achievable goal for me,” she explained.  “It is hard to be competitive within your rate as a recruiter, so I did not think it would happen.”
    Successful recruiters can apply for reclassification under the Navy’s Career Recruiting Force (CRF) program.  Green has chosen not to convert to CRF, instead hoping to one day return to the fleet.
    “As much as I have enjoyed recruiting, shore duty has reminded me of why I joined the Navy in the first place, which was to travel and do something different,” Green said.  “I have not traveled enough,” she said.
    Green said making first class has not been a big change for her.
    “Serving as the LPO for my division as a second class made me already think like a first class, so this advancement is only the beginning and makes me want to work harder to achieve my goals,” said Green.
    Those goals, Green said, are to eventually finish college and make chief petty officer or become a commissioned officer.
    “I am thankful for this opportunity, but personally it is not enough; I need to keep pushing,” she said.  “I also need to humble myself and remember all the recruiters and chiefs who have gone before me and to those whom have given me guidance to get me where I am today.  I wouldn’t be here without their help.”
    By Giselle Christmas
    Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class
    Navy Recruiting District San Antonio Public Affairs
    PHOTO CAPTION:
    171020-N-ND850-679:  CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas (Oct. 20, 2017) Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 1st Class Jalisa Green of Baton Rouge, La., is a recruiter assigned to Navy Recruiting Station Corpus Christi, Navy Recruiting District San Antonio.  After enlisting in 2009, Green served aboard the USS Cowpens (CG-63), USS Spruance (DDG-111), and USS William P. Lawrence (DDG-110) before becoming a Navy recruiter.  (U.S. Navy Photo by Burrell Parmer, Navy Recruiting District San Antonio Public Affairs/Released)

     

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    Flooded Louisiana Schools Receive $14 Million More in Recovery Funding

    Approximately $14 million in federal disaster aid will support schools in Ascension, East Baton Rouge, and Tangipahoa parishes with recovery and repair efforts following the August 2016 floods.

    Some repair projects received supplemental funding to enhance construction, reduce flood damage and break the cycle of repetitive losses.

    Students and schools in these parishes will benefit from the following projects reimbursed by FEMA:

    • Amite Westside Middle Magnet School has been approved for nearly $466,000 for classroom repairs. This includes $7,785 to install watertight doors.
    • Baker High School has been approved for about $2.4 million for repairs to classrooms. FEMA previously approved $5.4 million to reimburse the cost of temporary facilities, debris removal and cleaning expenses along with funding to replace contents and assist with building repairs.
    • Brookstown Magnet Middle School in Baton Rouge has been approved for approximately $2.4 millionfor classroom repairs. FEMA previously approved $1.7 million for cleaning and flood damage removal expenses.
    • Lake Elementary School in St. Amant has been approved for nearly $3.3 million for building and equipment repairs. Of that total, $61,758 will help elevate electrical equipment vulnerable to flooding. FEMA previously approved $7.4 million for temporary facilities and flood-damage removal and debris expenses.
    • St. Amant Primary School has been approved to receive about $1.8 million for classroom repairs. This includes funding of $150,300 to elevate electrical equipment.
    • The Runnels School in Baton Rouge has been approved for about $1.3 million for temporary classroom facilities, contents and repairs to accommodate displaced students and faculty.
    • The Wilma C. Montgomery Center – an East Baton Rouge School Board administration building - has been approved for about $1.3 million for repairs.

    To date, FEMA has reimbursed Louisiana schools more than $133 million for disaster-related projects through the Public Assistance program.

    The PA program has reimbursed over $489 million to local and state government entities as well as certain private nonprofits for August 2016 flood-related expenses. Eligible reimbursement projects include repairing or replacing disaster-damaged facilities and infrastructure, debris removal and emergency response activities.

    FEMA has a long-term commitment to help Louisiana communities and critical infrastructure recover from the August 2016 floods. The agency continues collaborating with the state on recovery projects with 282 applicants in 26 parishes.

    FEMA typically reimburses 75 percent of eligible expenses. However, the agency will reimburse applicants 90 percent of eligible expenses given the magnitude of the August 2016 floods.

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    Grambling takes 44th Bayou Classic, heads to SWAC Championship

    NEW ORLEANS - The 44th Annual Bayou Classic was all about unity. During the weekend, the theme “We Are One” was echoed from the Superdome to the French Market and throughout the various venues which hosted Bayou Classic events across the city. The Grambling State University Tigers took the victory for their third straight Bayou Classic, but the exciting back-and-forth game, combined with family fun events, and HBCU pride made everyone a winner.
    IMG_2022
    The Annual Bayou Classic brings fans from Grambling State University and Southern University and A&M College to New Orleans for an HBCU experience like no other. Students, fans and alumni unite to experience the historic rivalry and take part in the unique tradition and pageantry.
    IMG_2689
    The attendance at the 2017 Greek Show presented by McDonald’s and Battle of the Bands presented by the U.S. Marine Corps was 28,730. The attendance at the game was 66,550. This year, the electrifying halftime show was presented by P&G’s Crest 3D White Toothpaste.
    For the second year in a row, the game served as a playoff for the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) Championship game. The Grambling State University Tigers will go on to face Alcorn State on December 2, 2017 in Houston, Texas. The SWAC champion will then play in the Air Force Reserve Celebration Bowl in Atlanta, Georgia on December 16.
    Dottie Belletto, President and CEO of New Orleans Convention Company, Inc. (NOCCI) said, “It was a great year and now we have begun the planning for our 45th Bayou Classic Anniversary for 2018.”
    Highlights of the 44th Annual Bayou Classic include:
    • With the Grambling Tigers winning the Bayou Classic with a score of 30-21 against the Southern Jaguars, the Tigers lead the series holding 23 victories in the 43-game series.
    • With the win, the Grambling State University Tigers move onto the SWAC Championship against Alcorn State to be held in Houston on Saturday, December 2, 2017.
    • Grambling’s Devante Kincade and Southern’s Austin Howard were named MVPs of the 44th Annual Bayou Classic.
    • Louisiana Seafood presented a 44-foot po-boy to commemorate the Bayou Classic’s 44th Anniversary at the Bayou Classic Press Conference.
    • The theme of the 44th Annual Bayou Classic was “We Are One” to promote unity amongst the HBCU community.IMG_2801
    • In 2017, fan voting via the Bayou Classic App played a larger role in choosing the winner of their favorite step stem at the Greek Show and MVP of the game. There were 1,121 people that voted for the winner of the Greek Show and 493 people voted for the MVP of the game.
    • Over the Bayou Classic Weekend, the Bayou Classic App peaked in downloads at number 34 out of the top 200 Sports Apps. The app had 8,279 downloads and was more popular with fans this year vs. the debut year in 2016.
    • First place winners of the Bayou Classic Greek Show presented by McDonald’s, Beta Sigma Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. and Psi Beta Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., were presented with $3,000 checks for their victories.
    • This year the Bayou Classic Parade changed the date from Thanksgiving Day to pre-game on Saturday. The Bayou Classic Parade had an attendance of more than 65,000 attendees. The parade featured 11 high school marching bands, three of which were from out of state.
    • Bayou Classic Fan Fest presented by Cox with entertainment by iHeart Radio reached capacity for the first time and the entrance gates to Champions Square were closed. Over 12,500 people attended Fan Fest on a flow.
    • iHeart Radio provided artists including K Camp, Young Greatness and Cupid along with headliner T.I., presented by Coors Light at the Bayou Classic Fan Fest presented by Cox.
    • Six teams comprised of 21 students were selected to present their final presentations at the Bayou Classic BizTech Challenge presented by Nexus LA. The winner of the $10,000 Grand Prize was Team OurGlass from Southern University who created a portable 3D-printed device that brews tea, so that users can brew and drink tea “on the go”. The team is working with the Technology and Entrepreneurship Clinic at Southern University’s Law Center to patent and trademark their intellectual property, and set up legal structures to enable them to start selling their product.
    • The top three finalists of the Bayou Classic BizTech Challenge received $10,000 in free legal services from Stone Pigman Law Firm to advise them on next steps.
    • Approximately 150 people attended the Bayou Classic BizTech Challenge at the Hyatt Regency Hotel.
    • Sheryl Underwood, actress, comedian, and personality as seen on The Talk judged the Greek Show along with Elvin Ross, founder of Elvin Ross Studios, and Music Director of the beloved Tyler Perry films. Singer, songwriter, model and actress, Solange Knowles was in attendance for the show.  Omar J. Dorsey, actor in Queen Sugar was in attendance for the game.
    • The U.S. Marine Corps Band played an instrumental rendition of the National Anthem before the big game.
    • Lt. Governor Billy Nungesser, Bryan Terrell Clark who plays George Washington in the Broadway play Hamilton, and Anthony Pope, senior vice president and region manager for Cox’s Southeast Region conducted the coin toss before the big game.
    • The Bayou Classic partnered with the inDEFINED Initiative, Bryan Terrell Clark’s fashion line which supports inner city arts education. inDEFINED sold a special edition Bayou Classic tee at Fan Fest which benefited arts education programs in New Orleans.
    • Grambling’s Devante Kincade and Southern’s Lenard Tillery were inducted into Bayou Classic’s MVP Club during the Coaches Luncheon in honor of being named MVPs of the Bayou Classic in 2016.

    See more photo highlights by Yusef Davis, photojournalist 

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    COMMENTARY: Louisiana School Finder gives parents information to help children succeed

    School accountability is key to ensuring all students — regardless of Zip code, race, socioeconomic status or differing abilities — have equal access to the high-quality education they deserve. But it’s often difficult to gather information that paints a complete picture of how well local child care centers and schools are preparing children for the next grade level. A new tool created for Louisiana families offers a solution.

    Earlier this month, the Louisiana Department of Education released a new online tool called the Louisiana School Finder that enables families to find and evaluate schools and early childhood programs across the state to find the sites that best fit their unique child’s needs. The revamped report card system shows overall school and district performance scores — Louisiana schools, for example, earned a collective “B” letter grade this year — and traditionally reported data points like assessment results, graduation rates and college enrollment. It’s also expanded to offer results by student group, detail student discipline and attendance data, and even highlight facts about the teachers who work at each site, a huge step toward ensuring greater transparency and addressing equity.

    In addition, the system gives users information about all publicly funded early childhood centers, prekindergarten and Head Start programs across the state, unifying our early childhood and K-12 education systems. These new ratings, which were unveiled for the first time this year, are derived from site observations and provide a snapshot of each classroom’s climate and how well they are preparing kids to enter kindergarten ready. Statewide, about 1,500 performance profiles are now available.

    The Louisiana School Finder plainly communicates the details families need to make informed decisions about their child’s education, and the facts educators, stakeholders, nonprofit organizations and advocates need to understand the gaps that exist, how to direct resources and how to leverage best practices. It is truly a one-of-a-kind community tool.

    As president of Urban League of Louisiana, my job is focused on ensuring that all students have the same resources and opportunities as their counterparts. It’s a responsibility that is the heart of my organization. The Louisiana School Finder helps accomplish that mission and positions our state, our schools and our students toward continued success.

    By Erika McConduit

    President of the Urban League Louisiana

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    Our Glass wins Bayou Classic BizTech Challenge

    Four Southern University Baton Rouge students collected a $10,000 grand prize after placing first in the Bayou Classic Biztech Challenge.

    Their business pitch, Our Glass, caters to herbal tea consumers and is a 3-D printable, portable bottle that is insulated and allows consumers to brew tea on the go.

    Adorned in a white t-shirt with baby blue writing that spelled Our Glass, senior mechanical engineering and supply chain major from Mer Rouge Nathan Morrison, presented the problem of not being able to brew tea quickly without a heating element nearby.

    After coming up with the idea, Morrison sought out those who he knew could help bring his vision to life. SUBR students, Polite Stewar. Jr., Rashad Pierre and Ashley Lewis were the three additional powerhouses behind Our Glass.

    “We have to get patented, trademarked and figure out who gets what,” Morrison stated in regards to the volume of investment offers that the quartet have recently begun to receive after their victory.

    The students received a $10,000 check in which they will split four ways. They were also gifted $10,000 in legal fees during the Nov. 25, 2017, event.

    Read complete story at The Southern Digest.

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    Network Coalition honors New Orleans, Baton Rouge leaders during Bayou Classic 2017

    VCI International Inc. hosted the 24th Annual Network Coalition Reception at  the Hyatt House hotel in New Orleans honoring business and political leaders during the Bayou Classic weekend festivities. Honored were:

    • Lisa Mims-Devazin, PhD, Chancellor, Southern University New Orleans
    • State Senator Wesley Bishop
    • New Orleans City Councilman James Austin Gray ll
    • Eugene Green of The Green Business Report
    • Tyrone Legette of  Legette Construction
    • Hall Davis V of  Hall Davis and Sons Funeral Home in Baton Rouge
    • Tony Brown of the Eyes Open Foundation in Alexandria Louisiana
    • Sailor Jackson Jr., Louisiana Secretary of State office (retired)

      Tony Brown

      Tony Brown

    Michael McClanahan incoming president Louisiana NAACP State Conference was introduced. Erika McConduit, president of the Urban League Louisiana, Network Coalition chairman WT Whitfield, VCI International president Allen Semien Sr, Bobby Phills, Ph.D, chancellor-dean of the Southern University Land Grant Campus, Martin Burrell, president of the Dallas-based Burrell Group, and State Representative Sam Jenkins of Shreveport welcomed guests to the

    Untitled4pm event.

    Sponsors for the event included Acadian Companies, Baton Rouge Community College Foundation, Maximized Communications, CAWAN Resource Network, JAVA Copy Center, The Burrell Group, Yusef Davis Photography, Dr. Everett D. Gibson, and Ted Ellis Art Gallery.

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    High blood pressure redefined for first time in 14 years: 130 the new high

    High blood pressure should be treated earlier with lifestyle changes and in some patients with medication – at 130/80 mm Hg rather than 140/90 – according to the first comprehensive new high blood pressure guidelines in more than a decade. The guidelines are being published by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC) for detection, prevention, management and treatment of high blood pressure.The guidelines were presented this week at the Association’s 2017 Scientific Sessions conference in Anaheim, Calif., the premier global cardiovascular science meeting for the exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

    Rather than 1 in 3 U.S. adults having high blood pressure (32 percent) with the previous definition, the new guidelines will result in nearly half of the U.S. adult population (46 percent) having high blood pressure, or hypertension. However, there will only be a small increase in the number of U.S. adults who will require antihypertensive medication, authors said. Additionally, more African-Americans, a population that faces a higher risk for high blood pressure than other demographics, will have high blood pressure under the new guidelines. Fifty-six percent of women will be affected compared to 59 percent of men, which reflects an increase from 42 percent for women and 46 percent for men. This now means African-American men have the highest rate of hypertension while, previously, black women did.

    These guidelines, the first update to offer comprehensive guidance to doctors on managing adults with high blood pressure since 2003, are designed to help people address the potentially deadly condition much earlier.

    The new guidelines stress the importance of using proper technique to measure blood pressure. Blood pressure levels should be based on an average of two to three readings on at least two different occasions, the authors said.

    High blood pressure accounts for the second largest number of preventable heart disease and stroke deaths, following smoking. It’s known as the “silent killer” because many times there are no obvious symptoms, and it significantly increases the risk for heart disease and stroke.

    Paul K. Whelton, M.B., M.D., M.Sc., lead author of the guidelines published in the American Heart Association journal, Hypertension and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, noted the dangers of blood pressure levels between 130-139/80-89 mm Hg.

    “You’ve already doubled your risk of cardiovascular complications compared to those with a normal level of blood pressure,” he said. “We want to be straight with people – if you already have a doubling of risk, you need to know about it. It doesn’t mean you need medication, but it’s a yellow light that you need to be lowering your blood pressure, mainly with non-drug approaches.”

    Blood pressure categories in the new guidelines are:

    * Normal: Less than 120/80 mm Hg;
    * Elevated: Top number (systolic) between 120-129 and bottom number (diastolic) less than 80;
    * Stage 1: Systolic between 130-139 or diastolic between 80-89;
    * Stage 2: Systolic at least 140 or diastolic at least 90 mm Hg;
    * Hypertensive crisis: Top number over 180 and/or bottom number over 120, with patients needing prompt changes in medication if there are no other indications of problems, or immediate hospitalization if there are signs of organ damage.

    The new guidelines eliminate the category of prehypertension, which was used for blood pressures with a top number (systolic) between 120-139 mm Hg or a bottom number (diastolic) between 80-89 mm Hg. People with those readings now will be categorized as having either Elevated (120-129 and less than 80) or Stage I hypertension (130-139 or 80-89).

    Previous guidelines classified 140/90 mm Hg as Stage 1 hypertension. This level is classified as Stage 2 hypertension under the new guidelines.

    The impact of the new guidelines is expected to be greatest among younger people. The prevalence of high blood pressure is expected to triple among men under age 45, and double among women under 45 according to the report. For African-Americans, high blood pressure develops earlier in life and is usually more severe.

    Damage to blood vessels begins soon after blood pressure is elevated, said Whelton, who is the Show Chwan professor of global public health at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and School of Medicine in New Orleans. “If you’re only going to focus on events, that ignores the process when it’s beginning. Risk is already going up as you get into your 40s.”

    The guidelines stress the importance of home blood pressure monitoring using validated devices and appropriate training of healthcare providers to reveal “white-coat hypertension,” which occurs when pressure is elevated in a medical setting but not in everyday life. Home readings can also identify “masked hypertension,” when pressure is normal in a medical setting but elevated at home, thus necessitating treatment with lifestyle and possibly medications.

    “People with white-coat hypertension do not seem to have the same elevation in risk as someone with true sustained high blood pressure,” Whelton said. “Masked hypertension is more sinister and very important to recognize because these people seem to have a similar risk as those with sustained high blood pressure.”

    Other changes in the new guidelines include:

    * Only prescribing medication for Stage I hypertension if a patient has already had a cardiovascular event such as a heart attack or stroke, or is at high risk of heart attack or stroke based on age, the presence of diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease or calculation of atherosclerotic risk (using the same risk calculator used in evaluating high cholesterol).

    * Recognizing that many people will need two or more types of medications to control their blood pressure, and that people may take their pills more consistently if multiple medications are combined into a single pill.

    * Socioeconomic status and psychosocial stress are now recognized as risk factors for high blood pressure. In some urban communities, socioeconomic status can affect access to basic living necessities, medication, healthcare providers and the ability to adopt lifestyle changes.

    The new guidelines were developed by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology and nine other health professional organizations. They were written by a panel of 21 scientists and health experts who reviewed more than 900 published studies. The guidelines underwent a careful systematic review and approval process. Each recommendation is classified by the strength (class) of the recommendation followed by the level of evidence supporting the recommendation. Recommendations are classified I or II, with class III indicating no benefit or harm. The level of evidence signifies the quality of evidence. Levels A, B, and C-LD denote evidence gathered from scientific studies, while level C-EO contains evidence from expert opinion.

    The new guidelines are the successor to the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC7), issued in 2003 and overseen by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). In 2013, the NHLBI asked the AHA and ACC to continue the management of guideline preparation for hypertension and other cardiovascular risk factors.

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    Policy experts discuss education in the new Jim Crow era

    After decades of desegregation efforts, federal civil rights laws, and other attempts to close the achievement gap, a high quality education remains an elusive goal for most Black children.

    In an effort to engage Black parents around reaching that elusive goal, educators and community stakeholders tackled leadership, educational equity and policy in urban schools, during a recent panel discussion.

    Led by moderator Linda Tillman, professor emeritus of education leadership at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the panel discussed the challenges faced by African American teachers and leaders, as they work to educate Black children and young adults in urban communities.

    “We are here to revisit old discussions and bring fresh ideas,” Tillman said. “Jim Crow has affected Blacks in so many ways. Black education is a right [that’s] not solely based on White norms.”

    Panelist Terri Watson, a City College of New York (CCNY) educator and co-creator of the CCNY-based “Growing Our Own Doctor’s Project,” said that there’s not only a need for better education, but that there’s also a need for safer communities for Black students.

    “We have to focus on creating space where kids are informed and active, that’s important,” Watson said. “We have to let the kids know that the world is waiting for them, they’re up next and we have to change their mindset that the world views them as disposable.”

    Rodney Hopson, a professor and associate dean of education psychology at George Mason University, Sonya Douglass Horsford, an associate professor of education leadership at the Teachers College at Columbia University, and M. Christopher Brown II, the president of Kentucky State University also participated in the panel that took place during the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s annual legislative conference.

    Both Brown and Horsford, longtime friends, said the majority of public schools are now non-White. The proliferation of charter and alternative schools has also chipped away at the effectiveness of public schools.

    The federal government has played such a major role in shaping education policy and schools now mostly prepare African Americans for prison, not college, Brown said.

    “The school’s structure that’s used is that they teach our kids how to stand in a straight line, to raise their hands when they have to go to the bathroom…you do that in prison, so that’s the training they’re getting,” Brown said.

    He then quoted what he said was a prophetic statement made by W.E.B. Du Bois 57 years ago.

    “[African American] teachers will become rarer and in many cases will disappear,” Brown said quoting Du Bois, noting that the prediction has come to pass.

    Brown continued, quoting Du Bois: “[African American] children will be instructed in public schools and taught under unpleasant if not discouraging circumstances. Even more largely than today, they will fall out of school, cease to enter high school, and fewer and fewer will go to college.”

    Horsford, like the other panelists, said no one should be surprised, because, after all, resegregation has occurred and education is the “new civil rights in the new Jim Crow.”

    “We shouldn’t operate from the assumption that our schools are broken,” she said. “They are doing exactly what they were designed to do, which is to sift and sort children into different categories for economic reasons.”

    Horsford added that African Americans must tap the potential, possibilities and gifts of the young people who truly hold the answers to society’s pressing problems.

    Even educators have suffered and are poorly valued in a system guided by high-stakes testing and performance-based accountability, Horsford said.

    “We have to engage in parallel efforts…we need to reimagine schools and school systems that support everyone,” said Horsford. “We also have to make sure that, in the meantime, we are preparing students to not only survive, but also thrive in an era of extreme inequality.”

    By Stacy M. Brown
    NNPA Newswire Contributor

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  • ,,

    Broome issues executive order to expand small business participation in city contracts

    East Baton Rouge Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome today issued an executive order to expand efforts to increase the enterprise participation of small businesses in City-Parish contracts. The order also ensures that such businesses — including those owned by minorities, women and veterans — are afforded fair opportunities and do not face unfair barriers when seeking and performing City-Parish contracts.

    “This executive order is much needed in our city and parish,” Mayor-President Broome said. “I have been consistently vocal and demonstrative about the need for equity in all areas of life in our community, and this includes business. Everyone should have equal opportunities to build and grow successful businesses in the place they call home. These businesses add to our economic development, and a diverse array of business owners creates a more welcoming, progressive city for both current and future residents.”

    The order, which takes effect immediately, outlines accountability, inclusion and outreach efforts, and policy administration and operation in City-Parish departments. Stakeholder engagement is also prescribed, instructing the chief administrative officer in the Office of the Mayor-President to create more opportunities for members of the contracting community and for City-Parish departments, the Metropolitan Council, and others to work collaboratively on recommendations for how the City-Parish can better develop, deliver, monitor and measure a more successful small business enterprise program.

    Read the order here: http://www.brgov.com/press/SWB%2017-02.pdf

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    City Hall rally urges Mayor, Council to keep their word on ‘grocery gap’ funding

    Together Baton Rouge will hold a rally on Monday, November 13th at 4:30pm at City Hall, 222 St. Louis Street, to urge the Mayor-President and Metropolitan Council to fulfill their commitment to fund an economic development program to attract grocery stores to “grocery gap” neighborhoods.

    As candidates during last year’s elections, Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome and a majority of the current Metropolitan Council committed to support city-parish funding for a fresh food financing initiative in the amount of $1.5 million.

    The proposed city-parish budget contains zero funding to implement the initiative.

    It is the fourth straight year that city officials have given verbal commitment to support the project, but not followed through with funding.

    In 2013, the central recommendations of the EBR Food Access Policy Commission was to start a fresh food financing initiative to bring access to healthy food to the parish’s 100,000 residents who live in low food-access areas.

    Together Baton Rouge is holding the rally to urge city officials to keep their word and finally get the project off the ground.

    “Budgets are statements of a community’s values and priorities,” said Edgar Cage, who helps lead Together Baton Rouge’s food access work.

    “We believe our officials are sincere in their support. But it’s time we start saying, not just with our words but with our budgets and with our actions, that we value and prioritize addressing food access and economic development in our most neglected neighborhoods.”

    To RSVP to attend the rally, click here.

    For full details on the Fresh Food Financing Initiative, click here.

    Facts on the Grocery Gap in East Baton Rouge Parish

    • Nearly 100,000 residents in East Baton Rouge Parish live in “grocery gap” neighborhoods –about 20% of the parish population.
    • The national average of residents food deserts is 7%
    • 32,753 of the EBR residents in Grocery Gap neighborhoods are children. 13,282 are seniors.
    • The Grocery Gap affects all 12 Metro Council District.
    • Lack of access to health foods is directly related to obesity and obesity-related illnesses
    • Lack of access to grocery stores increases the cost of food by 7 to 25%, typically in the neighborhoods least able to pay more.
    • New Orleans has had a fresh food financing initiative since 2011. It has funded 6 grocery store projects, creating 200 jobs and adding 179,000 sq. ft. of food retail.
    • Fresh food financing initiatives are public-private partnerships. Public funds typically leverage 8 to 10 times as much private sector funding.

    Together Baton Rouge would not receive any public funds under this initiative. The organization does not accept funds from government sources, period. The funding for a fresh food financing initiative would go as incentives to grocery stores and to a community development finance initiative to administer the program.

     

     

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  • ,,

    Thomas uses code to connect readers with authors of color

    Kaya Thomas, was frustrated with the difficulty of finding books about and by people of color so she designed and wrote the code for the app.
    At age 18, she launched We Read Too, a mobile directory of multicultural books for young readers.

    “I want titles written by people of color to be easier to discover and all in one place, not blocked by a pay wall,” Thomas told Poets & Writers magazine. “I want (users) to see that there are authors who share their background and are creating work that reflects their culture in some way.”

    Now available through Google Play and Apple, the free directory has nearly 1,000 children and young adult titles. Each title has a detail page including the book cover, author, title, genre, and description with an option to share the books via email or social media. The books can be viewed with an option to purchase online.
    There are more than 15,000 users who have used the app to locate self-published and traditionally published authors of color. User can also recommend authors while discovering new titles. “I want all author of color to have their work highlighted in We Read Too regardless of how they got their work out there,” she said.

    Thomas plans to eventually include adult fiction titles in the directory. “We want to expand the directory to include as many titles as possible in those categories before expanding to adult literature.” Suggested books have to be written by an author of color and the main character in the book should be Black, Latinx, Asian, or Native. Every few weeks the suggestions are read through and added if they fit the criteria.

    Thomas graduated from Darmouth College with a degree in computer science. She started learning iOS development in 2014 while working as a mobile development intern for Time Inc. She later interned at Intuit and Apple working on iOS/OS technologies. She is an associate engineer at Slack Technologies, Inc. in California.

    ONLINE: WeReadToo.com

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    COMMENTARY: FBI’s behavior is classic deja vu

    It’s a classic case of déjà vu. The FBI’s counterterrorism division has identified a supposed new threat: “black identity extremists” (BIE). The FBI claims that BIE’s “perception of police brutality against African Americans has spurred retaliatory lethal violence against law enforcement.”

    In a time when white supremacists march down city streets toting loaded weapons and shouting racist taunts, it comes as a great shock that the FBI would decide to target black identity groups protesting police brutality and their right to exist free of harm.

    Sadly, this news comes as no surprise from an administration that has flaunted its disregard for the civil rights and liberties of people of color and blamed the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville on “many sides.” President Trump and his allies have exuded a lack of compassion and historical understanding that increasingly infects our government and our society.

    It’s up to us to stop the true sources of hate in this country online at action.naacp.org you can join our call to Congress to support the NO HATE Act of 2017, sign the pledge to vote for representatives who know where the true threat to safety and democracy lies; and donate the NAACP to help us defeat hate and advance justice.

    In solidarity,

    Derrick Johnson

    Interim President and CEO, NAACP

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  • ,

    Participants saught for Occupational Therapy research on Lupus

    The Department of Occupational Therapy at the University of South Alabama’ students and faculty are conducting much-needed research on how lupus affects African American women’s ability to participate in the everyday activities they need and want to do.

    To do so, simply visit https://sites.google.com/southalabama.edu/lupus and click “Take Survey.” The survey is a short, 33-item questionnaire that can be completed in 20 minutes or less. Your results will remain anonymous and will contribute to the overall effort to help all who are diagnosed with lupus.

    ONLINE: www.louisianalupusfoundation.org

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    Superintendent does not deserve all the blame

    Many I Have talked to are very dissatisfied with the performance of the current superintendent. We know that the next superintendent must be someone with a strong background and proven performance record in educating children (all children). Our current su- perintendent is well-versed in nance. Yes, this is what our board chose to lead our kids and schools over the past decade; a nance guy. This is perhaps where the notion that more money is the right answer to solve every educational problem comes into play. Maybe we should ask the districts in our country that spend less per pu- pil and yet outperform others. Or, we can ask those districts in places like New York that spend tens of thousands per pupil while performance still lacks. But, that’s another discussion for another time.

    In the superintendent’s defense, I do not think the current superintendent deserves all of the blame for district perfor- mance. For instance, currently Tangipahoa has an abundance of “magnet” schools. However, there exists absolutely no blueprint or school magnet plan illustrating to the public exactly how each magnet program should look and sound by full implementation. Nor, is there a timeline with performance benchmarks so that the indi- vidual responsible for imple- menting magnet programs District-wide can progress- monitor implementation. What kind of organization does not have these simple processes in place? Ours.

    What is the outcome of this? Well, for one, we have commu- nications magnet schools that have been in existence for over ve years without any real outlying educational experiences than those found in traditional schools. What is the blue print for the Medical Magnet at Amite? Is it just the state’s jumpstart CNA programs? Let’s get serious.
    We have kids dropping out of the high school’s IB program because they were not properly prepared for the Diploma Pro- gramme in K-8. There has been no success in securing the ac- tual Middle Years Programme despite attempts having been made since 2012 or earlier. There’s no wonder our kids are having trouble in high school; they are missing the o cial IB Middle Years. Let’s not even talk about the academic per- formance of the district’s mag- net schools. Basically, most of them are in decline.

    As for our high schools, a high school supervisor reportedly assigned e ective ratings to a high school administra- tor who was removed by the superintendent for basically being determined ine ective. How can such a discrepancy exist? Well, based on the lack of growth performance coupled with culture and climate issues that existed at this particular high school, the superinten- dent probably made the rightdecision. However, the individual who gave that particular school leader e ec- tive ratings should have also been repri- manded. The public must trust that indi- viduals are being held fairly accountable for how they perform with our children, and the ability to properly hold system leaders just as accountable as school lead- ers and teachers is a known weakness of the Tangipahoa Parish School System. This system has been known to place in- dividuals in district leadership roles who have not been proven to have been ef- fective leaders in schools based on, well, school performance. We must do better to win the public over.

    Lastly, Tangipahoa Parish Schools contain a reform measure known to help raise student achievement called the Teacher Advancement Program (TAP). The program involves the hiring of mas- ter and mentor teachers in TAP schools as well as a district Master teacher who supports TAP schools. At one point, the system had as many as nine TAP schools. Now, it has only one. Again, who holds the individual responsible for supporting these TAP schools (District TAP executive TAP Master teacher), and why is this individual still serving in this role when the district only has one TAP school? Who pays for this? How did the one school in which this individual was responsible for perform this past year? It declined.

    In conclusion, yes, the superinten- dent is ultimately responsible for district overall performance. However, the in- dividual responsible for district magnet programs, high school performance, and the individual responsible for the TAP should all be held accountable for the performance (or lack thereof) in these particular schools and programs overall. In addition, the board should request a copy of how the superintendent and/ r designee evaluated each and compare these evaluations with actual school/pro- gram performance. We do expect that, in the future, this superintendent as well as future superintendents do a better job at securing the most e ective individuals for these kinds of positions so that our entire district can be led in a more posi- tive direction, academically.

    By Patricia Morris
    President Greater Tangipahoa Parish Branch NAACP

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    SU Homecoming Parade route finalized for Nov. 4

    The race for Houston and the 2017 SWAC Championship is nearing the finish line and this Saturday, SU Athletics needs the Jaguar Nation to “Standout Bold For Thee.”

    As Southern University football prepares to salute the 2017 Senior Class, the SU annual homecoming parade will commence a full day of festivities with a new route through the North Baton Rouge community, Saturday, Nov. 4.

    Parade participants will access Elm Grove Garden Drive from Blount road prior to the start of the parade, which is scheduled to begin at 7:45 a.m. in front of Ryan Elementary. The parade will travel south down Elm Grove Garden Drive before making a right on Fairchild Drive. When the parade route reaches Scenic Highway, it will turn right and veer towards Scotland Avenue and will end at Scotlandville High School.

    For a view of the 2017 homecoming parade route, click here.
    In addition to the parade that will roll through the Scotlandville community Saturday, the SU Office of Admissions and Recruitment is scheduled to host more than 3,000 prospective students for High School Day on the Baton Rouge campus.

    Lastly, head coach Dawson Odums and the Jaguars prepare to battle Prairie View A&M in a pivotal SWAC West matchup at 4 p.m. SUS President-Chancellor Dr. Ray L. Belton and SU Director of Athletics Roman Banks will host the first-ever VIP Endzone Party on the A.W. Mumford Stadium field. Tickets for the VIP Party are available for $35 and can be purchased at the SU Ticket office.
    Fans must have a game ticket in order to purchase tickets for VIP Party.
    For additional information, fans are encouraged to contact the SU Ticket Office at 225-771-3171.

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    Robinson speaks against Kolwe, number of failing schools

    HAMMOND–Tangipahoa Parish School Board member Betty Robinson is highly critical of the superintendent of Tangipahoa Parish Schools Mark Kolwe and she questions the number of failing schools.
    “I have three failing schools in my district,” Robinson said. “Hammond Junior High, Woodland Park, and Westside Elementary, all these school having failing grades. It not the educational system; it is the Superintendent Mark Kolwe is to blame. He is not an educator.”
    Robinson said, “Another problem we have in the school system is that our children are being taught by uncertified teachers.”
    “Everytime a failing school gets a principal who turns around a school, the superintendent will transfer that principal. (For example) Terran Perry was turning around Hammond Junior High, a failing school,” she said.
    “The tax payers can change the school system, and remove the superintendent by attending school board meeting in record numbers and challenge how their tax dollars are spent,” she said.
    According to Robinson, the school board has hired a public relations firm to produce information about a proposed tax that will appear on the November ballot.
    “I cannot support a tax. I don’t trust them with the money, and the community doesn’t trust the system. If the tax passes, the majority of the money will go to Ponchatoula High,” she said. “We must vote against the tax.”
    Robinson said her trouble with the school board started on November 3, 2015, when she was sworn in. “I did not received new members’ orientation until 2016–14 months later,” she said.
    In a letter to The Drum, Robinson wrote:

    Dear Editor:
    The recent report ranking our city as being among the worst cities to raise a child hit hard. The reason is that this is a direct reflection of our educational system. Citizens need board members to be open and honest with them about the state of education.
    Likewise, board members need a superintendent who is courageous enough to be honest and open about these matters with us. We cannot go on pretending like everything is great when national reports state otherwise as this makes us appear uncivilized. I understand politics, but the well being of children and families is far too important to play politics. We simply cannot afford to do so. Doing so has caused the outcome seen nationally.
    Our parish it’s cities and towns are a jewel. However, a better job must be done with our schools.
    The superintendent of over a decade owes local mayors, business leaders, civic leaders and especially families answers as to why our system is in this current condition. And please, do not continue to place blame on money.
    People are tired of this excuse and have stated that they will invest when they can trust that their dollars will be effectively spent on improving educational outcomes for all children. Would you believe that one of the highest ranking school districts in our country actually spends less than we do per pupil? Go figure.
    It is about effectively prioritizing and managing what you have, and our data points out that prioritizing funds starting with what is in the very best interests of children has definitely not been an area of strength for our system’s leadership.
    An entire decade has passed, and this is the outcome. We must do better in assisting our parish’s cities and towns by doing our part in securing leadership that we know can improve system wide academic outcomes so that we all can reap the benefits of having a district filled with high ranking schools.
    Betty C. Robinson
    School Board Member
    Tangipahoa Parish District G

    By Eddie Ponds
    The Drum Founding Publisher

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  • ,,

    Faking normal over 50

    Today’s life expectancy rate for United States citizens stands at 76.5 and 81.2 years for men and women, respectively, according to recent data provided by the world’s leader of medical research, Imperial College London.

    But before we celebrate, it’s important to note that these levels are among the lowest of the world’s richest countries — a list of “lows” that includes places like Croatia and Mexico.

    Why? Because, among other factors, America lacks universal health insurance and has the highest child, maternal, homicide and body-mass index rates of any high-income country.

    What’s more, many Americans 50 years of age or more have discovered that living longer often requires them to work longer in order to keep up with their financial obligations and personal desires.

    ‘Faking Normal’ Over 50

    That’s what one Washington, D.C., resident Elizabeth White, a former chief operating officer for a midsize nonprofit organization, once-celebrated entrepreneur and MBA graduate of Harvard Business School, learned while struggling on the edge of a financial precipice for years, despite her outward appearances.

    White, now in her 60s, chronicles the pain she experienced as her flourishing career and upper-middle class lifestyle came to a grinding halt in her 2017 self-published book, Fifty-Five, Unemployed and Faking Normal. She says that while she “pretended” that things were going great, in truth she feared the future — and soon discovered that she had a lot of company.

    “There’s a lot of pressure to act like you’re doing well. That’s why I describe my personal reflections as an act of ‘faking normal,’” she said while speaking to media at the World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics in San Francisco last July.

    White admits that the townhouse she purchased years ago now has a rental rate that she couldn’t begin to afford today. Nor can she afford to pay the fee for private parking.

    Meanwhile, and in terms of how she reached her unexpected financial crisis, White says that after making her mark as one of only a handful of black women employed by the World Bank, she took a huge piece of her retirement savings to fund her own business. Her enterprise promoted African-inspired products — a venture that had tremendous potential but which eventually failed.

    “We were doing well, but I could see that we were not going to be able to grow the business into a national chain as we were already struggling with volume,” she said. “One day I just closed my stores.”

    From $200K a Year to $0

    For a while, White survived on receiving consistent consulting work. Then, as the 2008 economic crash occurred, she went from close to $200,000 a year to zero.

    “The jobs of the past weren’t there anymore,” she said. “And I found it harder to get hired than I did years earlier — probably due to age discrimination. It didn’t matter how great I may have looked. I learned that early; being in one’s 50s was no longer considered ‘young’ in the workplace. I realized I was in trouble.”

    Recent data from several social research organizations indicate that from ages 45 to 55, wages decline by nine percent or more — then dropping by an additional nine percent for those between 55 and 64. And most experts say age discrimination starts at around 35 with women bearing the brunt much sooner and more intensely than men.

    “Maybe it was too many bottled waters and too many visits to Starbucks,” White says with a laugh. “I was embarrassed to admit to my friends what was going on in my life. But it was those same friends who helped me make it. I realized I had to come to terms with my new reality and deal with life on new terms.”

    In her book, White provides over 100 online resources and offers ways to deal with the emotions she faced after landing in financial ruin.

    “We’re in the midst of a massive paradigm shift,” she states in the book’s conclusion. “Much of what we know has been turned on its head. We’re going to make mistakes. Learn from them. Forgive yourself. Focus on what is working. Throw the rest away.”

    By New America Media

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    Centenary College Choir prepares for fall tour

    The Centenary College Choir takes its 2017-2018 program, “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness,” on the road in early November for six performances in south Louisiana. The group will visit and sing at both churches and high schools during the three-day tour.

    The Choir debuted the full season program at its annual “Rhapsody in View” performance at Shreveport’s Riverview Theater during Centenary’s Homecoming weekend on October 21 and 22.

    The tour opens with a concert at St. John’s United Methodist Church in Baton Rouge at 7pm on Thursday, November 2. On Friday, November 3, the Choir will visit several Baton Rouge-area high schools in the morning and afternoon, giving prospective students a chance to hear the Choir and interact with current members. That evening, the Choir travels to Hammond-Ponchatoula-Well United Methodist Church for a 7pm concert. On Saturday, November 4, the group moves to Lafayette for a 6pm. appearance at St. Anthony Catholic Church. The tour wraps up on Sunday, November 5 as the Choir sings for morning services at Asbury United Methodist Church in Lafayette and then gives a final concert at First United Methodist Church in DeRidder at 6pm.

    Established in 1941, the Choir is the oldest and largest ensemble at Centenary College and celebrated its 75th anniversary in 2016. The group sings a diverse repertoire of music from classical to casual, making an international tour every other year. Nicknamed “America’s Singing Ambassadors” by the press, the Choir has toured throughout the world, representing Centenary College to audiences in 32 countries on six continents.

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    Edwards launches criminal justice reform video series ahead of Nov. 1 implementation

    As part of his campaign to educate the public on the Criminal Justice Reinvestment Initiative legislation going into effect on Nov. 1 of this year, Gov. John Bel Edwards has released three videos featuring community leaders who were active in passing the historic legislation. They elaborate on the necessity of criminal justice reform in Louisiana,  the reduced cost to taxpayers and the increased safety that will result from this reform for communities across the state.

    “We know from experience a broken justice system leads to more crime, more families torn apart and higher costs for hardworking taxpayers each year,” Gov. Edwards said. “Stakeholders from both sides of the aisle put their differences aside and found common ground to build comprehensive, bipartisan criminal justice reform. We made a decision to build a system that works better for everyone in Louisiana by looking at data-driven evidence, not anecdotes and misleading fear tactics.”

    The first video features Speaker Pro Temp Walt Leger (D-New Orleans), a former prosecutor and author of HB 489, one of the ten bills included in the criminal justice reinvestment package of legislation. Click here to watch Rep. Leger’s video.

    The second video released highlights the Rev. Gene Mills, president of the Louisiana Family Forum and member of the Louisiana Justice Reinvestment Taskforce. Click here to watch Rev. Mills’ video.

    The third video includes Natalie LaBorde from the Department of Corrections, the state agency charged with overseeing implementation of the reforms. Click here to watch LaBorde’s video.

    A new video highlighting the importance of the criminal justice reform legislation will be released each day leading up to the Nov. 1 implementation date.

    Click here to learn more about criminal justice reform.

    Read more »
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    Ignatious Carmouche is ‘The Voice’ winner

    OPELOUSAS–Ignatious Carmouche is “The Voice on Snapchat” winner of Season 12.

    Carmouche, who is from Houston and now lives in Opelousas, made it through the first round of blind auditions and secured a spot on Team Jennifer by singing “Latch.”

    In January, Carmouche submitted a video of himself singing “Pretty Wings” by Maxwell. Never in a million years did he think he’d make it, but out of 20,000 submissions he ended up winning with Team Adam. By winning, he was granted a chance to audition at the Season 13 Blind Auditions and ended up making it on Team Jennifer.

    Carmouchegrew up in a very religious household, which is why he grew up singing in church. Being a shy kid, he would sing with his back toward the congregation, but as he got older his confidence grew.

    He eventually started playing the piano, alto-saxophone and finally took singing seriously. Late last year, he got his ministry license and co-founded his own music ministry.
    Carmouche said he is ready to show the world the power of his voice outside of the church by being on “The Voice.”

    Read more »
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    Rotary plans 4th Annual Global Community Day for Nov. 5

    The Baton Rouge Capital City Rotary Club and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana invite the community to join them for a Global Community Day Celebration, 11 am, Sunday, Nov. 5 at the BREC Community Park at 14024 Highland Rd. Everybody is invited, especially the children, to explore cultural exhibits from around the globe, identify international flags and try ethnic foods. Visitors will get a free World Visitor Pass to travel from country to country to learn about different cultures and get the passes stamped. Members of Baton Rouge’s international community, dressed in colorful clothes, will perform traditional ethnic dances from around the world. The event is free and open to the public.

    Countries invited include Cameroon, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, France, Honduras, India, Italy, Ireland, Lebanon, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Russia, Scotland, Swaziland, Turkey, Palestine, Venezuela, Ecuador, Panama, Israel, Uganda, Israel, Burundi, Greece, Republic of Chad and Ukraine. Interested persons may contact us for participation.

    Baton Rouge Mayor Sharon W. Broome has proclaimed Nov. 5 as “Global Community Day.” The Henry Turner Jr. and Flavor band and other entertainment make this event too exciting to miss.

    Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is the International Stage Sponsor. Other sponsors are BREC, EBR Mayor-President’s office, WAFB TV, Entergy, Gerry Lane Chevrolet and Gerry Lane Buick-GMC, Louisiana Lottery, Visit Baton Rouge, Baton Rouge Chapter of The Links Inc. Capital City Rotary Foundation Inc., and Francis Nezianya’s Subway.

    Rotary International began as an idea more than 100 years ago. Today, Rotary flourishes worldwide with 1.2 million members in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. The mission of Rotary International is to provide service to others, promote integrity, and advance world understanding, goodwill, and peace through its fellowship of business, professional, and community leaders.

    Submitted By: Baton Rouge Rotary

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  • Super Science Saturday

    Super Science Saturday (SSS) is a free Science, Technology, Engineering and Math education event for students in kindergarten to 12th grade, parents, and anyone interested in seeing science in action. SSS is sponsored by LSU Chemistry, the Baton Rouge local section of the American Chemical Society (ACS), and LSU Athletics.

    SSS is held each Fall, usually around National Chemistry Week. This year there will be 20 stations with hands-on demonstrations and activities to engage students and adults alike. Each K-12 student that attends is given a Passport at the check-in area that has blocks for each of the activity stations. When the student visits the station and participates in the activities the Passport is stamped. After visiting all the activity stations located around the concourse level of the PMAC they will receive some small gifts at the check-out area. Many regional K-12 teachers give students with a fully-stamped Passport some bonus points for attending and learning some science – so students should hang on to their Passports if that is the case.

    Organizers said, “We typically have 1,000 to 1,100 K-12 students and 1,200 parents attend the event. Over 150 volunteers help with SSS, from staffing the activity booths, to blowing up 800+ balloons to give to the K-12 students that attend the event.”

    The activity stations this year will be staffed by Albemarle, BASF, Dow, ExxonMobil, the Greater Baton Rouge Industry Alliance, LSU College of Science Departments and organizations, LSU Engineering Diversity Ambassadors, LSU Food Science, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), Solutions Through Science, Iota Sigma Pi, and Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady of the Lake University Chemistry Department.

    The event is free, but SSS will collect non-perishable food items (and/or monetary donations) for the Baton Rouge Food Bank.
    The organizer of the event is Prof. George Stanley (LSU Chemistry, phone: 225-578-3471, E-mail: gstanley@lsu.edu). Please contact him for more information or questions about Super Science Saturday. Information is also posted on the LSU Chemistry website (chemistry.lsu.edu).

     

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    BRCC Foundation presents: Chancellor’s Evening with Ailey II

    Baton Rouge Community College and the BRCC Foundation will host Ailey II at 6:30pm on Nov. 5 in the Magnolia Performing Arts Pavilion, located on BRCC’s Mid City campus, 201 Community College Drive. Proceeds from the event will provide financial assistance for students, including scholarships; as well as professional development opportunities and programmatic grant awards for faculty.

    “It is an absolute honor to share such an enriching arts event with the Baton Rouge community as an extension of our commitment to serve the Capital Region, and provide an opportunity for patrons to support Louisiana’s future workforce and the advancement of BRCC’s students,” said BRCC Chancellor Larissa Littleton-Steib.

    Founded in 1974 as the Alvin Ailey Repertory Ensemble, the Ailey II company embodies its namesake’s pioneering mission to establish an extended cultural community that provides dance performances, training, and community programs for all people. Under the direction of Sylvia Waters from 1974 to 2012, Ailey II flourished into one of the most popular modern dance companies, combining a rigorous touring schedule with extensive community outreach programs. Current artistic director, Troy Powell, brings a fresh dimension to the company and contributes to its legacy of unmatched critical praise, honors, awards and proclamations.

    Ailey II continues to receive numerous honors and awards in recognition of its community outreach programs, which include going to local elementary, middle and high schools in the cities in which it performs. As part of its visit to Baton Rouge, Ailey II will also visit McKinley Middle Academic Magnet School for Visual and Performing Arts.

     

    dancer
    “We are delighted to host Ailey II and provide a great experience that all can enjoy, and an experience that brings beauty, light, and hope to our community,” said BRCC Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement and Executive Director of the Foundation Philip L. Smith, Jr.Tickets for the Chancellor’s Evening with Ailey II and gala are available at www.brccf.org.

    The BRCC Foundation is a 501c3 non-profit corporation created for the purpose of securing philanthropic support to advance, promote, and benefit the mission of Baton Rouge Community College, its faculty and students.

    For more information, contact BRCC Director of Community Relations Gerri Hobdy at (225) 216-8401.Tickets for the Chancellor’s Evening with Ailey II and gala are available at www.brccf.org.

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    Personal Health History Workshop opens for registration through Oct 13

    Deadline to pre-register is October 13

    The Southern University Agricultural Land-Grant Campus’ Family and Human Development Unit will host a Personal Health History Workshop, Tuesday, Oct. 31, at the SU Ag Center, 181 B.A. Little Dr., from 9am to 2:30pm.

    The free workshop will show individuals how to create a personal health history journal that can be used to keep track of not only their health history, but also the health history of their family’s including illnesses, medications, treatments and any past medical procedures. This information is often asked for by medical professionals when being admitted to the emergency room or seeing a doctor for the first time.

    Topics covered during the workshop will include:

    • Knowing Your Family Medical History
    • How to Get The Most from Your Doctor’s Visit
    • What’s a Power of Attorney
    • What’s a Living Will
    • Eating Healthy at Every Age
    • Harmful Effects of Tobacco
    • USDA Rural Housing Repair Program

    The event is free, but pre-registration is required.  To request a registration form or to pre-register, email milissia_jbaptiste@suagcenter.comdelores_johnson@suagcenter.com or call 225-771-2583, 225-771-3704.

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  • Charles Lloyd Jr. to perform for the Music Club’s Southern Charm Program Oct. 10

    Charles Lloyd Jr., director of the Southern University Concert Choir, will be the guest artist for the Music Club of Baton Rouge’s monthly recital on Oct. 10 at the Woman’s Clubhouse, 259 T.J. Jemison Blvd. The free “Southern Charm” program begins at 10:30am with coffee at 9:45am. Appearing with Lloyd will be Jaqueline Paige-Green and Richard Hobson. Lloyd is a recording artist, arranger, accompanist, composer, coach and an expert in the field of the spiritual art song. Two of his works were performed by Kathleen Battle and Jesse Norman on the 1990 “Spirituals in Concert” conducted by James Levine and recorded by Deutsche Gramophone.

    With more than 150 compositions to his credit, Lloyd is a major figure in the field of vocal music. His output has run the gamut from hymns to operas, cantatas to art songs, though he’s most readily identified with spirituals, which constitute more than half his work as a composer.

    According to Robert Faires of the Austin Chronicle,  Lloyd has not only made arrangements that preserve the traditional sound of this rich music but also adapted them for choirs and created contemporary versions that draw on the art song tradition. His achievements have made his music sought out by the likes of Kathleen Battle and Jessye Norman.

    For more information, call (225) 978-9430.

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    SU homecoming parade, party postponed while game moves to 1pm due to weather

     Southern University officials announced changes to Saturday’s homecoming football start time due to weather forecasts involving Tropical Storm Nate.

    Kickoff for Saturday’s football game against Alabama A&M has been moved up to 1 p.m. at A.W. Mumford Stadium. As a result, the annual homecoming parade and the homecoming day party have been postponed until further notice.

    “Our policy is to error on the side of caution for situations that involve the safety and well-being of our students, fans and alumni,” said Southern University athletics director Roman Banks. “With the weather projections surrounding Tropical Storm Nate, we felt it was in the best interest of the Southern University community to move the start time up to allow everyone safe passage home.”

    Southern University Athletics has also postponed Sunday’s Southwestern Athletic Conference home soccer match against Alcorn State and home SWAC volleyball contest against Grambling State. 

    Both games will be postponed until a possible makeup date can be determined by the conference office.

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  • Pink After 5 returns for 11th year of breast cancer awareness

    The Southern University Agricultural Land-Grant Campus, consisting of the Southern University Ag Center and the Southern University College of Agriculture, has partnered with the Missy Radio Organization, Southern University Alumni Federation, Southern University Student Organizations and the Outstanding Mature Girlz Organization to host the 11th Annual Pink Party with a Purpose…“Pink After 5!”

    The breast cancer awareness event will be held on October 19, 2017, on Southern University’s Baton Rouge campus. Onsite registration will be held from 5 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. at the SU Ag Center. Proceeds from this fundraiser will be donated to Pink Party Recipient, Marcia Myles, who is currently undergoing chemotherapy treatment.
    The Pink Bike Ride will begin at the Southern University Ag Center, ending at the Southern University Alumni Federation House with live music, healthy eating, and fun. Tickets range from $0 – $25.

    The entire family will have an opportunity to join a cause that raises awareness to millions around the U.S. during the month of October. Pink Bike Riders can pre-register, get tickets, or make a donation at https://goo.gl/Bc2Xaw.

    The Pink Party with a Purpose began in 2006, when local radio personalities Missy and Sashika joined forces to raise awareness to young women about breast cancer after Missy’s hairstylist, Jacinta Freeman, was diagnosed with cancer at the age of 28. Freeman had to abruptly stop working to undergo a mastectomy and chemotherapy, which caused her to lose a portion of her primary source of income.

    As a result both Missy and Sashika put on their creative wigs and gave birth to, “The Pink Party with a Purpose.” For the past ten years, ten ladies have received an outpouring of love from the community during their time of need.

    The Missy Radio Organization is a ten year champion in bringing awareness to breast cancer in young women. The organization consist of a network of individuals and other organizations dedicated to facilitating communications and education to improve communities in Louisiana. The organization aims to facilitate community expression; provide access to interactive media for the purpose of sharing news, music, culture, and
    information; and the production of unique and diverse programming that challenges the cultural and intellectual assumption of its core audience with a respect for all peoples and a concern for those under-represented by other media.

    Submitted by Southern University Ag Center

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    Baton Rouge to celebrate a musical, community champion during Henry Turner Jr. Day Oct 28.

    A few months ago, a middle-aged Black man with his gray beard lending a distinguished air to his casual summer attire walked into the deli section of a popular South Baton Rouge grocery store. The server recognized him and said how much she had enjoyed his music at a recent outdoor festival. She then commented that she had also seen him on TV trying to “stop folks from smoking,” adding jovially as he left the counter, “You got it going on, Mr. Henry, keep it up!”

    For Henry Turner Jr., musician, performer, producer, entrepreneur, community activist, this unaccustomed neighborhood recognition was especially gratifying. But as the Henry Turner Jr. Day Music Festival on October 28 approaches, sincere humility radiates from a face as familiar to movers and shakers in downtown Baton Rouge as to longtime fans who have followed Turner’s musical career since the ’70s when he was a founding member of the popular R&B cover group, Crystal Band.

    Henry Turner Jr. Day was initially proclaimed in 2015 by then Mayor-President Melvin “Kip” Holden and was endorsed this year by Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome. “This celebration is not just about me,” Turner said. “It’s a conscious effort by the political sector to recognize a music entrepreneur with a strong community spirit – and all the grassroots musicians who have been true ambassadors for our culture.”HTJr Day Proclamation

    Turner’s true fans and new enthusiasts generated by Turner’s social media presence, have embraced Henry Turner Jr. & Flavor– the signature Louisiana Reggae/Soul/Funk/Blues group he formed some 30 years ago– with almost cult-like fervor in anticipation of this month’s festival in Downtown Baton Rouge.

    Over the past three decades, Henry Turner Jr. & Flavor has undergone changes in personnel, genres and format, but remained true to its roots. Turner drives an audience-friendly repertoire with his guitar mastery and earthy baritone –  from blues to funky uptempo numbers; from cool jazz to soulful ballads

    With more than 16 singles and eight CDs under its belt, Henry Turner Jr. & Flavor consistently delivers a crowd-pleasing show, whether at Turner’s intimate Listening Room,  open-air venues, or at one of the Ultimate Louisiana Parties he takes across the country to popularize his state’s rich culture.

    Henry Turner reggae IIIAs a multiracial dashiki-clad band, Henry Turner Jr. & Flavor found an early home at Tabby’s Blues Box on North Blvd., the internationally known music Mecca presided over by one of Turner’s mentors, the legendary Tabby Thomas. In fact, his Listening Room on North St., opened in 2014, was modeled after Tabby’s concept of showcasing local, regional, and national talent.  On Thursday nights, diverse audiences including worldwide tourists come to enjoy the Listening Room All-Stars and home-cooked soul food.

    Henry Turner Jr. & Flavor was introduced to the road when they brought their Louisiana Reggae-Soul sound to the Annual Bob Marley Festival, but stopped touring in June 2015 when veteran drummer Ronnie Houston died. Turner returned home determined to bring a fresh new approach to the local music scene.

     

    Henry Turner Jr. & Flavor

    Henry Turner Jr. & Flavor

    “It’s been quite a journey,” Turner said during a recent interview. Growing up on North 36th Street with his parents and older sister Irene, his love of music emerged early on. “When I chose the guitar, my dad got me lessons encouraging me not to neglect the business side, since he and my mom were both business owners.”  And well respected in the community for their tradition of helping others, Turner said.

    “When people see me today as a music entrepreneur and someone who truly cares about people, that’s the legacy of Henry and Mattie Turner,” he said. “That’s what motivates me to mentor young musicians, to join the Smoke-Free initiative, and to support organizations such as Families Helping Families.”

    As the founder of Hit City Digital Records, he releases and distributes his and other artists’ music globally while operating a recording studio. He said his parents would be proud that he has combined his artistry with the art of marketing

    These days, Turner is selling his enthusiasm for the new Baton Rouge with the “Baton Rouge Theme Song” which has been released as a single. “I just wanted to give my city the gift of a theme song that would celebrate what it means to all of us.” And on Henry Turner Jr. Day, you can be sure it will do just that.
    By Hedi Butler
    Special to The Drum

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    Capitol High School Class of 1957 celebrates with reunion

    The Capitol High School Class of 1957 celebrated their 60th year class reunion on Saturday, September 16, 2017, at Drusilla Seafood Restaurant. On Sunday, September 17, 2017, and the classmates fellowshipped at Living Faith Cathedral at the 10:15am worship service. Classmates travelled from California, Colorado, and Arkansas.

    The Class of Capitol High School/Class of 1957 meets every other month during the Christmas season they join the Class of 1958 for a festive and enjoyable occasion.  Former teacher and instructor Mrs. Elmer Davis, who is 97,  attended the 60th Celebration at Drusilla Restaurant. Committee members for the celebration were Beverly A. Vincent, chair and class president, Joseph Stampley, co-chair and vice-president, Glorius M. Wright, Gloria J. Hall, and Cordelia Antoine.

    Mrs. Elmer Davis, Teacher of the 1957 Class at Capitol Junior High School, and Beverly A. Vincent

    Mrs. Elmer Davis, Teacher of the 1957 Class at Capitol Junior High School, and Beverly A. Vincent

    Pictured on the front row (l to r) are: Beverly A. Vincent, Annette D. Foreman, Eloise B. Ricard, Rita C. Johnson, Leatrice G. Jackson, Bettie S. Dixon, Theda R. Burden, Cordelia Antoine, Bernadine Moore, Glorious M. Wright, Geraldine J. Guyse, Kathryn F. Simous, and Gloria J. Hall. At the back are Rose L. Preston, Samuel Preston, Marvin Foster, Norma F. Reed, Thomas Washington, Russell Morris, Joseph Stampley, and Roosevelt T. Brown who serves as chairman of the yearly Christmas event.

    Submitted By Katrina M. Spottsville

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    Black Lives Matter Movement cannot be sued, U.S. Judge rules

    A Louisiana police officer cannot sue Black Lives Matter because it is a social movement.

    (Reuters) — A Louisiana police officer cannot sue Black Lives Matter because it is a social movement, a U.S. judge ruled on Sept. 28, finding the campaign could not be held responsible for injuries he got at a protest.

    The unidentified officer sued Black Lives Matter and an activist involved in a July 2016 protest in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where the officer was struck by a rock.

    The Black Lives Matter movement began with the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter on social media in 2012 after Black high school student Trayvon Martin was shot dead in Sanford, Florida, by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. Zimmerman was acquitted of second degree murder and manslaughter.

    It grew into a nationwide movement in response to the use of excessive force by police, particularly against Black men.

    “‘Black Lives Matter,’ as a social movement, cannot be sued, however, in a similar way that a person cannot plausibly sue other social movements such as the Civil Rights movement, the LGBT rights movement or the Tea Party movement,” Chief Judge Brian Jackson of a U.S District Court in Baton Rouge wrote in a 24-page ruling.

    While the movement itself lacked the capacity to be sued, an associated entity could be held liable, Jackson said. But the judge found the officer had not made a sufficient case against such a group or an individual involved and dismissed the lawsuit.

    Billy Gibbens, an attorney for DeRay Mckesson, the activist named in the lawsuit, said his client “does not condone violence of any kind, and we are very sorry that the officer was injured.”

    “The court was absolutely correct to find that DeRay is not responsible for the criminal conduct of an unidentified person,” Gibbens said in an email to Reuters.

    Attorneys for the officer, Black Lives Matter and the activist named in the lawsuit did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

    It was not clear how the ruling might affect a related lawsuit filed by an officer who was wounded during protests last year in Baton Rouge.

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  • New contractors licensing law enforcement begins Oct. 1

    Notice to all Builders, Remodelers,and Subcontractors
    According to the Louisiana Association of Home Builders, an addendum to the Contractors Licensing Law and Rules and Regulations were promulgated on January 20, 2016 to require a specialty license for six sub classifications.
    They include:
     1. Residential Pile Driving
     2. Residential foundations
     3. Residential Framing
     4. Residential Roofing
     5. Residential masonry/stucco
     6. Residential swimming pools
    A grace period was given by the Louisiana State Licensing Board for Contractors before enforcement began. That grace period has now expired.   As approved by the LHBA BOD on May 11th, enforcement will begin on October 1, 2017. Any corporation, partnership, or individual who, for a price, commission, fee, wage or other compensation undertakes or offers to undertake or superintend the following work as it relates to the construction of any building or structure that is not more than 3 floors in height, to be used by another as a residence, where the value of the work exceeds $7,500, including labor and materials, is required to obtain a specialty classification for that work..
    Labor Only:
    In lieu of obtaining a specialty classification, a subcontractor who provides labor only and does not supply materials may obtain a subcontract-labor-only specialty classification for work performed under the direct supervision of a licensed residential building contractor.
    Please share this information within your Local Associations and inform your subs in these fields to apply for their specialty license immediately.

    Contact the Louisiana State Licensing Board of Contractors for more info call (225) 765-2301 or visit www.lslbc.louisiana.gov. For instructions on how to apply, click here www.lslbc.louisiana.gov/contractors/forms/

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    SU fall enrollment sees jumps in key areas

    SU fall enrollment sees jumps in key areas

    Student population is expanding at Southern University Baton Rouge. In particular, for the first time in several years, the University experienced significant growth in important sectors this fall. Online enrollment increased 70 percent from last fall; new first-time students had an increase of 13 percent; cross-enrolled saw an increase of 609 percent; and transfer students jumped five percent.

    “What is encouraging about these numbers is the increase in the first-time freshmen at the University,” comments Ray Belton, president-chancellor of the Southern University System. “The SUBR campus has suffered from declining enrollment for multiple years, so this response gives indication that we are on the right path.”

    The increase in online enrollment is associated with marketing strategies including targeted digital campaigns the University activated last semester. The focus was to highlight newly released programs and concentrate on a new demographic: working professionals.

    “It gives me great joy to see our System flourish,” said Luria Young, interim executive vice president for academic affairs and provost. “While working collectively, we achieved a goal that we can continue to build upon.”

    Dianna Depron, SUBR executive director of admissions and recruitment, attributes the increase in transfer and cross-enrolled students to trending recruitment tactics, such as social media and digital campaigns, email marketing, and aggressive recruiting.

    In addition to the growing enrollment on its flagship campus, the SU System is enjoying encouraging numbers from the SU Law Center (SULC) and Southern University New Orleans (SUNO).

    According to Lisa Mims-Devezin, SUNO chancellor, the campus overall enrollment increased nearly five percent with first-time freshmen student enrollment expanding by 47 percent.

    “We took the initiative to do more community outreach, engagement, marketing, and recruitment,” said Mims-Devezin.

    SULC Chancellor John Pierre reported that despite the trends of national law schools, enrollment at the SU Law Center is up slightly this fall.

    “We’re very happy with the composition of the class and the numbers,” said Pierre.

    The SU System saw a moderate increase in overall student enrollment.

    “We will continue to invest and to shape strategies that will prove to fulfill our enrollment aims,” said Belton. “There is a great anticipation that we will continue to move the needle forward.”

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    Youth sought for TIGER Kids health study

    The TIGER Kids research study is looking at ways to improve the overall health of future generations. The study will evaluate ways to: increase kids’ physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior (help kids move more and sit less), encourage healthy eating, and assess other factors that may influence school performance, body image, stress and mood.

    Researchers are using state-of-the-art technology, including activity trackers and global positioning systems to monitor physical activity, advanced imaging (MRI and DXA) to measure body fat, and mobile phone messages sent through an app to help identify what motivates kids to make healthy choices.

    ONLINE: www.pbrc.edu/tigerkids

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    Recommended books for young readers

    Here’s a short list of recommended books for young readers to middle grade readers, selected by The Drum staff.

    • One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams Garcia
    • The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
    • The Great One by Barbara W Green
    • Trust by Jodi Baker
    • Booked by Kwame Alexander
    • Counting by 7s by Holly Sloan
    • Ninth Ward by Jewel Parker Rhodes
    • Clubhouse Mysteries (series) by Sharon Draper
    • Bird in a Box by Andrea Davis Pinkney
    • Yummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty By G. Neri
    • Children of Panther Burn by Roosevelt Wright Jr.
    • President of the Whole Sixth Grade by Sherri Winston
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    A conversation with Grambling State University’s athletic director Paul Bryant

    As the Chicago Football Classic is steadfastly approaching its 20thAnniversary weekend, co-founder and producer Everett Rand along with business partner Larry Huggins have made the Chicago media rounds with the participating school Athletic Directors. HBCU football teams Clark Atlanta University Panthers and Grambling State University Tigers are facing off on Saturday, September 30 at Soldier Field for the only collegiate football classic in the North. The Chicago Football Classic expects a strong turnout of not only both school’s alumni but the support of graduates overall.

    Grambling State University is considered one of the more prominent football programs in the country with a long tradition of championship wins, as a member of the Southwestern Athletic Conference. The university’s athletic director Paul Bryant is excited about being a part of this year’s Chicago Football Classic and working with businessmen and organizers Larry Huggins, Tim Rand and Everett Rand on making sure HBCU schools are highlighted on a national platform.

    Mary L. Datcher, Chicago Defender Sr. Staff Writer sat down with Bryant and discussed the program’s direction, recruitment and continuing the school’s tradition of producing quality students both athletically and academically. Read it on The Defender. 

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    Hamilton, Young, Butler appointed to rehab council

    Virginia Gay Young, of New Orleans, Tarj L. Hamilton, of Baton Rouge, and Glyn F. Butler, of Baker, were appointed by Governor John Bel Edwards to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Young is a project development manager with Lighthouse Louisiana. Hamilton is a licensed real estate agent and the owner of Clear2Close Realty, LLC. Young and Hamilton will serve as individuals with a disability on the council. . Butler is a client advocate with the Advocacy Center and will serve as a representative of the Client Assistance Program on the council. The Louisiana Rehabilitation Council’s duties include reviewing, analyzing, and advising the Louisiana Rehabilitation Services within the Louisiana Workforce Commission.

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    Ascension parish pushes to reject school tax exemptions

    Ascension Parish teachers, community leaders call press conference to urge school board to reject “blank check” on corporate school tax exemptions

    PRAIRIEVILLE–On Monday, September 18th, at 6:30pm, teachers, faith and community leaders are holding a press conference to urge the Ascension Parish School board to reject a proposal being put before it to offer a blank check to industry on exemptions from school taxes.

    The resolution will be considered by the Ascension Parish School Board’s finance committee on Tuesday, September 19th, 5pm.

    The resolution is being brought to the school board by Ascension Economic Development Corporation. It would have the school board grant a 100% property tax exemption to subsidize a non-disclosed project by a corporation already operating in the parish, the identity of which AEDC officials are refusing to disclose.

    “It is shocking that a school board would consider something so carte blanche and irresponsible,” said a statement by local educators, congregations and community leaders in Ascension Parish. “We’re calling on the school board to reject the proposal out of hand and start subjecting these corporate exemptions to serious scrutiny.”

    Standard practice for local tax exemptions across the country is that local taxing bodies create a set of policy criteria before approving exemptions, so that there are clear standards by which exemptions can be judged. The Ascension Economic Development Corporation originally intended to pursue that path several, but back-tracked to their current demand for 100% exemptions on non-disclosed projects.

    Industrial tax exemptions will be decided by local school boards for the first time this year, instead of by the state Board of Commerce and Industry, due to an Executive Order signed by Governor John Bel Edwards in 2016.

    In 2017, industrial tax exemptions are costing Ascension Parish schools $79.1 million in lost revenue.

     

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    Brandon to serve on state ethics board

    Bishop L Lawrence Brandon, of Shreveport, was elected by the Louisiana House of Representatives to serve on the Louisiana Board of Ethics with 10 other members. Brandon will serve a five-year term with a two-term limit. He is responsible for administering and enforcing Louisiana’s conflict of interest legislations, campaign finance registration and reporting requirements, lobbyist registration, and disclosure laws in order to achieve compliance by officials and others. He has relinquisched postons on local and regional boards that may have caused a conflict of interest.

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    Three amendments on Oct. ballot; five candidates vie for city court seat

    The Oct. 14 election is shaping up to be full of candidates for state treasurer and city court judge as well as constitutional amendemnts for voters to decide statewide.

    Five candidates have qualified for the state treasurer’s seat. They are: former Commissioner of Administration Angele Davis, a Republican from Baton Rouge; Derrick Edwards, a Democrat from Harvey; Joseph D. Little, a Libertarian from Ponchatoula; Sen. Neil Riser, a Republican from Columbia; and former Rep. John Schroder, a Republican from Covington
    However, in Baton Rouge, lawyers Whitney Higginbotham Greene, Chris Hester, Carson Marcantel, Johnell Matthews, Janice Miller, and Judy Moore Vendetto are vying for the City Court Division E seat vacated by retired Judge Suzan Ponder. Greene, Hester, Marcantel, and Vendetto are Republicans. Matthews and Miller are Democrats.

    Greene, the daughter of state 1st Circuit Court of Appeal Judge Toni Higginbotham and sister of 19th Judicial District Judge Beau Higginbotham. Hester is the son of former 19th Judicial District Judge Bob Hester. Greene is an assistant state attorney general and Hester is a prosecutor in the East Baton Rouge Parish District Attorney’s Office. Both are currently on leave for the duration of the campaign. Division E is a subdistrict in south Baton Rouge.
    There are three constitutional amendments voters will consider. One would ban property tax assessments from being applied to construction work materials.

    The second constitutional amendment creates a property tax exemption for the home of a wife or husband who lost their spouse in the line of public service. The third would dedicate the cash generated from any prospective increase in gas taxes to a special construction fund, said Jeremy Alford with LAPolitics Weekly.

    “These proposals represent the most concrete ways lawmakers and voters can put ideas into the law. As such, they deserve your attention and, your votes,” he said.

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    Group prepares for Womanhood101

    The CEO Mind Foundation will host “Womanhood 101: Girls EmPOWERed Program,” Saturday, Sept. 23 at the Eden Park Library, 5131 Greenwell Springs Rd., 9am -noon.

    The program will teach 10- to 14-year-old girls how to build self-awareness, social and emotional competencies, how to cultivate self-respect and personal responsibility, and how to make informed choices.

    Speakers include Siedda Hebert, Paula Hutchinson, Imanni Sheppard, and Miss Black East Baton Rouge 2017 Makeva Armant.

    They will  discuss self-esteem, positive connections, self-love, and entrepreneurship. Although the event is free, registration is required. Breakfast and lunch will be served.

    ONLINE:theceomind.org.

    By Nadja Curtis
    Contributing Writer

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    SU Ag Center provides recommendation to the board for medical marijuana vendor

    Southern University’s medical marijuana evaluation committee provided the Board of Supervisors with information on the top three vendors who have submitted applications to become the University’s medical marijuana cultivator.

    The committee recommended Med Louisiana, Advanced Bio Medical, and Southern Roots Therapeutics to the board for approval to enter into contract negotiations during a special board meeting on Sept. 8.

    Upon hearing the recommendations of the committee, the board decided to postpone their selection of a sole vendor to contract with to give them additional time to review the applications.

    The board is set to vote on the selection of a cultivator during their regularly scheduled board meeting on Sept. 22.

    Seven vendors submitted applications to become the medical marijuana cultivator of Southern. The vendors are Advanced Bio Medical, Aqua Pharm, Citiva Louisiana, Columbia Care, Med Louisiana, Southern Roots Therapeutics and United States Hamp Corporation (USHC).

    Senate Bill 271 (Act 96) by Senator Fred Mills gave the Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center and the LSU Agricultural Center the right of first refusal to be licensed, either separately or jointly, as the production facility for medical marijuana in the state of Louisiana.

    Additional information about Southern University’s Medical Marijuana Program is available at, http://www.suagcenter.com/PageDisplay.asp?p1=12549

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    Report: Louisiana one of worst for Black women

    A new report from the nonpartisan Institute for Women’s Policy Research reveals troubling data about the economic and social challenges Black women face in Louisiana.

    The report studied factors like political participation, employment, income, and family structure. It finds Black women concentrated in lower-paying jobs (even relative to their academic achievement), being paid less than white women and men in similar occupations, and having more limited access to health insurance, often while acting as their family’s primary breadwinner.

    “Black women continue to experience structural barriers to progress that have roots in the nation’s legacy of racial and gender discrimination and exploitation. A shifting political landscape has put Black women even more at risk for disenfranchisement and marginalization,” the report states.

    The state-by-state analysis reveals Black women in Louisiana as experiencing some of the nation’s most difficult circumstances. The report cites Louisiana as the most perilous place to be a Black woman. Among its key findings:

    Black women in Louisiana (and Mississippi) make less money than anywhere else in the country. In 2014, their median annual earnings were just $25,000. The median income for women nationwide was $38,000. Only 28.3 percent of Black women in Louisiana worked in managerial or professional occupations.

    In 2014, one in three Black women in Louisiana (31.3 percent) lived below the poverty line.

    In Louisiana, fewer Black women were covered by health insurance than in any other state (72.3 percent of the population had insurance). (This report was compiled using data from 2014, before Gov. John Bel Edwards expanded Medicaid coverage related to the Affordable Care Act — it’s possible this statistic has been affected, for the better, by that expansion.)

    According to Gambit magazine, “the needs of Black women as a population need to be championed by lawmakers — even though Black women in Louisiana also have the nation’s largest political representation gap relative to their proportion of the population, with no women of color (or women at all, actually) serving at the national level.”

    The report was compiled with the National Domestic Worker’s Alliance An executive summary of the report, including conclusions and recommendations, is online at www.domesticworkers.org.

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  • Baton Rouge launches web map to monitor heavy rainfall

    The City of Baton Rouge is launching a Web mapping application that allows city officials to monitor U.S. Geological Survey and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration stream gauge data every hour during weather events. With multi-colored dots that represent each stream gauge, responders can see how high water levels are in that area at a given time. This allows city officials to direct response resources to where they are most needed.

    Baton Rouge announced the launch of this platform via a Facebook post. The map, which is live now, was built in collaboration with the city’s Department of Information Services’ GIS Division.   

    Read more by Zack Quaintance Staff Writer with

  • Government Tech
  • at http://www.govtech.com/civic/Whats-New-In-Civic-Tech-Amazon-Seeks-Proposals-For-Where-To-Build-Its-Second-North-American-HQ.html#.

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    Farmer and Agriculture Stakeholder Forum planned for Sept. 13

    The Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development Institute will host the Farmers and Agriculture Stakeholders Forum, Wednesday, Sept. 13 at 1:30pm in SARDI’s office, 1209 Diesi St, in Opelousas.

    Farmers, agricultural stakeholders, elected officials and community stakeholders are invited to participate in the forum. Participants will be provided with information on programs and services offered by the federal government; as well as helpful resources for farmers and agricultural workers who have been impacted by the 2016 floods and Hurricane Harvey.

    A representative from the USDA and the offices of the three Congressmen elected to represent St. Landry Parish – Congressman Ralph Abraham, Congressman Clay Higgins and Congressman Mike Johnson – will be in attendance to present information and address questions.

    St. Landry Parish’s Congressmen serve on the following agriculture-related committees:

    Congressman Abraham
    House Committee on Agriculture
    Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management
    Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry
    Research and Technology

    Congressman Higgins
    Committee on Science, Space, and Technology
    Subcommittee on Environment

    Congressman Johnson
    House Committee on Natural Resources
    Vice Chairman of the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations
    Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans.

    Interested participants are asked to pre-register by Monday, September 11th to SARDI@suagcenter.com or by calling Krystle J. Washington at 337- 943-2410.

    Research has shown that every major crop grown in the state, is grown in St. Landry Parish; and, for decades the parish has been a leading agricultural parish in the state. A pillar of the mission at SARDI is to provide local farmers/ agriculture stakeholders with the information, tools, and resources they may need to go to the next level.

    SARDI is a satellite campus of the Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center located in Opelousas, La. in St. Landry Parish.

    The Southern University Ag Center and the SU College of Agricultural, Family and Consumer Sciences together are called the Southern University Agricultural Land-Grant Campus.

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    Kaweeda Green Adams selected NY superintendent

    Shreveport native Kaweeda Green Adams has been selected superintendent of the City School District of Albany, NY, a district with 9,700 students. She is a graduate of Caddo parish public schools and is pursuing a doctorate in organizational leadership from Grand Canyon University in Phoneics. She served in Nevada’s school district for 28 years with one position as school associate superintendent. In Albany, she will lead the district which has struggled to close the achievement gap and has been cited in recent years for disparities in suspension rates.

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  • ,,

    Former Louisiana hotel owner, billionaire to headline International Black Business Week in Chicago

    CHICAGO—While African Americans continue to be the fastest growing segment of entrepreneurs in the United States, they are also failing at greater rates, according to a report released by the Kaufman Foundation. But organizers of the International Black Business Week Expo & Conference said those rates can change with innovation, global relationships, and a focus on legacy.
    Held October 4-6 at Malcolm X College Conference Center, 1900 W. Jackson Blvd.- Chicago, IL, the International Black Business Week Expo & Conference will convene entrepreneurs, thought leaders, and change agents from across the globe to explore critical topics that will propel businesses forward and position small and mid-sized brands for success in state, national, and international markets.

    Covering everything from digital marketing to innovative business funding solutions, asset protection, generational wealth creation strategies, and more, International Black Business Week Expo & Conference will kick-off with a keynote by African-American Billionaire Businessman Michael V. Roberts who once owned a hotel in Shreveport, Louisiana.

    Known as the “Actionaire,” Roberts acquired his $1 billion wealth through real estate investments in hotel properties, shopping centers, telecommunications, and television.

    21366740_10100101843358713_6574805945588486178_o“As entrepreneurs we far too often struggle with finding and accessing tools, valid strategies, and resources that will help grow our businesses. Some of us just don’t know where to look. For those people, IBBW is a solution. We’re putting the people in the room that you need to connect with to take your business to the next level. We’re also intentionally putting the resources in the room. Any question you have, any gaps that exist in your business, any humps you need to get over, IBBW is a center of solutions. If you have a product or service that can be marketed beyond the local marketplace, into the national or international marketplace, we have experts to help you do that as well,” said IBBW founder Traneisha Jones. “There are countless opportunities in other countries that we can leverage to our benefit right here in Chicago. Let’s go global! Get here, so we can get you there!”

    The conference will also feature an exhibition with B2B resources, a signature Personal Branding Lounge and Hustle Lab for those needing innovative solutions for raising capital to start or grow their business, and presentations by a host of business leaders and experts including Professor Devin Robinson of the Beauty Supply Institute, Jamal Miller of Married & Young and Attorney Ernest Fenton of Law Offices of Ernest B. Fenton.

    Register at www.intlblackbusinessweek.com.

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  • ,

    Visitation changes at Tangipahoa Parish Jail

    angipahoa Parish Sheriff Daniel Edwards is announcing a change in visitation days for inmates in the Tangipahoa Parish Jail. Effective Saturday August 19, visitation for jail inmates will be Saturdays and Sundays, 9am – 4pm, with 30-minutes visitation per offender.

    All persons coming to the Tangipahoa Parish Jail to visit a an inmate must have and present a valid government issued photo driver license or photo identification card. Visitation for inmates is a privilege of the inmate, and it may be suspended or revoked for disciplinary or security reasons without any prior advance notification given. All visitors are considered guests and will be expected to abide by all policies and operational procedures when visiting jail inmates. Contact the Tangipahoa Parish Jail at 985-748-3387.

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  • Phone lines set up to help Texas families locate Harvey survivors in Louisiana’s shelters

    The Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) has set up a phone bank for Texas families trying to locate loved ones evacuated after Hurricane Harvey to state-run shelters here in Louisiana.

    The numbers to call are (225) 615-0086 and (225) 615-0258.

    For privacy and safety reasons, DCFS cannot confirm the identities of people staying in its shelters. However, people can call the reunification lines and provide the name, address and date of birth, if known, of the person they are trying to locate, as well as the caller’s own name and contact information. DCFS will then determine whether the person is in a state shelter and, if so, pass along the caller’s message.

    Both state shelters – the Alexandria mega-shelter and the Jewella shelter in Shreveport – have cellphones and charging stations available for Harvey survivors to use for calling family and friends.

    Survivors who would like to let their family members and friends know they are safe and well are also encouraged to register at www.safeandwell.org, a website set up by the American Red Cross. People searching for loved ones in the disaster area can use the same website to try to locate missing friends or family members in the affected area.

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    Liberty Tax Service Offers Tuition-Free Tax School, Sept 12

     Liberty Tax Service at 4911 S Sherwood Forest Blvd and 1402 N Burnside in Gonzales will offer a 10-week, tuition-free* Tax School for aspiring tax preparers, do-it-yourself filers, and those who want a better understanding of income taxes, beginning September 12, 2017.

    Tax School combines classroom discussion with hands-on learning. It offers practice in preparing income tax returns and covers a variety of topics, including: filing status, exemptions, tax credits, and more. Students learn about the tax code and gain a new, marketable skill. Those who successfully compete the course can apply for positions with Liberty Tax Service.

    Registration is open now for the Liberty Tax School that runs September 12, 2017. Small fee for books and supplies. Enrollment in, or completion of, the Liberty Tax Course is neither an offer nor a guarantee of employment, except as may be required by the state. Additional qualifications may be required. Enrollment restrictions apply. State restrictions may apply and additional training may be required. Valid at participating locations only. Void where prohibited. Liberty is an equal opportunity employer.

    For more information, call Liberty Tax Service at (225) 778-5892 or visit the Baton Rouge office at 4911 S Sherwood Forest Blvd.

     

     

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  • Moore offers prayers for Hurricane Harvey

    Pastor Darlene A. Moore, of St Peter-Trinity-Asbury United Methodist Church, submitted this prayer for the people of Texas and Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey:

    Most loving God, today we pray for all persons who have been impacted by the devastation of Hurricane Harvey. God please be present with each individual and family who are displaced, distressed, and devastated. We pray as Christian people world wide for protection, provision, shelter, safety, and comfort through their loss and distress. We pray for the heroes, sheroes and ordinary people who are putting their lives on the line to aide as well as assist those impacted by this Hurricane Harvey with rescue, medical aide, shelter, clothing, gas, bedding, water and more. We pray for the Clergy and mental health staff to have stamina to strengthen those who need strength. We ask O God, for you to allow the village to come together and offer hope and help. God also dispatch your angels of goodness and guardianship to help the vulnerable and disabled. Lastly, o way making God, help us to trust you to make a way to help everyone impacted to have a quick recovery and remember they are not alone. In Jesus name Amen.

    By Darlene A. Moore
    St Peter-Trinity-Asbury United Methodist Church
    Jeanerette, Louisiana

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    Youth experience nation’s capital during 4-H Citizenship program

    High school students from Southern University Laboratory School and Park Ridge Academic Magnet School learned about political processes in the vibrant, living classroom of the nation’s capital as part of Citizenship Washington Focus (CWF), an intensive 4-H civic engagement program for high-school youth held at the National 4-H Conference Center in Chevy Chase, Md.

    The six youth, Coby Pittman, Jaymya Joubert, and A’miya Thomas  Michael Boudreaux III, Tyliya Pitts, and Michael Wicker, along with Tiffany Franklin, Ph.D.,  4-H CWF coordinator at the Southern University Land-Grant Campus, and Tara Hollins, CWF chaperone, participated in the program from July 10 -14.

    While in DC, the students were given the opportunity to tour the United States Congress, where they met Representative Cedric Richmond, from Louisiana’s 2nd Congressional District, and had a personal night tour of the Capital with Representative Garret Graves from Louisiana’s 6th District.

    “I enjoyed the CWF color workshops most because I connected with others from different states and we were able to work together,” said Pitts. “I will impact my community, using what I learned from CWF, by connecting with my people and creating a program that could help them with their problems. Being involved in the CWF program meant a lot to me and I would love to return.”

    For more than 50 years, the National 4-H Conference Center has invited thousands of young people from across the country to travel to Washington, DC and participate in civic workshops, committees and field trips before returning home to make positive changes in their own communities. CWF not only strengthens young people’s understanding of the government’s civic process, but it also boosts their leadership skills, communication skills and overall confidence.

    During CWF, youth get a behind-the-scenes look at the nation’s capital while meeting with members of Congress to learn more about how their government works. At the end of the program, youth draft step-by-step action plans to address important issues in their communities. Youth have developed a plan that will provide a hands-on, engaging seminar with community youth, while discussing the negative effects of underage drinking and smoking.

    “CWF is a great opportunity for young people to come together, talk about the problems they see in their communities, and identify solutions to make their communities stronger,” said Jennifer Sirangelo, president and CEO of the National 4-H Council. “The experiences these young people gain during CWF gives them the tools and confidence to grow and thrive as leaders.”

     

    Caption for photo titled ‘With Rep. Garret Graves’: Baton Rouge and Baker high school students, front row from left, Tyliya Pitts, Jaymya Joubert, A’miya Thomas, Louisiana State Representative Garret Graves, Michael Wicker and Coby Pittman. Standing on the second row are, from left, Michael Boudreaux III,  Tiffany Franklin, Ph.D., 4-H Citizen Washington Focus (CWF) Coordinator at the Southern University Land-Grant Campus, and Tara Hollins, CWF chaperone. The students visited the Nation’s Capital from July 10-14 to participant in the 4-H CWF program. (Photo courtesy of the SU Land-Grant Campus.)

     

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