LOGO
  • ,,

    Thomas uses code to connect readers with authors of color

    Kaya Thomas, was frustrated with the difficulty of finding books about and by people of color so she designed and wrote the code for the app.
    At age 18, she launched We Read Too, a mobile directory of multicultural books for young readers.

    “I want titles written by people of color to be easier to discover and all in one place, not blocked by a pay wall,” Thomas told Poets & Writers magazine. “I want (users) to see that there are authors who share their background and are creating work that reflects their culture in some way.”

    Now available through Google Play and Apple, the free directory has nearly 1,000 children and young adult titles. Each title has a detail page including the book cover, author, title, genre, and description with an option to share the books via email or social media. The books can be viewed with an option to purchase online.
    There are more than 15,000 users who have used the app to locate self-published and traditionally published authors of color. User can also recommend authors while discovering new titles. “I want all author of color to have their work highlighted in We Read Too regardless of how they got their work out there,” she said.

    Thomas plans to eventually include adult fiction titles in the directory. “We want to expand the directory to include as many titles as possible in those categories before expanding to adult literature.” Suggested books have to be written by an author of color and the main character in the book should be Black, Latinx, Asian, or Native. Every few weeks the suggestions are read through and added if they fit the criteria.

    Thomas graduated from Darmouth College with a degree in computer science. She started learning iOS development in 2014 while working as a mobile development intern for Time Inc. She later interned at Intuit and Apple working on iOS/OS technologies. She is an associate engineer at Slack Technologies, Inc. in California.

    ONLINE: WeReadToo.com

    Read more »
  • ,

    Recommended books for young readers

    Here’s a short list of recommended books for young readers to middle grade readers, selected by The Drum staff.

    • One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams Garcia
    • The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
    • The Great One by Barbara W Green
    • Trust by Jodi Baker
    • Booked by Kwame Alexander
    • Counting by 7s by Holly Sloan
    • Ninth Ward by Jewel Parker Rhodes
    • Clubhouse Mysteries (series) by Sharon Draper
    • Bird in a Box by Andrea Davis Pinkney
    • Yummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty By G. Neri
    • Children of Panther Burn by Roosevelt Wright Jr.
    • President of the Whole Sixth Grade by Sherri Winston
    Read more »
  • ,,

    Report: Louisiana one of worst for Black women

    A new report from the nonpartisan Institute for Women’s Policy Research reveals troubling data about the economic and social challenges Black women face in Louisiana.

    The report studied factors like political participation, employment, income, and family structure. It finds Black women concentrated in lower-paying jobs (even relative to their academic achievement), being paid less than white women and men in similar occupations, and having more limited access to health insurance, often while acting as their family’s primary breadwinner.

    “Black women continue to experience structural barriers to progress that have roots in the nation’s legacy of racial and gender discrimination and exploitation. A shifting political landscape has put Black women even more at risk for disenfranchisement and marginalization,” the report states.

    The state-by-state analysis reveals Black women in Louisiana as experiencing some of the nation’s most difficult circumstances. The report cites Louisiana as the most perilous place to be a Black woman. Among its key findings:

    Black women in Louisiana (and Mississippi) make less money than anywhere else in the country. In 2014, their median annual earnings were just $25,000. The median income for women nationwide was $38,000. Only 28.3 percent of Black women in Louisiana worked in managerial or professional occupations.

    In 2014, one in three Black women in Louisiana (31.3 percent) lived below the poverty line.

    In Louisiana, fewer Black women were covered by health insurance than in any other state (72.3 percent of the population had insurance). (This report was compiled using data from 2014, before Gov. John Bel Edwards expanded Medicaid coverage related to the Affordable Care Act — it’s possible this statistic has been affected, for the better, by that expansion.)

    According to Gambit magazine, “the needs of Black women as a population need to be championed by lawmakers — even though Black women in Louisiana also have the nation’s largest political representation gap relative to their proportion of the population, with no women of color (or women at all, actually) serving at the national level.”

    The report was compiled with the National Domestic Worker’s Alliance An executive summary of the report, including conclusions and recommendations, is online at www.domesticworkers.org.

    Read more »
  • ,

    ‘Voices from the Bayou’ pulls powerful, emotional writing from BRCC students

    When Baton Rouge Community College professor Clarence Nero and his teaching colleagues walked into their classrooms for the first time after the tumultuous summer of 2016—a summer that in Baton Rouge had seen the murders of Alton Sterling and innocent police officers as well as historic flood—they had no idea what to expect from students.

    This wasn’t any ordinary semester at Baton Rouge Community College. Many enrolled students had lost their homes due to flooding; most were still reeling from the shootings and the subsequent protests and riots that rocked the capital city. There were students who had been traumatized in ways that defied simple explanations.

    Not only did Nero understand that they were in pain—he had lived with and through the same hellish nightmare that summer—he was determined to let them give expression to their experiences and reactions. Having seen this type of racial tension fuel students’ creativity in the film “Freedom Writers,” based on actual classroom experiences of Erin Gruwell, Nero showed the movie to students in his English classes.voices from the bayou

    The result was an instant connection: the diverse women and men in Nero’s classes identified with the students in Gruwell’s class who had shared stories of frustration and pain growing up in racially hostile, violent communities in South Central Los Angeles.

    Before long, students were sharing their own stories, too, writing narratives and engaging in intense conversations in the classroom around race in south Louisiana. The idea caught on around the college; other professors similarly challenged their students, and the school’s Creative Writing Club members joined in the effort. Students who had begun the semester in varying states of distress were writing powerful and unforgettable accounts of their shared experiences coming of age in the South.

    Voices from the Bayou was born: a collection of heartwarming and heartbreaking narratives told by college students who bravely put it all on the line during a time when our country is most divided, after a contentious presidential election. Their courageous stories of dealing with racism, the police, and the flood in Baton Rouge will leave an indelible impression, reminding readers that our young people are ever watching and their voices must be heard and studied for peace and humanity’s survival.

    The BRCC Foundation, a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt, nonprofit, has generously aided in the publication of this collection of student narratives. All proceeds from sales of this book will go towards the foundation; in turn, the foundation will help the students who participated in this project continue their education, will assist BRCC faculty with professional development, will facilitate student programming at the college and at literary events for high school students, and will provide scholarship funding for future BRCC students.

    ONLINE: MYBRCC.edu/foundation

     

    Read more »
  • ,

    Support turns Facebook postings into published book

    When local writer and teacher, Donney Rose, set out to pay homage to the vastness of Black identities during Black History Month, he had no idea how much his community would support his month-long social media project. Each day in Feb. 2017, Rose dedicated a Facebook post to a prose-style “shout-out” in recognition of the distinctive characteristics of present day Blackness. As the public posts gained more and more attention, Rose’s online friends began to suggest that he compile the posts to create a tangible product. Through this suggestion, the online community crowd-sourced funds to create what is now “Black Out Loud” – a 33-page, glossy cover paperback book with cover art by local visual artist Antoine Mitchell. 

    “Black Out Loud” gives recognition to many of the unsung heroes and survivors of Black culture through humor, critical analysis and depth. From cafeteria ladies to “hood scholars” to former inmates to historians, “Black Out Loud” casts a wide net in its attempt to deconstruct any monolithic view of the Black American experience.

    Donney Rose

    Donney Rose



    Rose has several scheduled upcoming book talks where he will read from “Black Out Loud,” as well as discuss its content, creation process and logic. The first two talks will be held on June 10 – the first at 1 p.m. at the inaugural IWE Festival at Southern University, followed by a talk at the Greenwell Springs Branch Library at 4 p.m. On June 17, Rose will present at the annual Juneteenth Freedom Festival held in downtown Baton Rouge, and on July 14, he will read at Love Alive Church.  

    “Black Out Loud” can be purchased online at Lulu.com, or in-person for $15.

    Rose is a poet and community activist from Baton Rouge. He works as a teaching artist and marketing director for the arts-based non-profit, Forward Arts, Inc. His work as a performance poet/writer has been featured online at Atlanta Black Star.com, Blavity.com, Button Poetry, All Def Digital, Slam Find, in 225 magazine, and the literary journals “Drunk in a Midnight Choir” and Nicholls State’s “Gris Gris.» His work as a community activist has been highlighted by BBC, New York Times, Democracy Now and The Advocate. He received the Humanitarian of the Year award at the 2016 New V Awards for promoting activism through his art.
     

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Summer reading program kicks off in Tangipahoa

    Tangi Library will kick-off its summer reading program following the theme of building and construction using the slogan, “Build a Better World.” Through the program, the library aims to combat summer learning loss by offering dynamic, entertaining and educational programs for children, teens, and adults.

    The program is open to all ages, separated into age categories from birth to 7 years old, 7-12 years old, 12-18 years old, and adults. Everyone that signs up for the program will have a chance to win prizes based on the number of minutes read throughout the summer. The process includes reading yourself or reading to your child, going online and logging minutes, then receiving prizes every time a new benchmark has been reached.

    Along with all of these great prizes, the library will also host entertaining guests to come in and perform. “For our summer kick-off parties, we will have “Lady Chops,” percussionist Elizabeth Vidos sure to bring music to your ears at all of our library locations. Lady Chops is a former STOMP percussionist that provides a quality show with information about different instruments , techniques of playing music, and little bit of a background about her life as a performer. All library locations will have new guests every week in June and July including a petting zoo, a trained dance troupe, stage productions of Beauty and the Beast and Pinocchio, a balloon artist extraordinaire, a magician, and more,” said Laura Brooks Thomas, M.A., community relations coordinator, Tangipahoa Parish Library.

    All of these performances are free and open to the public.

    thumbnail_SRP - Photo ChallengeTo get everyone really engaged in the Summer Reading Program, Tangi library invites the public to participate in our social media challenge. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter and share photos every day for the month of June that fit into the theme, BUILD A BETTER WORLD! With the key below, check and see what the theme of the day is and capture a picture that illustrates the theme. Remember, when doing the challenge, be sure to tag the library and use the hashtag #TangiReadTeam and share all of the amazing things going on at your local library. Join us in building a better world through reading at Tangi Library!

    Read more »
  • ,

    Book chronicles ‘The Forgotten People’ of Plaquemines Parish

    Tyronne Edwards wanted to ensure the rich contribution of Blacks in Plaquemines Parish, which is part of the history of Plaquemines, the state of Louisiana, the nation and the world for present and future generations. It prompted him to write The Forgotten People: Restoring a Missing Segment of Plaquemines Parish History.

    This book chronicles the specific achievements of leaders who dismantled institutional racism and outwitted Judge Leander Perez, Plaquemines Parish’s segregationist and dictator. It also educates readers to the battles waged by residents to knock down doors in schools, businesses, and government that were closed to them.

    In “The Forgotten People,” Edwards breathes life into the important historical record of Blacks’ self-determination and perseverance that should never be forgotten.

    Edwards, a native of and pastor in Phoenix, La., has 47 years of human service experience and community development. He is the founder and former executive director of the Zion Travelers Cooperative Center, Inc. in Plaquemines Parish which was organized in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. For 37 years as a trainer for the People’s Institution for Survival & Beyond, he has conducted Undoing Racism workshops throughout the country.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Museum presents ‘The Thibodaux Massacre’ Book Tour, Feb. 18

    For the first time ever, a limited number of people will experience live, the on-site telling of a key story hidden from people of Louisiana. Join us for this unique tour with the author who recently verified and chronicled the story in his book, The Thibodaux Massacre. The Feb. 18 tour will begin at 10 am from the Road African American Museum, 406 Charles Street, Donaldsonville, and continue down Bayou Lafourche to Thibodaux, returning to Donaldsonville at 3 pm.

    As part of its “When History Hurts” program, the River Road African American Museum (RRAAM) is sponsoring a day-long bus tour of Louisiana’s sugar cane country, which will include the site where striking Black laborers were buried after a mass murder that ended an 1887 tri-parish strike. The incident has since become known as the Thibodaux Massacre. John DeSantis, author of ‘The Thibodaux Massacre: Racial Violence and the 1887 Sugar Cane Labor Strike,” will share vivid details of this history and other events from a chartered bus making stops at locations relevant to the story. The tour includes a stop in Thibodaux where victims of the massacre are believed buried, where plans are afoot for archeological exploration by the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

    Critically acclaimed for its thorough research, the book is interwoven with the story of Jack Conrad, a former Lafourche Parish slave who joined the U.S. Army during the Civil War. After fighting for his freedom with other Black soldiers, he is wounded in the massacre 22 years later while watching vigilantes kill his son and others participating in the strike.

    “Much of this hurtful history until now has been unknown,” said DeSantis. “This is a story of empowerment, because 25 years after emancipation these courageous people dared standing up to an oppressive culture of white supremacy.”

    The tour is limited to 55 people and the tour price is $75 which includes:
    * A signed copy of the book, The Thibodaux Massacre
    * Lunch 
    * A tour of the River Road African American Museum
    * A private bus tour narrated by the author

    The museum’s director, Kathe Hambrick, said this special tour is meant to be “a healing tour” in the memory of those resilient sugar workers who lost their lives fighting for fare wages and equality. The history is painful, but we cannot move forward with reconciliation until there is acknowledgement of the injustices that happened right here in our own communities.

    For more information, call 225-206-1225.

    Read more »
  • ,

    South Baton Rouge history captured in new book

    The history of South Baton Rouge from antebellum America until the historic 2016 visit by President Barack Obama is the focus of a new book by LSU professor Lori Latrice Martin, PhD, and the Reverend Raymond A. Jetson.

    South Baton Rouge, sometimes referred to as Old South Baton Rouge, was one of the first places Blacks could earn a high school education in Louisiana. The three-mile community around historic McKinley High School was the site of the nation’s first successful bus boycott. When laws restricted where Blacks could live, work, learn, and play, South Baton Rouge was a refuge.

    Black-owned restaurants, theaters, gas stations, and other businesses populated the community, and change-makers–including Black lawyers, judges, clergy, educators, and nurses–helped to sustain the community and other portions of the southern half of Baton Rouge through the end of legal segregation and beyond.

    The book, Images of America: South Baton Rouge includes over a hundred images of free people of color, historic businesses, faith-based institutions, political figures, the 1953 Baton Rouge bus boycott, and the dedication of the Toni Morrison Society’s Bench by the Road at McKinley High School Alumni Center.
    image

    “As the city celebrates the 200th anniversary of its incorporation, we want to make sure that the history and contributions of Black communities, such as South Baton Rouge, are not forgotten,” said Martin.

    She is associate professor of African and African American Studies and sociology at Louisiana State University, and Jetson, is pastor of Star Hill Church and CEO of MetroMorphosis in Baton Rouge.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    N.O. Mother pens book hoping to help others whose sons were killed by police

    When Delzorah Barnett first learned that her son had been shot and was in the hospital clinging to his life, she nearly had a panic attack. When she later learned that he was shot multiple times by officers with the Atlanta Police Department and that he more than likely wouldn’t make it, it took everything in her to not die in the hospital with her first-born child.

    “When I arrived (to the hospital) and began to get the details from my nephew, who was shot by the guys who caused the confusion that lead to officers showing up and killing my son, I was broken internally. I continued to pray,” said Barnett, a New Orleans native. “I did not know how to feel, so I began to get information from each witness individually and then I realized that the officers just ran up and opened fire and did not stop until my son was on the ground, and then one of them shot him again.”

    Her family gathered at the hospital every day to pray for her son, 30-year-old E. Zaus Barnett, and he started to get a little better. He eventually was able to tell her what happened. Most importantly, he said he never raised a gun to the officers.

    image

    E. Zaus Barnett,


    Unfortunately, her son never got well enough to leave the hospital and eventually died several weeks after the shooting. The two officers who shot him were never charged.

    “That was so, so painful to the point that I really did not think I would live, but I did. I put all my hope and faith in my Father God, and he guided my path to be strong for my other children, family and friends, to stand for justice in a peaceful manner and to encourage and empower others,” Barnett said.

    That tragic incident propelled Barnett, who goes by Mz. WORTHit, to turn her pain and anger into action. She now inspires women to know that they are WORTH (Women of Righteousness, Truth and Honor) it and started a nonprofit organization, Justice from A 2 Zaus. The organization stands against gun violence, excessive force and police brutality while promoting male mentorship and hosting positive response summits for young males in New Orleans, Atlanta and Fayetteville, N.C. She also wrote a book, The Darkness of the Aftermath Transformed to Light, that help restore her after the death of her son and that she is hoping will help heal the nation.

    “My book was written to heal the hearts of those who have lost loved ones and (to help them) understand that revenge or retaliation is not the answer, but forgiveness, trusting God—who is the final judge—and helping others to bring about change is the answer for any of us,” Barnett said.  “My book shows that life does bring pain, but we must become more connected to God, and then we can know how to fight, have peace and continue to love.”

    Barnett recognizes the destruction of the relationships between law enforcement and communities across the country with the international spotlight being on the deaths of people of color at the hands of police, but says it’s not too late to change the narrative.

    “I believe that we must get to the root of the problem, and that is that the justice system must be reassessed. We must make sure that justice is served across the board, regardless of status, race, title or position of a person,” she said. “We must become a society that desires life over death and holds every person accountable who does not consider saving lives. All law enforcement officers are not shooting to kill, therefore we must face the truth that there is a group of officers who apparently have a serious issue with males of color, and they use the ‘I felt my life was in danger’ (justification) when that is really not the case.”

    Barnett said she believes that healing begins with forgiveness and then taking the necessary steps to bring about change. She said

    even though she is pushing for peace, she is also pushing for communities to fight for what is right.

    “We cannot stop marching peacefully; we cannot stop being involved with organizations that are dealing with the real problems and bringing it to the right people. We must vote, show up at city council meetings, keep teaching our children to do right, get an education and become politicians, law enforcement officers and hold positions where we can be the change.”

    Her son’s untimely death thrust her into philanthropy. Justice from A 2 Zaus and her women’s group have helped countless people across the country. Her podcast “Positive Male Response and Inspirational Conversation with Mz. WORTHit” has inspired numerous young people. However, Barnett is just getting started.

    She is gearing up to do even more to help the nation heal. She urges parents who have lost children due to gun violence or police brutality to never give up.

    “You must call on God and heal and then fight from a place of victory that will impact and encourage others that love and peace will always overpower evil. I know they will, because I walk from a place of victory with peace, love and faith, and God has changed the lives of many through me,” she said. “He has lifted the hearts and minds of many through me, and He is changing situations through me, so if he can do it for me, he will do it for you!”

    Barnett has given copies of her book to parents who have lost their children in similar ways. 

    ONLINE: mzworthit.com
    ONLINE: a2zaus.com 

    Read more »
  • Children’s book brings Bayou Classic tradition into every home

    ‘Twas the Night Before Bayou Classic is a beautifully illustrated children’s book that will resonate with Bayou Classic revelers will be released for limited distribution just in time for this year’s game next week.

    Lafayette author, educator, and school librarian, Andrea A. Brew is a second generation graduate of Southern  University, where her parents met. Inspired by her childhood experiences at the game coupled with countless pastimes as a college student, Brew has crafted a story many times experienced, but never told, until now.

    Read ‘Twas the Night Before Bayou Classic and find out what happens on the eve of the Bayou Classic, when a family of Southern University fans, filled with anticipation and blue-and-gold spirit, gets an unexpected visitor at their door.

    With more than 250,000 revelers converging on the Crescent City and nearly $55 million generated annually, the Bayou Classic is not only a tourist event. It has become a nationally touted tradition appealing to a cross generational demographic, celebrities in all facets of mainstream media and pop culture, as well as major corporations, which also includes NBC’s continued simulcast in support of the big game.
    For more than four decades famed HBCUs, Southern University and A&M College and Grambling State University have ushered in the holiday season with their annual weekend of events and festivities.

    Starting Thanksgiving Day with a parade in Downtown New Orleans, the festivities include a greek show, awards ceremonies, job fair, empowerment seminars, the Battle of the Bands and the grand finale of Louisiana Black college football—The Bayou Classic. For those who have attended the universities, this game bookmarks a rich and storied cultural experience that current and past students continue to celebrate with friends and family from generation to generation

    With Twas the Night Before Bayou Classic, Brew extends homage to the tradition in literary form.
    “The tradition of Bayou Classic for Grambling, Southern and Louisiana is a storied one–one that inspired me to write,” Brew said.

    In Baton Rouge, the book is available at Top Choice Products, 1492 Harding Blvd, (225) 775-5247.

    Online: www.andreabrew.com

    Read more »
  • ,

    God intervenes during stillness, writes Bogalusa native

    According to author Leslie P. Norris, Jr., God is a creator and sustainer of all that was, is, and is to be. AS such, there are times when God decides to intervene in human life.  In Norris’s new book, God’s Early Morning Intervention, he unveils personal experiences with God that lead to the writing of the 112-page book.

    “My book came to life in six years, as God awoke me many early mornings and wrote on the radar screen of my mind, “Be still and know that I am  God” (Ps. 46:10, KJV),” said Norris who is a native of Bogalusa, Louisiana, and son of the late Reverend LHP Norris Sr. and Adele Washington Norris.

    He is a graduate of Southern University Laboratory High School, Southern University, Nicholls State University, and Gammon Theological Seminary in Atlanta.

    God’s Early Morning Intervention focuses on God, on who He is and on His presence and work in human life.  God reveals and God conceals.  He said, “whether God manifests Himself or hides Himself is not man’s prerogative.  It is Almighty God’s prerogative.”

    Norris said he believes this book relates to concerns about family, religious beliefs and economical conditions that many face today. He said although God has omnipotence, preeminence and ultimate leadership in this world, God is not coercive.  “God may periodically intervene in people’s lives and circumstances but He does so without forcing them to obey and follow His lead. When they follow God’s lead, they are following the lead of the one who knows the way and is the way,” Norris said.

    He goal is to impart to readers the knowledge and understanding that God is always present in their lives. Published by Xllibris, God’s Early Morning Intervention is available at Barnes and Noble.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    New picture book shares ‘Stories by Grandma’

    Patricia F. Crowley offers vibrantly illustrated tales for young readers, pet-lovers

    GRETNA, La. – Patricia F. Crowley wrote “Stories by Grandma”  for her grandson, who is now 7 years old, to tell him tales that recount their family’s happy times with their beloved pets. With its vibrant illustrations and engaging narrative, this picture provides young readers and pet lovers alike with an entertaining and educational experience centered on the adventures of affable animals.

    Scruffy is a Yorkipoo puppy, Freddie is a finch and Jack is a sorrel-colored horse. Crowley tells their story, as seen from a child’s perspective, showing readers the simple pleasures of life provided by pets and how each has its own personality, making its own unique mark in people’s lives. Crowley depicts the loving bond people form with their pets, the contributions they make to life’s quality and how a child can come to appreciate the presence of each of these creatures in his family.

    “At a time when children seem to be surrounded by negative influence, pet ownership provides children with an opportunity to be loving and caring and to experience unconditional love and devotion,” Crowley says.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    New book “Black Author Secrets: How I Make $2,500+ in Book Sales Every Month!” availiable now

    Nationwide — Award-winning entrepreneur Dante Lee has just published the first ever African American guide to selling more books, and in this unique step-by-step guide, he reveals all of his secrets on how authors can be more profitable and more successful.

    The book is entitled, Black Author Secrets: How I Make $2,500+ in Book Sales Every Month! and it’s exclusively available for just $2.99 via his publishing company at www.UrbanEbooks.com

    In this 108-page book, Lee, who himself sells an average of 100 books or more per day, teaches existing and aspiring authors everything they need to know to generate constant streams of revenue with their books. He shares his own personal knowledge, insight and experience!

    “I wrote this book,” Lee comments, “because I know that a lot of authors, especially African American authors, are having difficulty making money from their books. They spend a year or more writing, editing, and proofreading, and then after the book comes out, nothing happens!”

    He adds, “This book is the first book of it’s kind that shows African American authors exactly what they need to do to make at least $2,500 a month in book sales.”

    For more details about either book, visit www.UrbanEbooks.com

     
    Read more »
  • ,,,,,

    Jones announces financial lecture and book tour

    What happens when you are taught to RAISE YOUR FINANCIAL I.Q., LEARN TO BUDGET YOUR MONEY, GET RID OF DEBT AND BUILD WEALTH from a self-made millionaire? Well, Above Average Group is excited to announce that best-selling author and motivational speaker, Paul D. Jones will be hosting a financial seminar and book tour starting April 2, 2016 from 10am – 1pm at the Sheraton Metairie where he will be answering these questions and more while motivating and inspiring you to “INVEST IN YOUR MIND”.

    A recognized “wealth builder” in the financial world, Jones has helped over 500 entrepreneurs and businesses of all sizes optimize profits and experience exponential growth through increased customer loyalty. He’s the author of “Who Told You…You Were Broke?”, “Schedule for Success,” “What You and Your Kids Need to Know About Credit” and now announces his latest writing entitled, “I Quit” (Being Broke) in conjunction with his lecture tour, “Financial Literacy University”. This tour not only targets recent college graduates burdened by paralyzing student loan debt and wanting to start off their careers correctly after graduation, it also gives a plethora of useful investment information to those who would normally “splurge” or perhaps not know how to invest. In addition, the tour exhibits significant benefits for single parents and families who simply want to get out of debt and enjoy a peace of mind from excessive debt due to non-budgeting.

    Growing up just outside of Chicago and raised by a single mother who taught him the importance of giving back, Jones has taken that passion and applied it to his own career and uses it to empower others. Through this informative seminar and book tour, attendees will receive information on better managing their money, acquiring better spending habits, growing and budgeting their business and improving and building their credit. “I can’t stand a victim mentality”, Jones protest and because of his “take charge of your life” attitude, participants of the seminar will walk away with real world, pragmatic advise that they can implement immediately into their daily lives.

    The “Financial Literacy University” and “I Quit” seminar and book tour schedule is as follows:

    * New Orleans – April 2nd
    * Houston, TX – April 9th
    * Phoenix, AZ
    * Savannah, GA
    * Orlando, FL
    * Memphis, TN

    Registration is currently open for New Orleans and Houston areas. Other locations will be opening soon. For more information and to stay up-to-date on new cities added to the schedule, visit www.pauldjones.com.


    Available for Interviews
    Double XXposure Media| 201-224-6570 | N.J. Office/ Email: Theellerbeegroup@aol.com
    Atlanta – (678)439-9641/ Email: Foxmediaprinc@gmail.com

     
    Read more »
  • ,

    Author of ‘Blackballed’ headlines Dillard University President’s Lecture Series, Feb 23

    From fraternities to administrative halls, American universities are failing to address serious race problems. In his new book, Lawrence Ross tells us how, and he brings the message to Dillard University, Feb. 23, at 7pm in the Georges Auditorium.

    A close review of racism at American universities could hardly come at a better time. Since last fall’s protests at the University of Missouri (in response to a string of racist incidents) and at Yale University (in response to an administrative letter exchange about race-based Halloween costumes), colleges across the country are grappling with difficult questions of racial justice. Lawrence RossBlackballed: The Black and White Politics of Race on America’s Campuses enters this conversation-a necessary polemic, if somewhat narrow in its focus. Ross is less concerned with the historical racial factors that have shaped university culture than with the daily experiences of racism on campus. The book’s target is the old assumption that racism ended with the legal abolishment of slavery-the assumption that banning something (in this case, segregative admissions policies) does away with whatever belief systems enabled the banned behavior in the first place.

    Blackballed by Lawrence Ross

    Blackballed by Lawrence Ross

    As Ross chronicles, it doesn’t. In 1923-more than 50 years after Harvard University officially banned admissions discrimination and graduated its first black student-the university decreed that “men of the white and colored races shall not be compelled to live and eat together,”  effectively forcing Black students to seek off-campus housing in whatever towns would have them. Such are the burdens on students who are “let in,” but not welcomed. That distinction between the notion of an opportunity (technically, black students can attend a particular school) and its reality (social and institutional forces impede those students’ success) has persisted into the 21st century.

    Throughout his survey of anti-Black racism on campus, Ross riffs on a few recurring themes, drawing largely from interviews with Black students who attended college over the last 50 years. A favorite theme is to view the Greek system as a case study in institutional racism. (Ross’ breakout non-fiction book was The Divine Nine: The History of African American Fraternities and Sororities in 2001.)

    A Brief History of the Dillard Presidential Lecture Series

    Beginning with the university’s first official president, William Stuart Nelson in the 1930s, public intellectual discourse has been a part of Dillard’s heritage. In the 1950s, Albert Dent organized the Edwin R. Embree Memorial Lecture Series whose guests included Eleanor Roosevelt, Thurgood Marshall, Mary McLeod Bethune, Martin Luther King Jr., and Jackie Robinson. Subsequently, Dillard presidents have assembled lectures that reflected their sensibilities. During Samuel DuBois Cook’s tenure, 1974 to 1997, he established a lyceum series, but also built a fine arts center to provide a new venue for lectures, theater and music. Walter M. Kimbrough launched Brain Food in 2013, and has continued the tradition with speakers such as Iyanla Vanzant, Misty Copeland, Benjamin Crump and Michael Steele.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Between the Lines book store names ‘Best Books of 2015′

    Baton Rouge bookstore owner Kim Knight said Between the Lines bookstore is the headquarters for book and literary lovers. Located at 4242 Government Street, the store provides connections between authors, readers, book clubs, the community and the world through its online presence.

    Knight released a short list of the best six books of 2015.

    Children’s
    16 trombone shortyTrombone Shorty by Troy Andrews and illustrator Bryan Collier. Hailing from the Tremé neighborhood in New Orleans, Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews has created a lively picture book autobiography about how he followed his dream of becoming a musician, despite the odds, until he reached international stardom. Trombone Shorty is a celebration of the rich cultural history of New Orleans and the power of music.

    16 Remarkable Story of George Moses Horton PoetPoet: The Remarkable Story of George Moses Horton by author-illustrator Don Tate. In the nineteenth century, North Carolina slave George Moses Horton taught himself to read and earned money to purchase his time away from his master though not his freedom. Horton became the first African American to be published in the South, protesting slavery in the form of verse.

    Young Adult Fiction
    16 Gone Crazy in AlabamaGone Crazy in Alabama by Rita Williams Garcia. Bestselling author Rita Williams-Garcia tells the story of the Gaither sisters, who are about to learn what it’s like to be fish out of water as they travel from the streets of Brooklyn to the rural South for the summer of a lifetime. Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern are off to Alabama to visit their grandmother, Big Ma, and her mother, Ma Charles. As Delphine hears about her family history, she uncovers the surprising truth that’s been keeping the sisters apart. But when tragedy strikes, Delphine discovers that the bonds of family run deeper than she ever knew possible.

    16 all american boysAll American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely. In an unforgettable new novel from award-winning authors Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely, two teens—one Black, one White—grapple with the repercussions of a single violent act that leaves their school, their community, and, ultimately, the country bitterly divided by racial tension.

     

    Adult Fiction
    16 Forty AcresForty Acres by Dwayne Alexander Smith. A young Black attorney, Martin Grey, confronts issues of race and power as he uncovers a shocking conspiracy. He finds out that his glittering new friends are part of a secret society dedicated to the preservation of the institution of slavery—but this time around, the Black men are called “Master.” A novel of rage and compassion, good and evil, trust and betrayal, Forty Acres is the thought-provoking story of one man’s desperate attempt to escape the clutches of a terrifying new moral order.

    16 The Ultimate BetrayalThe Ultimate Betrayal by Kimberla Lawson Roby. It’s been four years since 28-year old Alicia Black, daughter of Reverend Curtis Black, divorced her second husband, the most womanizing and corrupt man she has ever known. Since then, Alicia has been dating her first husband, Phillip Sullivan, a wonderfully kind and true man of God whom she’d hurt terribly by cheating on him. Alicia has worked hard to prove herself worthy of his trust once more, and when he asks her to marry him again, she couldn’t be happier. But Levi Cunningham, the drug dealer Alicia had an extramarital affair with, has just been released from prison, and he has completely turned his life around for the better. Still head-over-heels in love with Alicia, he will do whatever is necessary to win her back. Remarrying Phillip is the one thing Alicia has wanted for years, but she can’t get Levi out of her mind.

    These books are available at Between the Lines Bookstore or online at https://betweenthelinesbookstore.mybooksandmore.com

    Read more »
  • ,

    Hammond Library brings Kwame Alexander for ‘Crossover’ booksigning, Dec. 29

    The Hammond Library,314 East Thomas St., will host a book signing and discussion Tuesday, Dec. 29., with Kwame Alexander, award-winning author of Crossover and He Said, She Said.
    He is author of 21 books who recently won the 2015 John Newberry Medal for the Most Distinguished Contribution to American Literature for Children.
    Alexander is the founder of Book-in-a-Day, a student-run publishing program that has created more than 3,000 student authors in 75 schools; and LEAP for Ghana, an international literacy project that builds libraries, trains teachers, and empowers children through literature.

    Read more »
  • ,

    N.O. native T. Geronimo Johnson wins Ernest Gaines Award

    Welcome to Braggsville by T. Geronimo Johnson has been selected as winner of the 2015 Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence.

    Ernest Gaines, a native of Louisiana’s Pointe Coupee Parish and a literary legend, is a 2013 recipient of the National Medal of Arts, a recipient of the MacArthur Foundation’s Genius Grant, a recipient of the National Humanities Medal and a member of the French Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. Last year marked the 40th anniversary of publication of his critically acclaimed novel “The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman,” which was adapted into a made-for-TV movie that won nine Emmy awards. His novel “A Lesson Before Dying” published in 1993 won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction.

    Now in its ninth year, the Gaines Award is a nationally acclaimed $10,000 prize created by donors of the Baton Rouge Area Foundation. The award recognizes outstanding work from rising African-American fiction writers while honoring Gaines’ extraordinary contribution to the literary world.

    Welcome to Braggsville by New Orleans native T. Geronimo Johnson

    Welcome to Braggsville by New Orleans native T. Geronimo Johnson

    Johnson is a New Orleans native who lives in Berkeley, California, and serves as visiting professor at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. He earned a master’s degree in fine arts from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a master’s in language, literacy and culture from the University of California, Berkeley. He previously held the Stegner Fellowship at Stanford University and the Iowa Arts Fellowship at the University of Iowa. His fiction and poetry has appeared in Best New American VoicesIndiana ReviewLA Review, and Illuminations, among others.

    In addition, Johnson has taught writing at Arizona State University, the University of Iowa, UC Berkeley, Western Michigan University and Stanford. His first novel, Hold it ’til it Hurts, was a finalist for the 2013 PEN/Faulkner Award for fiction.

    Welcome to Braggsville offers a socially provocative and dark comedy about four UC Berkeley students who stage a protest during a Civil War reenactment in rural Georgia. In his review, Los Angeles Times book critic David L. Ulin said Johnson is “a terrific storyteller, and he moves fluidly from past to present, place to place. In the end, no one is right and everyone is – or perhaps it’s the other way around.” The book has been called a social satire that follows the Berkeley students into disaster. “It’s an ambitious book about race that wants to say something big about America,” writes NPR.

     

    Angela Flournoy, author of The Turner House

    Angela Flournoy, author of The Turner House

    Due to the exceptional quality of this year’s entries, Gaines Award judges short-listed two books – The Sellout by Paul Beatty and The Turner House by Angela Flournoy.

    The national panel of judges for the 2015 Gaines Award are: Thomas Beller, award-winning author and journalist; Anthony Grooms, a critically acclaimed author and creative writing professor at Kennesaw State University; renowned author Elizabeth Nunez, professor of English at Hunter College-City University of New York; Francine Prose, author of more than 20 books, including “Blue Angel,” a nominee for the 2000 National Book Award; and Patricia Towers, former features editor for O, The Oprah Magazine and a founding editor of Vanity Fair magazine.

     

     

     

    Paul Beatty, author of The Sellout.

    Paul Beatty, author of The Sellout.

    Award ceremonies take place at 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 21 at the Manship Theatre in downtown Baton Rouge. Johnson will read excerpts from his winning novel. The ceremony is free and open to the public, although reservations are requested at rsvp@braf.org.

    About BRAF

    The Baton Rouge Area Foundation is one of the Gulf Coast region’s largest community foundations. Winner of the Association of Fundraising Professionals’ 2011 Award for Outstanding Foundation, BRAF connects donors to projects and nonprofit groups, along with investing in and managing community projects. For more information, visit BRAF.org.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Instructor launches book on managing diabetes

    The Sims Memorial Library at Southeastern Louisiana University will host a book talk and signing featuring SELU sociology instructor Rebecca Hensley to introduce her new book, Your Life Isn’t Over ~ It May Have Just Begun! A Mini-Manual on Managing Diabetes, Tuesday, Nov. 10, in Room 313 at 5:30pm.
    “This is the book of tips, hints, and inside information that I wanted – and needed – when I was diagnosed with diabetes myself in 2008, but it didn’t exist,” said Hensley. “After years of hearing doctors say that most of their diabetic patients struggle with managing their condition, I decided that maybe I could inspire others by sharing how I manage diabetes while living a high quality life.”
    Library director Eric Johnson said the event also recognizes November as National Diabetes Awareness Month.
    The American Diabetes Association estimates that there are more than 21 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States and another 4,500 being diagnosed every day. Hensley said she remembers feeling overwhelmed when she was first diagnosed. “A lot of the materials I received early on were either too scientific, very complicated, or pretty boring,” she said with a laugh. “Some of the things I most needed to know to succeed I had to figure out on my own.”
    “My book is intended to help other people with diabetes get over the hump of fear and depression they may be dealing with. I’m not suffering,” she said. “In fact, I’m healthier, more fit, and even happier than I would have been had I not developed this disease that has helped me do the things everybody actually ought to do but doesn’t. And I eat chocolate every day.”
    The book talk is open to the public and free of charge. Light diabetic-appropriate refreshments will be served.

    Read more »
  • ,

    ‘God is the goodest’: Port Allen native releases lighthearted book about Jesus

    One thing 29-year-old Keion Jackson is pretty sure of is that God has a sense of humor. His newly-released book “Because Jesus” was written to show just that.

    “Often when faith is discussed, we forget that joy is a part of God’s personality.  Laughter is one of the greatest gifts he’s given us,” Jackson said. “I wanted to write this book to inspire people in a fun, new way that explores the humorous and lighthearted parts of faith.”

    And even though this Port Allen, La. native is in Kansas City where he’s undoubtedly missing Louisiana staples such as boudin, étouffée and crawfish boils, Jackson is making his mark in the industry as an accomplished writer and author, having published several children’s books.

    “Because Jesus” is filled with small, funny reminders that God’s love is all around. Jackson, who writes for Hallmark, uses simple things most people come into contact with on a daily basis- such weather,

    image

    technology and even food- to show that.

    “He did not come to condemn. One of the many ways God is not like the comment section on YouTube,” one page of the book says.

    “‘Don’t worry- I got this” is pretty much the essence of the whole gospel,” another page reads.

    Jackson’s favorite part of the book, which has received positive reviews, is its accessibility. The playful phrases, colors and imagery on each page make “Because Jesus” a page-turner and instant favorite.

    “I’m not a pastor. I’m not a bishop. I’m not even a deacon. I’m just a regular dude who’s been touched by the love of Christ,” Jackson said.  “It’s cool that I get to share the faith from that point of view. I’m trying to live this thing out according to The Word, and it’s not always easy.”

    “But this book gives me the chance to talk about God’s love and forgiveness in a fun, lighthearted, down-to-Earth kind of way.  That’s really exciting to me,” he added.

    “Because Jesus,” available on Hallmark.com, is the first installment of Jackson’s faith-based collection that will be released in Hallmark Gold Crown stores and online in 2016. The collection will feature items such as mugs, plaques and journals.

    Jackson doesn’t have any inspirational quotes or mottos that he lives by, but simply a Bible verse: Romans 8:28.

    “It’s a reminder that God is working on situations in our lives, even when we can’t see it.  He’s got an eternal viewpoint,” he said. “He’s looking down on us from forever, with a perspective we can’t see from the middle of our situation. This verse is a reminder that—no matter what—things will eventually get back to good.”

    He says that due to social media usage, today’s young people have a strong grasp on the value of individual voice and understand that their perspectives matter. He hopes his work can inspire those wanting to follow in his footsteps.

    “Believing your voice is worthy of being heard is a big part of being a writer.  But it’s not enough.  Young writers must pair that with education.  Learn the craft.  Learn structure.  Learn literary devices,” he said.

    Jackson is Clark Atlanta University graduate who enjoys filmmaking, volunteering and watching TV in his spare time. Fans can expect more books from him in the near future. If he gets his way, some of them will be about his home state and the teenage condition- always with extra doses of humor and optimism.

    “Life is interesting; there’s a story everywhere you look,” Jackson said.

    By Anastasia Semien
    Jozef Syndicate

    Read more »
  • ,

    Set in Louisiana, ‘Sugar’ is a vivid read for youth

    In Jewel Parker Rhodes’ novel, Sugar, 10-year-old Sugar is adventurous and brave. In this book, you go through her expeditions and the ups and down. Even having a forbidden friend, Billy (the white plantation owner’s son), Sugar is careful about what she does. When Billy tells her about the China men who were coming to River Road Plantation to work with them, she becomes more curious about the world. When they arrive, she goes over to their sacks to greet them and share stories from their country. Having her mother die and her best friend move north, Sugar is accepted into the Beals’ family and becomes friends with the Chinese family. When the plantation owner Mr. Wills fired the overseer he got revenge and burned the mill. Mr. Wills had no choice but to sell River Road. The big lessons of Ms. Parker Rhodes’ book, Sugar, is too never be afraid to overcome every obstacle and to allow nothing to interfere with your friendship, not even race.BuytheBook

    This book review submitted by a Glen Oaks Park Elementary student. To send your review, email news@thedrumnewspaper.info

    Read more »
  • Men We Reaped: A Memoir

    Men We Reaped by Jesmyn Ward leaves the reader spinning through their own convictions and deeper insights of the prevailing difficulties men (Black and in unequal situations) are forced to live…..and ultimately die in. Ward presents a very intimate recollection of the men in her life–so common among us all–but at the time of their deaths. We readers are pulled into an inner diatribe against society’s unequal treatment of these men. We are angered by these men whose lives we’ve reaped. And we are convicted by Ward showing this constant battle of man vs. poverty where man is again defeated. BuytheBookref=sr_1_1

    Ward is a former Stegner fellow at Stanford and Grisham Writer-in-Residence at the University of Mississippi. Her novels, Where the Line Bleeds and Salvage the Bones, are both set on the Mississippi coast where she grew up. Bloomsbury will publish her memoir about an epidemic of deaths of young black men in her community. She is an assistant professor at the University of South Alabama.

    Read more »
  • ‘Be Inspired’ reveals Beauchamp’s struggles

    In his first book, Be Inspired: My Struggle for Justice and Equality Inspired by the Death of Emmett Louis Till, documentary filmmaker and Baton Rouge native Keith Beauchamp reveals intimate details of his day-to-day  struggles to uncover the truth about  Emmett Till’s 1955 murder. 

    Unlike his documentary, Be Inspired reads like a diary log of Beauchamp’s victories and challenges to tell the story of Till’s decades-old cold case.

    Since the documentary’s release and the reopening of the Till case, Beauchamp has traveled extensively around the country, speaking and lecturing about his journey to tell the stories of Emmett Till and others.

    His film and television work have become great educational tools, and the completion of this book–Be Inspired–adds value to the anals of Black history and civil rights justice. BuytheBook.

    Read more »
  • ,

    LSU offers middle, high school students chance at cash, lunch with favorite author

    LSU’s Young Adult Literature Contest to Host Student Essay Contest

    LSU is offering area middle- and high-school students an opportunity to meet one of their favorite authors through the Young Adult Literature Conference & Seminar, happening May 31-June 5.

    Students may enter a writing contest, with a grand prize of $75 dollars, and a chance to have lunch with one of the five authors in attendance.

    Young adult authors Jacqueline Woodson, Sharon Draper, Kwame Alexander, Coe Booth and Sharon Flake will all be on campus as featured speakers at the conference, and have volunteered their time for this contest. Interested students should write a short essay on who their favorite author is and why. Entries may be submitted at chseproed@lsu.edu by May 15, with a winner to be announced on May 20.

    Kwame Alexander, author of The Crossover

    Kwame Alexander, author of The Crossover

    Sharon Draper, author of Out of My Mind

    Sharon Draper, author of Out of My Mind

    The Young Adult Literature Conference & Seminar theme, titled, “African-American Cultures in Young Adult Literature,” will provide attendees with unprecedented access to some of the nation’s most celebrated African-American authors. The conference will give participants unprecedented access to prestigious authors and academics in the field of young adult literature. School teachers, principals, curriculum specialists and librarians will all have the opportunity to explore the process of incorporating young adult literature into their classrooms and libraries while earning 30 continuing education credits. University and college professors who teach and/or study young adult literature can network, share ideas and brainstorm new curriculum approaches with other academics and professionals in K-12 settings.

    For more information on the conference, or to register, visit http://chse.lsu.edu/yalit.

    Read more »
  • When the going gets tough, the tough know to seek the right support

    In life, having a game plan can help you identify goals and be successful in your efforts. But unfortunately, such plans are never foolproof. From serious illness to serious romantic upset, there are limitless unforeseen circumstances that can set you back.

    “Finding support when life gets challenging is a helpful way to cope,” said Max Lucado, a leading inspirational author, named “America’s Pastor,” by Reader’s Digest.

    Lucado’s latest book, Miracle at the Higher Grounds Café, follows the story of a newly single mother after a very public break up. She takes over an old coffee shop in dire need of reinvention. After a visit from a curious stranger, the failing café suddenly becomes the go-to place for people in search of answers to life’s biggest questions, as its Internet connection links directly to God.

    While not everyone will experience divine intervention when the going gets tough, support can take on many forms. Lucado, well-known for his encouraging words, offers a few insights:

    Make a plan.  Hard times are a “petri dish for brainless decisions,” said Lucado. “To do nothing is the wrong thing. To do something is the right thing.” Keep it simple, but decide what would be most helpful in your situation, and pursue it.

    Join a congregation: If you aren’t already affiliated with a religious community, consider joining one. A priest, rabbi or minister can be a great resource for advice, and fellow congregants offer a built-in social circle and support network. If that’s not for you, a community center often offers many of the same benefits and programming.

    Spend time with loved ones: Time with family and friends can be a great reminder that you are loved. Take time each week to be around the people who uplift your spirit.  They can offer advice and insights into your particular situation and remind you that you are not alone.

    Be honest about the help you need: It can be hard to swallow your pride at times, but often, assistance is the only way to land on your feet. Whether you need financial aid, help with babysitting or advice, don’t be afraid to ask.

    When the going gets tough, the tough know to seek the right support.

    By StatePoint

    Read more »
  • Children’s book ‘Bonyo Bonyo’ expands mission

    Bonyo Bonyo is such a brave and loving story that transcends cultures. When the death of a young sister sparks the desire in her older brother to become a doctor because of the lack of health care in the country, a Kenyan family unknowingly becomes bonded to society and the readers are taken on the journey captured in this 42-page children’s book.  Bonyo faces financial challenges that limits him from continuing school until his father sells the family radio and sends Bonyo to study medicine in the United States of America.bonyo bonyo

    The young, brilliant Bonyo carries a personal conviction to become a doctor for his country but after graduating he begins a stronger commitment to the country by sending on doctor every year to care for the people in Africa. His determination pays off and he is able to impact society. This true story based on the life of Dr. Bonyo Bonyo gives the clear message that we are all impacted by life and death but the dreams and determination of one another can improve society and our personal lives.  This message was reinforced after discovering that net proceeds from book sales would go to the Bonyo’s Kenya Mission in Ohio.

    Bonyo Bonyo: The True Story of a Brave Boy from Kenya is written by Vanita Oelschlager and illustrated by Kristin Blackwood and Mike Blanc. The book is available online at www.http://vanitabooks.com/

    Read more »
  • ,

    Applications open for Ernest J. Gaines Summer Teaching Institute

    The Ernest J. Gaines Center at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, in conjunction with the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, is hosting the Second Annual Ernest J. Gaines Summer Teaching Institute June 8-June 12, 2015 for educators who would like to learn more about Ernest Gaines’ writings and how to incorporate the writings into their classrooms. The deadline to apply for the Second Annual Ernest J. Gaines Summer Teaching Institute is March 18, 2015. The institute will be limited to 10 participants, and each participant will receive a $200 stipend and a certificate showing their participation for professional development purposes. To apply, complete the application form below. Participants will be notified by April 15, 2015 on the status of their status. Applicants must provide the following information.

    Texts:
    Bloodline
    The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman
    A Gathering of Old Men
    A Lesson before Dying

    Activities:
    Round table discussion
    Examination of archival materials
    Lectures from Ernest J. Gaines scholars Dr. Marcia Gaudet and Dr. Darrell Bourque
    Creation of pedagogical materials

    For more information, visit the Ernest J. Gaines Center’s blog or contact Dr. Matthew Teutsch at (337)-482-1848 or at gainescenter@louisiana.edu.

    The deadline to apply is March 18. For more information, visit http://ernestgaines.louisiana.edu/node/44

    Read more »
  • Mitchell S. Jackson wins Ernest Gaines award

    THE BATON ROUGE AREA Foundation has named Mitchell S. Jackson winner of the 2014 Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence for his novel The Residue Years.

    Now in its eighth year, the Gaines Award is a nationally acclaimed, $10,000 annual prize created by foundation donors to honor outstanding work from rising Black fiction writers while honoring Louisiana native Ernest Gaines’ extraordinary contribution to the literary world. The Residue Years, published in 2013 by Bloomsbury Books, is a semi-autobiographical novel based on Jackson’s experience growing up in Portland, Ore., in a neighborhood ravaged by violence and drug use. The novel follows a former addict trying to steer her three sons away from drugs.

    Mitchell S. Jackson earned a master’s degree in writing from Portland State University and a master’s in creative writing from New York University, where he now teaches. He also earned fellowships from the Lannan Foundation, the Urban Artists Initiative and The Center for Fiction.His previous honors include the Hurston Wright Foundation award for college writers.In 2012, he published the e-book “Oversoul: Stories and Essays.”

    Previous winners of the Ernest J. Gaines award include Attica Locke for “The Cutting Season”, Stephanie Powell Watts for “We Are Taking Only What We Need” and Dinaw Mengestu for How to Read the Air.

    Gaines is a native of Pointe Coupee Parish, La. and became a literary legend and infl uential American author. 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of publication of his first novel, Catherine Carmier and the 40th anniversary of the adaptation of his critically acclaimed novel,The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, into a madefor-TV movie in 1974 that won nine Emmy awards. Gaines novel, A Lesson Before Dying, published in 1993, won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction.

    Read more »
  • Let It Shine, a must for young readers

    “Let It Shine: Stories of Black Women” is a wonderfully written, challenging collection of biographies masterfully illustrated for middle grade or advanced lower grade readers. Each story tells about a dynamic woman who was instrumental in gaining freedom from slavery, Jim Crow, segregation, or sexism. From the most recognizable women like Sojourner Truth to the more obscure Freedom Fighters like Biddy Mason, this book presents in detail the challenges and successes of ten women. Andrea Davis Pickney again delivers a great read with clarity and a hefty dose of pride. BuytheBook.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Silhouette of a Southern Cook

    New Orleans native, Tonya Jacob-Haggerty, shares her 30 years experience as a cook and her observations on relationships in her new 136-pg full color cookbook, “Silhouette of a Southern Cook: How Cooking Relates to Relationships.” This book is full mouthwatering southern dishes like, delightful Shrimp Cakes with creamy Remoulade sauce, New Orleans Authentic Dirty Rice, Jambalaya, delicious Crawfish Bisque, delectable Crab Corn Chowder,  and Award Winning Bread Pudding with Pecan Rum sauce and other lip-smacking southern recipes. Find out why it’s so important to prep your food before cooking and prep yourself before entering in a relationship.

    Read more »
  • ,

    SU’s great alumni speak out in new book

    Baton Rouge business coach and Southern University alumnus Howard White brings together 45 of Southern University’s great alumni who share ‘Lessons of Love and Life Learned on the Bluff’ in the newly released book Southern Greats: Lessons of Love and Life Learned on the Bluff .

    White, who is a John Maxwell-certified business coach, spent the past four years and traveled some 30,000-plus miles for interviews to complete this book, this story, this start.

    “No matter how often I put Southern Greats down, I was pulled back into the purpose of teaching, inspiring, motivating, and empowering readers with these stories from highly accomplished Southern University and A&M College graduates, who I call ‘Southern Greats’…They all share a great love for life, measurable success, a passion for their purpose, and a greater love for Southern University,” White said.

    He is the author of TOP Secrets to Create A TOP Performing Business and owner of Top Choice, one of the nation’s leading vendors of Southern University memorabilia located in Baton Rouge.

    Southern Greats: Lessons of Love and Life Learned on the Bluff is available in print and e-book through bookstores nationwide and online at www.southerngreats.com. Academic and bulk discounts are available in the Top Choice Products, 1492 Harding Blvd., Baton Rouge.

    Read more »
  • Broussard receives book award

    JINX BROUSSARD’s African American Foreign Correspondents: A History, received the History Division Book Award from the Association For Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. Broussard teaches media history and public relations in the Manship School of Mass Communication at LSU. The Vacherie native is the William B. Dickinson Professorship in Journalism at LSU. Broussard traces the history of Black participation in international newsgathering, starting in the mid-1800s with Frederick Douglass and Mary Ann Shadd Cary – the first Black woman to edit a North American newspaper. Broussard’s work provides insight into how and why African Americans reported the experiences of Blacks worldwide.

    According to African American Foreign Correspondents: A History, Black correspondents upheld a tradition of filing objective stories on world events, yet some Black journalists in the mainstream media, like their predecessors in the Black press, had a different mission and perspective. They adhered primarily to a civil rights agenda, grounded in advocacy, protest and pride. Accordingly, some of these correspondents – not all of them professional journalists – worked to spur social reform in the United States and force policy changes that would eliminate oppression globally.

    By examining how and why Blacks reported information and perspectives from abroad, African American Foreign Correspondents: A History contributes to a broader conversation about navigating racial, societal, and global problems, many of which we continue to contend with today. Broussard conducts research on the black press and is the author of Giving a Voice to the Voiceless: Four Pioneering Black Women Journalists.

     

    Read more »
  • Finding Freedom: Memorializing the Voices of Freedom

    Finding Freedom: Memorializing the Voices of Freedom Summer by Jacqueline Johnson (ISBN 1881163520) provides detailed information about the Freedom Summer.

    Monument on the campus of Western College at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

    The monument, dedicated in 2000, commemorates Western’s role in Freedom Summer 1964 and memorializes James Chaney, Michael Schwerner, and Andrew Goodman.

    They were the Freedom Summer trainees murdered in Mississippi, whose deaths brought national and world attention on the continuing existence of segregation and violent racism in the United States during the 1960s.

    Finding Freedom: Memorializing the Voices of Freedom Summer contains essays from participants in the 1964 training sessions, including essays by Oxford residents who supported the Friends of the Mississippi Project; monument architect Robert Keller; a poem by Miami University alumna Rita Dove; and period pho- tographs by photographer George Hoxie. Filmmaker and Baton Rouge native Keith Beauchamp contrib- utes the preface.

    BY KARLY M. BROWN

    Contributing writer 

    Read more »
  • Williams-Garcia, Mosley great picks for summer reading

     

    THIS SUMMER YOU CAN Relax and go on an adventure at the same time with two books that are sure to knock your sandals off with their fun filled adventures.So kick back those bare summer feet, unwind and prepare to go on a journey with some fascinating fictional characters as they quest throughout the great unknown.

    One Crazy Summer

    By Rita Williams-Garcia 11-year-old Delphine has taken on the role of mother to her two younger sisters after their mother, Cecile abandons the family. You’ll take part of a crazy journey across country with Delphine, her sisters, the Black Panthers, and Cecile. Delphine learns a valuable lesson one crazy summer that will stick with her for life.

    Fearless Jones                                                                                                                                                                                                                   By Walter Mosley Paris Minton was a bookstore owner with no enemies and living a worry-free life. But that

    fearless jonesall changed when Elana Love walked into his store. Elana dragged Paris into something he had never been in before. His house was burned down, he was beat up, and shot at and all because of Elana. So what do you do when your back is against the wall and you have no idea where to go and who to trust? You get Fearless Jones, the happiest and the scariest man alive to help you out of this mess. Come with Paris, Elana, and Fearless on a ride that they will never forget and that will forever change Paris’ life.

     BY KARLY M. BROWN

    Contributing writer

    Read more »
  • Consequences

    Here’s look at the books written by Baton Rouge natives that have landed on THE DRUM staff’s bookshelf. These books are available in major bookstores and online.

    The story of four women trying to balance social lives, work, and careers, but when men enter the picture and influence the decisions they make, they must deal with the consequences. Consequences was written by Calandra “StaXX” Brown.

    Read more »
  • For Winners Only

    Here’s look at the books written by Baton Rouge natives that have landed on THE DRUM staff’s bookshelf. These books are available in major bookstores and online.

    By Marvin Anderson
    Published by Insight Publishing Group. For Winners Only is  21-day journey to guide the reader to discover the winner within.

    Read more »
  • Louisiana Divas

    By Cosha Hayes, Shawanga Hall, and Alicia Hardy
    Published by Branue Productions, three Louisiana women come together to tell their stories ranging from over-coming postpartum depression to understanding your gifts, to give readers the true definition of what being a Louisiana Diva really means. For more information click here

    Read more »
  • Money Cometh: To the Body of Christ

    This book is a building block for individuals going through financial struggles. Author Leroy Thompson focuses on ‘calling out’ your harvest. Money Cometh: To the Body of Christ seeks to help the reader speak his/her fi nancial breakthrough into existence.

    It guides the reader to demand receipt of increases in his/ her ministries and family finances. This title provides the lesson of faith and proclamation – in order for you to see a miracle take place in your business, you must have faith and proclaim your financial increase.

    ONLINE:pastorran.blog.com

     

    Read more »
  • Singletary’s book help readers to keep financial resolutions

    The 21-Day Financial Fast: Your path to Financial Peace and Freedom

    This 242-page book, written by nationally syndicated financial columnist Michelle Singletary, introduces the idea of financial fasting. It encourages the reader to break the bad habit of carelessly spending through a 21-day fast.

    Singletary writes ways to help the reader put away all credit cards shopping to a halt. And it doesn’t just address individuals who live paycheck-to- paycheck; it also targets people with high incomes and bad spending habits.

    Financial Fast can be used as a lifeguard to help decrease debt by teaching the reader to limit spending to necessity and minimize desired purchases.

     

     
    Read more »
  • Milliken’s Bend: A Civil War Battle in History and Memory

    Milliken’s Bend: A Civil War Battle in History and Memory, by Linda Barnickel, won the A. M. Pate Jr. Award in Civil War History this month. “Milliken’s Bend,” published by LSU Press in April 2013, is a compelling and comprehensive account of the battle of Milliken’s Bend, La., at which a Union force composed predominantly of former slaves met their Confederate adversaries in one of the bloodiest engagements of the war. Though the fight received some widespread attention initially, it soon drifted into obscurity. Barnickel’s exhaustive research has uncovered the story of this long-forgotten battle, whose controversial aftermath led to a Congressional investigation and the suspension of prisoner exchanges between North and South. Barnickel’s book illuminates not only the immense complexity of the events that transpired in northeastern Louisiana during the Vicksburg Campaign but also the implications of Milliken’s Bend upon the war as a whole. The battle contributed to Southerners’ increasing fears of slave insurrection and heightened their anxieties about emancipation. In the North, it helped foster a commitment to allow free Blacks and former slaves to take part in the war to end slavery. And for Blacks, both free and enslaved, Milliken’s Bend symbolized their never-ending struggle for freedom.

    ONLINE: lindabarnickel.com

    Read more »
  • Resolved to be a better parent? Try these books

    Here are four great read to help strengthen, encourage, and inspire and help parents or guardians with their New Year’s resolutions to be a better parent. These authors break down parental issues and challenges using spiritual, educational, and scientific guidelines to help caregivers become better parents. Three of these authors are Louisiana- natives whose books will empower any parent.

    Kamali Academy’s AfriKan Centered Grammar Book

    Geared toward teaching and educating children on grammar basics, New Orleans native Samori Camara, Ph.D.’s,Kamali Academy’s Afrikan Centered Grammar Book presents grammar rules from subject-verb agreement to proper nouns and correct sentence structure for parents to advance their children’s learning.

    Resolved to be a better parent? Try these books
    The book is described as “Afrikan-centered” because it teaches Afrikanvalues throughout the writing exercises. Camara is a professor of history at Dillard University and also the founder at KamaliAcademy.

    Kamali Academy’s Afrikan Centered Grammar Book is a great curriculum for parents who homeschool elementary and middle school children. Camara provides online history classes on the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements and Afrikan Literature.

    The Parent Anointing

    Baton Rouge counselor Barbara Green’s The Parent Anointing is now on its second printing. The book delivers impactful Bible- based principles  to help parents become spiritually empowered, whether they have or have not given birth.

    Green pulls from her decades of experience as a certied counsellor, marriage therapist, and evangelist to bring insight and purpose to God’s “calling” of parenting.

     

    buythebook sandra semien

    It’s All in His Hands

    It’s All in His Hands ,by Shreveport native, Sandra Semien is a memoir of her life as a mother and champion of an intellectually disabled son (before suchlabels were given). The registered nurse is now also a parent advocate teaching and inspiring mothers who are raising children with learning disabilities and struggling with education programs and schools. To her readers, Semien writes: “I was delighted when God shared with me and now with you that,” ‘Even though you may not think of having the perfect child I thought of you as the perfect parent to love them to perfection’.”

     

    BuyTheBook Raising Black Boys

     

    Raising Black Boys

    Jawanza Kunjufu of Chicago has pulled together information on the Black male community and how Black boys are treated in the homes and throughout society. By showing his true passion towards reconstructing the mentalities and future of men, Kunjufu presents statistics and facts on the declining percentage of Black male success rates and how parents can redirect the trend.

    Raising Black Boys has the goal of helping parents eliminate some of the early problems that Black male youth are faced by showing the impact of specific goals, words spoken, and trends on rearing Black boys.

    .

     

    By Crystal Brown
    The Drum Contributing Writer 

     

     

     

    Read more »
  • Resolved to be a better parent? Try these books

    HERE ARE FOUR GREAT READS TO HELP strengthen, encourage, and inspire and help parents or guardians with their New Year’s resolutions to be a better parent. These authors break down parental issues and challenges using spiritual, educational, and scientific guidelines to help caregivers become better parents. Three of these authors are Louisiana- natives whose books will empower any parent.

    Kamali Academy’s AfriKan Centered Grammar Book

    Geared toward teaching and educating children on grammar basics, New Orleans native Samori Camara, Ph.D.’s, Kamali Academy’s Afrikan Centered Grammar Book presents grammar rules from subject-verb agreement to proper nouns and correct sentence structure for parents to advance their children’s learning.
    The book is described as “Afrikan-centered” because it teaches Afrikanvalues throughout the writing exercises. Camara is a professor of history at Dillard University and also the founder at KamaliAcademy.

    Kamali Academy’s Afrikan Centered Grammar Book is a great curriculum for parents who homeschool elementary and middle school children. Camara provides online history classes on the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements and Afrikan Literature.

    The Parent Anointing

    Baton Rouge counselor Barbara Green’s The Parent Anointing is now on its second printing. The book delivers impactful Bible- based principles  to help parents become spiritually empowered, whether they have or have not given birth.

    Green pulls from her decades of experience as a certied counsellor, marriage therapist, and evangelist to bring insight and purpose to God’s “calling” of parenting.

     

    buythebook sandra semien

    It’s All in His Hands

    It’s All in His Hands ,by Shreveport native, Sandra Semien is a memoir of her life as a mother and champion of an intellectually disabled son (before such labels were given). The registered nurse is now also a parent advocate teaching and inspiring mothers who are raising children with learning disabilities and struggling with education programs and schools. To her readers, Semien writes: “I was delighted when God shared with me and now with you that,” ‘Even though you may not think of having the perfect child I thought of you as the perfect parent to love them to perfection’.”

     

    BuyTheBook Raising Black Boys

     

    Raising Black Boys

    Jawanza Kunjufu of Chicago has pulled together information on the Black male community and how Black boys are treated in the homes and throughout society. By showing his true passion towards reconstructing the mentalities and future of men, Kunjufu presents statistics and facts on the declining percentage of Black male success rates and how parents can redirect the trend.

    Raising Black Boys has the goal of helping parents eliminate some of the early problems that Black male youth are faced by showing the impact of specific goals, words spoken, and trends on rearing Black boys.

    .

     

     By Crystal Brown
    The Drum Contributing Writer

     

     

     

    Read more »
  • Understanding Your Calling by Ginger London

    Under Standing Your Calling is Baton Rouge minister Ginger London’s study manual that teaches Christians how to easily discern and understand the call of God on their lives through discovering, developing and delivering their greatest potential in ministry service. London shares with readers how to break through the self-imposed barriers that keeps them either running from the call or stuck at a certain point. They will learn how to increase their God confidence, set goals to fulfill their calling and how to reach the masses with their message.

     

    London is the host of The Ginger London Ministries Show on Blog Talk Radio and publisher of the monthly “Heart to Heart” Newsletter, which provides articles to help in spiritual growth, relationships, and work success. Under Standing Your Calling and other inspirational materials, written by London, can be found at gingerlondon.com.

    Read more »
  • ,

    State library celebrates Black history with Kim Marie Vaz

    In celebration of Black History Month, the Louisiana Center for the Book in the State Library of Louisiana is hosting author Kim Marie Vaz for a discussion of The ‘Baby Dolls’: Breaking the Race and Gender Barriers of the New Orleans Mardi Gras Tradition. The presentation will take place at noon on Feb. 6 at the State Library Seminar Center.

    Vaz’s book is a history of the Million Dollar Baby Dolls, one of the first women’s organizations to participate in Mardi Gras, and its post-Hurricane Katrina comeback. The ‘Baby Dolls’ traces the tradition as it spread to different New Orleans neighborhoods and empowered women.

    The book uncovers the fascinating history of the women who wore baby doll costumes—short satin dresses, bonnets and stockings with garters—and their bold behavior during their journeys into the predominantly male Mardi Gras celebration.

    Vaz will share photographs from different time periods to highlight how the practice changed over time. The photos, along with short video clips, bring to life the spirit of fun and play that constitute the practice of masking.

    The ‘Baby Dolls’ served as the basis for a major installation on the Baby Doll tradition at The Presbytere as part of the permanent Carnival exhibit.

    Vaz is associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and education professor at Xavier University. Her research focuses on art as a response to social trauma.

    Registration is not required for this free event. Attendees are invited to bring brown bag lunches.

     

    Read more »
  • The Real Peoples Guide to the HCG Diet

    BATON ROUGE-Tackling head-on the myths and struggles surrounding the controversial HCG Diet, weight loss experts Patty Christopher and Geno Gambino of Baton Rouge have released their new book, The Real People’s Guide to the HCG Diet¸ revealing everyday techniques-mixed with humor and recipes.

    “Patty and Geno saved my life!” said Denise Taggart, who has Hashimoto’s disease and could not lose weight on any other program. She is one of more than 30 personal testimonies shared in the book from clients that have become the authors’ friends-who have all experienced great results on HCG.

    HCG (Human Chorionic Gonadotrophin) was discovered by Dr. ATW Simeons as a “cure” for obesity in the 1940s in Europe. Available in America in recent years it has become a very popular and effective weight loss solution. When taken with certain foods (outlined in the book), the HCG triggers the body to lose fat quickly: about a pound a day.

    “In the book and in our videos, we have stories from people who have lost 48 pounds in 50 days, and now they have their friends and family changing their lives too with the HCG Diet,” says Patty, a former middle school teacher. “The names in the book have not been changed; they want you to know who they are. Our clients love us because we are not some sales people, we have lived the program too and understand the challenges of making it through one more day on a diet with chocolate staring at you.”

    The Real People’s Guide to the HCG Diet is an escort through the 50-day HCG protocol and includes testimonies, recipes, food list, and instructions for taking HCG-mixed with humor. The book is a spinoff from a series of e-newsletters Patty and Geno sends to their clients at Waist Away Weight Loss Center to provide daily support and understanding.

    These are real people, real stories, and real lives-right here in Louisiana.

    The Real People’s Guide (ISBN 978-0-9859880-2-9) is available at http://www.waistawayllc.com and on Amazon.comas a paperback and ebook. At the request of clients, the authors will soon release a 25-day version of The Real People’s Guide.

    About the Authors
    Patty is a former middle school teacher who weighed 300 pounds when she met Geno, a native of New Orleans who grew up in a family-owned restaurant which kept him morbidly obese. The pair met in Vegas and after some time together began seeking drastic weight loss options including lap band surgery. Then, they found HCG! Owners of Waist Away Weight Loss Center in Baton Rouge, Patty and Geno have lost more than 180 pounds on the HCG Diet and have helped hundreds of others accomplish the same. They are sought-after local HCG experts at health fairs and wellness workshops. They and their center have appeared on ABC-affiliate WBRZ Channel 2 “HealthLine with Phil Rainer” and “America Now”.

    Read more »
  • Second Chances

    Second Chances- LaSundra Pitts

    Amite, LA-native LaSundra Pitts’ first novel Second Chances is a fast-paced story perfect for casual, light summer reading while on vacation. Categorized as Christian fiction, Second Chances where the stories of four characters blend with forgiveness, loneliness, and redemption between families and unlikely lovers. BuytheBook.

    Online: www.lasundrapitts.com

     

    Read more »
  • Juneteenth

    Juneteenth-Ralph Ellison

    Yes, the Ralph Ellison has a novel on freedom, published posthumously in 1999. A fascinating tale of the attempted assassination of Senator Bliss Sunraider who passes for white and reeks havoc on the Black constituents who reared him as a young man. On his death bed, he calls for the man who loved him most, his adopted father and biological uncle the Rev. AZ Hickman, an old Black preacher. Hidden within the story line is the celebration that freedom comes only when Whites recognize that their freedom is tied to the freedom of Blacks. Wonderfully written as only Ellison can. BuytheBook.

    Read more »
  • The Soles of My Shoes

    Danielle Martin – The Soles of My Shoes

    Danielle Alysse Martin is an entrepreneur and musician serving as the founder and owner of Press Play Theatre, a Christian-based performing arts company, creator of Pressed Down Apparel, a Christian T-shirt company and the manager, as well as a member, of Israel Martin and God’s Ultimate Praise.  The Soles of My Shoes is the entrepreneur’s first literary work. The collection of inspirational poems is divided into four sections: Learning To Walk, Running For My Life, If The Shoe Fits, and Struttin’ My Stuff. The Soles of My Shoes was written by Martin to inspire women from all “walks” of life. Martin said passion for women and the desire to assist them in their walk with Christ led her to found the company and blog, Pretty Girls Praise. The Soles of My Shoes can be purchased at thesolesofmyshoes.com and during the month of October half of the proceeds from the book will be donated to the Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center.

    Read more »
  • The Gospel According to Cane- Courttia Newland

    Black British author Courttia Newland brings a gripping story of an abducted child who returns home as a young adult full of anger, grief, and love. Set in contemporary London, the novel tells the desperate story of Beverley whose son was kidnapped from a locked, parked car while dad bought dinner. After 20 years of trying to piece her life back together, her son, Malakay, reappears as a temporary stalker opening the mail slot of her front door at night and calling her name. Fascinating story of redemption. BuytheBook.

    Online: www.courttianewland.com

    Read more »

  • What is Man

    What is Man-Lenard Tillery

    Lenard Tillery is an author and songwriter currently residing in Baton Rouge with wife of 20 years, Lisa and their six children. What is Man is the New Orleans native’s second literary work that explains while living mankind can possess the supernatural in the natural world and have the ability for the Spirit of God to dwell in an earthen vessel. Tillery explains to readers when God removes the life within the human spirit at His appointed time, the human body will experience a physical death and return to the dust from where it came. Then, each person’s living soul will spend eternity in its final destination based upon the everyday choices and activities. Tillery’s What is Man provides the resources that will help readers define and discover the purpose, functions and components of their human spirit, living soul, and body. BuytheBook.
    Online: www.lenardtillery.com

    Read more »
  • The Nehemiah Blueprint

    The Nehemiah Blueprint- Jon Bennett

    According to Baker, LA., author Jon Bennett, his first book, The Nehemiah Blueprint, was written out of a sincere concern for the betterment of urban communities. The book is based on the passionate, Biblical account of Nehemiah who received a vision from God to rebuild the city of Jerusalem. In The Nehemiah Blueprint, Bennett presents principles gleaned from as a “blueprint” for beginning to confront some of societal issues and rebuilding communities.

    Online: www.uplandavenueproductions.com

    Read more »

  • Misconceptions

    Misconceptions-C.Hayes

    Cosha Hayes makes the attempt to be a modern day Terry McMillan in her debut noel “Misconceptions”. While is it misses the mark as a modern version of Waiting to Exhale. It hits dead on a cautionary tale for a young female audience. Misconceptions chronicles the life of Gaby a young Baton Rouge native who falls for handsome young man named Tre. As the book chronicles Gabby’s transition from “ a teenager who was going no where fast” to a young woman who believes she has found the love of her life, she but soon realizes she is an emotionally and physically abusive relationship. Hayes does a great job setting the scene for the and bringing the old saying to life everything that glitters isnt gold. Its Hayes simple and fast paced writing style that make this book a perfect read for a young woman who is approaching a storm in life , but at the same would make a “grown” woman who has already been through one may want to leave this tale of self discovery on the shelf.

     

    Read more »
Back to Top
Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com