LOGO
  • ,,,

    Bradie James hosts inaugural internship with three scholars

    LSU alumnus Bradie James has collaborated with the LSU Office of Diversity to launch the Tiger Research Group internship program. This summer three students were given the opportunity to be the first James Interns: Justin Evans, a native of New Orleans; Todd Sterling Jr., a native of Baton Rouge; and John Wilson, a native of Lafayette.

    Interns were selected from the Presidents Millennial Scholars Program, or PMSP, and the Black Male Leadership Initiative, or BMLI, and were invited to participate in the summer internship program.
    Exposure to leadership, mentoring, and internships as a way to expand undergraduate co-curricular experiences is a central focus of both PMSP and BMLI. Participants in the programs believe that their co-curricular experiences are what differentiate them from other students upon graduation.

    “Internships play a critical role in helping to determine if the field of study a student is in, is really what he or she wants to do upon graduating,” said Sterling, a PMSP Scholar. “Taking part in the internship program allowed me the opportunity to use what I’ve learned from marketing and sales classes and apply it to real-world scenarios, and also to bring fresh ideas to Bradie’s team. Learning and working with an accomplished man like Bradie shows the kind of work ethic needed to develop and to have success in both life and business. I am very thankful for being able to take part in a trailblazing experience like the Tiger Research Group internship program, and looking forward to graduating this December and maybe working with Mr. James’ company in the future!”

    The four-week paid internship provided the students with real-world work experience that enabled them to practically apply what they are learning in their classes in a work setting. An additional benefit of participating in the program is that the students were personally mentored by James, who shared his entrepreneurial experience and his own understanding of navigating the obstacles and challenges that students sometimes face trying to transition from student to professional.

    “My experience with the internship program was amazing. It’s not often you get to engage in conversation with a man of his caliber, especially as an African American. I was able to gain insight on daily business operations and the purpose and plan behind everything Bradie and his team wanted to achieve. Through that, I was allowed to apply the knowledge I have acquired at LSU to help them achieve their goals. So as my senior year is coming to an end, I can say that after this internship I have gained more confidence and hope in myself to cultivate success whether as an employee or an employer,” said Wilson, a BMLI Fellow.

    The Office of Diversity hopes to develop more programs of this type and is eternally grateful to James for his vision, leadership, and support.

    “Mr. James has always given back to his alma mater and helping students in this fashion is a perfect partnership for LSU, Mr. James, and the national diversity advisory board,” said Vice Provost for Diversity Dereck Rovaris.

    The purpose of the LSU Black Male Leadership Initiative Fellows Program is to help improve retention, graduation, and participation rates for black male students through mentoring, leadership development, and academic support while connecting these students with faculty, staff, and the campus community.

    ONLINE: www.lsu.edu/diversity

    Photo: Bradie James with interns Justin Evans and John Wilson

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Cassandra Chaney chronicles police brutality, African-American community in new book

    Given the increasing attention to unarmed African Americans who have lost their lives at the hands of police, LSU School of Social Work professor Cassandra Chaney examined community sentiment regarding police in her new book titled “Police Use of Excessive Force against African Americans: Historical Antecedents and Community Perceptions.”

    The book delves into how the early antecedents of police brutality like plantation overseers, the lynching of African American males, early race riots, the Rodney King incident, and the Los Angeles Rampart Scandal have directly impacted the current relationship between communities of color and police.

    “Each public incident of mistreatment, such as assault and murder, of African Americans erodes the trust members of this group have of police and makes it more difficult for honorable law enforcement officers to effectively do their jobs,” Chaney said. “As a child and family studies scholar, I know well that these events do not just affect the person, but the families and communities of which they are a part.”

    Cassandra Chaney

    Cassandra Chaney

    Chaney and co-author Ray V. Robertson, an associate professor of sociology at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, further studies how African American college students perceive police in order to delve into how race, gender, and education create different realities among a demographic. The scholars chose to study the attitudes of African American college students because this demographic is typically at a developmental stage of life when they are becoming more aware of their values and what is happening in the world around them.

    “In my experience, African American college students have a lot to say about what is wrong with the world, and they see themselves as potential agents of change. Furthermore, their perceptions and sentiment of police mistreatment, such as assault and/or murder, is based on their personal experience, the experience of family and friends as well as the experience of African Americans throughout the nation,” Chaney said.

    Based on their findings, Chaney and Robertson offer recommended policies and strategies for police and communities to improve relationships and perceptions between the two.

    Chaney recently was awarded a Dean Larry Davis Social Justice Fund grant by the National Association of Deans and Directors for her project titled “Nothing Can Change until It Is Faced: Community Sentiment of Police in Low-Income Disenfranchised Communities.”

    “In this project, I will continue my work in this area by examining how African Americans of different ages perceive members of law enforcement. In particular, this work will examine how attitudes regarding law enforcement form, conversations African American parents have with their children regarding police and strategies individuals and families in low-income communities use to maintain safety in their communities,” she said.

    Chaney is a Black families’ scholar with broad interests in the formation, structure, and function of Black families. In particular, her research examines the narratives of single, dating, cohabiting, and married Blacks, as well as how religion and spirituality support these families, both historically and today. Using a variety of theoretical lenses, she qualitatively explores intimacy and commitment in Black heterosexual relationships, emphasizing how demonstrations and perceptions of masculinity/manhood and femininity/womanhood shape this discourse.

    ONLINE: Police Use of Excessive Force against African Americans: Historical Antecedents and Community Perceptions: https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781498539180/Police-Use-of-Excessive-Force-against-African-Americans-Historical-Antecedents-and-Community-Perceptions

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Tuquisha Adams takes marines to the fight aboard U.S. Navy Warship

    SAN DIEGO – Petty Officer 3rd Class Tuquisha Adams, a native of Shreveport, Louisiana, was inspired to join the Navy after her mother passed away.
    “I lost my mom and I was on a mission to make her proud,” Adams said. “One morning I woke up and the military was on my mind just out of blue.”

    Now, two years later, Adams serves aboard one of the Navy’s amphibious ships at Naval Base San Diego.“This is my first command,” Adams said. “Every day is a different experience. You never know what you’re going to get, but so far so good. I have had a learning experience. I have grown since I’ve been here.”

    Adams, a 2008 graduate of Fair Park High School, is an aviation boatswain’s mate handler aboard USS Essex, one of four Wasp-class amphibious assault ships in the Navy, homeported in San Diego.

    “I am a landing and launching aircraft petty officer,” Adams said. “I’m also training petty officer and assisting yeoman.”

    Adams credits success in the Navy to many of the lessons learned in Shreveport. “I learned to choose my friends wisely and never let anyone determine my future,” said Adams.

    Essex is designed to deliver U.S. Marines and their equipment where they are needed to support a variety of missions ranging from amphibious assaults to humanitarian relief efforts. Designed to be versatile, the ship has the option of simultaneously using helicopters, Harrier jets, and Landing Craft Air Cushioned (LCAC), as well as conventional landing craft and assault vehicles in various combinations.

    Because of their inherent capabilities, these ships have been and will continue to be called upon to support humanitarian and other contingency missions on short notice.

    Sailors’ jobs are highly varied aboard Essex. More than 1,000 men and women make up the ship’s crew, which keeps all parts of the ship running smoothly, from handling weaponry to maintaining the engines. An additional 1,200 Marines can be embarked.

    “They’re hard workers,” Adams said. “It comes with the field that they’re in.”

    Serving in the Navy means Adams is part of a world that is taking on new importance in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy.

    A key element of the Navy the nation needs is tied to the fact that America is a maritime nation, and that the nation’s prosperity is tied to the ability to operate freely on the world’s oceans. More than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface is covered by water; 80 percent of the world’s population lives close to a coast; and 90 percent of all global trade by volume travels by sea.“Our priorities center on people, capabilities, and processes, and will be achieved by our focus on speed, value, results and partnerships,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “Readiness, lethality and modernization are the requirements driving these priorities.”

    Though there are many ways for sailors to earn distinction in their command, community, and career, Adams is most proud of earning a promotion to third class petty officer.

    “I was proud to see that my hard work didn’t go unnoticed,” said Adams.

    As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied-upon assets, Adams and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes contributing to the Navy the nation needs.

    “Serving in the Navy means that I’m a part of something huge,” Adams said. “I am fighting for people I would never meet a day in my life and that’s a good feeling.”

    By  Jerry Jimenez
    Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class
    Navy Office of Community Outreach
    Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jackson Brown
    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Irene Lewis elected Undergraduate President of national agriculture organization

     Southern University student Irene Lewis, a senior agricultural sciences major with a concentration in plant and soil sciences, has been elected the national undergraduate president of the Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) organization for the 2019-2020 year.

    MANRRS provides leadership training and networking to positively promote the agricultural sciences and related fields among minorities.

    Lewis, who has been a member of Southern University’s MANRRS Chapter since her freshman year, said she was extremely excited when she learned that she was elected to the post.

    “To be able to give back to MANRRS and represent my university at a higher level was exciting for me,” she said. “Participating in MANRRS has afforded me countless opportunities so it only felt right to continue to serve the organization to the best of my ability,” said Lewis when asked why she decided to run for the national position.

    To qualify, she had to submit an application and an application video before being selected to move forward with an interview. Lewis  was interviewed by the then-President-Elect, Karl Binns. After passing the interview, she was informed that her name would be placed on the ballot.

    As a national officer, Irene represents the agricultural students enrolled in dozens of universities across the nation. This is something she doesn’t take lightly.

    “MANRRS has an enormous student membership,” she said. “These students are young people across the country and are a force, working to develop agriculture, natural resources and related sciences.  It’s important that I use this position to continue to advocate for underrepresented students in agriculture, especially for students at 1890 Institutions and other (Historically Black Colleges and Universities). They are truly our next generation of academic and industry leaders,” said Lewis.

    She said her goal as the Undergraduate National President is to be a supporter of the organization’s fourteen student officers.

    “I don’t think people can truly understand the weight that these positions can hold until they are in one. Balancing your academics, pursuing doctoral degrees (for some of our team), and serving in a national office requires a high level of discipline, collaboration, and accountability,” said Lewis. “My ultimate goal is to help my team be the best they can be,” she said.

    Prior to being elected to her current national position, Irene served as the Region IV Undergraduate Vice President for the 2018-2019 year, representing chapters in Louisiana, Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.

    At Southern University’s local chapter, Irene has served as the Chapter’s Secretary during the 2017-2018 academic year and Historian during the 2018-2019 year.

    “This year I am in a student advisory role as I transition out of the university,” said Lewis whose national involvement in MANRRS evolved from her participation at Southern.

    “I don’t think I would be able to serve in the way that I have if it had not been for participating in MANRRS at my chapter,” said Irene. “I gained countless mentors and a huge support system on campus. From our advisor, Dr. Janana Snowden, to the friends I met through MANRRS at SU, I really have had a tribe in these past two years of national service. Dr. Snowden literally gave me a pep talk minutes before I gave my campaign speech last year, and I am extremely grateful for that.”

    MANRRS is a non-profit organization that promotes academic and professional advancement by empowering minorities in agriculture, natural resources, and related sciences. It has more than 8,000 student and professional members within six regions and 55 collegiate chapters in 38 states and Puerto Rico.

    Lewis is a native of  Baton Rouge. She is the daughter of Eric and Maura Lewis and a 2016 graduate of Runnels High School.

    By LaKeeshia Giddens Lusk

    Irene Lewis, a senior Agricultural Sciences major with a concentration in Plant and Soil Sciences at the Southern University, has been elected the national undergraduate president of the Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences organization. (Photo by D’Andre Lee, SU Ag Center.)

     

    Read more »
  • ,

    CASA volunteers ready to lend their voices for abused children in foster care

    Capital Area Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Association welcomed a class of new volunteers at the conclusion of the 2019 September training session. The class was officially sworn in as CASA volunteers by Juvenile Court Judge Adam Haney on Sept. 12. Each volunteer will be appointed to advocate for the best interests of an abused child.

     The new advocates were sworn in at the CASA office during the 32-hour training course, which prepares CASA volunteers for their advocacy work. Volunteers have six months to complete the training. Once assigned to cases, the volunteers will work to help abused and neglected children reach safe homes with forever families.

    The training class includes: Patti Crump, Debbie Emery, Karen Godwin, Eboni Kaigler, Chiquita Kelly, Lindsey Litchfield, Helen Meyer, Brian Morin, Nicole Morin, Tommy Ray, Wendy Ray, Reba Roy, Mike Rush, Dona Sharkey, Wayne Sharkey, Michelle Sparks, Edward Stephen, Holly Tupper, Charles Vaughan, Dishili Young, and Nathan Zeller.

    Though CASA now has new advocates, the program still needs volunteers to continue serving every child in East Baton Rouge Parish who needs a voice. A boost in African American and male volunteers are still needed as CASA strives to have a diverse group of volunteers to match the diverse group of children in care. CASA is accepting people into its next training course, which will be held in January 2020.

    No special background is required to become a CASA volunteer. The first step to getting involved is to attend a 45-minute orientation at the CASA office, 848 Louisiana Ave. Upcoming sessions will be held October 5 at 10 a.m., October 10 at 5 p.m., October 16 at 3 p.m., and October 25 at 9 a.m. The full list of orientations through December can be found at www.casabr.org.

     

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Phoenix Award goes to Calvin Mackie for STEM NOLA

    “Through collective impact, we are changing a generation,” said Calvin Mackie, Ph.D, Saturday, September 14th, upon receiving the CBCF Board Chair’s Award from Rep. Cedric L. Richmond a speech at the CBCF’s Phoenix Awards Dinner at the 2019 Annual Legislative Conference (ALC.

    “STEM access is a social justice issue through and through.” Mackie said. He is the founder of STEM NOLA.

    Winning this prestigious award is opening doors for our organization and we’re looking for corporate and philanthropic partners to share our accomplishments and their implications with communities across America.” The Phoenix Award is the highest honor presented by CBCF. This award recognizes individuals whose extraordinary achievements strengthen communities and improve the lives of individuals and families, nationally and globally.

    The connection of STEM education to justice has been understood long ago in the education community, it was only in 2016 that the National Science Foundation (NSF) published their “Next Generation STEM For All: Envisioning Advances Based on NSF Supported Research” recognizing the deep connection between STEM education and social justice. STEM NOLA is building an inclusive STEM ecosystem in the greater New Orleans regions to expose, inspire, engage and educate all communities. STEM NOLA has engaged over 40,000 K-12 students, 10,000 families, 700 college students and 500 professionals in STEM events.

    The idea here is garnering collective impact by encouraging broader access, early in life and embracing the under-represented. This would include girls (of all races) and differently-abled youth. Mackie and other education trailblazers are currently focused on developing learning innovations, steeped in cultural connection to enrich the lives of students.

    The 2019 Phoenix Awards Honorees are:

    • Dr. Calvin Mackie, entrepreneur, author and professor will receive the CBCF Board Chair’s Award from Rep. Cedric L. Richmond.
    • Dr. Wanda Austin, aeronautics and systems engineer will receive the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) Chair’s Award from Rep. Karen Bass.
    • Congresswoman Barbara Lee will receive the ALC Honorary Co-Chair’s Award from Rep. G.K. Butterfield.
    • The Exonerated Five: Dr. Yusef Salaam, Korey Wise, Kevin Richardson, Raymond Santana, and Antron McCray, survivors of false convictions and social justice advocates will receive the ALC Honorary Co-Chair’s Award from Rep. Frederica Wilson.
    • Rev. Al Sharpton, civil rights activist, will receive The Harold Washington Award from the CBC
    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Southern University System selected as pilot institution for CIA’s White House Initiative

     Initiative focuses on HBCUs Recruitment and Workforce Development Program 

     

    The Southern University System and the Central Intelligence Agency entered into an unprecedented partnership to benefit students and faculty. President-Chancellor Ray Belton, Executive Vice President-Chancellor James Ammons, and representatives from the CIA signed a Memorandum of Understanding on Sept. 16 that will serve as the foundational framework for the university system’s participation in the CIA’s recruitment and workforce development initiative, which is part of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The Southern University System Board of Supervisors will ratify the agreement at Friday’s board meeting on campus.

    According to the MOU, the CIA chose Southern as the first participant based on the university system’s accredited programs, the graduation rate of its students, and the CIA’s track record of onboarding highly skilled and well-qualified talent.

    “Southern University is honored to have been chosen as the first institution to partner with the CIA for this initiative,” Belton said. “The reputable stature of the CIA alone is an asset to the university, students, and faculty, and we believe that the outcomes will be mutually beneficial for all involved.

    “For nearly 140 years, Southern has been a leader in innovation and scholarship. This opportunity with the CIA adds to our extensive portfolio of public and private partnerships that allow our students and faculty to expand their knowledge and to enhance their technical skills.”

    The MOU allows the CIA to engage in a broad range of classroom workshops, curriculum development, and recruitment activities to foster ongoing relationships with key university staff and personnel on Southern’s five campuses, and will provide for immediate contact with a qualified and diverse applicant pool.

    The Southern University System is comprised of Southern University Baton Rouge, Southern University New Orleans, Southern University Shreveport, Southern University Law Center, and Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center. The System is the only HBCU system in the nation.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Ernest E. Garrett III to Guide Louisiana’s Special School District

    Following a national search, State Superintendent of Education John White announced Ernest E. Garrett III will serve as the new Superintendent of the Louisiana Special School District (SSD), guiding the implementation of the SSD’s new three-year strategic plan and overseeing all operations of its special schools and programs. Garrett will take the helm Sept.3.

    The SSD was established by the Louisiana State Legislature to provide education to students housed in state or privatized facilities and hospitals. The SSD oversees Louisiana’s two special schools: the Louisiana School for the Deaf and the Louisiana School for the Visually Impaired. It also manages educational programs for eligible students enrolled in the Office of Youth Development, Office of Behavioral Health, Office of Developmental Disabilities, Department of Public Safety, and Corrections, and privatized facilities across the state.

    “Ernest is a strong leader and passionate advocate whose extensive experience, as a school administrator, as an advocate of students with low-incidence disabilities and as a social worker in both the school and clinical settings, will bring a unique perspective to the SSD and to the state education department’s executive team,” White said. “We look forward to watching the SSD redefine itself as a statewide model of excellence under his guidance.”

    Garrett, a native of Missouri, is the former executive director and chief executive officer of Deaf Empowerment Awareness Foundation, Inc., an organization designed to empower, raise awareness, and bridge a sustainable foundation of communication and equal access to both the deaf and hard of hearing and the hearing communities in the St. Louis metro area.

    Garrett previously served as the first deaf and first African-American superintendent of the Missouri School for the Deaf. In that role, he championed the idea of  “education without limits” and was instrumental in leading the school through a change management process that resulted in a new mission, vision, motto, and strategic plan that drew unanimous approval from the school’s advisory board. Garrett has also acted as the executive director of the Missouri Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and worked as a licensed social worker in both school and clinical settings.

    Garrett holds bachelor’s degrees in history and in professional and technical writing from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, and master’s degrees in social work and administration from Gallaudet University, a federally chartered private university for the education of the deaf and hard of hearing.

    He also holds an advanced research qualification in management, specializing in leadership and organizational change, from Walden University, the same institution at which he is currently a doctoral candidate in the final stages of his dissertation, which examines hiring and retaining persons with disabilities for leadership positions. His anticipated completion date is December 2019.

    “I am delighted at this opportunity to return to my first passion, which is the education of students with disabilities, and do not take lightly my selection for this role at such a critical time in the SSD’s history,” Garrett said. “The education of children with disabilities is an issue that resonates with me both personally and professionally. I believe that all children can learn and that it is our responsibility as leaders, educators, policymakers, advocates, and stakeholders to ensure that students with disabilities receive the best quality education and are thus prepared for college and the workforce upon graduation. Settling for anything less than high expectations for all students–regardless of disability–is not an option.”

    Read more »
  • ,,

    John Warner Smith named Louisiana’s newest Poet Laureate

    Governor John Bel Edwards and the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities has selected John Warner Smith as Louisiana’s newest Poet Laureate.

    A native of Morgan City, Smith began writing poetry while simultaneously building a successful career as a public administrator and a banker. He now teaches English at Southern University and A&M College, in addition to regularly publishing new works of poetry. Since 2007, he has directed Education’s Next Horizon, a non-profit policy advocacy organization dedicated to improving public education in Louisiana.

    Smith is a fellow of the prestigious Cave Canem program and has four published collections of poetry: Muhammad’s Mountain (Lavender Ink, 2018), Spirits of the Gods (UL Press, 2017), Soul Be A Witness (MadHat Press, 2016), and A Mandala of Hands (Kelsay Books – Aldrich Press, 2015). His fifth collection, Our Shut Eyes, is forthcoming from MadHat Press.

    He will serve as poet laureate for two years. Smith is available for public readings, workshops, and lectures, at venues across Louisiana during his tenure. Contact Christopher Robert at (504) 620-2639 or robert@leh.org.

    ONLINE: http://www.johnwarnersmith.com

    Read more »
  • ,

    Myra Richardson to receive NAACP’s advocacy award

    Myra Richardson will be presented the NAACP’s Prestigious Montague Cobb Health Advocacy Award, July 22, 2019 during the annual convention.

    This award was established to honor individuals and organizations that have made a significant impact in the field of health.

    This award is given annually in recognition of the legacy of Dr. W. Montague Cobb, who served as the President of the NAACP from 1976 to 1983.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Teens complete Emergency Medical Responder Institute

    Urban Restoration Enhancement Corporation presented the 2019 graduating class of the College & Career Ready Emergency Medical Responder Institute. The graduates, all Baton Rouge area high school students, obtained Emergency Medical Responder certification upon their successful completion of the 10-week EMR Institute.
    UREC’s 2019 College & Career Ready EMR Institute graduates are:
    • Adrianna Brown (Valedictorian)
    • Bridget Calhoun
    • Alexus Maiden
    • Leah Ruffin
    • Abria Scott
    • Aisha Smith
    UREC’s College & Career Ready EMR Institute prepares students attending high schools in Baton Rouge for medial careers while providing a pathway to industry-based certification. During the institute, scholars learned life-saving skills such as CPR, how to detect vital signs, trauma response and injury care management under the instruction of Bob Brankline with the East Baton Rouge Parish School’s Career and Technical Education Center.
    Throughout the institute, scholars participated in lecture-based instruction at Southern University School of Nursing and hands-on, skills-based instruction at CTEC. Scholars also participated in work site visits with the Mayor’s Office of Homeland Security (Red Stick Ready), Baton Rouge General Mid-City, ExxonMobil, Baton Rouge EMS & 911 Operations, Baton Rouge Fire Department, and Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady University (Fran U).
     
    Adrianna Brown, class valedictorian, said the program taught her technical, leadership and effective communication skills. “I learned how to take blood pressure, splint legs, and arms, and how to listen to and analyze people’s airways,” she said. “I would definitely recommend this program to others.”UREC held a graduation and pinning ceremony on June 12, 2019, at Southern University School of Nursing. Dr. Latricia Greggs, Chair of the Southern University’s BSN Program, delivered the keynote address. Greggs encouraged graduates to exercise empathy, patience, continued education, self-care, humor, trust and teamwork as they embark upon future studies and careers in the healthcare field.

    Photo (L-R): Danielle Duncan, UREC, Youth Program Coordinator; Adrianna Brown; LeahRuffin; Alexus Maiden; Dr. Latricia Greggs, Chair, Southern University School of Nursing BSN Program; Abria Scott; Bridget Calhoun; Aisha Smithand Kathryn Robinson, UREC, Youth Program Director.
    ONLINE: www.urec.org here.
    Read more »
  • ,

    Ivory Toldson joins education commission

    Ivory Toldson, Ph.D., professor of counseling psychology at Howard University and president of Quality Education for Minorities – QEM Network, has been appointed to the Commission on the Value of Postsecondary Education. This Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation-supported panel consists of 30 higher education leaders, business representatives, and foundation experts. They will study the value of earning college degrees and of earning post-high school certificates. The Baton Rouge native is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Negro Education, and executive editor of the Journal of Policy Analysis and Research, published by the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Inc

    Read more »
  • Carpenter receives La. Legislature’s 2019 Hudson Cup

    The Louisiana House of Representatives recently named State Rep. Barbara Carpenter as this year’s recipient of the Hudson Cup of Unity and Friendship Award. Carpenter is the first female to be honored. The award is given annually to one House member from members of the House based on leadership and respect. The prestigious award is presented in remembrance of the late former State Representative Charles “Doc” Hudson who served St. Landry Parish. Carpenter serves on the Administration of Criminal Justice, Retirement, and Transportation, Highways and Public Works committees. She is also dean of International Education and University Outreach at Southern University and A&M College.

    Read more »
  • French professor Jerry L Parker Jr. earns doctorate

    Jerry L. Parker Jr.  has successfully defended his dissertation to earn a doctorate of education in educational leadership from Southeastern Louisiana University. He investigated the presentation of cultural content about the Caribbean and Louisiana in textbooks and faculty teaching practices. His scholarly interests include curriculum leadership, instructional leadership, foreign language education, multicultural education, and Caribbean and Louisiana studies. He is currently an instructor of French and Spanish in the Department of World Languages and Cultures at Southeastern Louisiana University. He also serves as the department’s undergraduate program coordinator and director of the Foreign Language Resource Center. He holds a bachelor of arts in French Language and Literature from Southeastern Louisiana University, a master of arts in French & Francophone Studies from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.
    Read more »
  • ,,,,

    Following a residency with Jacksonville Symphony, Courtney Bryan takes her music to Rome

    Composer and pianist Courtney Bryan, Ph.D., has been awarded a fellowship at the American Academy in Rome. She was awarded the esteemed Rome Prize for music composition in April. Bryan teaches in the School of Liberal Arts’ Newcomb Department of Music at Tulane University in New Orleans. She recently completed a two-year residency with the Jacksonville Symphony in Florida, where she was the Mary Carr Patton Composer in Residence. Her work incorporates jazz, experimental music, gospel, classical, and R&B to bridge “the line between the sacred and the secular,” she said.

    Bryan explores historical themes and political issues in her art.

    While in Rome, she will be working on an opera, musicals, and a special melodrama titled “Caracalla: Inner Monologue of an Emperor”. Out of 982 applications nationwide, independent juries selected 30 American and six Italian artists and scholars–including Bryan– as this year’s winners, each of which receives a stipend, workspace, and room and board on the Academy’s campus in Rome. Last year, she won the 2018 Herb Alpert award which is given annually to five risk-taking mid-career artists.

    According to Tulane University, one judge of the Herb Alpert award wrote, “We value your breadth, the ways you gather and create communities, and your creation of a new kind of cosmopolitan classical music imbued with fierce urgency of the moment and a real story to tell. We appreciate your concern for and commitment to spirit, social justice, and shifting power dynamics and we celebrate your profound connection to the human voice. We perceive that you are on a powerful journey and as listeners, we’re lucky enough to be on it with you.”

     

     

     

    Read more »
  • ,

    Harris becomes nation’s first, only chair in race, media, and cultural literacy

    Tina M. Harris will join LSU’s Manship School of Mass Communication in the fall as the Manship-Maynard Chair in Race, Media and Cultural Literacy—the first position of its type in the nation. Harris will do research and teaching on advancing issues of diversity, access and social justice in media and society, and will build upon her extensive research base.

    “We are delighted to welcome Dr. Harris to our team. Her commitment to translating research from theory into practice is work that facilitates critical engagement with the issue of race. She is a distinguished scholar whose work here at the Manship School to advance conversations on race, media and cultural literacy will benefit our students and the broader community as we work to move forward the conversation on diversity and social justice in media, politics and in our communities,” said Martin Johnson, dean of the Manship School.

    Harris currently studies interracial communication and is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Georgia, which she joined in 1998. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky in 1995 and her master’s degree from the University of Georgia in 1992.

    Harris is the co-author of the textbook, Interracial Communication: Theory Into Practice. Her other research interests include communication and pedagogy; diversity and media representations; race and ethnic disparities; and religious frameworks in health communication. She has published many articles and book chapters on race and communication, has served as reviewer for many top tier communication journals, and has fulfilled many service roles within the discipline, including the National Communication Association, the Southern States Communication Association and other communication organizations.

    Harris is the recipient of more than 30 recognitions and awards for her outstanding achievements, including The University of Georgia’s 2017 Engaged Scholar Award by the Office of Public Service and Outreach and the Distinguished Josiah T. Meigs Teaching Professor award—the highest teaching honor. She has also been recognized by the University System of Georgia Board of Regents with the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Award for her research on pedagogy and race.

    “I spent time in Spain as a child when my father was stationed there as part of his career in the Navy, and I consider that the bedrock of who I am and my earliest influence that ignited a passion within me for ethnic and cultural diversity and international experiential education, so coming to the Manship School to serve as the Manship-Maynard Chair in Race, Media and Cultural Literacy is a full-circle moment for me,” Harris said. “Further, one of the brightest spots in my academic career is mentoring others and helping them realize their dreams. I look forward to working closely with students to help advance their understanding of diversity, access and social justice and to help prepare them for their future careers.”

    Harris is a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated, and in her free time enjoys volunteering in her community, smooth jazz, cooking, reading, and international travel.

    DrumRoll

    Read more »
  • ,

    Walker receives Iowa State achievement award

    Retia Scott Walker, Ph.D. has been named the 2019 Alumni Achievement Award recipient by the College of Human Sciences at Iowa State University (ISU). She is vice chancellor for academics and student services/ associate dean of Southern University’s College of Agricultural, Family and Consumer Sciences.
    According to ISU website, the award recognizes alumni who have accomplished meritorious service and/or distinguished achievements in business and industry, education, family and consumer sciences and health.
    “I am excited about this recognition and look forward to returning to Iowa State University this fall to participate in the celebration honoring graduates of the college,” said Walker. “I had a great experience there and developed lasting relationships with classmates and professors, some of whom I am still in touch with annually,” she said.
    Walker has been an educator for more than 50 years. She has served as the Vice Chancellor for Academics and Student Services/ Associate Dean in the SU College of Agriculture since November 2017. Prior to coming to Southern University Walker has served as an Interim Provost, an Executive Assistant to the President and as a Department Chair in Human Ecology, all at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. Walker has also held the position of Vice President of Academic Outreach and Public Services, Dean and Professor in the College of Human Environmental Sciences, both at the University of Kentucky and Assistant Professor in the College of Education Graduate Program at Texas Women University.
    Walker earned a B.S. in home economics education and a minor in foods and nutrition from Tuskegee University; an M.S. with a concentration in Family Studies from Hunter College; an M.S. ED in Education Administration and Supervision from Pace University (NYC) and a Ph.D. in Educational Administration from Iowa State University. Walker also completed her post-doctoral studies in gerontology at the University of Maryland-College Park and Baltimore, and the Executive Education Program from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.
    This award will be the third time she has been recognized by Iowa State University. In 1983, she was honored as an Outstanding Ph.D. Graduate and in 2003 she received the Virgil Lagomarcino Laureate Alumni Award from the College of Education.
    She will receive the 2019 Alumni Achievement  Award in October during Iowa State’s Homecoming.
    Read more »
  • ,,,

    PRIDE RESTORED: Jaguars dominant in 15-0 win

    After a 10-year hiatus, Southern University baseball claimed the program’s first Southwestern Athletic Conference tournament title since 2009 with a dominant 15-0 shutout of Alabama State Sunday afternoon at Wesley Barrow Stadium.
    Tyler LaPorte, who shared the league’s Player of the Year award with Alabama State’s Yasil Pagan, capped a phenomenal SWAC tournament with a 2 of 4 performance, which included three runs scored and a three-RBI home run in the top of the sixth inning.
    Southern pitcher Eli Finney made his second start of the tournament and baffled Hornet hitters from the start, pitching 8 and 1/3 innings, allowed no runs and scattered three hits. Finney fanned six hitters while the SWAC’s 2019 Relief Pitcher of the Year, Connor Whalen, entered in the bottom of the ninth to close the game. Whalen forced Alabama State shortstop Eriq White to groundout to Malik Blaise at short to ignite a post-championship dogpile that was 10-years in the making.
    Finney only allowed five Alabama State baserunner and Alabama State failed to land a runner in scoring position until shortstop Cristopher DeGuzman reached second base on a passed ball in the bottom of the eighth.
    Centerfielder Javeyan Williams and second baseman Johnny Johnson led Southern with four hits each and combined to score five runs and plate four RBIs. Catcher Bobby Johnson finished 3 of 5 at the plate and hit a two-run blast over the left field wall to spark Southern’s offensive onslaught.
    The Jaguars belted out 16 hits and left absolutely no doubt who wanted the championship more.
    Southern landed the first blow thanks to an RBI double by Ashanti Wheatley that scored Tyler LaPorte, who drew a leadoff walk. However, the Hornets ended the damage there as Hunter David flied out and Wheatley was tagged out at third following the ensuing throw-in.
    After a 1-2-3 inning, the Jaguars added to the lead with Johnson’s two-run blast to lead 3-0. The sides traded scoreless innings until the top of the fifth, where the Jaguars added to their lead. There, Coby Taylor was hit by a pitch and Javeyan Williams laid down a bunt, beating the tag at first before LaPorte dropped a flare to right for a two-run triple.
    Johnny Johnson scored LaPorte on a double down the left field line and stole third, scoring on an RBI sac fly by David. LaPorte later put the contest out of reach with a three-run shot over the left field wall and with the Hornets unable to figure out Southern starter Eli Finney, the Jaguars added five runs for insurance down the stretch, cruising to their first SWAC tournament championship since 2009.
    Southern will head to Chicago for a post-season exhibition tune-up in the inaugural HBCU World Series against North Carolina A&T Thursday afternoon before learning where they will play in NCAA Regional on May 31.
    By Christopher K. Jones
    Read more »
  • ,,,,

    Christian Davenport named Baton Rouge’s first Poet Laureate

    Christian Davenport has been named the first poet laureate by Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome.

    Davenport, also known as Cubs the Poet, is a native of Baton Rouge and earned a bachelor of arts in psychology from Dillard University. He has traveled the world since, with the desire of bringing perspectives and inspiration back to his home city where he plans to release his first book of poetry under his publishing company, Poetry Still Matters. Davenport is a spontaneous poet, drawing his inspiration from the connections that he makes with other people in a diverse array of settings. His poetry has taken him from Baton Rouge to Preservation Hall in New Orleans to a Ted Talk in Rapid City, South Dakota, where he was a featured speaker.  Davenport relays that he sees each opportunity to connect with another person as a new poem. 32842186_921822594608903_4260217759285116928_o

    “Christian’s impressive body of work represents new styles in poetry which require collaboration and communication, attributes that will serve him well as the city’s Poet Laureate,” said Broome. “ I look forward to adding this great work to the cultural conversation across our city.”

    The Baton Rouge Poet Laureate Program, initiated by Broome and facilitated through the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge, celebrates Baton Rouge’s rich culture and diversity through the work of a poet who will represent Baton Rouge by creating excitement about poetry through outreach, programs, teaching, and written work.

    During a celebration at the East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library on Tuesday, May 7, Christian was named the 2019 Poet Laureate. The evening included performances by the Poetry Out Loud Regional Winner, Lily Carter, Louisiana School for the Deaf Poet Jordan Howard, and Seth Finch, Baton Rouge High School jazz musician. State Poet Laureate, Dr. Jack Bedell was in attendance and spoke at the event. Dr. Joanne Gabbin, founder and director of The Furious Flower Poetry Center at James Madison University, was the evening’s keynote speaker.

    The term of service of the Poet Laureate is one year and comes with a $5,000 stipend, which covers community engagement events by the Poet Laureate over the term. Funds raised for this position were contributed by private donors.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Dereck J. Rovaris Sr. named president of the American Association of Blacks in Higher Education

    LSU Vice Provost for Diversity Dereck J. Rovaris Sr. has been named president of the American Association of Blacks in Higher Education, or AABHE.

    AABHE is the premier organization to drive leadership development, access and vital issues concerning Blacks in higher education, AABHE also facilitates and provides opportunities for collaborating and networking among individuals, institutions, groups and agencies in higher education in the United States and Internationally.

    Rovaris earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Kansas with a triple major in psychology; human development and family life; and crime and delinquency studies. He worked for three years as a financial aid counselor at Xavier University of Louisiana, where he earned an M.A. in guidance and counseling. He later earned a Ph.D. in higher education administration from the University of Illinois.

    Rovaris returned to Xavier, serving as assistant dean of the graduate school, director of graduate school placement and as an assistant professor with the graduate school. He also directed two nationally recognized student enrichment programs, Xavier’s McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program and its SuperScholar/EXCEL program.

    In 2006, he completed the Management Development Program at Harvard University. In 2007, he completed a Council for Opportunities in Education professional development tour in England and The Netherlands. Later in 2008-09, he was in Chicago at DePaul University as a presidential fellow with the American Council on Education. In 2010, he became associate vice chancellor for academic and multicultural affairs at the LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans, and in May 2014, he was named LSU vice provost for diversity.

    The LSU Office of Diversity is a division of the Office of Academic Affairs and provides support, referral and information to students, faculty and staff on issues and concerns related to diversity and inclusion. For more information, please visit www.lsu.edu/diversity.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Edwards named Principal of the Year semi-finalist

    East Baton Rouge Parish principal Catasha Edwards has been name a semifinalist in the Louisiana Department of Education’s 2020 Teacher and Principal of the Year.

    Edwards, who is principal at Westdale Heights Academic Magnet School, is one of 14 semi-finalists statewide and the only one from East Baton Rouge. She was also an assistant principal at Audubon Elementary.

    These educators are making exceptional gains with students, pushing them to achieve at the highest levels in the state.

    All Teacher and Principal of the Year finalists and semi-finalists will be honored at the 13th Annual Cecil. J. Picard Educator Excellence Symposium and Celebration on Friday, July 19, 2019 at the Crowne Plaza Executive Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

    ONLINE: Louisiana Believes

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Jinx Broussard wins national teacher of the year award

    LSU Manship School of Mass Communication’s Jinx Coleman Broussard, Ph.D. is the recipient of the 2018 Scripps Howard Foundation’s Teacher of the Year Award. The national competition recognizes excellence in teaching in several areas, including innovative teaching practices, influence on curriculum, mentoring of students and faculty scholarship as it relates to teaching, leadership in educational activities and on-going industry engagement inside and outside the classroom.

    Broussard is the Manship School’s Bart R. Swanson Endowed Memorial Professor and has been teaching public relations, strategic communications, media history, and mass media theory at the Manship School since she joined the School full time in 2006.

    Dubbed a pioneer in the classroom by her peers, Broussard is a strong supporter of community organizations through her service-learning curriculum. Her public relations campaigns students have successfully navigated regular course work while forming companies and selecting appropriate agency names and logos before conceiving of and implementing campaigns for dozens of local nonprofit organizations. For the past seven years, Broussard has partnered with Donate Life Louisiana to provide experiential learning opportunities to her students. Each year Broussard’s students develop strategic communication and public relations campaigns aimed at promoting organ, tissue and eye donation. Her work alongside students has led to increased donation awareness nationally for the Louisiana donor registry. Additionally, public relations campaigns produced by Broussard’s students for Donate Life Louisiana have won three national awards since 2014 – two first place awards and one second place award.

    Broussard has been honored with numerous awards, including The Center for Community Engagement, Learning, and Leadership (CCELL)’s 2018-2019 Service Learning Happy Award, the Public Relations Association of Louisiana’s (PRAL) First Circle Award for lifetime achievement in the field, the Clarence L. Barney African American Cultural Center Distinction in Diversity Award, the Baton Rouge Area of Black Journalists (BRAABJ) Pioneering Black Journalist Award, and the Legends Award from the LSU A. P. Tureaud Jr. Black Alumni Chapter, among others.

    “Jinx brings unmatched experience and enthusiasm to the classroom, and the Teacher of the Year Award highlights her fierce dedication to student learning and to seeing her students succeed. We are so proud of Jinx—but not surprised at all—that she won this prestigious award.” Martin Johnson, dean of the Manship School, said. “Over the years, Jinx has mentored countless students who have gone on to oversee communications for top national brands and non-profits. Many of the doctoral students she has mentored have gone on to professorships and have themselves shaped the lives of students as well.”

    Broussard’s research interests include the black press, representations of racial and ethnic minorities, media history, alternative media, crisis communication, public relations strategies and tactics, and the civil rights movement. These interests date back to her Ph.D. dissertation, “Lifting the Veil on Obscurity: Four Pioneering Black Women Journalists: 1890-1950” and subsequent books on these women. Broussard is also author of the national award-winning book titled African American Foreign Correspondents: A History. She also is co-author of a book about crisis communication that is scheduled to come out in May.

    As a public relations professional, Broussard was the director of university relations at Dillard University before becoming director of public information for the city of New Orleans and press secretary to Mayor Sidney J. Barthelemy in New Orleans for almost eight years.

    When notified of her selection, Broussard said her teaching involves drawing out of students the talents they do not know they possess, while guiding them to reach deep inside themselves to accomplish goals they thought were too advanced at the beginning of the semester but mastering them by the end of the semester.

    “I achieve this with my students by setting the highest expectations, by never handing them an answer, by challenging them and their solutions in ways the real world would, and by demonstrating by example that excellence involves being accountable and available, never cutting corners, and above all, that integrity is paramount to success not only in their academic and professional careers, but in their lives,” Broussard said.

    Broussard’s Teacher of the Year award will be presented at the beginning of the keynote session during the 2019 AEJMC Toronto Conference. The Scripps Howard School of Journalism will also hold a ceremony in Cincinnati, Ohio on April 18.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Lauren Roach receive MLK Humanitarian Award

    LSU’s Manship School of Mass Communication junior Lauren Roach was awarded the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Humanitarian Award by the LSU Black Faculty and Staff Caucus for her outstanding efforts in establishing a new initiative to improve race relations. Roach’s “Seaux Live” initiative aims to create safe spaces on campus for diverse students to meet and socialize to build a sense of community between people from the same ethnic background.

    Her initiative launched in September 2018 and resulted in many students gathering together between classes in a welcoming environment. Roach, a native of Bowie, Maryland, is studying digital advertising to work within the digital or social media marketing industry.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Girard Melancon picked to lead BRCC’s workforce solutions

    Girard Melancon, Ph.D., as vice chancellor for workforce solutions at Baton Rouge Community College. He has work with sector-based workforce training programs for more than 15 years and has invested more than $60 million foundation and taxpayer dollars into progressive workforce development initiatives. He is president of the National Council for Workforce Education. He earned a doctorate in education administration with higher education concentration in community and technical college finance and non-traditional students from the University of New Orleans.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Kennedy Center Fellow audits 400 years of American Blackness in verse

    With support from the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Baton Rouge-based writer, poet, and community activist, Donney Rose is exploring the debt owed to African American humanity in the United States with the creation of The American Audit – a poetry and mapping project assessing the nation’s standing with its black citizens 400 years after the first slaves settled in Jamestown. Placing a special emphasis on his own Louisiana/Deep South roots, Rose plans to culminate the project in a four-part multimedia performance piece/epic poem centered around the assessment of laws, culture, economics and family structure as it pertains to 400 years of black American existence using an audit report as extended metaphor, according to a blog post by The Kennedy Center. A 2018-2019 Kennedy Center Citizen Artist fellow, Rose is a native of Baton Rouge and a well-known performance poet whose career spans 20 years on the regional and national spoken word circuit.

    “Human life, dignity and liberation are invaluable concepts,” Rose said. “Yet 400 years ago, there were people who put a dollar amount and expected a monetary return on account of free labor. We cannot reconcile with those sins until we are able to honestly admit that a segment of our population are still reeling from the effects of not having their humanity fully actualized until just over 50 years ago. The plan for The American Audit is to examine the emotional currency, toll, labor extolled unto a group of people who came here as products and have fought to be fully human.’”

    Click here to read the Kennedy Center’s blog post on The American Audit. Watch The American Audit trailer here

     

    Read more »
  • ,

    Woodlawn High grad serves aboard guided-missile cruiser in Pearl Harbor

    PEARL HARBOR – A Baton Rouge, Louisiana, native and 2017 Woodlawn High School graduate is serving in the U.S. Navy aboard the guided-missile cruiser, USS Port Royal Seaman Elijah Sykes has served in the Navy for one-and-a-half years and is a U.S. Navy cryptologic technician (technical) aboard guided-missile cruiser operating out of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    As a Navy cryptologic technician, Sykes is responsible for anti-ship missile defense of the ship.

    Sykes credits success in the Navy to many of the lessons learned in Baton Rouge.“Keeping a steady foot, being assertive and getting the job done at that moment was something I brought into my Navy career,” said Sykes. Approximately 300 men and women serve aboard the ship. According to Navy officials, their jobs are highly specialized and keep each part of the cruiser running smoothly. They do everything from maintaining gas turbine engines and operating the highly sophisticated Aegis weapons system to driving the ship and operating small boats.Though there are many ways for sailors to earn distinction in their command, community, and career, Sykes is most proud of completing boot camp last year.

    “I have just started my career but the Navy has put me in a great position,” said Sykes.

    A Navy cruiser is a multi-mission ship that can operate independently or as part of a larger group of ships at sea Navy officials explained. The ship is equipped with a vertical launching system, tomahawk missiles, torpedoes, guns, and a phalanx close-in weapons systems. Being stationed in Pearl Harbor, often referred to as the gateway to the Pacific in defense circles, means Sykes is serving in a part of the world taking on a new importance in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances, and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy.“Our priorities center on people, capabilities, and processes, and will be achieved by our focus on speed, value, results and partnerships,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “Readiness, lethality and modernization are the requirements driving these priorities.”The Navy has been pivotal in helping maintain peace and stability in the Pacific region for decades. The Pacific is home to more than 50 percent of the world’s population, many of the world’s largest and smallest economies, several of the world’s largest militaries, and many U.S. allies.

    Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Sykes, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Sykes is honored to carry on that family tradition.

    “Several of my family members served,” said Sykes. “I am happy to continue the legacy of being in the military and my family has been very supportive of my decision.”

    As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Sykes and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes, one that will provide a critical component of the Navy the nation needs.

    “To me, serving in the Navy means protecting the waterfront and doing my duties on and off the ship,” said Sykes. “It’s not only what I can do for the Navy but what it can do for me.”

    By Chief Mass Communication Specialist Erica R. Gardner, Navy Office of Community Outreach
    U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brian T. Glunt 
    Read more »
  • ,,

    Darryl Johnson opens The Garden Cafe at Goodwood Library

    Darryl Johnson, owner of SYI Food Services, has opened The Garden Cafe at Independence Community Park. The cafe is located directly across from the Goodwood Main Library in Baton Rouge near the botanic gardens and serves hot and cold coffee drinks, smoothies, breakfast dishes, salads, soup, sandwiches, and desserts. Johnson also operates a food truck and catering service, as well as provides concessions at BREC’s Memorial and Olympia Stadiums. Formerly known as Socially Yours, SYI’s food truck provided the refreshments for the opening of the expansion of the botanic gardens in 2018 as his company had begun customizing the café’ space.

     

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Kelvin Hill hired to oversee public works

    Mayor Sharon Weston Broome has hired Kelvin J. Hill to fill the newly created assistant chief administrative officer position overseeing all six city-parish public works departments, beginning Feb. 4.

    Hill, the former vice president of operations at Georgia Pacific in Port Hudson, will be charged with supervising the departments of building and grounds, development, environmental services, fleet management, maintenance, and transportation and drainage.

    “The addition of Mr. Hill to my administration bolsters our capacity to ship high-high quality providers to the citizens of East Baton Rouge Parish,” stated Broome in a news release. “He brings a wealth of experience to our public works departments, which are the spine of City-Parish government.”

    Hill served as the vice president of operations at Georgia-Pacific and has more than 20 years of operations and management expertise.

    Read more »
  • ,,,,,

    Louis A. Berry Institute for Civil Rights & Justice honors Black Panther Malik Rahim

    The Center for African and African American Studies at Southern University at New Orleans partnered with Southern University Law Center’s Louis A. Berry Institute for Civil Rights & Justice to honor and recognize Louisiana’s own Malik Rahim (formerly known as Donald Guyton) at an inaugural Living Legend Award Celebration, Jan. 18, at the Millie M. Charles School of Social Work on SUNO’s campus.

    Rahim was selected because of his lifelong commitment to community activism.

    He enlisted in the United States Navy and after an honorable discharge, he became a founding member of the Louisiana Black Panther Party. He later served as a founding member of Sister Helen Prejean’s anti-death ministry, Pilgrimage for Life, as a founding member of the Fisher Projects Health Clinic and GED studies program and as the founder of the Angola 3 Support Committee. Following Hurricane Katrina, he served Louisiana citizens in need through immediate rescue efforts and later founded Common Ground Collective, which offered free healthcare, legal, rebuilding and clean up services in homes, schools and commercial buildings in nine parishes. By the time his work with CGC ended, approximately half a million Louisiana citizens had been served at no cost. From the 1970s until the present, Rahim has been a fierce and committed advocate for environmental and social justice, housing and prisoner rights and civil and human rights.

     

    Feature photo of Malik Rahim is from BlackSourceMedia.com

     

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Kenneth Sanders elected Justice of the Peace

    Southern University alumn Kenneth Sanders has been elected Democratic judge of the Tarrant County Justice of the Peace Courts in Arlington, TX.  Sanders is part of a historic number of new Black justices of the peace in Texas. The Fort Worth native defeated the incumbent in the general election on Nov. 8, 2018.

    See his swearing in here: https://youtu.be/xS7ak9Fm-GQ

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    ‘Nature’ recognizes LSU chemistry professor Isiah Warner for mentorship

    Nature, the leading, international weekly journal of science has selected LSU Boyd Professor Isiah Warner for the Nature Award for Mentoring in Science. The Nature Awards for Mentoring in Science were founded in 2005 to celebrate mentorship, a crucial component of scientific career development that too often goes overlooked and unrewarded. Through Warner’s leadership and mentorship, the LSU Department of Chemistry has become the leading producer of doctoral degrees in chemistry for African Americans in the U.S. Under his direction, the LSU Office of Strategic Initiatives has mentored countless numbers of students across eight programs from the high school to doctoral levels.

    “I am delighted at the achievements of our awards winners, including Dr. Warner, and I am especially delighted this year at the diversity of their experiences and of their commitments to mentoring. I know that the judges had a strong field of applicants. It’s terrific for Nature to be able to celebrate researchers who have been so outstanding in their encouragement of a strong scientific ethos in those who come after them,” said Sir Philip Campbell, editor-in-chief of Springer Nature.

    Warner is considered one of the world’s experts in analytical applications of fluorescence spectroscopy. His research aims to develop and apply chemical, instrumental and mathematical measurements to solve fundamental questions in chemistry.

    Warner has recently been recognized as the 2016 SEC Professor of the Year, member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, American Chemical Society, Royal Society of Chemistry and American Association for Advancement of the Sciences. He also received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring from President Clinton and the American Chemical Society Award for Encouraging Disadvantaged Students into the Sciences.

    “Dr. Warner’s dedication to teaching, service and research embodies the LSU mission. We congratulate him on this international recognition,” said LSU President F. King Alexander.

    Warner is also the Phillip W. West Professor of Chemistry, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor at LSU and has achieved the highest professorial rank in the LSU system — LSU Boyd Professor.

    Each year, Nature gives the awards in a different geographical region, and this year’s awards honor excellent mentors in the South of the United States. Awardees are nominated by a group of their former trainees, from different stages of the mentor’s professional life; and the winners of the awards have demonstrated outstanding mentorship throughout their careers.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Southern University System Board installs new chair, members

    The Southern University System Board of Supervisors today convened for its first meeting of the new year at Southern University Baton Rouge. Atty. Domoine D. Rutledge and the Rev. Samuel C. Tolbert Jr. were installed as the new chair and vice chair, respectively.

    “We have been entrusted with a tremendous responsibility by way of Southern and I approach it with a seriousness of purpose that it warrants,” Rutledge said.

    The two-time Southern alumnus said he had three major objectives for himself and his fellow board members of the system of five campuses — Southern University Baton Rouge, Southern University New Orleans, Southern University Shreveport, Southern University Law Center and Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center.

    “…Increased attention and focus to enrollment management,” he said. “Students are the lifeblood of this university. We have to ensure that they have a quality experience academically and otherwise. We must also focus on the alignment of the academic inventory with workforce demands. It is one thing to have a degree but another to have a job. We must ensure our students have marketable skills to compete in a global marketplace.

    “And finally, we cannot ignore how a disinvestment in education — particularly higher education — forces us to create new revenue streams through public and private partnerships and other means that will bear tremendous fruit for this institution for years to come.”

    Also installed to the 16-member board were Raymond Fondel and Leon R. Tarver II — both reappointed by Gov. John Bel Edwards. New appointees, Sam Albert Gilliam and Arlanda Williams, were installed as well.

    Gilliam is a former member of the Board (2000-2006) and most recently served as interim chancellor at Southern University Shreveport. Williams represents Louisiana’s 1st Congressional District and is vice chancellor for workforce development and institutional advancement at Delgado Community College. CrBOekRI

    The Board and others presented tokens of appreciation to Ann A. Smith, outgoing chair, and the Rev. Donald R. Henry, outgoing vice chair, as well as immediate past members Michael Small and the Rev. Joe R. Gant. The Board’s “Above and Beyond” award for Southern University System exemplary employee service went to Patricia Coleman, a payroll accountant at Southern University Baton Rouge.

    Other meeting highlights included more information on the rollout of Southern University System President Ray L. Belton’s working strategic plan for the system; reports from campus chancellors and other administrators; and infrastructure update. The board is scheduled to meet again on Feb. 22 on the campus of Southern University Shreveport.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Courtney M. Scott named chief service officer

    Courtney M. Scott has been named chief service officer for Mayor-President Sharon Broome. Scott has over 15 years of multi-faceted experience in project management, community engagement, and communications. She has deep relationships with Baton Rouge’s arts, cultural, non-profit, academic as well as business and civic communities. Her passion and commitment to the city are unparalleled.

    Scott earned both a bachelor and master’s degree in Mass Communication from Southern University and is a graduate of Baton Rouge Magnet High School.

    As Chief service officer Scott will support the development of strategic city initiatives focused on increasing volunteerism, community engagement, and new partnerships with businesses and philanthropic leaders. Upcoming initiatives that fall under the chief service officer include Mayor’s Summer Youth Employment Program and Mayor’s Youth Advisory Council.

    “Service has shaped my character and success, and I am honored and humbled to serve the Baton Rouge community in this role,” said Scott. “My goal is to create a collaborative experience for residents by developing action-oriented plans that deliver concrete results and continuously improve quality of life while furthering progress in our community.”

    Read more »
  • Young received distinction honors

    Angela Nichols Young, Ph.D., of Lake Providence, has been selected for inclusion in the upcoming Trademark Women of Distinction 2018 Honors for demonstrating dedication and professional excellence. She is CEO of Healthy Minds Counseling Angency and the House of Hope for Boys in Bastrop.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Master Sergeant Bianca S. Sellers-Brown retires with 30 years civil service

    USAF - 1980-1Master Sergeant Bianca S. Sellers-Brown retired Nov. 3 with 30 years federal civil service and 34 years in the U.S. Air Force.State Rep. Barbara Norton acknowledged the occasion as Bianca Brown Day. Brown also received proclamations from Gov. John Bel Edwards and Senator W. Jay Luneau. According to her husband, Tony Brown, she has “commuted from Woodworth to Barksdale AFB in Bossier–282 miles a day–for more than 15 years. She has driven 1.1 million miles in that time she says for God and Country.”

    Master Sergeant Bianca S. Sellers-Brown is the Noncommissioned Officer in Charge for the 307th Mission Support Group Commander’s Support Staff, Barksdale Air Force Base, LA, responsible for managing the administrative support functions for over 400 personnel. She has the additional responsibility of Wing Focal Point for the Unit Training Assembly Processing System (UTAPS), managing the participation records for over 1,400 Reserve personnel assigned to the 307th Bomb Wing. As a Wing Focal Point, she also provides training and helpdesk support to all personnel requiring access to UTAPS and the Air Force Reserve Orders Writing system (AROWS-R). Because of her wide breadth of experience and expertise in her career field, she was also appointed to the Wing Inspection Team. Her willingness to assist when required resulted in her being requested by name to provide backfill administrative support to almost 200 personnel assigned to the 489th Bomb Group at Dyess AFB, TX. She has served over 34 years in the United States Air Force and the Air Force Reserves combined.

    Sergeant Sellers-Brown was born in Redlands, California and enlisted in the Air Force through the delayed enlistment program in January 1980, while a senior in high school. After graduating high school, she departed for basic military training in July 1980. She graduated Administrative Support Specialist technical training school at Keesler AFB, MS in October 1980. Her first active duty assignment was overseas at RAF Fairford, England with the 7020th Air Base Group. In January 1983, she was transferred to the 23rd Tactical Fighter Wing, the “Flying Tigers”, at England AFB in Alexandria, Louisiana where she attended Noncommissioned Officer Leadership School in November 1987 and received the award of Distinguished Graduate. Her final active duty position was serving as the Military Secretary to the 23rd Tactical Fighter Wing Commander. She separated from active duty in December 1992.

    In March 1997, she joined the Air Force Reserve, serving with the 917th Transportation Squadron at Barksdale AFB, LA. While assigned to the Transportation Squadron, she deployed as a transporter to RAF Fairford, England in support of Coronet Astro (Jun 1998), Elmendorf AFB, Alaska (Jun 1999), Australia in support of Operation Tandum Thrust (May 2001) and Istres, France (Sep 2001).

    In July 2001, she accepted a full-time position as an Air Reserve Technician (ART) with the 917th Maintenance Squadron. She earned recognition as the 917th Wing Noncommissioned Officer of the Quarter, Apr-Jun 2002. In April 2004, she was hired as the Noncommissioned Officer in Charge of the Commander’s Support Staff (CSS) with the 917th Mission Support Group (MSG), working directly for the Mission Support Group Commander and promoted to the rank of Master Sergeant in May 2004. In Jan 2011, the 917th Wing inactivated and was reactivated as the 307th Bomb Wing. She remained assigned to the 307th MSG as the Unit Program Coordinator until 1 Oct 2017 when she was assigned the task of standing up the newly reorganized Group CSS for the 307th MSG.

    Her awards and decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal, Air Force Commendation Medal, Air Force Achievement Medal, Air Force Outstanding Unit Award, Air Force Good Conduct Medal, Air Reserve Forces Meritorious Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Nuclear Deterrence Operations Service Medal, Air Force Overseas Ribbon Long Tour, Air Force Longevity Service, Armed Forces Reserve Medal, USAF Noncommissioned Officer Professional Military Education Graduate Ribbon, Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon (Rifle) and the Air Force Training Ribbon.

    Sergeant Sellers-Brown is married to Tony Brown of Lake Charles, LA and together they have three children, Shayne (Danielle) Daney, Joseph Brown, and Sydney Brown and six grandchildren, Jaynila, Joseph Jr, Joeria, André, Adrian, and Jylell. Tony is a news journalist and owner of Eyes Open Productions, who was recently featured in a television documentary by Investigation Discovery.

    Read more »
  • Williams inducted as first Black chief judge of the Second Circuit

    Chief Judge Felicia Toney Williams, of Tallulah, has been inducted Dec. 13 to the Second Court of Appeals in Shreveport. On Oct. 4, Williams became the first Black chief judge of the Second Circuit, which serves 20 parishes in North Louisiana. She has served four years on the Louisiaiana Judiciary Commission, and chair of the Louisiana Conference of Court of Appeal Judges. She was elected unapposed to a third, 10-year term. She is married to attorney Moses Junior Williams. She had three children Rhonda, Myra and Justin, and two grandchildren Christian and Camryn.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Gregory Pierson appointed assistant director of aviation

    Gregory Pierson was appointed assistant director of aviation of the Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport (BTR) by Mike Edwards, the director of aviation.

    Pierson has 12 years of airport management experience, and was serving as the Interim Assistant Director of Aviation. He was previously the BTR Airport Computer/Electronics Systems Manager (IT Manager). He first joined the Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport 15 years ago as a PC LAN Specialist. Within his first three years, he was promoted to a PC LAN Administrator. In his most recent role as IT Manager, his Airport-wide involvement afforded him the experience to identify and manage the expectations and needs of various stakeholders, while ensuring the decisions and processes related to the Technology division were in alignment with the overall mission of the Airport.

    Pierson holds a bachelor of science degree in computer science with a minor in business management from Southern University, and a masters of business administration from the University of Phoenix. He has an ITIL Foundation and Software House industry certification and is currently preparing for his AAAE Certified Member certification. He is also a member of the National Association of Tax Professionals (NATP), and is an IRS Registered Tax Preparer.

    “I am truly humbled and excited about the opportunity to serve in this new capacity. I look forward to continuing to do my part to make BTR the airport of choice, and to facilitate improvements in our community outreach efforts.”

    Greg grew up in the Baton Rouge Area, graduating from Scotlandville Magnet High School in Baton Rouge. He and his wife LaToya have three children, Alyvia, Dylan and Skylar.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Barrow, Peacock named State Senators of the Year

    The Childcare Association of Louisiana recently named Senator Regina Barrow and Senator Barrow Peacock as its 2018 State Senators of the Year.

    District 15 State Senator Regina Barrow was honored for her support of important legislative reform issues promoted by the association and her many other significant contributions on behalf of early childhood education. The association also noted her tireless work in ensuring the safety and education of the state’s youngest learners and her passion about early childhood education. Senator Barrow is currently enrolled in the Tulane University Early Childhood Policy Leadership Institute and will graduate in November 2018.

    Barrow Peacock

    Barrow Peacock

    District 37 State Senator Barrow Peacock was also selected for the award. He promoted legislation during the 2018 Regular Session of the Louisiana legislature to lower the cost of childcare. The association also noted his consistent support of early childhood education when selecting him for the award.

    The Childcare Association of Louisiana is a professional organization serving the needs of licensed childcare centers and early childhood education across the state. Its mission is to educate, advocate and collaborate to build a premier, proactive early childhood education industry for Louisiana families.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Dawn Mellion-Patin receives Iowa State’s 2018 George Washington Carver Distinguished Service Award

    Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center’s Vice Chancellor for Extension and Outreach Dawn Mellion-Patin, Ph.D., has been named the recipient of the 2018 George Washington Carver Distinguished Service Award by Iowa State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

    Patin has dedicated her career to educating and improving the lives of small farmers. In 2005, she developed the Southern University Ag Center’s Small Farmer Agricultural Leadership Training Institute, an intensive leadership development program that guides small, minority, socially-disadvantaged and limited-resource farmers through the process of becoming competitive agricultural entrepreneurs.
    aa8d40d7369d9be54015ed6f722c4bb9
    Her work in the field of agriculture has also provided her with the opportunity to serve as a panel manager for United States Department of Agriculture (USDA); chair of the Southern Region- Agricultural and Natural Resources Program Leaders Committee; grant committee member for the USDA’s  National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA); 1890 representative on the National Extension Disaster Education Network Executive Committee and historian for the National Society of Minorities in Agricultural, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) organization.

    She has received the SU Ag Center’s Outstanding Specialist Award, Tuskegee University’s Distinguished Service Award, the Association of Extension Administrators Excellence in Extension Award and USDA NIFA Cooperative Extension System Outstanding Leadership Award.

    Patin earned a bachelor’s degree in plant and soil sciences and a master’s degree in educational agriculture, both from Southern University, and a doctoral degree in Agricultural and Life Sciences Education from Iowa State University.

    The George Washington Carver Distinguished Service Award was established in 2005. The award honors distinguished College of Agriculture and Life Sciences alumni who have demonstrated outstanding achievement or leadership by making significant, influential, or innovative contributions to society.

    Patin received the award during the annual Honors and Awards Ceremony on October 26.

    By LaKeeshia Lusk
    The Drum Contributing Writer

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Buddy Stewart Music Foundation honored during Henry Turner Jr Day Music Fest

    Henry Turner Jr. honored the Buddy Stewart Music Foundation’s Philliper Stewart, Sonia (Trudy) Stewart and Cardell Stewart with the 2018 Henry Turner Jr. Day Music Festival Community Award. A Certificate and Commemorative plaque of the “Baton Rouge Theme Song” were presented on Saturday, October 27 at the 2nd Annual Festival held at North Boulevard Town Square on the Galvez Plaza Crest Stage.African Queen Z Dance Troupe

    Henry Turner Jr.Day was established in 2017 to salute individuals, organizations and companies, in the greater Baton Rouge area, for their ongoing philanthropic efforts to improve the quality of life for people in the community.

    As a musician, bandleader, singer/songwriter, promoter, activist and musical entrepreneur Henry Turner Jr. is well known for mentoring musical talent. For his contributions both October 28, 2015, and October 28, 2017, were proclaimed Henry Turner Jr. Day by Mayor Presidents’ Kip Holden and Sharon Weston Broome. As a direct result of these honors Henry Turner Jr. Day now pays homage to others whose on-going efforts continue to make Baton Rouge a better place.

    The Buddy Stewart Music Foundation was chosen as it has served the Baton Rouge community for over 30 years. The former business was originally known as Buddy Stewart’s Rock Shop. It was, at one time, one of the largest minority family owned and operated music stores in South Louisiana. It came about as a result of Buddy’s passion for music. As a bandleader with a big band sound and the ability to sing, write, play and promote the art of music he understood the historical impact of music in people’s lives. Last year’s honoree was Families Helping Families.

    Lilli Lewis

    Lilli Lewis

    The festivals’ lineup included Louisiana Red Hot Records’ Lilli Lewis and featured Universal Music Groups Brett Barrow on guitar playing with Henry Turner, Jr. & Flavor. Additional performers included Clarence “Pieman” Williams and the Rouge Band along with Henry Turner Jr.s’ Listening Room All-Star’s April “Sexy Red” Jackson, Lee Tyme, Xavie Shorts, Uncle Chess and the Groove Band, Larry “LZ” Dillon, Dinki Mire and comedian Eddie Cool. Dance troupes included the Chinese Friendship Association of Baton Rouge, Yuan’s Dance Studio and African Queen Z. Famed drummer Joe Monk led a jam that closed the show and featured SmokeHouse Porter and Miss Mamie, Robert “The Juice” Lenore, Andrew Bernard of John Fred & his Playboy Band and 7 Goddess. Teddy “Lloyd” Johnson of Teddy Juke Joint served as Emcee.

    Feature photo: Henry Turner Jr. presenting the Buddy Stewart Music Foundation with the Henry Turner, Jr Day 2018 Community Award and Commemorative plaque of the “Baton Rouge Theme Song.”(L-R) Sonia (Trudy) Stewart, Philliper Steward, Cardell Stewart and Henry Turner, Jr.

    Read more »
  • ,

    E. Keith Cunningham of LHC earns Sterling Achievement Award

    The Council of State Community Development Agencies has recognized the Louisiana Housing Corporation for its efforts to house families displaced by the 2016 floods. The council recently presented LHC executive director E. Keith Cunningham Jr., with the Sterling Achievement Award during its Annual Meeting. “Receiving the Sterling Achievement Award is an incredible honor and accomplishment – one that recognizes our dedication to serving the citizens of Louisiana,” said Cunningham. “We have a dynamic team, who despite experiencing personal loss during the flood, demonstrated exemplary commitment and compassion for helping families impacted by the flood.” The Sterling Achievement Award recognizes state programs that demonstrate positive results in improving the lives of people who are experiencing homelessness or on the verge of being homeless. This award is presented annually to one state agency.

     

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Bell directs New Venture’s ‘Love, Whitney – A Choreoplay!’

    New Venture Theatre recently announced the cast of the upcoming Love, Whitney – A Choreoplay!, October 19-21 at the Hayden Hall at Southern University. An original production, conceived by Greg Williams Jr.,  as a way to pay honor and tribute to one of the great voices of our time. Performed only through dance, Love, Whitney is a celebration of one of America’s greatest talents, Whitney Houston! The show catalogs her career while expressing the themes behind her music and her story. The show features all her greatest hits, and will have you dancing in the aisles. The cast are: Trinity Star Alexander, Zaria Brown, Adaya Robertson, Aleriya Griffin, Ambre Porter, Dion Sideboard Jr., Elise Patin, Elisha Jenkins, Jamaal Edwards, Jamin Brock, Jasmine Elliott, Kali Jones, Karenna Mitchell, Kari Johnson, Kayla Mitchell, Kerrington Griffin, Kodie Danay Brown, Krystal Gomez, Kyle Smith, Mariyah Osborne, MiKesha Anderson, Navaeh Robertson, Omarion Jones, Queline Ketchens, Raymond Turner, Rontrevius Foreman, Shira Brown, Tameia Hayes, and Trinity Simmons. Dwight Bell is director and choreographer. ℜ

     

    Read more »
  • ,

    Dr. Joia Crear-Perry joins state commission for healthy babies

    Dr. Joia Crear-Perry of New Orleans, was appointed by Gov. John Bel Edwards to the Healthy Moms, Healthy Babies Advisory Council. Crear-Perry is an obstetrician and gynecologist and the President of the National Birth Equity Collaborative. She will serve as a representative of a community-based organization that works to prevent maternal mortality. The Healthy Moms, Healthy Babies Advisory Council was created to address racial and ethnic disparities in maternal health outcomes and incorporate a community-engaged, equity-focused lens into current programs and campaigns which seek to prevent maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity. The council shall promote safe and equitable care for every mother and every birth in this state.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    School board selects Kenyetta Nelson-Smith to lead

    The seven-member East Baton Rouge Parish School Board unanimously selected Kenyetta Nelson-Smith Ph.D., as vice-president of the board following the resignation of Rep. Connie Bernard last month. Nelson-Smith has represented District 3 in North Baton Rouge since 2011. She is the assistant professor/program leader of child development at Southern University and an assistant specialist of community and economic development with the Ag Center. She will hold the vice president position through Nov. 6 when she seeks re-election.

     

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Who to Watch: Barbara W. Green

    Baton Rouge counselor Barbara Green said she discusses everything with Seniors, parents, and social workers. At 71, Green manages a full time practice, host trainings and seminars, teaches in ministry, and publishes children’s books along with spiritual reflections. A native of Shreveport, Green has spoken to audiences that number in the thousands and consistently fills them with wisdom, hope, and clear instructions to move forward in their lives. She has been married to Henry Green of Belle Chasse, Louisiana for 48 years.

    Green is a licensed professional Christian counselor and marriage and family therapist who has been in private practice since 1989. She established Inner Reflections Counseling for “the purpose of helping people to help themselves.”

    Barbara W. Green shares "The Great One" with excited fifth graders in Baton Rouge.

    Barbara W. Green shares “The Great One” with excited fifth graders in Baton Rouge.

    She has recently taken her teachings on God’s call of parenting and family dynamics to groups across the state and nation through online podcast interviews. These teachings are written in her books: The Parent Anointing and The Great One.

    “Evangelist Barbara W. Green’s story The Great One will inspire readers to ensure that each generation’s history is properly passed down to equip the next generation for life’s journey. Although, the characters are dogs, their humanistic approach to spirituality and community is one we can all relate to. In this beautiful story, you will find disparity, hope, inspiration, and a quest to salvage your own family history and hold on to the greatness of family histories,” wrote Ellen Sudderth, the host of ESPresents in Virginia.

    Moves made from 2015 to 2017:  Sponsored workshops and a weekend retreat for women. Launched The Parent Anointing seminar for parents, guardians, and individuals who work with children. Conducted workshops for the EBR School System and area churches. Conducted weekly workshop for East Baton Rouge Council on Aging for the elderly citizens who were affected by The Great Flood in August 2016. Published my first children’s book, The Great One, with illustrator Antoine Mitchell.

    What to expect in 2018 from you: Trainings and webinars in emotional intelligence, married couples enrichment, and Sister-to-Sister.

    Personal resolution: To leave this natural world empty so that I might enter the spiritual world full.

    Life/business motto: “Helping Others to Help Themselves”

    Business resolution: To better my clients emotionally so that they might live their best lives.

    What is your #1 priority right now?  Service!

    Best advice you’ve ever received?  Live Your Best Life Now!

    Role Model: Maya Angelou

    What has been a deciding moment or an experience that pushed you forward?
    A deciding moment always comes on the heels of challenge. With that being said I think many of my deciding moments  have come when I felt I had little choice other than to choose to try. During the times of sickness, fear of consequences or getting beyond challenges that would inadequately define me if I failed, or just plain pride are the unctions that made me move forward to conquer the challenge. After the victories I knew that it was God who presented the URGE to give the challenge my best shot at conquest. The results have produced much humility in the recognition that it is God who gets the glory for every victory, beginning with the decision to even attempt the conquest of the challenge in the first place.

    What music are you listening/dancing to? Gospel

    What are you reading?  Butterfly Rising in my Soul by D. Renee Hamilton

    What’s entertaining you?  I go to the moves regularly. I like to watch “The Good Doctor” series.

    ONLINE: www.barbaragreenministries.org 

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Who to Watch: Niki’ H. Morrow

    As a child growing up in Lake Charles, Niki’ H. Morrow wanted to “save the world.” It is a passion that she said has led her to earn a degree in sociology from LSU and to hold a career in social services. “It has been my passion since a very young age,” said Morrow who has recently been selected as one of 30 professionals to participate in the state’s Adverse Childhood Experience Educator Program. The program will train-the-trainers on the impact of childhood adversity and traumatic experiences such as abuse, neglect, or sexual assault.

    A case manager for a local nonprofit, Morrow also mentors young girls at Star Hill Baptist Church. She often used craftmaking to release stress and express herself creatively. But, what began as a hobby has become a growing business in Baton Rouge.

    “My father, who was an entrepreneur, always wanted me to follow in his footsteps, but I refused not knowing it would be my saving grace in life years later,” she said. HarloweHearts

    In 2015, Morrow, established Harlowe Enterprises LLC and Harlowe Hearts Custom Designs. “Harlowe Hearts is a lifestyle brand that takes pride in bringing you exclusive custom made designs and products that fit every occasion in your life. Our staff has an amazing eye for detail, vast knowledge of products, and constant growing proficiency in the latest printing methods,” said the 37-year-old.

    Moves made: Harlowe Hearts Custom Designs opened in 2015. Since that time, we have grown into a full-service custom design boutique that offers screenprinting, vinyl designs, and embroidery.

    What to expect from you: We will begin to provide embroidered school uniforms and expand services provided to business such as promotional items and uniforms.

    Personal resolution: Constantly strive for growth and excellence

    Life/business motto: Let’s make something amazing together.

    Business resolution: To double our company’s net worth by the end of the year.

    What is your #1 priority right now? Growing Harlowe Hearts into a full-service, brick and mortar embroidery boutique.

    Best advice you’ve ever received? NO simply means “Next Opportunity.”

    Role Models:  My father, Lawrence Morrow, founder and owner of Gumbeaux Magazine, and my mother, Jacqueline Malveaux

    What has been a deciding moment or an experience that pushed you forward? The joy and excitement we get from our customers.

    What music are you listening/dancing to? Trevor Jackson, Ella Mae, and Shamar Allen

    What are you reading? The Art & Science of Respect by J. Prince and  Year of Yes by Shonda Rhimes

    What’s entertaining you? Ted Talks

    ONLINE: www.harlowehearts.com and @harlowehearts

     

    Read more »
  • ,

    University View Academy promotes Michelle Clayton to Superintendent

    The University View Academy Board of Directors voted to promote Michelle Clayton, Ph.D., to Superintendent of the K-12 statewide online charter school at the first meeting of the 2018-19 school year.

    Over the past seven years, the school has grown from originally serving 500 K-12 students to a current enrollment of 3100 students from every parish of the state using an innovative model of online instruction by certified Louisiana teachers.

    Clayton has served as associate superintendent of University View for the past year under the leadership of Lonnie Luce, Ph.D., who move to a new leadership role as the school’s chief officer.

    Clayton’s prior experience includes serving as deputy superintendent of East Baton Rouge Parish School System and as the executive director of academics for the Zachary Community School System.

    “I am very excited about the opportunity to help students across the state and be part of the innovative delivery model at University View Academy,” said Clayton. “The school has a tradition of academic achievement, and I will continue to build on that strong foundation. Innovation resonates with who I am as an educator.”

    She is a graduate of Louisiana State University and earned a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from University of Louisiana Lafayette and a doctorate from Southern University in science and mathematics education.

    Read more »
  • ,,,,

    Lashley means business in the Big Apple

    Growing up in Franklin, La., LSU graduate Victor Lashley may have come from a small town, but he’s making a name for himself in New York City.

    “My very first day in New York City was the day I moved here for my summer internship. I packed my bags, got in a cab and pretended to know the address that I gave my taxi driver,” said Lashley.

    Lashley said the internships and connections he made at LSU set him on a path for success.

    “The College of Business has a lot of good partnerships with a lot of different companies, so they would come into the Finance Club and with a lot of opportunities for internships or careers and JP Morgan was on my radar. I just worked with the Olinde Career Center to be a qualified candidate. I applied and started interning when I was a sophomore.”

    During Lashley’s first summer at JP Morgan, he worked in the prime brokerage operation within their investment bank. Lashley returned to JP Morgan for a second summer, this time working in treasury services. After graduating from LSU in 2012, he became an official employee of JP Morgan, working as a sales associate.

    “Every 6 months I went to a different role, so during my first two years I had four different jobs. And then after that program finished, I placed permanently in trade finance and that involves importing, exporting, and working capital transactions internationally.”

    Lashley has since worked his way up to vice president of global trade at JP Morgan.

    “The day-to-day responsibilities are connecting U.S. customers with either a buyer or seller in an international market. So, (working with) a U.S. manufacturer selling to an emerging market or a U.S. company that’s sourcing or purchasing somewhere overseas,” Lashley said.

    While a student at LSU, Lashley majored in business marketing with a minor in leadership development.

    “I did a program in the Honors College called LASAL (Louisiana Service and Leadership), which is all about partnering with Louisiana locally to address poverty and coastal land loss, so it was a combination of two unrelated topics that gave me a very diverse experience in terms of class and activities.”

    Lashley said that experience at LSU, along with everything he learned through his various internships, has helped him get where he is today. And he’s not the only LSU graduate who is enjoying success in New York City.

    “LSU gives you the world in South Louisiana. It’s definitely very cultural, very rich in spirit and the LSU brand will stay with you for the rest of your life. I meet people in New York City who may recognize my class ring, or maybe purple and gold when I wear it, and it’s a connection that’s always there.”

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Who to Watch: Steven C. Baham

    Steven C. Baham, 40, is a computer scientist and owner of Baham Laboratories, LLC, in Baton Rouge. A native of Slidell, Baham is the son of Les and Eva Baham. As a child, he and his brother, Michael, wanted a Nintendo game system, but their father wanted them to build computers to play video games instead. Since 1994, Baham has been gradually building clientele as a technology consultant. He established Baham Laboratories, LLC in 2004, and today the company has more than 600 clients and nearly 30 business IT service agreements in Baton Rouge, Hammond, New Orleans, and Slidell.

    Moves made from 2015 to 2017: The 2016 flood was challenging because with my home office damaged, I had to learn to operate with a small amount of equipment with minimal space. Even so, we were able to build a custom e-mail cloud server for Baham Labs clients with special security features, recover valuable data for clients who had their office computer flooded.

    What to expect in 2018 from you? My biggest topic I keep reinforcing is digital security. I think most people don’t take it seriously until something really bad happens to them. It’s my job to help protect and educate people/organizations on how to protect themselves. When you’re a person like me who sees the worse things happen to some people online, it makes it easier to explain to others the steps they should be taking. I still have a few surprises for 2018 that I can’t reveal yet, but watch our social media accounts in the next couple months.

    Baham Laboratories

    Baham Laboratories

    Role models: My parents are my main role models.

    What is your #1 priority right now? I have a small team finishing the data wiring for the new Geico building in Baton Rouge. That’s my priority since the next business steps will take place after that.s complete.

    Best advice you’ve ever received? Prepare yourself for what you want to do in the future, as well as prepare yourself the best you can for what might happen.

    What has been a deciding moment or an experience that pushed you forward? It took me missing a wedding anniversary, and my daughter’s birthday one year because a client didn’t follow my advice… which lead to a system crash which they expected me to fix on those days respectively. I think when I realized that I could tell people what they HAD to do to improve their data systems, and if they refused, I could tell them to sign off on a form showing that I wasn’t liable for what might happen, was when I realized I had more power over how I could run my business.

    Personal resolution: More vacation time

    Business motto: “We organize digital chaos.”

    What music are you listening/dancing to? I’m enjoying my 80s station on XM radio.

    What are you reading? Currently a lot of technical information online.

    What’s entertaining you? I love going to the movies! I’m also a Marvel movie fan, and a lifelong Star Wars fan.

    ONLINE: www.bahamlabs.com 

     

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    NAACP honors Stewart with Cobb Award

    On July 16, Louisiana Center for Health Equity President Alma C. Stewart received the NAACP Dr. William Montague Cobb Award “For her outstanding efforts to advance health policy, health advocacy, and social justice in the State of Louisiana.” The award was presented at the NAACP Annual Convention in San Antonio. This award is given annually in recognition of the legacy of Dr. William Montague Cobb, who served as the President of the NAACP from 1976 to 1983, to honor individuals and organizations that have made a significant impact in the field of health.

    Stewart has served as the state health committee chair for the Louisiana State Conference of the NAACP since 2014. She also organized the statewide, multi-year Campaign for Healthcare for Everyone Louisiana in 2013. The goal of this campaign was to advocate for statewide policy change and build grassroots momentum to implement Medicaid expansion by 2016.

    In an effort to address Louisiana’s high rate of uninsured adults, keeping the Louisiana State Conference of the NAACP and HCEL partner organizations engaged, over the course of three years Stewart organized public testimony at legislative hearings, rallies, press conferences and prayer vigils under the mantra of “Dying for Coverage” as part of a movement to bring attention to this issue on a state and national level. HCEL was successful in shaping public opinion about Medicaid expansion which polls favorably in Louisiana despite cascading contributions from well-financed conservative out-of-state organizations that have opposed it. She coordinated the hosting and production of a gubernatorial candidate forum on healthcare that was televised and livestreamed across the state in 2015. Alma has personally penned numerous articles and delivered countless speeches and presentations.

    On January 12, 2016, Governor John Bel Edwards signed an executive order expanding Medicaid in Louisiana on his first day in office making Louisiana the first state in the Deep South to expand Medicaid. Not only was this a win for Stewart and her organization, the Louisiana State Conference of the NAACP and others, but also for the hundreds of thousands of people who gained health insurance when this law went into effect on July 1, 2016. “Many of the more than 470,180 Louisiana citizens who now have health insurance coverage, in rural and urban areas, under the Medicaid expansion are doing so for the first time, and are receiving preventive care, early diagnosis and treatment for cancer, diabetes, mental health conditions, and addictions. Early diagnosis and access to care both help reduce costs to the state and the healthcare system,” said Stewart.

    The infusion of federal dollars for Medicaid expansion created and supported 19,200 jobs that have brought in state and local tax receipts of $103 million and $74.6 million, respectively, according to a March 2018 report by the Louisiana State University’s Public Administration Institute. Medicaid expansion saved the state $199 million in fiscal year 2017, according to a 2017 report from the Louisiana Department of Health. The reasons include the state spending match is lower under Medicaid expansion than it was before, both for most Medicaid populations and for supplemental payments to hospitals. The decrease in the uninsured population has also reduced “disproportionate share payments” to hospitals for people without coverage who receive treatment.

    “Medicaid expansion has benefitted Louisiana in several ways and there is growing evidence to support the fact that it is working. Moreover, it is saving lives. That’s why the NAACP Dr. William Montague Cobb Award means so much to me,” said Stewart.

    About Louisiana Center for Health Equity

    Louisiana Center for Health Equity which is a statewide 501(c) (3) tax-exempt organization, dedicated to the mission of addressing health and healthcare disparities, and fostering health equity in Louisiana. Founded in January 2010, the organization has partnered with over forty other Louisiana organizations on a state, local and national level to eliminate health disparities caused by poverty, lack of access to quality health care, and unhealthy environmental conditions.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Henry Turner Jr. to receive Slim Harpo Music Award

    Blues, soul and funk musician Henry Turner Jr. has used his musical platform to celebrate philanthropists and musicians in the Baton Rouge area. The city is awarding him with the 2018 Slim Harpo Blues Award, Thursday, November 15 at 6 p.m. at Time Out in Baton Rouge.

    Turner was named an “Ambassador” for his efforts to represent and share his enthusiasm for blues with music enthusiasts. It is an incredible honor that he shares with other 2018 recipients, Shannon Williford (“Legend”) and Mamie & Smokehouse Porter (“Pioneers”). Previous recipients of the Slim Harpo Music Award include Van Morrison, Keith Richards, Alvin Batiste, Buddy Guy and many others.

    Henry Turner, Jr. and his band, & Flavor, have released nine CDs and seventeen singles. Henry Turner & Flavor have toured the United States, Canada and Japan. In 2014, he opened Henry Turner Jr.’s Listening Room and Heritage Museum in Baton Rouge to celebrate and support touring musicians.

    Read more at OffBeeat Magazine

    Read more »
  • ,

    Airport commission chair nominated for two Catalyst awards

    Chairman Cleve Dunn has been nominated for two Catalyst awards by the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC). The AMAC Catalyst awards honor persons who have made outstanding contributions to furthering the goals of AMAC. 

    Dunn’s nominations include:
    AMAC Advocate of the Year Award:This award recognizes an individual within the industry who has been an outstanding spokesperson, educator, innovator, advocate, and strategic partner with AMAC for diversity inclusion in the field of aviation, aerospace (Aeronautical influences such as pilots, airlines, aerospace, educators in the field), or corporate leaders that contribute and encourage minority opportunities and growth in these areas.   

    AMAC Inclusive Leader Award: This award honors an organization that has demonstrated diversity inclusion within its corporate structure of procurement and employment. Nominees are viewed within the industry as a leader for supplier diversity, best practices and fostering business capacity with its diverse partners. Nominees should demonstrate support of AMAC’s goals and mission. 

    “I am honored to receive the Catalyst Award nominations from such a prestigious organization as AMAC. I want to thank the AMAC Catalyst Award nominating committee for valuing and recognizing the work that many of us do around the country to promote minority-owned businesses, and increase contracting opportunities and professional advancement for minorities in the aviation and aerospace industries,” said Dunn. “I do not accept these award nominations alone. I also accept them on the behalf of all the current and former Baton Rouge Metro Airport Board of Commissioners that have advocated for minority-owned and disadvantaged businesses while serving on our commission. Finally, I’d like to thank the Baton Rouge Metro Airport Administration and numerous staff members who have been committed to inclusion and increasing the participation of minority-owned and disadvantaged business enterprises.” 

    Award winners will be announced at the 2018 AMAC Airport Diversity Conference in Seattle the third week of August.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Edwards announced his appointments to several Louisiana boards and commissions

    Gov. John Bel Edwards announced his appointments to several Louisiana boards and commissions.

    St. Bernard Port, Harbor and Terminal District
    The Board of Commissioners of the St. Bernard Port, Harbor and Terminal District Board has complete jurisdiction to regulate all domestic, coastwise, and intercoastal commerce and traffic of the district, and all commerce and traffic within the district where such is conducted by or a facility wholly owned by the district.

    William T. “Bill” Bergeron, of Arabi, was appointed to the St. Bernard Port, Harbor and Terminal District. Bergeron is a managing member of Bergeron Resources, LLC. As required by statute, he was nominated by a majority of the St. Bernard Parish legislative delegation.

    Patient’s Compensation Fund Oversight Board
    The purpose of the Patient’s Compensation Fund Oversight Board is to guarantee that affordable medical malpractice coverage is available to all Louisiana private healthcare providers and to provide a certain, stable source of compensation for legitimate injured parties of medical malpractice.

    Corey J. Hebert, M.D., of New Orleans, was appointed to the Patient’s Compensation Fund Oversight Board. Hebert is a physician and the president and Chief Executive Officer of Hebert Medical Consulting, Inc.

    Louisiana Emergency Response Network Board
    The Louisiana Emergency Response Network Board serves to defend the public health, safety and welfare by protecting the people of the State of Louisiana against unnecessary deaths and morbidity due to trauma and time-sensitive illness.

    Gerald A. Cvitanovich, M.D., of Metairie, was reappointed to the Louisiana Emergency Response Network Board. Cvitanovich is a physician and the Chief Medical Officer of MHM Urgent Care. As required by statute, he was nominated by and will serve as a representative of the Louisiana State Coroner’s Association.

    William W. Lunn, M.D., of New Orleans, was reappointed to the Louisiana Emergency Response Network Board. Lunn is a physician and the Chief Executive Officer of the Tulane Health System. As required by statute, he was nominated by and will serve as a representative of the Tulane Health System.

    Paul B. Gladden, M.D., of New Orleans, was appointed to the Louisiana Emergency Response Network Board. Gladden is a physician and Chief of Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery at Tulane University. As required by statute, he was nominated by and will serve as a representative of the Louisiana State Medical Society.

    Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners
    The Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners (LSBME) protects the health, welfare, and safety of Louisiana citizens against the unprofessional, improper, and unauthorized practice of medicine by ensuring that those who practice medicine and other allied health professions under its jurisdiction are qualified and competent to do so.   In addition, the Board serves in an advisory capacity to the public and the state with respect to the practice of medicine.

    Christy L. Valentine, M.D., of New Orleans, was reappointed to the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners. Valentine is a physician and Medical Director with Anthem, Inc. As required by statute, she was nominated by the Louisiana Medical Association.

    Roderick V. Clark, M.D., of Lafayette, was reappointed to the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners. Clark is a physician with Acadiana Renal Physicians. As required by statute, he was nominated by the Louisiana State Medical Society.

    J. Kerry Howell, M.D., of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners. Howell is a physician in private practice and a veteran of the United States Air Force. As required by statute, he was nominated by Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center.

    Louisiana State Board of Examiners of Psychologists
    The Louisiana State Board of Examiners of Psychologists is responsible for licensure and regulation of psychologists within the state.

    Gregory K. Gormanous, Ph.D., of Alexandria, was appointed to the Louisiana State Board of Examiners of Psychologists. Gormanous is a licensed psychologist and Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Louisiana State University – Alexandria. He is also a veteran of the United States Army. As required by statute, he was nominated by the Louisiana Psychological Association.

    Louisiana Board of Pharmacy
    The Louisiana Board of Pharmacy serves to protect the public health, safety and welfare by the effective control and regulation of the practice of pharmacy; the licensure of pharmacists; and the licensure, permitting, certification, registration, control and regulation of all persons and sites, in or out of this state, that sell drugs or devices to consumers and/or patients, or assist in the practice of pharmacy, within the state. The board also serves as the controlled substance authority for the state, issuing controlled dangerous substance licenses to all qualified applicants desiring to manufacture, distribute, prescribe or dispense controlled dangerous substances within the state. Further, the board monitors its clients for compliance with the laws and rules relative to their activities with controlled dangerous substances.

    J. Robert Cloud, PharmD, of Chatham, was appointed to the Louisiana Board of Pharmacy. Cloud is a pharmacist and the Director of Pharmacy at the Glenwood Regional Medical Center. He will serve as a representative of the 5th Pharmacy Board District.

    Kevin LaGrange, of Lafayette, was appointed to the Louisiana Board of Pharmacy. LaGrange is a pharmacist at Professional Arts Pharmacy. He will serve as a representative of the 7thPharmacy Board District.

    Robert C. “Rock” LeBas, of Opelousas, was appointed to the Louisiana Board of Pharmacy. LeBas is a pharmacist and the owner of Glenn’s Family Pharmacy. He will serve as a representative of the 8th Pharmacy Board District.

    Rhonny K. Valentine, of Natchitoches, was reappointed to the Louisiana Board of Pharmacy. Valentine is a pharmacist who provides relief work for retail pharmacies. He will serve as a representative of the 4th Pharmacy Board District.

    Blake P. Pitre, of Houma, was reappointed to the Louisiana Board of Pharmacy. Pitre is a pharmacist and the owner of B&J Pitre Pharmacy. He will serve as a representative of the 3rdPharmacy Board District.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Jordan joins Urban Congress on African American Males

    The Urban Congress on African American Males welcomes James “Jay” Jordan who is currently interning with the organization. He is a second-year student pursuing his doctorate in LSU’s Sociology Department. His research interests include: African-American self-government, food security education, and community supported agriculture. Before moving to Baton Rouge, James led an organic gardening program at an elementary school in San Francisco. After falling in love with this work, he moved to Baton Rouge to create child-centered gardening programs and to study the benefits that they offer to people living in food deserts. Given his passion for teaching young children lessons associated with their health and happiness, James will be supporting Urban Congress Goal #3: Expand the number of African American boys entering kindergarten who are ready to learn and who are able to advance annually at or above their grade level. Jordan said he’s very grateful to have the opportunity to work with the Urban Congress because it enables him to join forces with people who are committed to empowering the marginalized citizens of Baton Rouge.

    Read more »
  • Dillon honored by Washington Parish sheriff

    Washington Parish Corrections Deputy Katie Dillon has been honored by Sheriff Randy Seal as the Corrections Deputy of the Quarter ending March 2018. Seal made the selection based on the recommendation of Chief of Corrections Jim Miller and the administrative staff of the jail.

    “Katie Dillon is tremendous asset to Chief Miller and the entire operation of the jail. She is a true professional who expertly manages the inmate population in a no-nonsense manner. All at the Sheriff’s Office are pleased to have Katie as a valuable member of our staff,” said Seal.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Judge Piper Griffin named Louisiana Judicial Council Chairperson

    Louisiana boasts the largest number of Black  judges per capita and the Louisiana Judicial Council/National Bar Association prides itself on being the voice of its membership.  The Council recently installed as the organization’s 10th chairperson was Judge Piper D. Griffin during its 20th annual meeting in Baton Rouge last month.

    Griffin has served as the organization’s secretary for many years and most recently as its Chair Elect. Judge Griffin currently serves on the Orleans Parish Civil District Court since her election in 2001. She also serves as Chair of the 4th and 5th Circuit Judges Association, Secretary of the Louisiana Judicial Council Foundation/NBA, Treasurer of the Louisiana District Judges Association, President of the St. Katharine Drexel Prep Board of Directors (formerly Xavier Prep) and President of the Crescent City Chapter of the Links, Inc.

    Other judges installed to new board included Judge June B. Darensburg as chair-elect, Judge Regina B. Woods as treasurer, Judge Rachael Johnson as secretary, Judge Angelique Reed and Judge Adrian Adams as district representatives, and Judge Madeline Jasmine, past chair.

    With a theme of “Advancing Judicial Competence,” organizers said the meeting saw meaningful continuing legal education and dialogue amongst the bench and bar. The Conference began with a community service activity and frank conversation with civil rights activist and attorney, 99-year-old Johnny Jones. A reception honoring retired Baton Family Court Judge Luke A. LaVergne took place at the home of former Congressman and State Senator Cleo and Debra Fields. The meeting was chaired by Judge Wilson Fields of the 19th Judicial District Court. Chief Justice Bernette Joshua Johnson swore in the newly elected officers.

    Read more »
  • ,,,,,

    Southern University wins in NIS national oral and poster competitions

    Southern University and A&M College was well represented by 30 undergraduate and 5 graduate students who participated in the 75th Joint Annual Meeting of the National Institute of Science and Beta Kappa Chi Scientific Honors Society, in Washington, DC.   This scientific conference, hosted by the University of the District of Columbia, aimed to provide young scientists the opportunity to disseminate their research findings and to network with students and peers of like minds.   This Diamond Anniversary Year represents the 75th one for the joint annual meetings of Beta Kappa Chi (BKX) and the National Institute of Science (NIS). Southern University students won several awards at the conference.

    Oral Presentations

    Irene Lewis   1st Place Agricultural Sciences undergraduate

    Kirstin Brooks 2nd Place Psychology undergraduate

    Gagandeep Kaur 1st Place Environmental Tox. graduate

    Poster Presentations

    Prathusha Bagam 1st Place Environmental Tox. graduate

    Demario Vallier 2nd Place Poster Biology graduate

    Students and faculty were elected to national offices as well.  Deadra James Mackie was elected as national executive secretary for the 18th year, student officer, Joenique Woods, was unanimously chosen as the Southcentral Regional Vice President for Beta Kappa Chi and secretary for the National Institute of Science.  Honors student, Ikea McKay, was elected president of the National Institute of Science and Darrell Harry was chosen as student secretary for Beta Kappa Chi Scientific Honor Society and Treasure for the National Institute of Sciences.  As expected, the Jaguar nation made an indelible mark on the conference.

    Beta Kappa Chi Honor Society was founded in Lincoln, Pennsylvania in 1921, and chartered in 1923.  BKX is a member of the certifying body, the National Association of College Honor Societies (www.achsnatl.org).

    Travel to this endeavor would not have been possible were it not for the financial support of the Dolores Margaret Richard Spikes Honors College and the Timbuktu Academy, both led by Diola Bagayoko, Ph.D., the Southern University Foundation, through the Office of Robert Easley, the College of Sciences and Engineering dean Patrick Carriere,Ph.D., and the Department of Biological Sciences.  Collective contributions from these units allowed the students to have scholarly and professional experiences. The students’ advisors were Eric Pugh, Deidra Atkins-Ball, Phyllis Okwan, and Deadra James Mackie. Bagayoko said “the Jaguar Nation is very proud of them for their intellectual and leadership accomplishments.”

     

    Pictured: (first row) Deadra J. Mackie, Dr. Deidra Atkins-Ball, Paige Mitchell, Wes Washington, Joenique Woods, Ashley Lewis, Irene Lewis, Eric Pugh, Chloe Washington, Tiara Johnson, Dr. Phyllis Okwan and Brandon Parker; (Second row) Terani Dillahunty, Kirstin Brooks, Kelvin Wells, Jacara Glover, Jonathan Sumbler, Ikea McKay Naila McCraney, Darrell Harry, Demario Vallier and Edgar Perez

     

    Read more »
  • ,,,,

    New Orleans poet wins world title, uses platform to promote social change

    Kenyan-born New Orleans poet and activist, Mwende “FreeQuency” Katwiwa, has made her voice her life’s work. She has been a writer and performer since middle school, with her activism-based poetry amassing almost two million online views, including an official TED talk titled “Black Life at the Intersection of Birth and Death” in 2017. She has received recognition as an activist in the Movement for Black Lives and in the Reproductive Justice field through her work as a founding co-chair of the New Orleans chapter of BYP100, and her work with Women With A Vision, Inc. Now as Poetry Slam, Inc.’s 2018 Women of the World Poetry Slam (WOWPS) champion, FreeQuency intends to use her new platform to do even more.

    Most immediately, FreeQuency will travel to speak and perform at the Breaking down Borders African Youth Summit in Gauteng, South Africa, May 14-18. This performance and speaking engagement is perfectly aligned with her mission, as the summit’s theme is a call to action to African youth to start and continue taking steps and making strides in creating an Africa they imagine for themselves that can also be bequeathed to future generations. That visit will be followed by an intense summer working trip to Nairobi, Kenya, where she will continue co-creating a women’s activist poetry scene called Paza Sauti: Women of the Word. (Paza Sauti is Swahili for ‘Raise Your Voice’). The two upcoming visits to the African continent are not FreeQuency’s first travels abroad to elicit change, her activism track record consists of previous trips to South Africa, Kenya, and Brazil to connect, build and perform alongside local activists and artists, as well as her time working as a featured artist, workshop leader, and festival planning assistant for the 2017 Paza Sauti: Dar es Salaam Youth Poetry Festival, for which she is now partnering for her summer initiative.

    “I really want to use my WOWPS title to allow me to bring activist poetry into spaces that would not normally invite those kinds of poets,” FreeQuency said. “Similar to Darfur-born poet and activist Emi Mahmoud – who used her 2016 WOWPS title and platform to speak at the United Nations as a Somalian refugee and start a peace walking campaign – I view the title as less of an accolade and more as another piece of a platform. I plan to expand this platform for the antiracist, LGBTQ+ advocacy and decolonization work I do. It means something to be a Kenyan-born person winning this award too, and I hope it allows me to speak to more people back home as well.”

    FreeQuency often speaks to creating the world she wants to live in as she calls out this theme in her work, using what now seems to be the catchphrase: “Words Create Worlds.” Examples of such include the poetry she used to land her WOWPS title. Among these works are poems that address issues such as how Disney movies socialize girls into oppressive ways to exist, ways toxic masculinity shows itself on men with a happy resolution, black motherhood in the era of Black Lives Matter, ways religion has been used as a tool for colonization on the African continent, ways in which white supremacy manifests, and the lack of attention the deaths of black women murdered by the state receives.

    Through her poetry, activism and role as a youth worker, FreeQuency said she also hopes to inspire the young people that she works with from east Africa to New Orleans to use their voices as tools for social change. She is the coordinator of the New Orleans Youth Poetry Festival and a founding member of the New Orleans Youth Open Mic, and hopes to help cultivate this space into one focused on pushing community and societal change through writing, similar to the ways she was brought up in the tradition of poetry as protest. While she has been a change agent for much of her life, the 26-year-old finds that holding the highly-sought after poetry slam title will enable her to further her mission of utilizing her voice and words to promote social change. She will use her title to continue shedding light on various issues across the world.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Perkins has been appointed as library’s PR director

    Kayla D. Perkins has been appointed as the new East Baton Rouge Public Library Public Relations Director. Perkins has been employed by the Library for five years. She will be responsible for coordinating marketing and promotion of all library programs, services and resources and direct responsibility for ads, news releases, media appearances and The Source, the library’s monthly newsletter. Perkins is a native of Baton Rouge, LA and a graduate of Southern University.

    Read more »
  • Williams of New Venture honored

    New Venture Theatre’s artistic director Greg Williams Jr. is the recipient of the 2018 Man-Up Theatre of Arts Award from Patterson Enterprises who presents the 2018 Voice Awards, May 13, in New Roads. For 11 years, Williams has led New Venture’s productions in Baton Rouge.
    Greg Williams, Jr. is in his eleventh season as Artistic Director at New Venture Theatre. Before beginning his role at New Venture, he served as a co-founder of the King Little Theatre and also the Creative Production Company.

    His professional theatre background includes working with Don Holder (Tony Award Winning Lighting Designer for Disney’s THE LION KING), The Negro Ensemble Theatre Company (NYC), Black Theatre Network (New York), The Little Black Box Theatre Company (New Jersey), Northwestern State University (Louisiana) and American Family Theatre (Philadelphia.) He conceived the highly acclaimed musicals SHOUT! and SWEET GEORGIA BROWN, which both played to sold out audiences.

    As Artistic Director for New Venture, Mr Williams’ directing credits include over 35 productions such as August Wilson’s FENCES, the regional premiere of THE COLOR PURPLE, AIDA, DREAMGIRLS, FAT PIG and LADY DAY AT EMERSON’S BAR AND GRILl.

    Mr Williams is a graduate of Northwestern State University (Bachelor of Arts), Ellis College of New York (Masters in Business) and the International Association of Assembly Management Performing Arts School (Graduate Certificate.) He has earned many distinctions including a State of Louisiana Commendation for his contributions to the performing arts in the African American community, iHope Award for his dedication to the arts, MLK Leadership Award for leadership in the arts community, The Baton Rouge Links Louisiana Role Model Award for contributions to the performing arts community, and was nominated for the Fichandler Award under the Stage Directors and Choreographers Foundation. Under his leadership, New Venture has also earned distinction for productions of artistic excellence and highly praised theatrical diversity.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Kina Kimble appointed commissioner of 19th judicial court

    Judges of the 19th Judicial District Court recently appointed Kina Kimble as one of two court commissioners after the resignation of Quintillis Lawrence. Commissioners are quasi-judges who make recommendations to judges. As a commissioner, Kimble can set bail for newly arrested prisoners, and also sign search warrants, arrest warrants, subpoenas, and seizure orders for foreclosures. She can also take indictment returns from grand juries. Kimble is a 2005 Southern University Law Center graduate who had been an assistant public defender since 2013. She was an adjunct professor of criminal and juvenile law in the Southern Law Center Clinical Educational Department from 2010 to 2015. As a commissioner, Kimble handles numerous prisoner lawsuits filed annually against the state Department of Public Safety and Corrections, applications for post-conviction relief, and uncontested applications to expunge certain criminal records. The court’s other commissioner is Nicole Robinson

    Read more »
  • ,

    State epidemiologist receives The Reverend Connie Thomas Award

    Erica J. Washington, an epidemiologist for the State of Louisiana, will be presented with The Reverend Connie Thomas Award in honor and appreciation of her years of service and dedication to Luke’s House, the community and her robust work in the field of healthcare. Washington, a native of Baton Rouge, LA, moved to New Orleans in 2007 to pursue a master’s degree in public health from Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. She began working with Luke’s House as the organization’s first public health intern, and recruited others to volunteer from Tulane SPHTM. In 2013, Washington was recognized as a White House Champion of Change for Prevention and Public Health. She was a 2016-2017 Informatics-Training in Place Program Fellow through Project S.H.I.N.E. – a collaborative between Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and National Association of City and County Health Officials that seeks to increase the informatics capacity of health departments nationwide.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Temple honored by Boys and Girls Club

    Candace Temple was honored by the Boys and Girls Club at its Great Futures Gala that was held on March 3, 2018. Temple serves as a member of the East Baton Rouge Parish Library Board of Control, East Baton Rouge Parish Complete Streets Advisory Committee, GBRA Realtors Government Relations Committee and Forum 35. She is also serves as co-chair of Baton Rouge Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome’s Transition Team’s Housing and Land Use Subcommittee and a volunteer for the Bethany Church Kids Ministry. Temple is a full-time real estate agent with EXIT Realty Group. She is the mother of two daughters.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    SU law student asks, ‘Can Alexa Testify Against You?’

    We live in an age when increasing numbers of people rely on devices to turn off their lights, make a phone call, or set the morning alarm. This may explain why since its launch in 2015, Alexa—or what Amazon calls a “virtual assistant” —has become a virtual extension of the lives of its estimated eight-million-plus owners.

    This codependency however comes with its own set of risks, according to a research paper published in the Southern University Law Review. (Read the paper here.)

    The paper “Alexa, Pick An Amendment”: A Comparison of Fourth and First Amendment Protections of Echo Device Data,” asks whether Alexa owners are protected under the First and Fourth Amendments when their privacy rights are infringed upon. The paper was written by by Tara Melancon, a third-year law student at Southern University Law Center in Baton Rouge.

    Tara Melancon

    Tara Melancon

    Melancon writes that American society has been preoccupied with privacy rights since at least the late 19th century, when The Right to Privacy, a law review article from 1890, broached the perennially relevant subject of the need for “privacy laws to keep up with technological progress.”

    The issue has become increasingly relevant.

    The reason, as Melancon explains, is not only because Alexa might be used to collect evidence against owners entangled in the criminal justice system; but because recent technological advances, notably our smart phones—which track our every move and purchase—have made us vulnerable and possible targets for investigation.

    Read more at The Crime Report by Julia Pagnamenta.

    Read more »
  • ,,,,,

    Middle schoolers participate in Southern University’s Black History Quiz Bowl Championship

    Six teams of eager middle school students from McKinley Middle Magnet, Westdale Middle School and Scotlandville Middle Pre-Engineering Academy competed in the SU Land-Grant Campus’s Middle School Black History Quiz Bowl Championship Competition on Feb. 28.

    Thoughout February, Southern University Land-Grant Campus professor emeritus and Black History Quiz Bowl organizer Owusu Bandele, Ph.D., conducted quiz bowls at the three area schools. The first and second place teams from each school were invited to participant in the championship competition at the SU Ag Center.

    During the championship,  Dawn Mellion Patin, Ph.D., SU Land-Grant Campus vice chancellor for extension provided the opening remarks, and Bandele served as moderator. Awards were presented to the winners by research associate Erica Williams Mitchell.

    The competition covered a variety of topics including current events, politics, history, sports and entertainment.

    Westdale Middle School’s Wakanda Team won 1st place during the Championship Middle School Black History Quiz Bowl Competition at Southern University on Feb. 28. (Photo courtesy of SU Land-Grant Campus.)

    Westdale Middle School’s Wakanda Team won 1st place during the Championship Middle School Black History Quiz Bowl Competition at Southern University on Feb. 28. (Photo courtesy of SU Land-Grant Campus.)

    Westdale Middle School’s Team Wakanda took first place. Team members were: Kahlil Bandele, Elijah Doomes, Condoleezza Semien, Lailah Collins, and Khamerin Edmonds.

    McKinley Middle Magnet School's Imhotep Team won 2nd place in the Middle School Black History Quiz Bowl Championship Competition at Southern University on Feb. 28. (Photo courtesy of SU Land-Grant Campus.)

    McKinley Middle Magnet School’s Imhotep Team won 2nd place in the Middle School Black History Quiz Bowl Championship Competition at Southern University on Feb. 28. (Photo courtesy of SU Land-Grant Campus.)

    McKinley Middle Magnet School’s Team Imhotep town second place. Members were Justin Thompson, Michael Shin, Sean Murphy, and Victoria Williams.

    Westdale Middle School's Freedom Riders Team took home 3rd place during the Middle School Black History Quiz Bowl Championship Competition

    Westdale Middle School’s Freedom Riders Team took home 3rd place during the Middle School Black History Quiz Bowl Championship Competition

    In third place was Westdale’s Team Freedom Riders with Micah Dunn, Caelen Broussard, Pamela Davis, Marshall Seymour, and Phillip Antoine.

    Members earned place medals. Every participant received a book by or about some aspect of the Black American experience.

    The event ended with SU Land-Grant Campus Chancellor-Dean Bobby R. Phills, Ph.D., encouraging the young students to pursue a college education.

    By LaKeeshia Giddens Lusk
    Contributing Writer

    Read more »
  • ,

    Bayou Classic Ranked Number One HBCU Classic

    The numbers have spoken. Bayou Classic enters its 45th year as the number one ranked HBCU Classic. With 66,550 attendees in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome for the November 25, 2017, battle on the gridiron between Grambling State University and Southern University, the attendance numbers surpassed their top four HBCU Classic competitors. Also on the list were Magic City Classic (#2 with 61,221 attendees), State Fair Classic (#3 with 55,231 attendees), Florida Classic (#4 with 47,819 attendees), and Southern Heritage Classic (#5 with 47,407 attendees).

    This ranking comes with another number one spot, as the Bayou Classic also topped the attendance rankings of the top 35 Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) games played in 2017.bayou classic

    The ranking should ignite pride and excitement amongst longtime Bayou Classic fans and newcomers. “As we look to the future of Bayou Classic, the possibilities are limitless. Building off this momentum, we hope to engage a larger fan base and provide even more opportunities to students, fans, and alumni.,” says Dottie Belletto, President and CEO of the Bayou Classic’s management company, NOCCI.

    Since 2011 when NOCCI took over as the Bayou Classic’s management company, the game experienced a 63.4% increase in overall attendance. The Bayou Classic has come a long way and hopes to hold on to that number one spot for years to come

    The 2018 Bayou Classic Game will be held on Saturday, November 24, 2018, in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Louisiana Travel Association announces new officers, honors graduates of tourism leadership class

    The Louisiana Travel Promotion Association–-which voted Jan. 23 to change its name to the Louisiana Travel Association-– installed a group of tourism industry leaders as new officers for its executive committee and board of directors during the association’s Annual Membership Meeting at the DoubleTree by Hilton in Lafayette.

    “For 57 years, LTA has strengthened Louisiana’s tourism industry through our marketing program, advocacy efforts and educational opportunities,” said Jill Kidder, LTA President and CEO. “We are thrilled that our members have selected tourism industry leaders from throughout the state to lead this organization as we continue to promote a viable job-creating and revenue-producing industry.”

    New officers installed on the executive board committee include:
    · Chairman Travis Napper, Ruston-Lincoln CVB
    · Vice-Chair Janice Delerno Verges, The Stockade Bed & Breakfast
    · Secretary Ben Berthelot, Lafayette CVC
    · Treasurer Kerry Andersen, Pinnacle Entertainment
    · Immediate Past Chair Mark Romig, New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation

    New directors:
    · Timothy Bush, Louisiana’s Cajun Bayou
    · Dustin Gontarski, Compass Media
    · Jennifer Ritter Guidry, Atchafalaya National Heritage Area
    · Kevin Kelly, Houmas House Plantation & Gardens

    Returning directors:
    · Marc Becker, New Orleans Hotel Collection
    · Peggy Benoit, Carmel Inn & Suites Thibodaux
    · Dickie Brennan, Dickie Brennan & Company
    · Alana Cooper, Monroe-West Monroe CVB
    · John Crook, Vernon Parish Tourist Commission
    · Brandy Evans, Shreveport-Bossier CTB
    · Marion Fox, Jeff Davis Parish Tourist Commission
    · Arlene Gould, Natchitoches Parish CVB
    · Andy LeBouef, Mardi Gras World
    · Ralph Ney, Marriot Hotel Baton Rouge
    · Donna O’Daniels, St. Tammany Parish Tourist & Convention Commission
    · Lynette Tanner, Frogmore Plantation & Gins
    · Denise Thevenot, Louisiana Tax Free Shopping

    LTA also honored the Louisiana Tourism Leadership Academy graduates during the meeting. The 18 members of the LTLA class spent all of 2017 developing their leadership skills while learning from seasoned professionals from throughout the tourism industry. The goal of the program is to equip each class member with knowledge and skills that will enrich their tourism-related organizations, therefore strengthening the state-wide tourism industry.

    “LTLA has been a tremendous opportunity for those interested in learning more about Louisiana’s tourism industry, and we are proud of the 2017 graduating class,” said Jill Kidder, LTA President and CEO. “It is our hope that these professionals will utilize their new-found knowledge and experience to better themselves, their organizations and their state.”

    Louisiana Tourism Leadership Academy 2018 graduate

    Louisiana Tourism Leadership Academy 2018 graduate

    The graduating class of LTLA includes: Rebecca Blankenbaker, with Cane River National Heritage Area; Marica Brewster, with Von Mack Agency; Alvon Brumfield, with Louisiana Renaissance Festival; Kimberly Caldarera, with L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles; Megan Gavlick, with L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles; Katherine Johnson, with Natchitoches CVB; Zondra Jones, with St. Tammany Parish Tourist Commission; Leslie Landeche, with Mardi Gras World; Barry Landry, with Louisiana Office of Tourism; Shanna Landry, with Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana CVB; Kaylie Leblanc, with Lafayette CVC; Angie Manning, with Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana CVB; Joshua McNemar, with Office of the Lt. Governor; Jessica Ragusa, with Office of the Lt. Governor; Madeline Sanchez, with Louisiana Travel Association; Timika Spurlock, with Sheraton New Orleans; Stella Thorton, with Louisiana Tax Free Shopping; and Kellie Walters, with Louisiana’s Cajun Bayou.

    LTA is a trade association leading and strengthening Louisiana’s vibrant tourism industry through promotion, education and advocacy on behalf of our members. The membership voted in early 2018 to shorten the association’s name and staff is working with an agency to reveal a full rebrand later this year. Tourism generated $1.04 billion for Louisiana in 2016 and employs more than 230,000 people throughout the state.

    ONLINE: LTPA.org

    Read more »
  • ,

    Rene honored with Above and Beyond Award

    A long-time Southern University Baton Rouge employee and former assistant mass communications professor was presented the December 2017 Above and Beyond Award.

    Robert Rene’, Ph.D, also has served as interim director and associate director of the Office of Recruitment and Admissions. Rene’ worked in television news before serving at Southern University.

    In his current role, Rene’ meets with students, parents, principals, counselors, and alumni to guide students’ academic futures. He recently participated in the fall 2017 California Community College Transfer to HBCUs Caravan that took place October 31 -November 8. The caravan began in Northern California Sacramento area and concluded nine days later in the Southern California — Long Beach area.

    “Dr. Robert Rene’ was such an asset to this year’s caravan. He brought such a wisdom and calm to the caravan. I am personally appreciative of his flexibility and support during the entire trip,” said Helen P. Young, project director, California Community Colleges Transfer Guarantee Agreement to Historically Black Colleges & Universities.

    “I humbly accept this award for the service I enjoy doing,” said Rene’.

    The Above and Beyond Award was established to help inspire and motivate SU employees to reach their maximum performance. One award is presented at the SU Board of Supervisors meetings each month.

    Recipients of the award are nominated by their peers. Nominations are forwarded to the Board of Supervisors chair and vice chair for selection.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Castine named New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center event manager

    Lauren Castine has been named event manager at the New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center–the sixth largest convention center in the nation. She will be responsible for managing all aspects of the event planning process. As a liaison between the Center and clients, she will guide clients through event preparation and show set-up, monitor in-house events and oversee all related activities to ensure successful events.”

    ONLINE: https://www.mccno.com/new-orleans-ernest-n-morial-convention-center-names-lauren-castine-event-manager/

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Jones joins investment team for Congo TV Network

    Sports marketer Walter Jones joins investment team for Congo TV Network. Jones has come in as a Priority Investor in Congo TV Network. Jones will join about 12 other investors who have given Congo TV the stability needed to have a prosperous and record breaking year in 2018. According to The Wrights, a priority investor is someone who owns five or more shares of the network. Jones will join about 12 other investors who have given Congo TV the stability needed to have a prosperous and record breaking year in 2018.

    ONLINE: CongoTV

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Historymaker: Landrum-Johnson named Chief Judge at Orleans Criminal Court

    In a historic appointment, Orleans Parish Criminal District Court Judge Keva Landrum-Johnson ascends to a higher role in the court. She will serve a two-year tenure as chief judge of criminal court, becoming the first Black woman to serve in that office. For the past 10 years, Landrum-Johnson has presided as judge of Section E of criminal court. She was first elected to that office in 2008, and is currently serving a second term. As chief judge, Landrum-Johnson will continue to preside over criminal trials and proceedings allotted to her section while also overseeing the administrative functions of the court and serving as an ex officio member on court committees. In 2007, she became the first African-American woman in Louisiana to serve as District. She also spent 10 years as an assistant district attorney in Orleans Parish. She worked in private practice, public defense, and as a criminal law professor at Southern University at New Orleans.

    ONLINE: Louisiana Weekly

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Edwards makes board appointments to Children’s Trust Fund, polygraph, others

    Gov. John Bel Edwards announced his appointments to several Louisiana boards and commissions.

    Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board
    The Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board provides funds for non-profit and public agencies throughout the state for the prevention of child abuse and neglect.

    Alicia C. Kober, M.D., of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board. Kober is a pediatrician at Ochsner. As required by statute, she will serve as the representative of the Louisiana State Medical Society.

    Shailindra M. “Lynn” Farris (photographed), of Baker, was appointed to the Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board. Farris is a licensed clinical social worker and a Title IV-E Director at Southern University Baton Rouge. As required by statute, she will serve as the representative of the Louisiana Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers.

     

    Sabine River Authority
    The Sabine River Authority’s mission is to provide for economic utilization and preservation of the waters of the Sabine River and its tributaries by promoting economic development, irrigation, navigation, improved water supply, drainage, public recreation, and hydroelectric power for the citizens of Louisiana.

    Dayna F. Yeldell, of Zwolle, was appointed to the Sabine River Authority. Yeldell is a real estate broker and the owner of First Choice Real Estate Services, LLC. She will serve as a resident of Sabine Parish.

    Byron D. Gibbs, of Hackberry, was reappointed to the Sabine River Authority. Gibbs is a retired teacher, coach, and administrator with the Cameron Parish School Board and a veteran of the United States Air Force. He will serve as a resident of Cameron Parish.

     

    Louisiana State Polygraph Board
    The Louisiana State Polygraph Board issues polygraph examiners licenses and monitors the continuing education of polygraph examiners in the state of Louisiana.

    Don A. Zuelke, of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Louisiana State Polygraph Board. Zuelke is a licensed polygraphist and the owner of Don A. Zuekle & Associates.

     

    Fluoridation Advisory Board
    The Fluoridation Advisory Board assists public water systems with obtaining funding to implement water fluoridation, assists the director of the state Oral Health Program with the educating of the general public, and advises the state Fluoridation Program.

    Alicia C. Kober, M.D., of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Fluoridation Advisory Board. Kober is a pediatrician at Ochsner. As required by statute, she will serve as the representative of the Louisiana State Medical Society.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Grambling student, Adrian Wilson, named to La. Board of Regents

    Adrian Williams, of Ruston, has been appointed to the Louisiana Board of Regents. He is in his third year as a Liberal Arts and Theatre major at Grambling State University. Williams has served as the 2014-2015 Student Government Association (SGA) Freshman Class President, the 2015-2016 SGA Sophomore Class President, the 2016-2017 SGA Chief of Staff, a Student Ambassador, a member of the University Concert Choir, the NAACP, and the Floyd L. Sandle Players Club.  He is a brother of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity of America, Inc. and currently serves as the 2017-2018 SGA President. Williams has aspirations to become a professional performer, lawyer, and political figure.  Following graduation, he plans to attend graduate school for performing arts and law school.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Wilbert Pryor named to Board of Regents

    Wilbert Pryor, of Shreveport, has been appointed to the Louisiana Board of Regents. Pryor is the chief deputy district attorney for Caddo Parish  for the Honorable James E. Stewart, Sr., Caddo Parish District Attorney.  He formerly served as an ad hoc Shreveport City Court judge and was in private law practice. A native of Shreveport, Pryor is a graduate of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN, where he was a football letterman, and the Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center.  He has served on the Louisiana Lottery Corporation Board of  Directors and the Louisiana Commission on Human Rights.  He presently serves on the Family Justice Center of Northwest Louisiana Board of Directors, the Pathways to Education  Board of Directors, and the Zion Baptist Church, Board of Deacons. For his efforts to improve the community, Mr. Pryor was awarded the 2016 NAACP Shreveport branch Dr. Jesse N. Stone Pioneer Award.

    Read more »
  • Former legislator Roy Burrell, others named to state commissions

     Gov. John Bel Edwards announced his appointments to several Louisiana boards and commissions.

    Louisiana Citizens Property Insurance Commission

    The Louisiana Citizens Property Insurance Corporation is a nonprofit organization created to provide insurance products for residential and commercial property applicants who are in good faith entitled, but unable, to procure insurance through the voluntary insurance marketplace.

    Brian E. Chambley, of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Louisiana Citizens Property Insurance Commission. Chambley is the Director of Agency Development and the Specialty Products Sales Manager for Southern Farm Bureau Casualty Insurance Company. As required by statute, he was nominated by Farm Bureau Insurance Companies.

    College and Career Readiness Commission
    The College and Career Readiness Commission makes recommendations for the development of statewide policies, guiding principles, and programs that address the current and future economic needs of the state and promotes student success in high school and in life beyond secondary education.

    Melinda W. Mangham, of Lafayette, was appointed to the College and Career Readiness Commission. Mangham is the Interim Director of Middle School for Ascension Episcopal School. Additionally, she operates her own education consulting firm, Mangham Academic Planning Strategy.

     

    Early Identification of Hearing Impaired Infants Advisory Council
    The Early Identification of Hearing Impaired Infants Advisory Council advises the Office of Public Health on various aspects of the development and implementation of the Early Identification of Hearing Impairment in Infants Law, which includes making recommendations on risk factors for hearing loss, program standards and quality assurance, program integration with community resources, materials for distribution, and program implementation and follow-up.

    Marbely D. Barahona, of Jefferson, was appointed to the Early Identification of Hearing Impaired Infants Advisory Council. Barahona is a Parent Guide for Louisiana Hands & Voices.

    Ashley J. Nielsen, of Covington, was appointed to the Early Identification of Hearing Impaired Infants Advisory Council. Nielsen is an Inclusive Education Specialist for Northshore Families Helping Families.

     

     

    Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board
    The Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board provides information and recommendations from the perspective of advocacy groups, service providers, and trafficking victims to the Human Trafficking Prevention Commission.

    Taneka Harris Blacknell, of Prairieville, was appointed to the Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board. Blacknell is a Special Agent for the Federal Bureau of Investigation. As required by statute, she will serve as a representative with expertise in advocacy for adult victims of human trafficking.

    Stacie S. LeBlanc, of Gretna, was appointed to the Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board. LeBlanc is an attorney and the Executive Director of the New Orleans Children’s Advocacy Center and Audrey Hepburn CARE Center. As required by statute, she was nominated by the Louisiana Children’s Advocacy Centers.

    Richard M. Pittman, of Gonzales, was appointed to the Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board. Pittman is an attorney and the Director of Juvenile Defender Services for the Louisiana Public Defender Board. As required by statute, he will serve as a public defender and was nominated by the Louisiana Public Defender Board.

    Kathleen S. Richey, of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board. Richey is an attorney and the Chief Executive Officer for LouisianaChildren.org. She will serve as the organization’s representative on the board.

    Rafael F. Salcedo, Ph.D., of Folsom, was appointed to the Human Trafficking Prevention Commission Advisory Board. Salcedo is a clinical psychologist in private practice. As required by statute, he will serve as a licensed psychologist with experience related to exploitation and was nominated by the Louisiana State Board of Examiners of Psychologists.

     

    Oilfield Site Restoration Commission
    The Oilfield Site Restoration Commission serves to: (1) approve and evaluate a priority list for site restoration annually; (2) approve lists of Contractors acceptable to conduct site assessment and site restoration; (3) review administration of site restoration activities and review the adequacy of site restoration assessments and reopen the funding needs and arrangements for site-specific trust accounts every four years; and (4) provide general administration and management of the Oilfield Site Restoration Fund and all site-specific trust accounts.

    Cynthia G. Dupree, of Lafayette, was appointed to the Oilfield Site Restoration Commission. Dupree is a member of the Louisiana Landowners Association’s Board of Directors and will serve as its representative on the commission.

     

    Southern Rail Commission
    The Southern Rail Commission serves to promote the safe, reliable and efficient movement of people and goods to enhance economic development along rail corridors; provide transportation choices; and facilitate emergency evacuation routes. The SRC engages and informs public and private rail interests to support and influence southeast rail initiatives.

    John M. Spain, of New Roads, was reappointed to the Southern Rail Commission. Spain is the Executive Vice President for the Baton Rouge Area Foundation. Additionally, he is a veteran of the United States Army.

    Roy W. Woodruff Jr., of Metairie, was reappointed to the Southern Rail Commission. Woodruff is an Adjunct Instructor at Tulane and a former District Fire Chief with the New Orleans Fire Department. He is also a veteran of the United States Navy.

     

    Louisiana Economic Development Corporation
    The board of directors is responsible for governing the Louisiana Economic Development Corporation, which serves as the single review board for all financial assistance loans, incentives or inducements, customized workforce training, investment programs, and any related appropriations, grants, or joint ventures administered by the Department of Economic Development, excluding those financial incentive programs administered by the state Board of Commerce and Industry or programs only authorized by the Secretary, the Governor, and/or the Joint Legislative Committee on the Budget.

    Todd O. McDonald, of New Orleans, was appointed to the board of directors of the Louisiana Economic Development Corporation. McDonald is the Vice President of Strategy at Liberty Bank and Trust Company. As required by statute, he was nominated by the Louisiana Workforce Investment Council and will serve as its representative on the board.

     

    Water Resources Commission
    The Water Resources Commission is responsible for working with the Commissioner of Conservation to prevent waste of ground water resources and to prevent or alleviate damaging or potentially damaging subsidence of the land surface caused by withdrawal of ground water.

    Glenn L. Brasseaux, of Carencro, was reappointed to the Water Resources Commission. Brasseaux is the Mayor of the City Carencro and a veteran of the United States Army Reserve. As required by statute, he was nominated by and will serve as the representative of the Louisiana Municipal Association on the commission.

     

    Louisiana Rehabilitation Council
    The Louisiana Rehabilitation Council’s duties include reviewing, analyzing, and advising the Louisiana Rehabilitation Services within the Louisiana Workforce Commission regarding the performance of its responsibilities relating to eligibility, extent, scope, and effectiveness of services provided. The Council also reviews functions performed by state agencies that affect or that potentially affect the ability of individuals with disabilities in achieving employment.

    Brian C. Wood, of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Wood is an intern with the Governor’s Office of Disability Affairs. He will serve as a former recipient of Vocational Rehabilitation Services on the council.

    Nanette J. Magness, of Shreveport, was reappointed to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Magness is the Program Director and Clinical Director for the Low Vision Rehabilitation Center of the Louisiana Association of the Blind. She will serve as a former recipient of Vocational Rehabilitation Services on the council.

    Alexis D. Young, of Minden, was appointed to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Young is a licensed clinical social worker and Webster Cares Grant Counselor for the Webster Parish School Board. She will serve as a former recipient of Vocational Rehabilitation Services on the council.

    Marvin R. Rush, of DeRidder, was appointed to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Rush is a former educator. He will serve as a former recipient of Vocational Rehabilitation Services on the council.

    Susan G. Killam, of New Orleans, was reappointed to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Killam is the Transition and Employment Initiatives Director with LSU Health’s Human Development Center. She will serve as a representative of individuals with disabilities who have difficulty representing themselves.

    Nicole D. Walker, of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Walker is the Executive Director of UpLIFTD, an organization which assist persons with disabilities and the disadvantaged in achieving their goal of self-sufficiency through their desired employment. She will serve as a representative of service providers for the community rehabilitation program.

     

    Louisiana Manufactured Housing Commission
    The Louisiana Manufactured Housing Commission functions to: (1) License manufacturers, retailers, developers, salesmen, and installers; (2) Work with manufactured home consumers, manufacturers, retailers, developers, salesmen, and installers to hear complaints and make determinations relating to construction defects, warranty issues, and service complaints; and (3) conduct hearings on any violation of the provisions of the law.

    James Douglas Anderson, of Lake Charles, was appointed to the Louisiana Manufactured Housing Commission. Anderson is a Performance and Learning Consultant with Clayton Homes and a veteran of the United States Air Force. He will serve as an at-large representative.

     

    Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council
    The Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) was established to support the efforts of our citizens with disabilities to live independently in the community of their choice. Some of the specific duties of the Statewide Independent Living Council are: (1) jointly develop a State Plan for Independent Living; (2) monitor, review, and evaluate implementation of the state plan; and (3) develop strong positive partnerships with the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council and other members of the disability community.

    Kandy S. Baker, of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council. Baker is a licensed clinical social worker and a Program Coordinator for the Louisiana Workforce Commission. She will serve as the representative of the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council.

    Rosemary M. Morales, of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council. Morales is a Program Manager for the Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities within the Louisiana Department of Health.

     

    Workers’ Compensation Advisory Council
    The Workers’ Compensation Advisory Council is responsible for monitoring and reporting to the governor and the legislature on the implementation and administration of laws pertaining to the administration of workers’ compensation claims and making specific recommendations thereon.

    Jennifer L. Marusak, of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Workers’ Compensation Advisory Council. Marusak is the Vice President of Governmental Affairs for the Louisiana State Medical Society and will serve as its representative on the council.

     

    Louisiana State Board of Private Investigator Examiners
    The Louisiana State Board of Private Investigator Examiners licenses private investigators and businesses in the state of Louisiana in order to contribute to the safety, health, and welfare of the people of Louisiana.

    Paul C. Dugas, of Schriever, was appointed to the Louisiana State Board of Private Investigator Examiners. Dugas is a licensed private investigator and the Owner and President of Dugas Legal Investigative Services, LLC. He will serve as the representative of the 2nd Public Service Commission District.

     

    Louisiana Workforce Investment Council
    The Louisiana Workforce Investment Council serves to develop a strategic plan to coordinate and integrate a workforce development delivery system to assure efficiency and cooperation between public and private entities by advising the governor on the needs of Louisiana’s employers and its workforce as well as being responsible for occupational forecasting, which is used for driving programs and funding for job training.

    Leigh D. King, of Ferriday, was appointed to the Louisiana Workforce Investment Council. King is the Vice President of Cox Business. He will serve as a representative of the general business community on the council.

    Melissa H. Mann, of Baton Rouge, was appointed to the Louisiana Workforce Investment Council. Mann is the Director of Governmental Affairs for CenturyLink. She will serve as a representative of Louisiana’s information technology sector on the council.

     

    Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports
    The Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports serves to develop, foster, and coordinate services and programs of physical fitness and sports for the people of Louisiana. The Council encourages local governments and communities to develop local physical fitness programs and amateur athletic competitions.

    Benjamin J. Berthelot, of Lafayette, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Berthelot is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Lafayette Convention and Visitors Commission.

    Robert W. Boudreaux, of Broussard, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Boudreaux is the State Office Administrator for the Knights of Columbus Louisiana State Council.

    John B. Boyer, of Gretna, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Boyer is retired. He is a USA Track and Field Certified Official.

    Pamela G. Carey, of Atlanta, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Carey is the Sports and Recreation Consultant and GUMBO Coordinator for Families Helping Families at the Crossroads in Rapides Parish.

    Katherine F. “Kathy” Hill, of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Hill is an Adjunct Professor of Kinesiology at LSU.

    Kenneth W. Jenkins, of Baton Rouge, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Jenkins is retired. He is the former Director of Student Activities for the East Baton Rouge Parish School System.

    Joseph N. “Joey” Odom, of Lake Charles, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Odom is the Manager at Sports Productions. He formerly served as the Director of Public Relations and Parks for the City of Lake Charles.

    Charles W. “Bill” Skinner, of Hammond, was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Skinner is a retired educator.

    Rani Gregory Whitfield, M.D., was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Whitfield is a board certified family physician with a Certificate of Added Qualification in Sports Medicine.

     

    Red River Waterway Commission
    The Red River Waterway Commission was created for the purpose of establishing, operating, and maintaining the Red River Waterway, a navigable waterway system, extending from the vicinity of the confluence of Red River with Old River and the Atchafalaya River northwestward in the Red River Valley to the state boundary.

    Roy A. Burrell, of Shreveport, (photographed above) was appointed to the Red River Waterway Commission. Burrell is the President of Best Communications Management Services and a former member of the Louisiana State House of Representatives. He will serve as an at-large member on the commission.

     

    Capital Area Groundwater Conservation District
    The mission of the Capital Area Ground Water Conservation District is to provide for the efficient administration, conservation, orderly development, and supplementation of groundwater resources in the parishes of East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, Pointe Coupee, West Baton Rouge and West Feliciana. The board develops, promotes, and implements management strategies to provide for the conservation, preservation, protection, recharging, and prevention of waste of the groundwater resources over which it has jurisdictional authority.

    Jens P. Rummler, of Oscar, was reappointed to the Capital Area Groundwater Conservation District. Rummler is a USDA-certified master farmer and a Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry certified master cattle producer. As required by statute, he was nominated by and will serve as a representative of Pointe Coupee Parish.

    Nelson L. Morvant, of Gonzales, was reappointed to the Capital Area Groundwater Conservation District. Morvant is a licensed professional geoscientist and a Senior Environmental Analyst at Entergy Services, Inc. As required by statute, he was nominated by and will serve as a representative of industrial water users in the district.

     

    Red River Levee and Drainage District
    The Red River Levee and Drainage District was established to construct and maintain levees, drainage, and levee drainage, and to do all other things incidental thereto.

    Carl W. Carpenter, of Pelican, was appointed to the Red River Levee and Drainage District. Carpenter is the owner and operator of CWC Services. As required by statute, he was nominated by a legislator representing the district.

     

    Jimmy D. Long Sr. Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts
    The Board of Directors for the Jimmy D. Long Sr. Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts functions to establish and maintain the School and to provide the highest quality of instruction for the children of the School.

    Jimmy D. Berry, of Natchitoches, was appointed to the Jimmy D. Long Sr. Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts. Berry is a retired educator and principal for the Natchitoches Parish School Board and Northwestern State University.

     

    Louisiana Board of Drug and Device Distributors
    The Louisiana Board of Drug and Device Distributors issues licenses for and regulates the distribution of legend drugs and legend devices by distributors within and into the state of Louisiana in order to safeguard life and health and to promote the public welfare.

    Chad D. Gielen, of Crowley, was reappointed to the Louisiana Board of Drug and Device Distributors. Gielen is the President and CEO of Louisiana Wholesale Drug Co., Inc. As required by statute, he was nominated by the Louisiana Association of Wholesale Drug Distributors.

    Randall D. Brooks, of Prairieville, was reappointed to the Louisiana Board of Drug and Device Distributors. Brooks is the Facility Manager of PetNet Solutions. As required by statute, he was nominated by the Louisiana Association of Wholesale Drug Distributors.

     

    Parish Boards of Election Supervisors
    The purpose of the board in each parish is to oversee and supervise all elections within the parish to ensure the safety and accuracy of the democratic process. The Board of Election Supervisors oversees the preparation and conducting of each election in the parish. Each parish’s board is composed of the parish’s registrar of voters, the parish’s clerk of court, the chairman of the parish executive committee of each recognized political party, and one member appointed by the governor.

    Wilkie J. “Jo” Travis, of Kentwood, was appointed to the St. Helena Parish Board of Supervisors. Travis is a retired dairy owner.

    Robert R. Gentry, of Many, was appointed to the Sabine Parish Board of Election Supervisors. Gentry is the retired publisher and owner of The Sabine Index Newspaper and a veteran of the Louisiana National Guard.

    Margie D. Bass, of Jonesville, was reappointed to the Catahoula Parish Board of Election Supervisors. Bass is a loan teller with Catahoula LaSalle Bank.

     

    Medicaid Pharmaceutical & Therapeutics Committee
    The Medicaid Pharmaceutical & Therapeutics Committee is responsible for developing and maintaining a preferred drug list (PDL) in conjunction with a prior approval process relating to the Medicaid drug program.

    Marty R. McKay, of Woodworth, was appointed to the Medicaid Pharmaceutical and Therapeutics Committee. McKay is the owner of Pearson Drugs #7. As required by statute, he was nominated by the Louisiana Independent Pharmacies Association.

     

    Louisiana State Polygraph Board
    The Louisiana State Polygraph Board issues polygraph examiners licenses and monitors the continuing education of polygraph examiners in the state of Louisiana.

    Judith C. Goodman, of Metairie, was reappointed to the Louisiana State Polygraph Board. Goodman is a licensed polygraph examiner and the owner and President of Professional Security Training.

    Calvin T. Bowden, of Denham Springs, was appointed to the Louisiana State Polygraph Board. Bowden is a licensed polygraph examiner and a detective with the Livingston Parish Sheriff’s Office.

     

    Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board
    The Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board provides funds for non-profit and public agencies throughout the state for the prevention of child abuse and neglect.

    Angela S. Breidenstine, Ph.D., of New Orleans, was appointed to the Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board. Breidenstine is a licensed clinical psychologist and Assistant Professor at Tulane University School of Medicine’s Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. She will serve as a representative of the Louisiana Psychological Association.

    Yolanda T. Motley, of New Orleans, was appointed to the Louisiana Children’s Trust Fund Board. Motley is the Senior Administrator of Kingsley House, Inc. She is serve as a representative of the early childhood community.

     

    New Orleans Center for Creative Arts
    The Board of Directors for the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts oversees the management of the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (NOCCA). The Board oversees the hiring of the President/CEO, the fiscal operations of the facility, and the development of policies necessary to operate the center. NOCCA is a state agency whose mission is to provide arts training for high school age students who aspire to be professional artists.

    Troy J. Broussard, of Prairieville, was reappointed to the Board of Directors for the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts. Broussard is the Associate State Director of Advocacy and Outreach for AARP and a veteran of the United States National Guard.

     

    Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council
    The Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) was established to support the efforts of our citizens with disabilities to live independently in the community of their choice. Some of the specific duties of the Statewide Independent Living Council are: (1) jointly develop a State Plan for Independent Living; (2) monitor, review, and evaluate implementation of the state plan; and (3) develop strong positive partnerships with the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council and other members of the disability community.

    Roszella J. Viltz, of Lafayette, was reappointed to the Louisiana Statewide Independent Living Council. Viltz is a Children’s Special Health Services Parent Liaison for the Louisiana Department of Health. She will serve as an advocate for individuals with disabilities.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Baton Rouge sailor reflects on year of recruiting in America’s Navy

    First Class Jalisa Green, a recruiter assigned to Navy Recruiting District San Antonio, shows that not shying away from hard work and responsibility does not go unnoticed.
    Green, a Louisiana native, longed to travel and see the world beyond her hometown of Baton Rouge.  She believed joining the Navy would give her that opportunity.
    After enlisting in 2009, she was stationed in Yokosuka, Japan, serving on USS Cowpens with follow-on assignments on USS Spruance  and USS William P. Lawrence.
    “Working on a ship was challenging; it meant long hours, a lot of sweat, dirt, and wrench-cranking, but I loved it,” said Green, a gas turbine system technician (mechanical).
    Although her passion is to travel as much as possible, early in her career she knew one day she would transition to shore duty as a recruiter.
    “I had a great recruiter, who has been a positive influence from day one in my decision to become a recruiter, and continues to support me throughout my career,” said Green.
    Recruiters are representatives of America’s Navy and act as ambassadors in their communities.  To become one requires previous experience in the Navy or other branch of the military, an outgoing personality, creativity, initiative, and strong organizational and time-management skills, among other skills.
    For some Sailors, transitioning from the fleet to recruiting can be challenging.  Many find it difficult adapting to office work after spending time in more operational rates on a ship.
    “For me the biggest difference was all the paperwork,” said Green.  “But the long hours and dedication you have to put in are the same.  Ship life had already groomed me for that.”
    Green has proven her strength and ability to adapt within the recruiting world.  As a second class petty officer, she was given the position of leading petty officer (LPO) for her division, a role that is traditionally given to a first class petty officer.
    “Becoming a LPO was a tough experience.  I had to make sacrifices in my personal life for my career,” admits Green.  “It was hard, at first, to find that balance and to remember to take care of myself and make time for other goals, like college.”
    Green says she finds strength through her many mentors in the recruiting community as well as through her family.
    “I reach out often to my chief, division leading chief petty officer, and my first class petty officers,” said Green.  “They all encourage me to never back down and to always strive for more from myself and my recruiters.”
    Green’s grit and strong work ethic made her a standout Sailor within the recruiting community and lead to her meritorious advancement to first class petty officer through the Meritorious Advancement Program  on June 30.
    Earning meritorious advancement was a huge milestone for Green, who says she was completely surprised by her selection.
    “I honestly did not think it was an achievable goal for me,” she explained.  “It is hard to be competitive within your rate as a recruiter, so I did not think it would happen.”
    Successful recruiters can apply for reclassification under the Navy’s Career Recruiting Force (CRF) program.  Green has chosen not to convert to CRF, instead hoping to one day return to the fleet.
    “As much as I have enjoyed recruiting, shore duty has reminded me of why I joined the Navy in the first place, which was to travel and do something different,” Green said.  “I have not traveled enough,” she said.
    Green said making first class has not been a big change for her.
    “Serving as the LPO for my division as a second class made me already think like a first class, so this advancement is only the beginning and makes me want to work harder to achieve my goals,” said Green.
    Those goals, Green said, are to eventually finish college and make chief petty officer or become a commissioned officer.
    “I am thankful for this opportunity, but personally it is not enough; I need to keep pushing,” she said.  “I also need to humble myself and remember all the recruiters and chiefs who have gone before me and to those whom have given me guidance to get me where I am today.  I wouldn’t be here without their help.”
    By Giselle Christmas
    Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class
    Navy Recruiting District San Antonio Public Affairs
    PHOTO CAPTION:
    171020-N-ND850-679:  CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas (Oct. 20, 2017) Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 1st Class Jalisa Green of Baton Rouge, La., is a recruiter assigned to Navy Recruiting Station Corpus Christi, Navy Recruiting District San Antonio.  After enlisting in 2009, Green served aboard the USS Cowpens (CG-63), USS Spruance (DDG-111), and USS William P. Lawrence (DDG-110) before becoming a Navy recruiter.  (U.S. Navy Photo by Burrell Parmer, Navy Recruiting District San Antonio Public Affairs/Released)

     

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Network Coalition honors New Orleans, Baton Rouge leaders during Bayou Classic 2017

    VCI International Inc. hosted the 24th Annual Network Coalition Reception at  the Hyatt House hotel in New Orleans honoring business and political leaders during the Bayou Classic weekend festivities. Honored were:

    • Lisa Mims-Devazin, PhD, Chancellor, Southern University New Orleans
    • State Senator Wesley Bishop
    • New Orleans City Councilman James Austin Gray ll
    • Eugene Green of The Green Business Report
    • Tyrone Legette of  Legette Construction
    • Hall Davis V of  Hall Davis and Sons Funeral Home in Baton Rouge
    • Tony Brown of the Eyes Open Foundation in Alexandria Louisiana
    • Sailor Jackson Jr., Louisiana Secretary of State office (retired)

      Tony Brown

      Tony Brown

    Michael McClanahan incoming president Louisiana NAACP State Conference was introduced. Erika McConduit, president of the Urban League Louisiana, Network Coalition chairman WT Whitfield, VCI International president Allen Semien Sr, Bobby Phills, Ph.D, chancellor-dean of the Southern University Land Grant Campus, Martin Burrell, president of the Dallas-based Burrell Group, and State Representative Sam Jenkins of Shreveport welcomed guests to the

    Untitled4pm event.

    Sponsors for the event included Acadian Companies, Baton Rouge Community College Foundation, Maximized Communications, CAWAN Resource Network, JAVA Copy Center, The Burrell Group, Yusef Davis Photography, Dr. Everett D. Gibson, and Ted Ellis Art Gallery.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Hamilton, Young, Butler appointed to rehab council

    Virginia Gay Young, of New Orleans, Tarj L. Hamilton, of Baton Rouge, and Glyn F. Butler, of Baker, were appointed by Governor John Bel Edwards to the Louisiana Rehabilitation Council. Young is a project development manager with Lighthouse Louisiana. Hamilton is a licensed real estate agent and the owner of Clear2Close Realty, LLC. Young and Hamilton will serve as individuals with a disability on the council. . Butler is a client advocate with the Advocacy Center and will serve as a representative of the Client Assistance Program on the council. The Louisiana Rehabilitation Council’s duties include reviewing, analyzing, and advising the Louisiana Rehabilitation Services within the Louisiana Workforce Commission.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Brandon to serve on state ethics board

    Bishop L Lawrence Brandon, of Shreveport, was elected by the Louisiana House of Representatives to serve on the Louisiana Board of Ethics with 10 other members. Brandon will serve a five-year term with a two-term limit. He is responsible for administering and enforcing Louisiana’s conflict of interest legislations, campaign finance registration and reporting requirements, lobbyist registration, and disclosure laws in order to achieve compliance by officials and others. He has relinquisched postons on local and regional boards that may have caused a conflict of interest.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Kaweeda Green Adams selected NY superintendent

    Shreveport native Kaweeda Green Adams has been selected superintendent of the City School District of Albany, NY, a district with 9,700 students. She is a graduate of Caddo parish public schools and is pursuing a doctorate in organizational leadership from Grand Canyon University in Phoneics. She served in Nevada’s school district for 28 years with one position as school associate superintendent. In Albany, she will lead the district which has struggled to close the achievement gap and has been cited in recent years for disparities in suspension rates.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Batiste, a former FBI agent, to lead Xavier police force

    Jacques Battiste has been named the new chief of police at Xavier University of Louisiana, according to Joseph Byrd, vice president for student services.

    Battiste, a 1988 Xavier graduate, returns to his alma mater from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, where he accumulated more than 22 years of experience as a Supervisory Special Agent. During his tenure at the FBI, Battiste worked internationally to conduct investigations on terrorism suspects, responded to critical incidents such as the 1996 Centennial Park bombings in Atlanta, Georgia, and USS Cole attack, and served as lead agent on several national security special events in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.

    Battiste brings wide-ranging experience. He served as a program manager in the FBI Counterterrorism Division Africa Fusion Cell, and oversaw intelligence analysts developing strategies to defeat terrorism in North and West Africa. He is a trained bomb technician, deploying to high-risk locations around the world to dismantle hazardous devices and Weapons of Mass Destruction, and has also served on the SWAT team. Read more at the Xavier Herald.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Southern University to honor eight football legends Sept 1

    Southern University Athletics will honor eight of the most highly decorated football players in the program’s history during the inaugural SU Football Kick-off Extravaganza on Friday, September 1 in the F.G. Clark Activity Center.

    The fundraising event will salute eight former SU football players who enjoyed extensive NFL careers, which garnered several All-Pro awards, Super Bowl and Pro Bowl appearances, Super Bowl wins, and Hall of Fame inductions.

    Aeneas Williams, Rufus Porter, Mel Blount, Ken Ellis, Harold Carmichael, Rich “Tombstone” Jackson, Isaiah “Butch” Robertson, and Frank Pitts will be recognized as Southern Football Legends and celebrated for their achievements on the Gridiron and as ambassador of Southern University.

    https://foundation.sus.edu/football-extravaganza/The event will serve as a precursor to a special on-field pregame ceremony during the Jaguars opening game against South Carolina State in the MEAC/SWAC Challenge in A.W. Mumford Stadium on Sunday, September 3rd.

    Kickoff for the nationally televised season opener is slated for 1:35 p.m. on ESPN2.

    Blues recording artist Willie Clayton and Zydeco musician Keith Frank will headline a concert that will follow the ceremony honoring the former Southern University football legends.

    VIP tables, which include reserved seating with catered Louisiana cuisine and specialty drinks, are available for purchase. General admission tickets for the kick off extravaganza are $25 and are available now online at https://foundation.sus.edu/football-extravaganza/ or at the SU ticket office. Contact 225-771-3171.

    Read more »
  • Morris named to Louisiana Housing Corporation

    Andreanecia M. Morris, of New Orleans, was appointed by Gov. John Bel Edwards to the Louisiana Housing Corporation. Morris is the executive director of HousingNOLA. She will serve as the representative of the 2nd Congressional District. The Louisiana Housing Corporation assures that every Louisiana resident is granted an opportunity to obtain safe, affordable, and energy efficient housing.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Covington native serves in Japan aboard USS Germantown

    SASEBO, Japan – A 2016 Covington High School graduate and Covington native is serving in Japan in the U.S. Navy aboard USS Germantown.

    Seaman Recruit Nicholas Brumfield is an operations specialist aboard the ship operating out of Sasebo, Japan.

    A seaman recruit is the Navy’s entry-level enlisted position following graduation from boot camp. Brumfield graduated from the Navy’s Recruit Training Command at Great Lakes, Illinois in July and has begun his apprenticeship training on the Germantown.

    “I decided to become an operations specialist because it sounded cool,” Brumfield said. “It sounded like I would be actually doing something, playing an active role in protecting the ship and my shipmates.”

    With more than 50 percent of the world’s shipping tonnage and a third of the world’s crude oil passing through the region, the U.S. has historic and enduring interests in this part of the world.

    “Our alliance is rooted in shared interests and shared values,” said Adm. Harry Harris, U.S. Pacific Command Commander. “It’s not hyperbole to say that the entire world has benefited from the U.S.-Japan alliance. While our alliance helped stabilize the region after the Second World War, it also enabled the Japanese people to bring about an era of unprecedented economic growth. And for the last six decades, our Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen have worked side by side with the Japan Self Defense Force to protect and advance peace and freedom.”

    Commissioned in 1986, Germantown is the second Navy ship named after the Revolutionary War Battle of Germantown. With a crew of more than 900 sailors and Marines, Germantown is 609 feet long and weighs approximately 16,000 tons. Designed specifically to operate landing craft air cushion small craft vessels, Whidbey Island-class dock landing ships have the largest capacity for these landing craft out of any U.S. Navy amphibious ship.

    “I like my chain of command, they really focus on us as junior sailors, helping us build up not only Navy-wise but far into the future about what we want to do when we leave the service. They genuinely care about us,” said Brumfield.

    Sea duty is inherently arduous and challenging but it builds strong fellowship and esprit de corps among members of the crew. The crew is highly motivated and quickly adapt to changing conditions. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches, and drills.

    “Serving in the Navy, not only does it have benefits for me but I’m doing something greater than myself,” Brumfield said. “Nothing is given to us, you have to work for everything you accomplish.”

    The Navy’s presence in Sasebo is part a long-standing commitment.

    “The U.S.-Japan alliance remains the cornerstone for peace and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region,” said Harris.

    By Chief Petty Officer Bill Steele
    Navy Office of Community Outreach

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Mackie appointed to LaSTEM Council

    Calvin Mackie, Ph.D., of Gretna, was appointed by Gov. John Bel Edwards to the LaSTEM Council. Mackie holds a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and is the President and CEO of the Channel Zero Group. He formerly served on the faculty at Tulane University where he researched heat transfer, fluid dynamics, energy efficiency, and renewable energy. Mackie is also the founder of STEM NOLA, an organization which serves to expose, inspire, and engage members in New Orleans and the surrounding communities about opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

    The Louisiana Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Advisory Council (LaSTEM) was established to coordinate and oversee the creation, delivery, and promotion of STEM education program; to increase student interest and achievement in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics; to ensure the alignment of education, economic development, industry, and workforce needs; and to increase the number of women who graduate from a postsecondary institution with a STEM degree or credential.

    ONLINE: http://www.channelzro.com

    Read more »
  • Jones picked for SU cheer squad

    Jumyria Jones, of Port Allen, is the first athlete on the West Side to be accepted on the Southern University Co-Ed Cheer Team. Jones has been a cheerleader since sixth grade and is a recent graduate of Port Allen High School. She cheered at PAHS all four years and was co-captain her senior year. She was also named Miss Black West Baton Rouge Parish last summer. Jones plans to pursue a degree in criminal justice and attend law school.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    SU Lab coach Rebecca Marshall honored

    The Louisiana High School Athletic Association Coaches Convention recently honored Southern University Laboratory School head track coach Rebecca Marshall.

    Marshall has helped to cultivate a rich athletic history for the Southern University Laboratory School Kittens. She has a bountiful tradition of producing track stars who have ranked amongst the states top track leaders. Many former team members under her leadership have gone on to become elite athletes.

    She has won 21 Class 1-A State Championships and 15 of them were consecutive. She currently holds the position as Athletic Director but has worn many hats over the past years. During her 30 years at Southern University Laboratory School she has served as SGA Sponsor, Assistant Volleyball Coach, Cheerleader Coach, Dancing Doll Coach and Dean of Students.

    Submitted by Rene Marshall-Williams

    Read more »
  • Baker High School Symphonic Band wins championship

    The Baker High School Symphonic Band will be performing at the Festival at Carnegie Hall: National Band and Orchestra Festival in New York City on March 31, 2018.  The Baker High Concert Band won multiple awards at the National 2016 Spring Music Festival competition in Orlando, Florida, including the High School Grand Champion Award for Instrumental Music. Baker also received a Superior Rating, 1st place in the High School Class A Concert Band category, and Overall Instrumental Grand Champions. Derrick Walker is the band director.  He earned a bachelor of arts in music from Southern University in Baton Rouge and a high school diploma from Meridian High School in Mississippi.

    Derrick Walker, Band Director

    Derrick Walker, Band Director

    Read more »
  • Grande, Wilkerson named to NBA’s top 40

    Southern University Law Center Alumni Ashlei Gradney and Lacresha Wilkerson have been named 2017 National Bar Association’s Top 40 Under 40. Gradney is an attorney at Kastl Law, P.C. in Dallas. Her practice areas include business, criminal, family, personal injury, wills-trusts-probate, elder law, and juvenile law. Wilkerson is an assistant attorney general with the Louisiana Department of Justice.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    EBRP Schools’ Michelle Clayton moves to online K-12 charter

    University View Academy Superintendent Lonnie Luce announced the appointment of Michelle Clayton, former deputy superintendent of East Baton Rouge Parish School System, as the new associate superintendent of innovation and interim K-8 principal for the online K-12 charter school.

    Clayton graduated of LSU and earned a Ph.D. from Southern University and A&M College. The former teacher also served as executive director of academics for the Zachary Community School District.

    Luce said Clayton is now part of his dream team of educators to lead University View Academy into being a K-12 charter school in which every student in every parish of the state has the opportunity to gain a quality public education from day one to graduation, and earn two years towards a college degree by graduation time if they so desire.

    She will direct implementation of the school’s new curriculum as K-8 Principal and assist the Superintendent with comprehensive data analysis and planning so that the staff and students unite to achieve greater academic performance in all subjects.

    Mandy LaCrete

    Mandy LaCrete

    Recently, the school added Mandy LaCerte from Baton Rouge Community College as its director of early college and workforce development to manage the school’s growing two-year associate’s degree program. LaCrete was also a founding board member of Apex Collegiate Academy in North Baton Rouge. Shana Corers was named interim high school principal.University View Academy starts the 2017-2018 school year as an independently managed statewide charter school, after being affiliated with Connections Education of Baltimore for six years.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Sims to lead Medical City Fort Worth

    Jyric Sims has been named chief executive officer for Medical City Fort Worth after a national search. The Baton Rouge native has more than 17 years of health care experience and began his career as a certified nursing assistant before being promoted to leadership and business development roles, including director of operations at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. He was also senior vice president and chief operating officer for the Tulane Health System in New Orleans. Sims earned a bachelor of science degree from Louisiana State University.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Dr. Vindell Washington named Blue Cross chief medical officer

    Dr. Vindell Washington has joined Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana as chief medical officer. He brings to the state’s largest health insurer extensive experience in leading clinical teams and in health IT, most recently as the national coordinator for healthcare information technology in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

    Prior to that, Washington was at the Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady Health System in Baton Rouge for more than seven years, leaving as president of the medical group, which includes more than 500 medical providers and 1,400 employees. While at the health system, he also served as vice president of performance excellence and technology and chief medical information officer.

    Washington is a board-certified emergency medicine physician. Before coming to Baton Rouge, he served as chief executive officer of Piedmont Emergency Medicine Associates, a large private group in Charlotte, North Carolina.

    He received his undergraduate degree from Pennsylvania State University and his medical degree from the University of Virginia. He also received a Master of Science degree in healthcare management from the Harvard School of Public Health.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Barthelemy named to SUS board

    John L. Barthelemy, of Braithwaite, was appointed to the Board of Supervisors of Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College. Mr. Barthelemy is a Plaquemines Parish Councilmember and former educator. Mr. Barthelemy was the principal of Phoenix High School for 30 years. After Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Isaac, he worked with FEMA to redevelop Phoenix High School. Mr. Barthelemy earned a Masters of Education degree and a Bachelors of Arts degree from Southern University. He will serve as a representative of the 1st Congressional District.

     

     

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Small business, champions honored

    LED and SBA Honor 2017 Louisiana Small Business Award Winners

    Louisiana Economic Development and the U.S. Small Business Administration announced the 2017 Louisiana Small Business Award winners at an event honoring small business leaders who exemplify the entrepreneurial spirit of Louisiana. The winners were honored in a private reception at the Governor’s Mansion, May 3.

    “We are pleased to recognize these enterprising and innovative business leaders, especially at this time in the middle of National Small Business Week,” LED Secretary Don Pierson said. “Small businesses account for more than 97 percent of all employers in Louisiana. They provide jobs to more than 900,000 of our state’s residents – more than half of our private-sector workforce – and they keep our communities vibrant. Small business success is vital to our state’s economy, and the business people we honor today are some of Louisiana’s best.”

    LED and the Louisiana Small Business Development Center Network served more than 13,475 small businesses and individuals last year, directly resulting in 1,022 new jobs, 1,587 retained jobs and the launch of 165 new businesses. The Small Business Award program recognizes top performers in a broad range of categories.

    The 2017 Louisiana Small Business Award winners are:

    2017 SBA Champion Award winners

    8(a) Graduate of the Year:
    Tiya Scroggins
    Scroggins Consulting
    Shreveport

    Family-Owned Business of the Year:
    Tom Sawyer
    Automotive Alignment and Brake Service
    Lake Charles

    Green and Sustainable Business Award:
    Elizabeth Shephard
    LifeCity LLC
    New Orleans

    Veteran Small Business Champion:
    Carla Antoine
    Life Towne Center
    New Orleans

    Women in Business Champion:
    Klassi Duncan
    Urban League of Louisiana – Women’s Business Resource Center Contractor’s Resource Lab
    New Orleans

    Region VI Women’s Business Center of Excellence:

    Joyce James

    Joyce James

    Joyce D. James
    Southeast Louisiana Women’s Business Center
    Baton Rouge

    Region Small Business Development Center of Excellence and Innovation Center Award:
    William (Bill) Joubert and Sandy A. Summers
    Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University
    Hammond

    2017 LED Entrepreneur Awards

    LED Small and Emerging Business of the Year:
    Trudy R. Poret
    Tarpan Construction LLC
    Cottonport

    LED Small Business Innovation Award:
    Chris Meaux
    Waitr
    Lake Charles

    LED Most Outstanding Business Growth Award:
    Alex W. Reed
    Fluence Analytics
    New Orleans

     

    LED Resource Partner of the Year:
    Louisiana Small Business Development Centers Network

    Louisiana PTAC Contractor of the Year:
    Suzette Freeman
    Janet Berry
    Carrie Harper
    Advantage Personnel
    Baton Rouge

    MEPOL Small Manufacturing Award:
    Walerij Holack
    Gulf South Machine
    Ponchatoula

    NFIB Small Business Champion:
    Mike Coullard
    Panola Pepper Corp.
    Lake Providence

    USDA Rural Development Lender of the Year:
    Jeremy Gilpin
    Greater Nevada Credit Union

    USDA Rural Development Borrower of the Year:
    Rock Bordelon
    Central Louisiana Hospital Group, LLC
    Benton

    Small Business Person of the Year:
    Alejandro (Alex) Hernandez
    Hernandez Consulting
    New Orleans

    Read more »
  • ,,

    AKA Debutante Cotillion presented ten maids, princesses, Miss Amity

    Ten beautiful young women were presented by Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, Nu Gamma Omega Chapter at its annual Debutante Cotillion and Spring Ball on April 8, 2017 at the Belle of Baton Rouge Atrium. The warm welcome to all guests came from chapter President Jacqueline Nash Grant. Junior League of Baton Rouge president Kathy Fletcher Victorian served as Mistress of Ceremonies for the evening themed “An Elegant Array of Precious Pearls”.

    Joy Gustavia Trusclair was crowned as Queen of the Cotillion, the daughter of Donald and Joyce F. Trusclair. She was escorted by Raymond Vincent.

    Taylor Danielle Fields was acknowledged as the 2017 Miss Amity.

    Reigning as princesses were First Princess Cache’ Marchell Brown, daughter of Raymond and Calaundra Clarke and the late Marlon Brown, escorted by Darius Washington; Second Princess Peyton Lauryn Matthew, daughter of Torin Matthew and Veronica Matthew, escorted by Taylor Matthew; Third Princess Taylor Danielle Fields, daughter of John Fields and Brigitte Fields, escorted by Kendall Boults; Fourth Princess Sondra Alexis Williams, daughter of Robert and Carla Williams, escorted by Alvin McCrory III; Fifth Princess Desiree’ Nicole Jones, daughter of Ervin and Jennifer Jones, escorted by Clyde Edwards-Helaire.

    Honored as 2017 Cotillion Maids were First Maid Victoria Lauryn Clark, daughter of Darren Clark and  Sonceree Clark, escorted by Clayton Hunter; Second Maid Mia Geneice Gaines, daughter of Telfry and Melissa Gaines, escorted by Preston Gaines; Third Maid Shania Darnay Stewart, daughter of Shondel Stewart and Chastity Sanders, escorted by Devonte Landry; Fourth Maid Nia Simone Ross, daughter of Ike and India Ross, escorted by Keilen Ross.

    Ball captains for the event were: Nicholas Cloyd, Tristan Matthew, Derick Rheams, Jr., and Carter Tucker.

    Mary A. Darby, Kimberly McCants, Velena Johnson, Jacqueline N. Grant, Kathy F. Victorian, Errin W. Gaines, Danielle Staten, and Brandy Johnson

    Mary A. Darby, Kimberly McCants, Velena Johnson, Jacqueline N. Grant, Kathy F. Victorian, Errin W. Gaines, Danielle Staten, and Brandy Johnson

     

    Errin Gaines served as general debutante chairman, while Brandy Johnson, Kimberly McCants and Danielle Staten served as co-chairman. Other program participants included chapter Vice President Velena Johnson, Carla Harmon, Toyia Charles-Comminey, Joycelyn Green, Mary Alice Darby, Ellen McKnight and Brittnei Shelling.

    Submitted by Morgan Etienne

     

     

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Baker High School Boys Varsity Basketball Team reaches state playoffs

    Because of their hard work and endurance and in spite of the loss of their school and/or homes as a result of the Great Flood of 2016, the Baker High School Boys Basketball Team participated in the 2017 Allstate Sugar  Bowl/LHSSA Basketball Tournament. With an overall season record of 25-12 and district record of 7-5, the team made it to the quarter finals of the tournament. We look forward to next year’s team making it all the way! Good luck to the team’s graduating seniors in their future endeavors. GO BUFFS!

     By Submitted News

    Read more »
  • Molaison, Holt appointed to state judiciary commission

    Jefferson Parish Judge John J. Molaison Jr. and former labor union leader Sibal S. Holt were appointed by the state Supreme Court to serve four-year terms on the Judiciary Commission of Louisiana.

    Molaison has served as judge for Division E of the 24th Judicial District Court and is president of the Louisiana District Judges Association. He also worked for the Jefferson Parish District Attorney’s Office and with two private law firms.

    Holt, a citizen member, was nominated by the Louisiana District Judges Association. She is the former president of the Louisiana AFL- CIO and the first Black woman in the nation to be elected president of a state labor federation. After retiring, she become a licensed commercial general contractor and established S. Holt Construction Co., LLC, leading her to be the first Black female general contractor in Rapides Parish. She is co-owner of the We Care Residential Therapeutic Home, a facility which houses young men with limited cognitive skills and extreme behaviors.

    The commission is the nine-member body that examines allegations of judicial misconduct in Louisiana and recommends to the high court when it finds it appropriate that sanctions should be imposed on a judge.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Meet the Players; Louisiana’s longest known married couple

    Since January 27, 1935, Lawrence and Varrie Player, of Benton, La., have been together, making them Louisiana’s longest-known married couple. They have been married 82 years. Last year they were honored by the Louisiana Family Forum during a reception at their home.. The second-longest married couple is Will Henry and Virgina Teasley, of Bryceland, who have been married for 80 years.

    State Rep. Mike Johnson presents Lawrence and Varrie Player with an award as the Louisiana Family Forum's longest married couple during a special reception in their honor on Feb 12, 2016. Mike Johnson photo.

    State Rep. Mike Johnson presents Lawrence and Varrie Player with an award as the Louisiana Family Forum’s longest married couple during a special reception in their honor on Feb 12, 2016. Mike Johnson photo.

    “It is a true delight to honor these two great couples for their examples and their commitment,” State Rep. Mike Johnson said.  “In a day when the stability of so many marriages and families is in jeopardy, these folks stand out as exceptional models for all of us.”

    The longest-known married couples are honored by Louisiana Family Forum to encourage individual marriages, build a stronger marriage culture and to remind those in the state that lifelong marriages benefit everyone. Each couple was presented an official statement of special recognition from Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards. Their names also are entered into Louisiana Family Forum’s Marriage Hall of Fame.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Meet Renee Horton–another hidden figure

    Renee Horton, PhD, remembers spending many nights gazing at the stars as a child growing up in Baton Rouge, wondering if there was anything beyond our universe. Her interest in space was stimulated during family trips to Biloxi, Mississippi, to visit her uncle, who was in the Air Force. The family would stop at the rest area outside of the John Stennis Space Center — where a replica of the moon lander was located. “I played around it, pretending I was exploring space. One day, I decided I wanted to be an astronaut,” Horton wrote  in an online feature at NASA.gov.

    She joined the Air Force ROTC program and, during her physical, learned that she had significant hearing loss. Later, Horton was diagnosed with a hearing impairment which prevented her from applying to be an astronaut. But, she learned she could still play an important role in sending crews to space.

    The Space Launch System is the first flight program Horton worked on at NASA.  Many SLS parts — including the SLS core stage — are made of metal, including the largest rocket fuel tank ever built, and metallic materials and welding are my areas of expertise. As an engineer at Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, she is helping build metal rocket parts that can withstand the extreme forces of launch and space travel, and will send astronauts farther away from Earth than they’ve ever traveled before. “Our team at Michoud is making history every day as we build this extraordinary new rocket. We’re moving one step closer to launching the most powerful rocket in the world, and it’s exciting to watch all of it come together,”  she wrote.

    At her father’s influence, Horton earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Louisiana State University. She loved math, and he thought engineering would be the best way for her to use her talents. She said she later switched to being a scientist because of her desire to learn and investigate. “Physics is my passion,” she wrote.  “I’m the first African American — and first in my family — to earn a doctorate in material science, with a concentration in physics, from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa.”

    Horton enjoys photography, mentoring outside of work, writing poetry, and reading.

     

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Officers installed on SU System Board

    The Southern University and A&M College System Board of Supervisors installed officers for 2017 and held a swearing-in ceremony for newly appointed members during its regular monthly meeting, Jan 6.

    Chairwoman Ann A. Smith and vice chairman Rev. Donald R. Henry, who were elected during the annual officers’ election in November 2016, were installed as the new officers for the governing board for the only historically black college and university system in America.

    Smith is a retired school educator and administrator in Tangipahoa Parish, member of the Louisiana School Board Association, and former member of the Tangipahoa Parish School Board.

    Henry represents the 2nd Congressional District. He is a planning and scheduling professional at Noranda Alumina, LLC; and co-owner of DRH Consulting Group, LLC in Gramercy.

    Taking the oath of office for the SU Board were two newly appointed members and three reappointed members named by Governor Edwards, December 30, 2016.

    “I salute the long-standing members of the Board for their great and unselfish service to the Southern University System and congratulate those members who have been reappointed who will continue in service. I genuinely look forward to working with you as we advance the mission of the Southern University System,” said SU System President Ray L. Belton.

    Sworn in on the 16-member board that serves to manage and supervise the SU System were:

    Leroy Davis, of Baker, is a retired professor and dean of Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College. Additionally, Davis is a former mayor and councilman of the City of Baker. He received a bachelor of science degree from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, a master of science degree from the University of Illinois, and a doctoral degree from the University of Illinois. He will serve as a representative of the 2nd Congressional District.

    Richard T. Hilliard, of Shreveport, is a senior engineer and business consultant at the Maintowoc Company, Incorporated. Hilliard received a bachelor of science degree from Georgia Technological University and a master of science degree from Walsh College. He will serve as a representative of the 4th Congressional District.

    Domoine D. Rutledge, of Baton Rouge, is an attorney and general counsel of the East Baton Rouge Parish School System. He is a former national president of the Southern University Alumni Federation and the current president and chairman of the Southern University System Foundation Board of Directors. Rutledge received a bachelor of arts degree and a juris doctorate from the Southern University Law Center. He will serve as an at-large member on the board.

    Smith, of Kentwood, received a bachelor of science degree and a master of science in education from Southern University. She will serve as a representative of the 5th Congressional District.

    Rev. Samuel C. Tolbert Jr., of Lake Charles, is the pastor of the Greater Saint Mary Missionary Baptist Church. He received a bachelor of arts degree from Bishop College and a master of divinity from Payne Theological Seminary. He has also received an honorary doctorate of divinity from Union Baptist College and Theological Seminary and Christian Bible College and an honorary doctorate degree from Temple Bible College. Rev. Tolbert will serve as an at-large member on the board.

    The Board of Supervisors of Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College is vested with the responsibility for the management and supervision of the institutions of higher education, statewide agricultural programs, and other programs which comprise the Southern University System. Members serve six-year terms appointed by the governor.

    Read more »
Back to Top
Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com