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    Brown named SU Executive VP, provost

    The Southern University System has selected M. Christopher Brown II as the new executive vice president for academic affairs and provost. Brown has more than 10 years of experience in higher education administration including serving as president of Alcorn State University in Mississippi, and as executive vice president and provost at Fisk University in Tennessee.

    Brown, who is currently senior fellow, Division of Academic Leadership and Change, for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities in Washington, DC, was chosen from a pool of candidates after a nationwide search to fill the new SUS cabinet position. The search committee, co-chaired by retired SU chemistry professor William E. Moore and Sonya Hester, Southern University Shreveport Faculty Senate president, was comprised of SU faculty from each campus, students, staff, alumni, and community stakeholders.

    Prior to serving as the18th president of Alcorn State University and before his appointment at Fisk, he served as dean of the College of Education at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, vice president for programs and administration at the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, director of social justice and professional development for the American Educational Research Association, as well as executive director and chief research scientist of the Frederick D. Patterson Research Institute of the United Negro College Fund. Brown has held faculty appointments at Pennsylvania State University, George Mason University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Bowie State University, West Virginia University, Indiana University, and the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

    “We are pleased that Dr. Brown will join the SUS team,” said Ray L. Belton, SU System president-chancellor. “He is a dynamic and innovative administrator who has demonstrated a high level of engagement working productively with faculty and staff in higher education. Dr. Brown’s extensive academic background and his executive leadership qualities are commensurate with our immediate vision to sustain and enlarge the SU System.”

    Brown is the author/editor of 17 books and monographs. He is the author or co-author of more than 100 journal articles, book chapters, and publications related to education and society.  Regarded as an international scholar, he has lectured and/or presented research in various countries on six of seven continents – Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America.

    “I am humbled by this honor. I look forward to working with President-Chancellor Belton to help realize his vision for the SU System,” said Brown.

    He was the recipient of the 2001 Association for the Study of Higher Education’s Promising Scholar/Early Career Award, the 2002 AERA Committee on Scholars of Color Early Career Contribution Award, the 2007 Philip C. Chinn Book Award from the National Association for Multicultural Education, the 2008 Association of Teacher Educators Distinguished Educator Award, and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities Commission on Access, Diversity, and Excellence 2013 Distinguished Service Award. He also was recognized with a 2013 Trofeu Raca Negra (Black Race Trophy) from the Honors Council of the Society of Afro-Brazilian Socio-Cultural.

    A former member of the South Carolina State University Board of Trustees, Brown is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated, the 100 Black Men of America, Rotary International, a 33rd degree Free and Accepted Mason Prince Hall Affiliation, and an ordained Baptist minister.  

    The Charleston, South Carolina native holds a Ph.D. in higher education from The Pennsylvania State University, a master of science in education policy and evaluation from the University of Kentucky, and a bachelor of science degree in elementary education from South Carolina State University.

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  • Henry added to hall of fame

    Southern University’s acclaimed art professor, Randell Henry, has been inducted into the Scotlandville High School Alumni Association’s Hall of Fame. A mid-term January 1976 Scotlandville grad, Henry is among the first 12 persons selected by the Scotlandville High School Alumni Association to go into the Hall of Fame.

    Henry  said his high school’s hall of fame selection tops the honor he received recently when one of his paintings was cited by the New York Times chief art critic, Roberta Smith, as her favorite piece at the recently held New York art show, “60 Americans.”

    “I never thought I would be in a hall of fame. This is more than lagniappe from Scotlandville,” he said.

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    Wheeler leaves for Kentucky State University

    Erin Wheeler, Ph.D., has been appointed assistant vice president for academic support services at Kentucky State University. She was a biology instructor at Southern University and A&M College, an adjunct biology instructor at American InterContinental University Online, and a STEM learning strategy consultant with the Center for Academic Success at Louisiana State University.

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    Crump to keynote national asset building conference

    The Southern Regional Asset Building Coalition (SRABC) will hold its eighth annual conference Oct. 8-9 in Biloxi, Mississippi, at the Beau Rivage Resort. The featured keynote speaker is Maxine Crump, the executive director of Dialogue on Race Louisiana.

    Crump made history when she became the first Black woman to live in a residence hall on LSU’s campus, then again in 1975 by becoming Baton Rouge’s WAFB Channel-9 News’ first Black reporter. She’s been inspiring others to make history ever since, through her work in television, radio, humanitarian efforts and community development. She also plays an important role in working to eliminate race discrimination in Baton Rouge with the  Dialogue on Race Louisiana, which aims to educate the community on ways to make their future free from “a vivid racial divide that still exists in Louisiana.” In February earlier this year, she took the TEDxLSU stage with her message “Using Talk to Create Action”.

    “The public is especially invited to join this dynamic network at the 8th annual conference and become engaged in making concrete steps to ensure economic inclusion and wealth building for all,” said Gena McClendon, SRABC project director.

    Since 2007, the SRABC conference has brought together 250 advocates and experts from 18 states to collaborate on specific strategies and efforts that increase financial security for communities across the nation.

    With special emphasis on defining policies and programs that support low-income families and communities, this year’s conference provides participants with provide opportunities to collaborate utilizing the latest research and innovative ways to assist low- to moderate-income families in building wealth.

    SRABC is a partnership of state coalitions dedicated to the advocating for and the development of asset-building policies and programs for low-income families and rural communities.

    ONLINE: www.srabcoalition.org

     

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  • Brown to lead SU Ag center

    The Southern University Board of Supervisors has named Adell Brown Jr., Ph.D., interim chancellor for the SU Ag Center effective July 1, 2015.  Brown served as Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration, and currently as Vice Chancellor for Research and Executive Vice-Chancellor.

    Brown has more than 42 years of experience in higher education and agriculture, with 39 of those years at Southern University.
    He has held several positions within the SU Ag Center and the SU Baton Rouge (SUBR) campus. These positions included Adjunct Professor in the Department of Economics and Finance in the College of Business; Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration at the SU Ag Center; Associate Specialist and Specialist/Extension Economist; Assistant Administrator and Specialist for Agriculture; Acting Administrator and Assistant County Agent for the Cooperative Extension Program at SUBR. He also served as Small Farm Coordinator for the College of Agriculture at SUBR.

    Apart from of his employment with the Southern University System, Brown has been Vice President for Research, Planning, Community and Economic Development and Tenured Associate Professor in Business for the College of Business at Mississippi Valley State University;  Program Manager for the USDA’s Cooperative State Research Services Office of Small-Scale Agriculture in Washington D.C.; USDA visiting professor for Farmer Home Administration and  Research/Teaching Assistant for the Department of Agricultural Economics at Louisiana State University.
    He is also the immediate past president/chair of the 100 Black Men of Metropolitan Baton Rouge, a non-profit organization where African-American males assume roles of community leadership, responsibility, and guidance to enhance the lives of youth.
    Brown earned a bachelor of science in agricultural business from Northeast Louisiana University, a master of business administration with a concentration in management and finance from the University of Southwest Louisiana and a doctorate in agricultural dconomics with concentrations in Production Economics, Statistics and Management from Louisiana State University.
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    SUBR set to win four HBCU Digest Awards

    Southern University is a finalist in four categories in the 2015 HBCU Digest national awards competition.

    SU’s College of Nursing and Allied Health is a finalist in the Best Nursing School category and the Human Jukebox Marching Band is among the top Marching Bands.

    Southern scored in the Top Alumnus category with National Alumni Federation President Preston Castille. The SU Alumni Federation also finished among the top National Alumni Association of the Year Category.

    The winners will be announced and receive their awards at a ceremony July 10 at Hampton University in Virginia. The ceremony is part of the HBCU National Media Summit being held at Hampton from July 9-11.

    According to HBCU Digest, finalists are annually selected based on the impact of nominees’ achievement on institutional development, and for media coverage earned for the institution by way of the nominee.

    The Marching Band category includes: Southern, Alabama State University Mighty Marching Hornets, Florida A&M University Marching 100 and Albany State University Marching Rams Show Band.

    Schools in Best Nursing School category, include: Southern, Prairie View A&M University and Tougaloo College.

    The Alumnus of the Year category, includes: Castille; Adriel Hilton of Morehouse, FAMU, and Morgan State University; Michael Jones, of Dillard University; and John Thompson, FAMU.

    The National Alumni Association category includes: Southern, FAMU, South Carolina State University, Tuskegee University, Xavier University of Louisiana and Clafin University.

    Winners are selected by an academy of former HBCU Awards winners, former and current HBCU presidents, alumni, faculty, students and journalists covering HBCU issues for local or national outlets.

    Created in 2011 by HBCU Digest Founding Editor Jarrett L. Carter Sr., the HBCU Awards is the first national awards event to recognize the influence and impact of HBCUs on American culture.

    The SU Alumni Federation previously won the HBCU Digest’s inaugural National Alumni Association of the Year award in 2012.

    @jozefsyndicate

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    Dillard finalist for six HBCU Digest Awards

    Dillard University ranks among the finalists in six “Best Of” categories sponsored by the HBCU Digest annual awards ceremony that will be held this week on Dillard’s campus. The HBCU Digest is a daily blog/news resource providing news synopsis, links and commentary on stories about America’s 105 historically black colleges and universities.

    Each year it sponsors the HBCU Awards event to honor, acknowledge and celebrate achievements at historically black colleges and universities throughout the country.

    Crowning winners in the fields of leadership, arts, athletics, research, and community engagement, the HBCU Awards is the first and only event to recognize the influence and impact of HBCUs on American culture.

    The HBCU Awards ceremony will be held July 10 during the HBCU National Media Summit, which is July 9-11 at Hampton University in Virginia.

    From a pool of 430 nominations, Dillard University was selected as a finalist in the following areas: Best Choir; Best Fine Arts Program – (Film and Theater); Best Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics STEM Program (Physics); Female Faculty of the Year – Kemberley Washington; Male Alumnus of the Year – Michael Jones, ’82; and Male President of the Year – Dr. Walter Kimbrough.

    @jozefsyndicate

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    McKnight receives LDA Distinguished Service Award

    Hugh V. McKnight, DDS, of Baton Rouge, has been named this year’s recipient of the Distinguished Service Award that was presented during the 135th House of Delegates of the Louisiana Dental Association (LDA) on April 11, 2015, at the New Orleans Morial Convention Center.

    The Distinguished Service Award is the highest honor bestowed by the LDA and is given annually to individual members who exemplify the highest standards of professional conduct in dentistry and make extraordinary contributions in organized dentistry and their community.

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    Dr. McKnight has been a member of the LDA, the American Dental Association (ADA) and the Greater Baton Rouge Dental Association (GBRDA) for 36 he was the 1992 president and has served on LDA committees.

    He was the 1979-81 president of the Pelican State Dental Association and has been the assistant treasurer of the National Dental Association since 1992. He is a life member of the Pierre Fauchard Academy and a fellow in the International College of Dentists and the Academy of General Dentistry. He has served in consultant roles for the EBR Parish School Board, the Head Start Program, Earl K. Long Medical Center and the EPSDT Dental Medicaid Program. He’s currently a member of MCNA’s Dental Medicaid Advisory Committee.

    Dr. McKnight is a firm believer in giving back to the community. He is active with Mt. Pilgrim Baptist Church (at 9700 Scenic Hwy. pastored by Rev. Jesse B. Bilberry, Jr.) in various capacities including Sunday school teacher and chairman of the Deacon Board (ministry). He is also a member of the Boy Scouts of America Board (Istrouma Area Council).

    He is married to Audrey McKnight, and they have three children Sheletha Yvette, Hugh, Jr. and Yolanda.

    The LDA is the largest professional health organization for dentists in Louisiana. It is a statewide grassroots organization whose purpose is to promote, advocate, and protect the dental professional. The LDA has over 1,900 members. For more information, visit www.ladental.org.

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    Tierra Smith named national student journalist of the year

    The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) is proud to announce the selection of Tierra Smith of Grambling State University as the association’s 2015 Student Journalist of the Year. The award recognizes a full-time collegiate journalist who displays a commitment to NABJ’s goal of outstanding achievement within the field of journalism.

    It isn’t often that a historically Black college or university has a campus newspaper willing to dig deeply – even when a powerful administration is watching and questioning nearly every move. It’s with this approach that Smith has led the campus newspaper with tenacity comparable to some of the nation’s top editors, just on a college campus. Under her leadership, The Gramblinite, GSU’ s campus newspaper, has been diligent in holding GSU’s administration accountable, from questions on salaries of top administrators, to spending, and lack of resources for the school’s football program, Smith has continuously been unafraid to ask the hard questions.

    “We couldn’t be more proud of Tierra. She is clearly off to a great start, and we wait with anticipation to see what will be next as she begins her journalism career,” said NABJ President Bob Butler. “Tierra is an aggressive and passionate journalist which will serve her well as she continues to pursue her passion.”

    A native of Milwaukee, Smith became fascinated with the media when she was accidentally enrolled in a journalism course at her high school in Houston.

    “If they never put me in that class, I would have never been exposed to journalism,” Smith said, in a piece written last year for The New York Times Student Journalism Institute. She was a 2014 participant in The Times program at Dillard University and she was a 2014 student journalist with the NABJ Student Multimedia Projects.

    Her high school journalism teacher was going to remove her from the class because she did not have the necessary prerequisites, but she saw her passion and decided to let her stay. A few months into the class, Smith was named an editor of the high school’s newspaper and yearbook.

    Now a graduating senior, Smith, 22, is majoring in mass communications with a concentration in sports journalism. Smith was also a participant in the 2014 Class of the Sports Journalism Institute, a program geared toward creating a pipeline of more women and minorities in sports journalism. Additionally, Smith was the recipient of the 2014 NABJ Sports Task Force, Larry Whiteside Scholarship.

    Smith is a talented student journalist, and a strong NABJ student member. She’s been a part of NABJ since 2012, attending three national conventions, a regional conference and restarting the GSU student chapter as founding president. She has grown her chops at Grambling State along with internships at Gannett’s The News-Star and the Gannett Content Production Center in Monroe, Louisiana. In Summer 2014, she was a sports intern at the Salt Lake Tribune in Utah.

    Smith was most recently named a Dow Jones News Fund business reporting intern for Summer 2015. She will be working for NABJ’s Greg Moore at the Denver Post. She also has an active role in the GSU chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc., and she maintains a 3.6 GPA. Smith will start the next chapter of her journey as a graduate student at Louisiana State University this Fall.

    Smith will be honored along with other honorees at NABJ’s Annual Convention and Career Fair this summer in Minneapolis.

    An advocacy group established in 1975 in Washington, D.C., NABJ is the largest organization of journalists of color in the nation, and provides educational, career development and support to black journalists worldwide.

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    SUNO researcher partners with PBI to continue DNA forensic research

    Pressure BioSciences, Inc. announced it has entered into a Collaboration Agreement with Southern University at New Orleans to focus on improving and extending the applications of the Company’s unique and patented pressure cycling technology platform for the detection of DNA in forensic samples.

    Pam Marshall,Ph.D., interim director, Forensic Science Program SUNO is an expert on sexual assault kit examination and collection practices and will lead the program with Pressure BioScience Inc.

    While a graduate student in the laboratory of Professor Bruce Budowle (a recognized key opinion leader in forensic science) at the University of North Texas’ UNT Health Science Center, Marshall and her colleagues showed that incorporating PCT into the testing protocol for poor quality bone enabled more DNA to be detected as compared to standard methods. As part of the collaboration, Marshall will continue this pioneering work. She and her team at Southern University also will investigate other important areas in which PCT might enhance forensic sample testing.

    “A critical yet often difficult task in forensic analysis is the extraction of high quality DNA from challenged or inhibited samples,” said Marshall. “My previous work with the PCT platform gave me an appreciation for this powerful and enabling technology. My published research established that improved quality and quantity of DNA could be extracted from human bone samples with PCT, as compared to bones not treated with PCT.”

    Marshall said she believes that several projects undertaken during the collaboration could help establish PCT as a standard method in forensic science. For example, in an effort to reduce poaching, the extraction of DNA from seized African Elephant ivory samples is an important yet very difficult challenge at the present time. “We believe PCT might enable the recovery of greater amounts of DNA compared to current methods,” she said. “If successful, this could lead to the use of PCT for the extraction of DNA from a variety of difficult samples. This will be one of the first projects undertaken.”

    “We are pleased to support Dr. Marshall and her team in their development of new, improved, and expanded applications of the PCT platform in the testing of forensic samples. We believe their efforts will result in commercially profitable PCT-based products for PBI, possibly before the end of 2015,” said Nate Lawrence, vice president of marketing and sales for PBI.

    “In addition to the possible development of new PCT-based products, we are pleased that the collaboration also will support the Forensic Science program at SUNO,” said Mr. Richard T. Schumacher, President and CEO of PBI. “This program provides students with the course work, skills and experience necessary for success as a forensic scientist. This role is critical to our criminal justice system, since investigators, courts, and the public depend on forensic scientists for accurate and timely information.”

    Mr. Schumacher continued: “Our country needs well educated, professionally-trained, forensic scientists. “The Bureau of Labor Statistics currently estimates an approximate 20% increase in job growth in the forensic science field over the next six years. However, although the number of forensic science graduates nationwide is high, the number of graduates among underrepresented minorities is highly inadequate. That is why we are pleased to support educators like Dr. Marshall and universities like SUNO who are at the forefront of developing the next generation of highly skilled forensic scientists, with a vast majority from underrepresented populations.”

    Southern University at New Orleans was founded in 1956 to expand academic opportunities for Blacks. Today, SUNO still serves as a beacon for those looking for educational advancement in an environment that provides the personal attention some students need for success. With our mission in mind, we plan to be America’s premier urban institution of higher learning in the field of Forensic Science, providing educational access to students ready to contribute to our city and nation. In 2013, SUNO successfully implemented the Forensic Science Bachelor of Science degree program. SUNO is the only Historically Black College and University (HBCU) in Louisiana to offer this degree and one of four nationwide. The BS in Forensic Science degree program is committed to producing technically knowledgeable and skilled graduates equipped with the basic foundational science and laboratory problem solving skills necessary for success in the crime laboratory. Upon completion of the Forensic Science program, graduates will be prepared to function as forensic scientists, or for advanced study in such areas as forensic science, biomedical research, medicine and law. Please visit the University’s Web site at www.SUNO.edu.

    Pressure BioSciences Inc. develops, markets, and sells proprietary laboratory instrumentation and associated consumables to the estimated $6 billion life sciences sample preparation market. PCT customers also use our products in other areas, such as drug discovery and design, bio-therapeutics characterization, soil and plant biology, vaccine development, histology, and forensic applications.

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    Turner takes 3rd at state science fair

    Tyler Turner

    Tyler Turner

    Lake Forest Charter School 8th grade student Tyler Turner won 3rd place at the Louisiana Science and Engineering Fair in the environmental science category. Tyler’s project was titled “Alternative Roofs” and studied the most cost effective and energy efficient ways of roofing. His results found that grass covered roofs absorbed less energy than tile and wood. The fair was held March 23-25 in the LSU Union.

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    Stewart named La. House communications director

    The Louisiana House of Representatives has promoted Cory Stewart to director of communications. Having previously served as public information specialist and deputy director of communications for the House of Representatives, Stewart has 13 years of legislative, communications and organizational leadership experience. His work has received local, state, and national recognition and awards. Stewart is the Chairman of the National Association of Legislative Information and Communications Staff and is the recent recipient of the national Legislative Staff Achievement Award given by the National Conference of State Legislatures. A graduate of Southern University and A&M College, Stewart began his career in public service with the Louisiana House as an intern in 2002 and joined the full-time staff in 2006.

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  • Three named Southern University Agricultural Legends

    Three individuals were recognized as Louisiana Living Legends during the fifth annual Louisiana Small Farmer Conference at the Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center on March 20.

    They are Bobby R. Phills,Ph.D., program director for the Science Center and professor in the College of Engineering Sciences, Technology and Agriculture at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee; Freddie Johnson, a retired Southern University food and nutrition professor, of Baton Rouge; and Elvadus Fields, former county agent and farm management specialist at Southern, now retired, of St. Joseph.

    These three join 15 others who have been honored with this distinction since 2005.

    “The Louisiana Living Legends Award is an opportunity to honor heroes with ties to the Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center for their years of selfless service,” said Dawn Mellion-Patin, Ph.D., agricultural specialist and organizer of the small farmer conference.

    Phills is the former dean and research director of the College of Agricultural, Family and Consumer Sciences at Southern. In this role he created the Beginning Agricultural Youth Opportunities Unlimited (BAYOU) Summer Enrichment Program, which exposed hundreds of high school students across Louisiana to the broad array of careers in the agricultural sciences.

    “This program was responsible for placing hundreds of student interns at major research universities, in private industry and with the USDA,” Mellion-Patin said.

    Johnson served for 36 years in the Department of Human Nutrition and Food at Southern. Before that she was supervisor of food service for the state Department of Education. Her activities included sensory evaluation and establishing a staff sensory panel, design of a food research sensory evaluation area and a home economics space utilization study. Her research included the palatability of “rabbit nuggets” and other alternative food products for limited resource families.

    Fields was a county agent for the Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service for 32 years and then became a farm management specialist for Southern. He has been a supporter of the SU Livestock Show and was responsibility for bringing more than 150 youth to show animals for more than 50 years. He was a founding member of the Delta Livestock Enterprise and Northeast Louisiana Black Farmers and Landowners Association.

    During this year’s small farmer conference, the 125th anniversary of the establishment of the 1890 land-grant universities was also celebrated, said Gina E. Eubanks,Ph.D., vice chancellor for extension at the Southern Ag Center and program leader for nutrition and food sciences at the LSU AgCenter.

    Southern University is one of 19 universities across the country with 1890 land-grant status. In 1890, Congress passed the Second Morrill Act with the stipulation that Blacks were to be included in the land-grant university system. The first Morrill Act was signed into law by Pres. Abraham Lincoln in 1862. There is an 1862 land-grant university in every state including LSU in Louisiana.

    The other 15 Living Legends include Bernestine McGee, Floyd Jenkins, Elsie Cyrus, Samuel Donald, Alonzo Chappell, Sara Sims, Pecola Scott, Willie T. Sensley, Owusu Bandele, Leodrey Williams, James McNitt, James Archie, Solon Marshall, Kirkland Mellad and Wesley Crawford.

    By Linda Foster Benedict
    LSU AgCenter

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  • Llorens named private school’s founding president

    James L. Llorens has been confirmed by the Board of Directors for Cristo Rey Baton Rouge to serve as founding president. The board held its launch meeting March 3, 2015, and is currently completing its feasibility study. Although no facility has been located for the Catholic, college prep school, it is scheduled to open in Fall 2016. The high school will be private but only enroll low-income students. Llorens formerly served as chancellor of Southern University and A&M College and a former aide to East Baton Rouge Mayor-President Kip Holden. In the Cristo Rey model, students participate in a corporate work-study program.  Local businesses sponsor a full time job that is shared by a team of four students who each work one full day per week at the business. The job salary is paid to the school to offset tuition costs for students. The jobs provide students with hands on experience to prepare them for future careers. The Cristo Rey network is made up of 28 schools serving 9,000 students in 26 cities. The network has a 96% graduation rate, a 100% college acceptance rate, and a 90% college enrollment rate.

    ONLINE: http://www.cristoreybatonrouge.org/

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  • McCollum named head of Ed Department

    Sharon McCollum, Ed.D., will soon head the Virgin Islands Education Department following the Virgin Island government committee approval of her nomination late February. The New Orleans native McCollum has a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Southern University and A&M College, a master’s in sociology from the University of California-Davis, and a doctorate in educational administration from the University of Southern Mississippi.McCollum, who has worked her way up through the ranks of the Education Department and served as principal at Ivanna Eurdora Kean High School for more than a decade, was tapped by Gov. Kenneth Mapp in December 2014 to be the territory’s Education commissioner.

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    Bagayoko secures $500k for SU research

    Southern University System’s Distinguished Professor of Physics Diola Bagayoko,Ph.D., has received a three-year, $503,931 federal research grant to help develop new methods and processes in the field of materials and energy science.

    The grant is from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration. The newly funded project is a major component of the Consortium for Materials and Energies Studies (CMaES) led by Florida A&M University.

    The first year funding for Southern University at Baton Rouge is $153,931 and the funding for each of the following two years is $175,000 for a total of $503,931.

    CMaES is a collaborative effort among seven Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and two national laboratories of the DOE. Some of the other key objectives include the production of new knowledge, and the training of the next generation of scientists and engineers in areas of interest to DOE.

    Besides SUBR and FAMU, other collaborating organizations include: Prairie View A&M University, Tuskegee University, Tennessee State University, Benedict College, Morehouse College, Allen University, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    Tommy Rockward, who received his Bachelor of Science and master’s degrees in Physics from SUBR, is the lead scientist for the collaboration at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

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    Student chemists advance to state competition

    PLAQUEMINE–More than 200 parents, teachers, students and community members assembled at the Math, Science & Arts Academy West in Plaquemine for the second annual Dow Westside You Be the Chemist Challenge® on Feb. 11.

    Thirty-three 6th – 8th grade students from Iberville and West Baton Rouge Parishes competed against one another through numerous rounds of multiple-choice questions that tested their knowledge of chemistry concepts, important discoveries, and chemical safety awareness.

    Sponsored locally and nationally by Dow, the Challenge is an academic competition created by the Chemical Education Foundation (CEF). The Challenge aims to engage middle school students in chemistry through a dynamic event that partners members of the chemical industry with schools and organizations in the communities in which they operate.

    “At Dow we are committed to supporting the next generation of scientists, engineers, chemists and innovators for careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields,” said Abby Cook, Public Affairs Manager, Dow Louisiana Operations. “We are proud to collaborate with organizations like the Chemical Education Foundation to do the important work of changing lives through quality education.”

    After six rounds of competition at the Dow Westside Challenge, the Champion, First Runner-Up, Second Runner-Up and Third Runner-up from both West Baton Rouge and Iberville Parishes were decided. Alex Gautreaux, student in Cynthia West’s class at Devall Middle, took first place for the second consecutive year! Erin Stephens of Janell Albarez’s class at Brusly Middle achieved First Runner-Up. Hanna Prather, also a student of Cynthia West’s class at Devall Middle, placed Second Runner-Up and Naturi Scott of Delky Arbuckle’s class achieved Third Runner-Up for West Baton Rouge Parish.

    Kristopher Cayette, a student in Tanya Taylor’s class at MSA West achieved Champion for Iberville Parish. Lucas Sanchez, a student from Tyne Courville’s class at MSA West took First Runner-Up. Second Runner-Up was achieved by Emily Deslatte of Pam Mechana’s class at St. John and Alixes Bouvay of Dorothy Trusclair’s class at Plaquemine High received Third Runner-Up.

    Champion, First Runner-Up, and Second Runner-Up recipients from both Iberville and West Baton Rouge parishes will advance to the You Be the Chemist State Challenge, April 25 at Louisiana State University. The winner of the state competition will move on to compete in the National Challenge held Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in June.

    Participating schools in the local Dow Westside Challenge included: Devall Middle, Port Allen Middle, Holy Family, Brusly Middle, MSA West, MSA East, St. John School, Plaquemine High, and White Castle High.

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    Poised to be the next big thing in music industry

    An interview with gospel artist Anita Jarrell-Robertson

    About 17 years ago, music executive Vivian Scott Chew told me in a telephone interview to be on the lookout for a gifted singer who very few people had heard of but one who was about to take the world by storm with her music. The songstress Chew was referring to was R&B sensation and acclaimed actress Jill Scott.

    It was around 1998 when Chew predicted how big Scott would get. And in 2000, Scott’s debut album — Who is Jill Scott?: Words and Sounds, Vol. 1 — was released. That album made it to the Top 20 of the Billboard albums chart. Scott, also a songwriter, had earned three Grammy nominations for the project, which included the hit “Gettin’ in the Way.”

    Now, nearly 20 years after Chew — who has long provided direction and musical support for new and emerging artists — spoke of Scott’s imminent rise from obscurity to stardom, there is another gifted singer who is on the verge of an accomplishment that’s reminiscent of Scott’s dynamic ascension to prominence in the entertainment industry.

    Her name? Anita Jarrell-Robertson. And she has a voice and a stage presence that command attention. Jarrell-Robertson in July of 2014 released her contemporary gospel album “God is There,” a CD filled with tracks that minister to the core of people’s hearts. The title track — “God is There” — speaks directly to the listener whose life has been thrown into a tailspin by one personal calamity after another.

    On that track, Jarrell-Robertson shares that the Lord is always present, especially in times when He seems most distant.

    “The song, ‘God is There,’ was written during a very tumultuous time in our lives (my husband and my children). At that time we were fighting cancer with my daughter, Jessica. She was only about a year old and she had relapsed with leukemia for the second time, and her doctor had informed us that she probably would not make it,” Jarrell-Robertson said.

    “So, we were facing a lot, we were facing her (conceivably) passing. She was our first child, we already had a second child with a third one on the way. And we were going through tough times in our marriage because of all the stress,” Jarrell-Robertson said. “We had issues with outside family members and friends with their opinions and their judgments, and we just felt alone.

    “We actually had a pastor at that time to tell us that our daughter was going to die, and that we needed to let her go because she was going to die and that’s what (he said) God had told him,” recalls Jarrell-Robertson, whose family moved to Carrollton, Texas, from Baton Rouge, La. “We were told a lot of things during that season but when all that stuff was happening, it was like we were in a whirlwind and I was like, ‘Where are You? What’s going on?’ I remember being in the hospital room by myself one day with my daughter, and I looked around and I looked up and asked, ‘Where are You?’ And He answered me and He said, ‘I am there.’ ”

    God’s response, Jarrell-Robertson admits, didn’t exactly soothe the pain she was feeling as her child faced such a life-threatening disease.

    Jarrell-Robertson couldn’t understand how she could be serving God as passionately as she was at that time and, yet, sill be faced with such a harsh reality.

    “I just didn’t understand,” states Jarrell-Robertson, who said her experience caused her to feel somewhat like Job, whose family was hit with disaster that claimed the lives of his 10 children. “And so the song actually came about because God gave me the song. The whole song was written like a conversation.”

    From her dialogue with the Lord, Jarrell-Robertson said she learned that trusting God and walking by faith don’t come without trials from time to time. She learned that sometimes people go through difficult times as preparation for the places God is sending them in some cases and so that they could have testimonies to help edify other people in other cases. Jarrell-Robertson and her husband, Jesse, now share the profound testimony of their daughter being cancer-free.

    The 12-track album has so many songs on it that are more than capable of capturing and suspending the attention of listeners. One such track is “Even Me,” which is perhaps Jarrell-Robertson’s most widely recognized song.

    “Even Me” sends the message that regardless of how unworthy of God’s grace and mercy a person may feel he is, the Lord’s love is strong enough to cover him.

    “I came to this realization that I can come to the cross even with this, in whatever mess that I’m in, I can still come to the cross with it,” said Jarrell-Robertson, who, with her husband, started Harvest Music, a record label for independent Gospel artists. “Basically, God was not surprised about the condition of my heart. I was, but He wasn’t. His blood was powerful enough to save and deliver ‘even me.’ ”

    The song “God is There” earned Jarrell-Robertson the top 2014 Chosen Voice Awards honor for “Best Contemporary Song.”

    Jarrell-Robertson’s music, which has crossover appeal, can be purchased on her official website, http://www.anitaworships.com. Other places it can be found include: Pandora, iTunes, Amazon, Spotify, and iHeart Radio.

    By Donald Lee
    Guest Columnist

    Donald Lee is founder-pastor of Kingdom Living Christian Center of Dallas. E-mail him at pastordonjlee@yahoo.com.

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  • Caught You: Praying

    The nonprofit group, Answering the Call, hosted a prayer vigil for the youth of the City of Donaldsonville and surrounding areas, Monday, Jam. 26, 2015, at the Louisiana Square on Railroad Ave.

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    Caught You: Lions celebrate 65 years

    The Capitol Senior High Class of 1967 members celebrate their 65th birthday at their annual Christmas gathering in style with a formal affair at Lake House Reception Center on December 20, 2014. During the event Beverly R. Pitcher was crowned Queen and Frank James crowned King. Pictured left to right are: Bottom row: Queen Beverly R. Pitcher, King Frank James Upper row: Raymond Johnson, Gwendolyn M. Guillory, Deloris R. Gray, Patsy F. Parker, Lyndell C. Brown, Willie White. (Photographer: Cleveland Brown)

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    SU Board elects Tarver, Braxton for 2015

    NEW ORLEANS–The Southern University Board of Supervisors elected Leon R. Tarver II as chairman and Calvin W. Braxton Sr. as vice chairmen for 2015, during it’s regular meeting held in New Orleans, Nov. 28.

    Tarver, a Shreveport native and resident of Baton Rouge, is SU System president emeritus and is the retired executive administrator of the Center of Cultural Heritage and International Programs at the Southern University System. Governor Bobby Jindal appointed Tarver to the SU Board in January 2013. He serves as an at-large member.

    “Thanks to my colleagues for their support. I want to do a lot to make Southern a finer institution for all,” said Tarver.

    The newly elected chairman holds a bachelor of arts degree in political science from Southern University Baton Rouge, a master’s of public administration from Harvard University (John K. Kennedy School of Government), and a doctor of philosophy from The Union Institute in Cincinnati, Ohio.

    Tarver has held academic and administrative positions at the national, state, and local levels.

    The former SU System president has conducted international development activities in Egypt, England, Ethiopia, France, Ghana, Haiti, Mozambique, Nigeria, and South Africa, and founded two museums on African and African-American art within the Southern University System.

    Braxton, of Natchitoches, is the president and chief executive officer of Braxton Land Company and president of Natchitoches Ford-Lincoln-Mercury.  Governor Jindal appointed Braxton in June 2011.

    Calvin W Braxton Sr

    Calvin W Braxton Sr

    “SU is my heart. I want to do what we need to do to move forward to make a better SU,” said Braxton.

    The new officers will replace Bridget A. Dinvant, chairwoman for the past two years, and the Rev. Joe R. Gant, vice chairman for the past year, who both continue to serve on the board.  The Board of Supervisors of Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College serve to manage and supervise the Southern University System.

     

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    BR NAACP recognizes leaders

    NAACP Annual AwardThe Baton Rouge Chapter of the NAACP hosted its annual Freedom Fund Brunch, Oct. 4, honoring four community leaders and public servants. Chapter president Michael McClanahan (pictured at left) and chapter members recognized Markita Sweet with the President’s Award, Ronald Marshall with the Public Sevice Award, State Senator Sharon Weston Broome with the Lifetime Achievement Award, and Howard White with the Entrepreneurship Award. The event took place at Mt. Pilgrim Baptist Church and Darrin Goss, president of the Capital United Way was the keynote speaker.

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  • Rutledge to lead SUS Foundation

    domoine rutledgeAttorney Domoine D. Rutledge, general counsel for the East Baton Rouge Parish School System and former National President of the Southern University Alumni Federation, has been elected president and chairman Southern University System Foundation during the Foundation’s annual meeting on October 23. He will replace Anna M. Jones, owner and operator of State Farm Insurance Agency located in Baton Rouge, as president. During her tenure, Jones increased the Foundation’s revenue by 44 percent and the awards to system campuses by 35 percent.

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  • Lukongo joins Ag Center

    Ben O. Lukongo, Ph.D., was named assistant professor of agricultural economics. In this position, Lukongo provides leadership in the establishment of economic and community programs, serves as an economist for the sequential and mixed species grazing and hibiscus projects, research collaborator for existing and future research projects, and proposal developer in the areas of economic and community development. Lukongo served as a lecturer of economics and research associate for the Department of Finance and Economics in the College of Business at Mississippi State University. The Democratic Republic of Congo, Central Africa, native earned a doctorate in applied economics from the College of Business at Mississippi State University.

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    Political strategist, Donna Brazile, donates papers to LSU

    Though she has made her name and home in Washington D.C. for the past three decades, distinguished LSU alumna, veteran political strategist and commentator, author and Democratic Party official Donna Brazile makes no secret of her pride in being a native of Louisiana and an LSU graduate.

    Now an important piece of Brazile’s personal history has returned to her home state with the recent donation of her papers to the LSU Libraries Special Collections.

    Donna Brazile

    Photographs, correspondence and speeches, as well as other writings, memoranda, reports and analyses, campaign management and research files, and memorabilia comprise the collection.

    Together, the 32 boxes of materials document Brazile’s involvement in Democratic politics and the Democratic National Committee; her interest in and efforts to mobilize Black voters, elect women to office and advocate for voting rights; her public speaking and teaching; her work with the Louisiana Recovery Authority; and her participation in every presidential campaign between 1976 and 2000, including as manager of the Gore-Lieberman bid for the White House.

    Brazile, who was the first Black American to lead a major presidential campaign, said, “LSU was an indispensable part of my education, as a person and as a political operative.”

    “From taking classes with life-changing professors to writing opinion pieces in the Daily Reveille to weekly Friday discussions on campus about the social justice issues of the day, LSU engrained in me a lifelong love of learning and shaped me as a political organizer. Because LSU gave me so much, I am humbled to give LSU Libraries Special Collections my papers and grateful to share my life’s work to encourage and inspire the next generation of political activists to take their seats at the table.”

    A native of Kenner, La., Brazile graduated from LSU in 1981, and the university awarded her an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters in 2005. In the early years of her career, she was involved in grassroots efforts to establish a holiday celebrating the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., and she organized the 20th anniversary celebration of the March on Washington. She then worked as chief of staff and press secretary to Eleanor Holmes Norton, Congressional Delegate for the District of Columbia. She went on to be an advisor to the Clinton-Gore presidential campaigns and, as noted above, to manage Al Gore’s 2000 presidential bid. A significant figure in Democratic politics, Brazile currently serves as vice chair of voter registration and participation at the Democratic National Committee, and formerly served as interim chair of the Democratic National Committee and chaired its Voting Rights Institute.

    She is an adjunct professor in the Women’s Studies Program at Georgetown University who has also taught at the University of Maryland and has been a resident fellow at Harvard University’s Institute of Politics.

    Brazile is also a nationally syndicated columnist, a political commentator for CNN and ABC News and a contributing writer to Ms. Magazine and O, The Oprah Magazine. In 2004 she published Cooking with Grease: Stirring the Pots in American Politics (Simon and Schuster), a memoir of her life and her 30 years in politics.

    In the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, former Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco tapped Brazile to serve on the Louisiana Recovery Board. Brazile is also the founder and managing director of Brazile and Associates, a political consulting and grassroots-advocacy firm based in Washington, D.C. “On behalf of the LSU family, we enthusiastically accept Donna’s papers with the utmost gratitude in doing so,” said LSU Executive Vice President and Provost Stuart Bell, “A pioneer for many, future generations will cherish the rich history that abounds in these treasured documents; those that detail her journey and someone with Louisiana beginnings who has achieved such great impact. We are extremely proud of Donna Brazile, her many contributions to society and are humbled that she is sending her papers home to her LSU alma mater.”

    “Donna Brazile’s longtime involvement in presidential politics and policy making, her status as a trailblazer for women and African Americans, her close and ongoing identification with Louisiana and LSU and the profile she has built in the public arena through her writings, television commentary and service to the DNC all combine to make her papers a welcome and important addition to our political collections,” said LSU Libraries Curator of Manuscripts Tara Laver.

    Brazile’s papers are part of the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections in the LSU Libraries Special Collections, located in Hill Memorial Library.

    Follow Brazile on Twitter @donnabrazile

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    SU Director promoted to VP for Advancement at Winona State

    Winona State University in Minnesota has appointed Ernie Hughes to the position of vice president for advancement and executive directorrector of the WSU Foundation.

    He most recently served as director of community economic development for the Southern University System in Baton Rouge, La. Prior to this appointment, he served in roles as vice president for advancement, special assistant to the president, and executive director of the Southern University System Foundation; and associate vice chancellor for advancement and community development specialist for the Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center. Hughes holds a Ph.D. in human resource development from Louisiana State University, an M.B.A. with specialization in marketing from Mississippi State University, and a B.A. in finance and logistics from Mississippi State University.

    “Dr. Hughes brings with him with more than 20 years of experience in higher education,” said WSU President Scott R. Olson. “His reputation for fostering collaboration and sustainable partnerships is well-suited to our mission in the Advancement Office and for the university at large.”

    Hughes describes WSU as a student-focused, community-responsive university and said he is excited to spend time getting to know the campus and community while helping to develop and instill strategic institutional vision and values.

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  • Tolbert now national Baptist president

    The Reverend SAM TOLBERT of Lake Charles has been named president-elect of the National Baptist Convention of America International, Inc. Tolbert is pastor of Greater Saint Mary Missionary Baptist Church and also serves as vice president of the North American Baptist Fellowship

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  • Collins performs with 300 thespians

    Zachary High School theater student TONY COLLINS was one of 300 student thespians around the country to be accepted into the Summer Conservatory at AMDA College and Conservatory of the Performing Arts in New York City. The program is an intense two-week course to strengthen acting, vocal, and dance ability and provide students the chance to work with Broadway professionals.

     

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  • High schoolers win nationally with local 100 Black Men

    The 100 Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge, Ltd., had winning entries in three areas of competition at the annual convention of 100 Black Men of America this summer in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. The Financial Literacy Team, including SUNDAE-MARIE BRUMFIELD of Capitol High School and GODIS JACKSON and LOVEIS JACKSON of Baton Rouge Magnet High School won top prize in the State Farm sponsored Dollars & $ense Competition, scoring 99.7 out of a possible 100 points. Baton Rouge Magnet High School students Justin Jackson and Daniel Joseph represented won second place  of the African American History Challenge. JALEN LEWIS (pictured) of  Glen Oaks High School, was selected as the 2014-15 International Mentee of the Year.

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  • Southern receives charter bus

    SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY now has its own touring bus. The Office of Student Affairs purchased the bus for $45,000 – it cost $264,000 new – from the Louisiana Property Assistance Agency. The bus has been rebuilt from the windshield to the rear of the vehicle. Among the changes include, new seating, televisions, Wi-Fi access along with a new restroom facility. The touring bus is believed to be the first of its kind in the univer- sity’s history.

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  • Coaxum to be honored by McDonald’s

    Henry L. Coaxum, Jr., a New Orleans business executive and civic leader, is one of this year’s recipients of the McDonald’s 365Black Awards.   The national awards salute outstanding individuals who are committed to making positive contributions that strengthen the Black community.

    Coaxum will be honored at the awards ceremony which will be held Saturday, July 5, 2014, at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center during the 20th anniversary of the ESSENCE Festival™ presented by Coca Cola®  in New Orleans.

    This year’s honorees also include: civil rights activist the Rev. Al Sharpton; music executive and entrepreneur Kevin Liles; film producer Will Packer; inspirational leader Iyanla Vanzant; and former NFL athlete Dhani Jones.  Additionally, artist Skyler Grey and entrepreneur Gabrielle Jordan Williams will be recognized alongside this lineup with the first-ever McDonald’s 365Black Community Choice Youth Award.

    Coaxum, president of Coaxum Enterprises, Inc., is the owner/operator of seven McDonald’s restaurants in New Orleans. 

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  • Lewis named Mentee of the Year

    JALEN N. LEWIS has been selected as the 100 Black Men of America Inc.’s Mentee of the Year. Lewis is Glen Oaks High School senior, member of the ROTC, and a drummer in the school’s marching band. He was nominated by the 100 Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge president Michael W. Victorian. Lewis will be honored by the national organization later this summer.

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  • Deruise receives award from Governor’s office

    ARIANNE DERUISÉ received this year’s highest honor of the Director’s Award at the annual Louisiana Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness. Deruisé received this honor for her specialized roles of meteorological operations officer and state hurricane program manager during normal work days, and in times of activation for emergen- cies and events. Deruisé has been instrumental in the success of many of the state’s responses, including 2013’s Tropical Storm Karen and this year’s uncommon winter storms

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  • Barnes elected to COSBP

    Louisiana State University School of Law student KENNETH BARNES JR. has been elected vice-chair of the Council of Student Body Presidents. COSBP is a state entity that comprises Student Government Presidents from public in- stitutions of higher learning. Universities, Coleges, Community Colleges, as well as Technical Colleges are represented within COSBP. Barnes will serve as the liaison between the COSBP’s committees and COSBP, as well as fulfill other duties of COSBP’s Executive Board.

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  • Komunyakka receives honorary Doctorate

    Pulitzer Prize winning poet YUSEF KOMUNYAKAA received an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters at Centenary College’s May 3 graduation alongside Moonbot creator WILLIAM JOYCE. A Bogalusa native, Komunyakaa is veteran of the Vietnam War as well as a lifelong poet and educator.

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  • Richardson chosen for ‘Mr. Hammond High’

    Hammond High Senior CHASE RICHARDSON was chosen as Mr. Hammond High. He is a four-year letterman of the Robotics Team and serves as the Interact Club President, Beta Club Treasurer, and as the Vice-President of the HHMS Chapter of the National Honor Society. He is also a member of the Chess Club. Richardson plans to attend Southeastern Louisiana University in the fall taking pre- engineering courses before transferring to LSU to pursue a degree in Mechanical Engineering.

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  • Rutledge named Principal of the Year

    Sharmayne Rutledge was named East Baton Rouge Parish School system Principal of the year. She is principal Greenbrier Elementary. She is also a semi finalist for the Louisiana State Principal of the year.

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  • America needs to save hurting Nigerian girls

    I WOULD LIKE NOTHING MORE than to hear on the news that our FBI or Navy Seals have found and saved the 276 kidnapped girls in Nigeria by Boko Haram. There are reports that some of the girls have already died or are sick due to poisonous snakebites. They and their families are suffering. They need help.

    Boko Haram has led a five-year Islamic uprising in Nigeria that has taken the lives of thousands of people, both Muslimand Christian. Just this week an attack on Gamboru, which is on the border of Cameroon, took the lives of 300 people.

    In recent weeks Boko Haram’s regime has been responsible for the kidnapping of 276 young girls and is threatening to sell them into slavery. This year alone, at least 1,500 people have been killed by this terroristic group. Nigeria is a nation of approximately170 million people. The country is half Muslim and half Christian. The religious regime feels that Western influences are corrupting Nigeria and that a Muslim state must be enforced.

    Abubakar Shekau is the leader of Boko Haram which means, western education is a sin. Shekau has been in hiding with his ruthless and depraved army in the Sambisa Forest. The forest is reportedly 23,000 square miles of thick, tall vegetation filled with poisonous snakes, lions and monkeys. It is extremely

    difficult to navigate. There is no place in our world for this kind of ideology car- ried out in the name of religion. Shekau and his militant blood- thirsty supporters are deranged psychos who wreak misery on any- one with whom they

    come into contact. America cannot run to every nation and put out every fire. Ukraine, Syria, Egypt and many other places are filled with serious problems and could use our help. I do not believe we are the world’s police.

    Nigeria is considered a very poor country but their economy is growing. They are Af- rica’s largest oil pro- ducer with billions of dollars in oil sales. Unfortunately most of the Nigerian wealth is in the hands of a few people and corruption abounds from busi- ness to government.

    They seriously need to utilize some of their oil money to develop a stronger military and police force to protect them.

    America cannot take care of every- body. However, try- ing to help Nigeria develop a better de- fense is something we should do and I hope we can be successful. This shouldn’t require five thousand troops. However, it may require our government sending FBI, Navy Seals, or whoever to locate and deal with Abubakar Shekau. Surely we have one drone just for him.

    by Glenn Mollette

     a national columnist 

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  • New UREC leaders appointed

    The Board of Directors for Urban Restoration Enhancement Corporation ,UREC, has appointed two Baton Rouge community and business leaders to key board offices. CATHY DENSON, assistant vice president of Commercial Banker Bank at Red River Bank, has been appointed chair of the board, while GIRARD J. MELANCON, PH.D., executive director for adult and continuing education at Baton Rouge Community College, has been appointed vice chair.

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  • Artists unveil school mural

    THE VISUAL ART DEPARTMENT of Central High School recently unveiled a completed mural of a Louisiana landscape scene. The mural was designed by the tal- ented art senior students of and painted by talented art seniors MATTHEW GUIDRY and OR’RON CLARK.

    The Talented Art Program in the Central School District provides instructional services to students who have been identified by state assessment as having artistic commitment, possessing above average creativity, and advanced artistic skills

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  • Wells named the Teacher of the Year

    Mrs. Paula Wells was named the Teacher of the Year for Hammond Westside Elementary Montessori School.  Mrs. Wells was selected by her colleagues for her professionalism, dedication to her students, and knowledge.

    Mrs. Wells exhibits a positive attitude, which is reflected in the way in which her students treat one another.  She inspires her students to work to their potential.  Mrs. Wells’ strong content knowledge and effective lesson delivery lead to her students’ success.

    Mrs. Wells serves as a mentor teacher and provides support to her grade level team. She also serves on the school’s leadership team

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  • Southern University Ag Center pays tribute to ‘Heroes’

    The Louisiana Living Legend Banquet, highlighting three award recipients as “heroes with ties and connections to Southern University” for their years of selfless service. The 2014 Louisiana Living Legends were WESLEY CRAWFORD, retired agricultural extension agent and mentor who served in Monroe, Morehouse and Franklin parishes for 33 years; SOLON MARSHALL, retired vocational agriculture teacher who taught in Richland and Franklin Parishes for 37 years; and KIRKLAND E. MELLAD, PH.D., retired vice chancellor for research, with 39 years of service at Southern University

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  • Hayes hired as Grambling’s Admissions Director

    GRAMBLING, La.  — Grambling State University has hired Clarence Lavon Hayes as director of admissions and recruitment.

    “Dr. Hayes is a welcomed addition to the division of enrollment management,” said Gloria George, interim associate vice president for enrollment management. “His skills, knowledge and experience will enhance the delivery of services to our students, faculty, staff, alumni and the university community.”

    Hayes is an accomplished professional with over 16 years of education experience at Jackson State University, Hinds Community College, Coahoma Community College and the Clarksdale Municipal School District.  He earned a bachelor’s in public administration from Mississippi Valley State University in Itta Bena, Miss. At Jackson State, he earned a master’s in guidance and counseling and a doctorate in urban higher education at JSU’s executive Ph.D. program.

    Hayes has been the graduation coach at Clarksdale High School in Clarksdale, Miss., monitoring student progress and helping school staff to incorporate ACT standards into the curriculum. As a consultant he has been part of a team of professionals developing and implementing admissions strategies for JSU. The capital city four-year institution has about 9,000 students. GSU has about 5,000.

     

     

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  • Evans named “Detective of the Year”

    Detective Dwight Evans has been named “Detective of the year by the St.Tammany Parish Sheriff’s office. In 2013, he was as
    signed 186 cases with a solve rate of 36 percent. This far exceeds the national average of 19 percent by nearly
    double.
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  • Imprint Counseling Services opens in Hammond

    Imprint Counseling Services LLC, located at 204 E. Charles Street, in Hammond, celebrated their Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting with the Hammond Chamber of Commerce . Imprint provides counseling and mental health services to the greater Hammond community. Jolyn Patton Schexnydre is the owner.

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  • Grambling State University’s Band featured in ESPN Magazine

     

    ESPN, the world leader in sports and sports and sports entertainment, needed a band that would complete ESPN The Magazine’s music issue the editors reached out the Grambling State University’s marching band to make the issue complete. One week before December graduation, ESPN requested ten band members to travel to New Orleans  for a  photo shoot at Tipitina’s. ESPN provided band members and two faculty with a tour bus for the trip. The issue hits the stands this month.

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    Southeastern Football team ranked top 10 by FCS

    After setting a single season school record for victories, winning its first conference championship since 1961 and making its first-ever trip to the Football Championship Subdivision playoffs, the SOUTHEASTERN LOUISIANA FOOTBALL TEAM finished sixth in both of the final FCS national polls. Southeastern was picked No. 6 by the voters in both the Sports Network and FCS Coaches’ polls. The ranking represented the season high for the Lions in both listings.

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  • Presenting Miss Tangipahoa

    Miss Tangipahoa, Kentwood High student Jamaria Martin, was all smiles when she was crowned queen in the senior division on December 5. Her parents are Eureka Martin and Charles Ginn. Tykeria Cohn, a Kentwood High School student, was runner up for queen in the senior division. Her parents are Natashan Cohn and Christopher McKnight.
    Charlisha Martin, O.W.Dillion Elementary School student, was named Miss Teen Tangipahoa. Her parents are Eureka Martin and Charles Davis. Doretha Pod was the Grand Marshal for the 2013 Tangipahoa Christmas Parade. A lifelong resident of the community. The mother grand mother and great grand mother work more than 20 years as a sack grader for Houston Sack House, a local business who doors closed years ago. Today she sings in her church choir and cook from scratch.

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  • LLBC Host Scholarship Brunch and Honor Southern and Grambling Alumni

     

    Vice Chairman Rep. Ed Price, Chairwoman Rep. Katrina Jackson, scholarship recipient Nakia Graham, and event co-chair, Rep. Regina Barrow.

    Vice Chairman Rep. Ed Price, Chairwoman Rep. Katrina Jackson, scholarship recipient Nakia Graham, and event co-chair, Rep. Regina Barrow.

    The La Legislative Black Caucus and LLBC Foundation hosted their 29th Annual Scholarship Jazz Brunch.The event was  a collaborative effort , held  Saturday, November 30, 2013,  the legislative Caucus and its foundation to raise funds to grant scholarships to Louisiana students from elementary education through higher education.

    The LLBC and LLBCF also awarded the Avery C. Alexander Civil Rights Award to two recipients this year: Rev. Betty Claiborne; Pastor, Heard Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church and to Rev. E. Edward Jones, Sr.; Pastor, Galilee Baptist Church of Shreveport, for their exemplary work in their communities; the Pinkie C. Wilkerson Humanitarian Award to  LafayeCarter Jackson; Memorial Funeral Home of Homer, LA the Charles I. Hudson Visionary Award to Erica McGeachy Crenshaw of Execute Now!.
    This year saw in inclusion of the Bayou Classic Legend Award, given to spectacular alumni of Grambling State University and Southern University. The inaugural winners were Willie Brown, administrator of the Oakland Raiders and Hall of Famer for Grambling, and Alecia Shields-Gadson, the athletic director at Coppin State University, for Southern. 
    Additionally, the LLBCF was able to grant scholarships to college students during the event based on their essay submissions, and they were: Leon Duncan, Jr., University of Louisiana at Lafayette; Nakia Nicole Graham, Northwestern State University; Justin Williams, University of Louisiana at Lafayette.
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    Southern Inducts New Members to Sports Hall of Fame

    Southern University Alumni Gary Magee and Greg C. Martin were inducted into the Southern University Athletics Hall of Fame. Magee, a 1960 Southern graduate, was a running back for the Jaguars from 1955-1959.Magee is currently victim assistance coordinator for Washington Parish.Martin, who played basketball at Southern from 1997-2000 is the academic coordinator for football at the University of Missouri.

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  • Oschner brings Dr. Gia Tyson, hepatologist, to transplant institute

    Ochsner Multi-Organ Transplant Institute recently welcomed new hepatologist, Dr. Gia Tyson, to their staff.

    Tyson, a native of Louisiana, earned her medical degree at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA. She completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, MD and her fellowship in Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX.  Most recently, Dr. Tyson completed an advanced Fellowship in Transplant Hepatology co-sponsored by Tulane University and Ochsner Clinic Foundation in New Orleans, LA.  Dr. Tyson has contributed to numerous research publications focusing on Hepatitis C and liver cancer.

    She is board certified in internal medicine and gastroenterology. She will be practicing general hepatology, transplant hepatology and gastroenterology at Ochsner Medical Center in New Orleans and Baton Rouge during the following days and time:  The Ochsner Liver Center – Baton Rouge Ochsner Health Center – Summa (Bluebonnet Blvd) 9001 Summa Avenue, Baton Rouge, LA  70809 Tuesdays and Fridays 8 am – 5pm Wednesdays 1:20 pm – 5 pm • The Ochsner Liver Center – New Orleans Ochsner’s Multi-Organ Transplant Institute   1514 Jefferson Hwy, New Orleans, LA 70121 Thursdays 9 am – 5 pm  

     

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  • Frazier Appointed Parish Attorney of Caddo

    Donna Frazier has been appointed parish attorney of Caddo. Frazier is the first Black female in the history of the parish to serve in this position. She was assistant parish attorney for eight years and assistant Caddo district attorney and section chief of the drug session. Frazier is a graduate of University of Texas School of Law and LSU.

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  • Plaquemine Native Becomes No. 1 Slam Poet in the World

    Chancelier “xero” Skidmore has attempted to craft the perfect poem for over a decade.

    A teaching artist in Baton Rouge, Skidmore has competed nationally in team and individual poetry slams for 13 years, and each individual competition he attends has him vying for the opportunity to claim the number one spot.

    On Oct. 5 in Spokane, Wash., after three previous attempts, the Plaquemine native was victorious in his quest to become the number one ranked slam poet in the world, emerging as the 2013 champion of the Individual World Poetry Slam (iWPS).

    A poetry slam is an Olympic style poetry competition in which poets are scored 0-10 by five randomly selected judges for a possible high score of 30. The high and low scores of each round are then thrown out, and the middle three are added together for the final score.

    iWPS is a poetry slam festival created in 2004 by Poetry Slam, Inc. (PSi). It features four preliminary rounds with poems of one, two, three and four minute lengths. The top twelve of the 72 competing poets move on to grand slam finals, and spar in a possible three rounds of three-minute poems. In the end, four poets move on to the final round with a clean slate, hoping to become number one.

    His work published in the anthology, Spoken Word Revolution Redux by Sourcebooks mediaFusion and the Spring 2010 volume of the New Delta Review by LSU Press. Executive Director of Forward Arts, Inc. and works as Program Manager/lead teaching-artist of WordPlay.

    In addition to poetry, Xero also plays percussion for a few bands and loves to hang out with his daughter in her music studio.

    Online:www.xeroskidmore.com

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  • Will M. Campbell Jr., has been selected as 2013 “Louisiana’s State Star”

    Will M. Campbell Jr., has been selected as 2013 “Louisiana’s State Star” by the Louisiana Small Business Development Center. Campbell serves as the director of LSBDC at Southern and under his leadership the program become one of the top producing centers in the state.  Campbell was honored during a private awards reception in Orlando, held in conjunction with the 33rd America’s Small Business Development Center Network Annual Conference. He is among 63 “stars” that were  chosen nationwide.

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  • Judge Honored By State Bar Association

    Judge Sheva M. Sims, who provides over Division D of Shreveport City Court, was selected to receive a Louisiana State Bar Association Crystal Gavel Award. Judge Sims was recognized for outstanding volunteer efforts with local community groups.

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