LOGO
  • ,,

    Civil Rights Attorney Ben Crump launches law firm with national scope

    TALLAHASSEE—With the aim of more effective activism to promote individual and social justice in America, renowned civil rights advocate and attorney Ben Crump  this week launched a new law firm with a nationwide network of top lawyers. Well known for his work representing the families of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Corey Jones, Tamir Rice and others, Crump said the new firm will have the scale to seek justice for individuals across the nation and broadly extend his advocacy for social justice causes.

    Ben Crump Law PLLC, will focus on civil rights, employment law, personal injury, workers’ compensation, medical malpractice and wrongful death cases, as well as mass torts and class actions.

    “We are at a pivotal time in American history, when the hunger for social justice is spurring a renewal in our civil rights movement,” Crump said. “Tapping into a nationwide team of talent gives us the scale to help individuals across the country and the ability to bring class actions and mass tort cases that can spur the progress toward real change.”

    Offices will be in Washington, D.C., Los Angeles and Tallahassee. Ben Crump Law has established an affiliation with the Morgan & Morgan law firm to create linkages with some of the top lawyers in the country, allowing the firm to handle cases anywhere in the country as part of the Ben Crump Law network.

    People of color are disproportionately affected by environmental racism, discriminatory practices and lack of access to quality schools and the internet — causes that all may be addressed by uniting the interests of many plaintiffs, Crump said.

    “Crump speaks truth to power and gives hope to the hopeless,” said John Morgan, founder of Morgan & Morgan. “He is today’s seminal civil rights lawyer. The go-to guy. A modern-day Johnny Cochran.”

    Crump will host TVOne’s “Evidence of Innocence,” which is based on wrongfully convicted citizens who have been exonerated by clear and convincing evidence. He is also will lead the investigation on A&E’s upcoming documentary series “Who Killed Tupac?” and can be seen on the new film “Marshall,” set to release October 13.

    A distinguished civil rights advocate, Crump has been honored with the Henry Latimer Diversity Award, The Florida Association of Fundraising Professionals, Outstanding Philanthropist of the Year, National Newspaper Publishers Association Newsmaker of the Year, and The Root 100 Top Black Influencers. Crump also has served as president of the National Bar Association. He has been recognized by Ebony magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential African Americans and has received the National Civil Rights Museum’s Freedom Award, the American Association for Justice Johnny Cochran Award, the NAACP Thurgood Marshall Award, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s Martin Luther King Servant Leader Award.

    Visit Ben Crump Law online at www.bencrump.com.

     

    Read more »
  • ,

    Trump Approves Louisiana Emergency Declaration

    President Donald J. Trump declared that an emergency exists in the State of Louisiana and ordered Federal assistance to supplement State, tribal, and local response efforts due to the emergency conditions resulting from Tropical Storm Harvey beginning on August 27, 2017, and continuing.

    This action authorizes the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), to coordinate all disaster relief efforts.  This action will help alleviate the hardship and suffering that the emergency has inflicted on the local population, and provide appropriate assistance for required emergency measures, authorized under Title V of the Stafford Act, to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety, and to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe in the parishes of Beauregard, Calcasieu, Cameron, Jefferson Davis, and Vermillion.

    Specifically, FEMA is authorized to identify, mobilize, and provide at its discretion equipment and resources necessary to alleviate the impacts of the emergency.  Emergency protective measures, including direct Federal assistance, will be provided at 75 percent Federal funding.

    Brock Long, Administrator, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Department of Homeland Security, named William J. Doran III as the Federal Coordinating Officer for Federal recovery operations in the affected areas.

    Read more »
  • ,

    AppsILike.net encourages, helps create mobile apps

    Savvier Health, LLC has been granted a license to offer the same easy to-use subscription-based app creation platform that has been used by tens of thousands of people around the world to successfully publish hundreds of thousands of apps. Their system uses a simple what-you-see-is-what-you-get format to allow subscribers to easily exchange standard text and pictures with their own in hundreds of ready-to-publish app templates. With this system, even the average high school student can churn out multiple apps each month and make money for college in his spare time.

    Now, anyone who can use a home computer has the potential to copy and paste and write his way into a piece of the explosive international app market that has made more than a few millionaires. Neither coding experience nor a large investment in time or resources is needed to become a part of the app revolution anymore. It’s no secret that people of color, specifically Blacks and Hispanics, are grossly underrepresented in apps on the market, as well as among the ranks of app creators, but that tide is about to turn.

    With AppsILike.net subscribers simply choose from hundreds of templates, change the text and pictures, and then click a button to submit their work to their technical support team, who then ‘builds’ the app and submits it to the AppStore under the subscriber’s AppStore developer account, or provides the code (APK) that subscribers can upload to their GooglePlay or Amazon/Kindle developer accounts. With literally millions of stock photos available online for purchase, the possibilities for creating new apps is endless.

    While not everyone is computer savvy, AppsILike.net provides numerous step-by-step tutorials to help even the most skeptical subscribers create stunning apps with little effort. Free technical support via email is also available.

    While there will be a slight learning curve for many, a person with no app creation experience whatsoever could create a basic app in a Saturday afternoon utilizing their easy methods and A-Z tutorials, and soon be able to create a basic app in less than an hour.

    There are different types of apps, as well as different complexities of apps. For instance, an app for a local beauty shop may only contain a page full of photos of beautiful hairstyles, a page for employees’ contact information, and pages for business hours, specials, and prices. This is a quick and easy app to create. On the other hand, a more complicated app to customize, such as a music app or some game apps, will take more time.

    With more than 200 templates, over 100 features available thru www.AppsILike.net, as well as millions of online stock photos available for purchase, the potential to create, earn and uplift is unlimited.

    By BlackNews.com

    Read more »
  • ,

    Covington native serves in Japan aboard USS Germantown

    SASEBO, Japan – A 2016 Covington High School graduate and Covington native is serving in Japan in the U.S. Navy aboard USS Germantown.

    Seaman Recruit Nicholas Brumfield is an operations specialist aboard the ship operating out of Sasebo, Japan.

    A seaman recruit is the Navy’s entry-level enlisted position following graduation from boot camp. Brumfield graduated from the Navy’s Recruit Training Command at Great Lakes, Illinois in July and has begun his apprenticeship training on the Germantown.

    “I decided to become an operations specialist because it sounded cool,” Brumfield said. “It sounded like I would be actually doing something, playing an active role in protecting the ship and my shipmates.”

    With more than 50 percent of the world’s shipping tonnage and a third of the world’s crude oil passing through the region, the U.S. has historic and enduring interests in this part of the world.

    “Our alliance is rooted in shared interests and shared values,” said Adm. Harry Harris, U.S. Pacific Command Commander. “It’s not hyperbole to say that the entire world has benefited from the U.S.-Japan alliance. While our alliance helped stabilize the region after the Second World War, it also enabled the Japanese people to bring about an era of unprecedented economic growth. And for the last six decades, our Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen have worked side by side with the Japan Self Defense Force to protect and advance peace and freedom.”

    Commissioned in 1986, Germantown is the second Navy ship named after the Revolutionary War Battle of Germantown. With a crew of more than 900 sailors and Marines, Germantown is 609 feet long and weighs approximately 16,000 tons. Designed specifically to operate landing craft air cushion small craft vessels, Whidbey Island-class dock landing ships have the largest capacity for these landing craft out of any U.S. Navy amphibious ship.

    “I like my chain of command, they really focus on us as junior sailors, helping us build up not only Navy-wise but far into the future about what we want to do when we leave the service. They genuinely care about us,” said Brumfield.

    Sea duty is inherently arduous and challenging but it builds strong fellowship and esprit de corps among members of the crew. The crew is highly motivated and quickly adapt to changing conditions. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches, and drills.

    “Serving in the Navy, not only does it have benefits for me but I’m doing something greater than myself,” Brumfield said. “Nothing is given to us, you have to work for everything you accomplish.”

    The Navy’s presence in Sasebo is part a long-standing commitment.

    “The U.S.-Japan alliance remains the cornerstone for peace and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region,” said Harris.

    By Chief Petty Officer Bill Steele
    Navy Office of Community Outreach

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Licensing law changes for Louisiana contractors

    According to the Louisiana Home Builders Association, HB 675, now Act 231 of the 2017 Regular Legislative Session makes several changes to the Contractors’ Licensing Law. Act 231 will go into effect Tuesday, August 1st 2017.

    Licensed residential contractors shall provide in writing:
    1. Name
    2. Contracting license number
    3. Classification
    4. Current insurance certificates evidencing the amount of liability
    insurance maintained and proof of workers’ compensation coverage

    Registered home improvement contractors shall provide in writing:
    1. Name
    2. Registration number
    3. Current insurance certificates evidencing the amount of liability
    insurance maintained and proof of workers’ compensation coverage

    This information shall be provided to the party with whom the contractor has
    contracted to perform contracting services, regardless of whether such information is requested by the contracting party for whom the work is to be performed.

    Also, licensed residential contractors and registered home improvement contractors shall produce to the permitting authority evidence of a license or registration in good standing prior to the issuance of any permit required by law. Click here to read the act in its entirety

    Read more »
  • ,

    Cravins tells youth ‘You can have an impact today’

    Former State Senator Donald Cravins, Jr. addressed more than 300 high school student leaders attending Louisiana Youth Seminar, July 19, on Louisiana State University’s campus.

    “You’re here now. You can have an impact today. You are Louisiana’s today and Louisiana’s future,” said Cravins, a former LYS Program Director and current LYS Advisory Committee Member.

    Cravins was the guest speaker before the time-honored LYS presentation of “Louisiana: A Dream State,” which pays tribute to the unique citizens, cultures and traditions of Louisiana.

    “It’s about making this state a better place. I hope that you allow this program to do for you what it has done for me. We have an obligation to leave our state a better place than we found it,” said Cravins.

    Cravins previously served as chief of staff to former U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, a LYS alumna.He is the National Urban League’s senior vice president for policy and executive director of the Washington Bureau. He also serves as a captain in the District of Columbia Army National Guard Judge Advocate General (JAG) Corps.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    SU Lab coach Rebecca Marshall honored

    The Louisiana High School Athletic Association Coaches Convention recently honored Southern University Laboratory School head track coach Rebecca Marshall.

    Marshall has helped to cultivate a rich athletic history for the Southern University Laboratory School Kittens. She has a bountiful tradition of producing track stars who have ranked amongst the states top track leaders. Many former team members under her leadership have gone on to become elite athletes.

    She has won 21 Class 1-A State Championships and 15 of them were consecutive. She currently holds the position as Athletic Director but has worn many hats over the past years. During her 30 years at Southern University Laboratory School she has served as SGA Sponsor, Assistant Volleyball Coach, Cheerleader Coach, Dancing Doll Coach and Dean of Students.

    Submitted by Rene Marshall-Williams

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Camphor Memorial United Methodist Church celebrates 100 years

    Camphor Memorial United Methodist Church One-Hundred Years Centennial Celebration was held on Sunday, June 25, at the 10:55am worship service. The theme was “God’s Grace and Witnessing for Jesus Christ.  Founding dates 1917-2017.  

    The centennial message was given by Pastor Stephen Emmanuel Handy, of McKendree United Methodist Church located in Nashville, Tennessee.  He graduated from Dillard University in New Orleans, Louisiana with a bachelors degree in business administration.  He has a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from Tennessee State University, a master’s degree in divinity from Vanderbilt University and is currently working on his doctorate in divinity from Wesley Seminary.  In 2009, Stephen was appointed by the Bishop to become the first African-American Pastor at McKendree United Methodist Church.  His father, Bishop W.T. Handy, served on the United Methodist Ministry for many years and was former minster of the St. Mark United Methodist Church located in Baton Rouge.  

    Camphor Memorial United Methodist Church Centennial Celebration, January-June 2017 Schedule of Events
    Activities and Fellowship, “A Moment of Camphor History”, Black History Sunday, Ecumenical Service, Gospelfest, Writing Essay Contest, Church Outside the Wall, “When Camphor was in Vogue”, Centennial Banquet, Centennial Concert, Prayer Breakfast, Old Fashioned Basket Family Picnic, and the Centennial Celebration Praise and Worship Services. A reception was held after the worship services in the Moses T. Jackson Fellowship Hall.

    The twelve founders and former ministers were recognized.  The Centennial Celebration was very well attended.  Rev. Clifton Conrad Sr., Senior Pastor, Rev. Tiffanie Postell, Associate Pastor, Rev. Ken Irby, Baton Rouge District Superintendent and Rev. Cynthia Harvey,  Bishop, Louisiana Annual Conference.  Camphor Memorial United Methodist Church is located at 8742 Scenic Highway in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 

    By Mada McDonald Clark
    Contributing Writer

    Photographed above are: Julia B. Moore, Claude Tellis DTh., Mada McDonald Clark, Mary Emerson, Rev. Stephen Emmanuel Handy, Associate Pastor Tiffanie C. Postell, Pastor Clifton C. Conrad Sr., Press L. Robinson, Sr. EdD, Marilyn Ray-Jones DTH, Wesley J. Belton, Blanche P. Smith, and Mary T. Charles. Photo by: Tina Bernard. Submitted by: Katrina Spottsville

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Seven additional community meetings announced on the Zoo

    The community is strongly encouraged to attend 13 community meeting on the Zoo at Greenwood Park. BREC announced six meetings last week. The Keep the Zoo at Greenwood Park Committee are adding seven additional community meetings. BREC Superintendent Carolyn McKnight has been invited to attend all of the additional meetings; however, the Keep the Zoo at Greenwood Park will be on hand for all 13 meetings.

    “Every citizen has a role to play in building community and creating sustainable community investment across our East Baton Rouge parish. The vitality of our Baton Rouge Zoo at Greenwood Park and democracy relies upon the active participation of every person,” said committee member, Becky Bond.

    According to a written statement, the group saw the need for additional meetings to offer a balance in diversity; reaching across lines of race, culture, class, and location to gather participants.

    Meetings planned:

    • July 11 – Perkins Road Community Park, 7122 Perkins Road, 6pm
    • July 11 – City of Baker Council Meeting, Baker Municipal Center, 3325 Groom Road, Baker, LA 6pm
    • July 12 – City Center Development District, Piccadilly Cafeteria, 6406 Florida Blvd., 8:00 am
    • July 13 – Highland Road Community Park, 14024 Highland Road, 6pm
    • July 22 – Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church, 185 Eddie Robinson Sr., Dr., 9:00 am
    • July 25 – CADAV Community Meeting, Scotlandville Library, 7373 Scenic Hwy., 6:00 pm
    • August 1 – Central Library, 11260 Joor Road, Central, LA, 6pm
    • August 01 – Baton Rouge Airport, Conference Room, 2nd Floor, 3:30 pm
    • August 3 – Zachary Library, 1900 Church Street, Zachary, LA ; 6pm
    • August 8 – Independence Park Theatre, 7500 Independence Blvd, 6pm
    • August 10 – Federation of GBR Civic Associations, Goodwood Library, 7711 Goodwood Blvd., 6:00 pm
    • August 14 – Greenwood Waterfront Theater, 13350 Hwy. 19, 6pm
    • August 24 –Visit Baton Rouge Board Meeting, 359 3rd Street, 12 noon
    For more information, contact Metro District 2 at (225) 389-8331

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Dialogue necessary to move beyond fear

    The reactions to the Department of Justice’s decision to not charge police in the shooting death of Alton Sterling have divided largely along racial lines. Baton Rouge like many cities was racially segregated at its founding.Although the city has undergone “desegregation,” in the last several decades clear racial divisions exist most vividly with Florida Blvd as the racial dividing line.
    Crump

    Crump

    Many institutions and individuals have either ignored their roles in this continued division or looked for ways to explain it or justify an unacceptable situation.Often people wonder what difference talking about these racial divisions can do to make real lasting positive change. Given our name, we obviously believe that talk/dialogue does change things. It matters though what kind of talking it is. Dialogue done badly likely does more harm than good. We work hard at developing a dialogue that is functional and well-fitted to the difficult conversation of race. One thing we do know is that the dialogue must take place outside of a rush to act or in the mist of highly charged, anxiety filled times. In those times, myths and misunderstandings and old unaddressed issues are bursting through, and the dialogue will be ill-informed.
    Webster states, dialogue “seeks understanding and harmony.” In the educational process we use called the Dialogue On Race Series, we stress understanding; which may or may not lead to harmony.  However better understanding has a powerful impact that can lead to changes; changes that benefit everyone.The attempts to address racism in Baton Rouge have not kept pace with the growing problem.

    The fear of explosion and violence is a symptom that says we all know something is wrong. Instead of looking for ways to explain that “wrong,” we need to look for ways to understand the problem.  What has caused the problem and why have we let it go on so long? We also need to ask why so many have stayed quiet, avoided it, or believed that the problem of race has gone.

    Yes we need dialogue but we need dialogue done well. Dialogue on Race Louisiana’s core program, the Dialogue on race series is not just any conversation. The magic of the Dialogue on Race Series is that it is structured, facilitated, backed with factual information. It is formatted to set a safe environment for open, honest, brave conversation.
    The DOR Series is a highly specialized form of discussion that imposes rigorous discipline on the participants.  The series begins by defining the terms used. You have to have a common understanding of the terms being used.
    When dialogue is done well, the results can be extraordinary; long-standing stereotypes can be dissolved, mistrust can be overcome, mutual understanding achieved, vision shaped, grounded in shared purpose, new common ground discovered, new perspectives and insights gained, bonds of community strengthened.
    When Baton Rouge solves institutional racism, the sharp line of racial division will end. Also protest will not be seen as something to fear, instead it will be recognized as it is meant to be; a tool of a free society.

    By Maxine Crump 

    CEO Dialogue on Race Louisiana
    Baton Rouge

    ONLINE: http://dialogueonracelouisiana.org
    https://www.facebook.com/DialogueOnRaceLouisiana

     

    Read more »
  • ,

    College offers high school diploma for free

    VIRGINIA COLLEGE ANNOUNCES HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM IN PARTNERSHIP WITH PENN FOSTER TO OFFER COMMUNITY MEMBERS ACCESS TO POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION 

    Virginia College in Baton Rogue has established a  High School Diploma Program  where students can earn an accredited high school diploma at one of 11 Virgina College campuses across the country in as little as 12 weeks and at no cost. Since the program began in January 2017, the Baton Rouge campus has enrolled 20 students, with four already completing the program and graduating with their diplomas – three of those graduates went on to enroll at Virginia College.

    The program is designed for students who have previously faced challenges completing their high school diploma or GED but who are interested in earning a high school diploma as a step toward a new career or further vocational training. Transfer credits will be awarded for comparable high school subjects where a full credit has been earned. Penn Foster also accepts transfer credits from a GED.

    “We are proud to partner with Penn Foster to offer this program at our campus,” says Campus President Bill Wells. “Through the High School Diploma Program, we are uniquely able to equip and empower students, regardless of their situation, to prioritize their education and take the necessary steps toward becoming the leaders, employees and business owners of tomorrow.”

    Students enrolled in the High School Diploma Program work directly with an experienced instructor every step of the way. The program requires students to dedicate a minimum of 12 hours each week to on-campus classwork, and allows for any additional to be completed remotely. These flexible class times and schedules allow many students to still maintain a job while earning their diplomas, accommodating a variety of situations and lifestyles.

    Upon completing the High School Diploma Program and earning a high school diploma, students are given an opportunity to enroll at Virginia College to begin vocational training and work toward a certificate, diploma or degree through any of its various programs.

    ONLINE: www.vc.edu/locations/batonrouge/ or call (225) 236-3900. For more information about the High School Diploma Program, .

     

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    LETTER: Ask legislators for more health centers in schools

    Dear Citizens:

    Did you know that there are 63 School-Based Health Centers in 27 parishes in Louisiana? They are medical offices in a school, staffed by physicians, nurse practitioners, registered nurses and licensed behavioral health professionals. School-based health centers keep children in school by providing medical and mental health care on campuses. More than 70,000 students have access to health care through these centers. There are many benefits including reducing absenteeism and tardiness, reduction in hospital emergency care, the prevention of suicide and depression, and keeping children in school so that they can graduate. We know that 96 percent of students treated in a center RETURN to class.

    We need more school-based health centers in our schools and in more parishes throughout Louisiana. Yet, today the funding for existing School Based Health Centers is in danger due to state budget cuts to healthcare.

    As the president of the Louisiana School-Based Health Alliance and a health professional, I have spent countless hours working with partners across the state to get MORE health centers in our schools. Why? Because they keep students in school and parents at work. They provide Louisiana children with acute care for minor illnesses and injuries, prescriptions for medications, immunizations, diagnosis and treatment of chronic diseases and mental health services. Parents must give permission for their children to be treated.

    Please ask your legislator to fight for School-Based Health Center funding. It’s for children and parents. I encourage you to contact your legislator today and ask him or her to restore funding for School-Based Health Centers.
    Louisiana School-Based Health Alliance

    Tabitha J. Washington, MHA
    President

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Mayor Broome to citizens: ‘I stand against hatred, division, and words that divide’

    On May 19, 2017, Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome released this letter to residents of East Baton Rouge Parish after seeing racist and bigoted statements posted online.

    At my inauguration in January, I spoke about the fabric of our community and how it could be torn by the challenges of the day. I said that many would look at these challenges and choose to define us by the different and diverse pieces that exist. I stood before this city excited by the opportunity to help lead the unification of our different and disparate pieces of cloth into a wonderful, colorful, distinctive and inclusive quilt that will be the “new Baton Rouge.” I spoke about how we could utilize the common and strong threads of respect, opportunity, fairness, inclusion, equity, and optimism to weave an amazing tapestry of growth and progress that touches every area of this parish and beyond. I had much hope then and I have much hope now.

    I have a profound love for this city, parish and ALL residents. My goal as mayor-president is to unite people around our collective goals of progress and equity. While freedom of speech is one of the pillars that makes this country so beautiful, irresponsibility of such can be used as a tool to separate us as community. As your mayor-president, I stand against hatred, division, and words and actions that only further divide our community. I do not endorse or support the opinions of any individual or media outlet that would attempt to take us down a path of strife and contentiousness. I write to you today to say that this division cannot and will not be the demise of Baton Rouge.

    While this administration has been working diligently to address the priorities that you as citizens have established for Baton Rouge and East Baton Rouge Parish, we still have much work to do. This includes but is not limited to: ensuring that all of our children, regardless of their addresses, receive an optimum education; our police are equipped and trained properly not only to be aligned with 21st century best practices, but to also be aligned with the community they serve; we are adequately prepared for natural disasters and recovery; and that all neighborhoods have the tools necessary to make them the safe, progressive places that residents deserve; and that economic growth touches all parts of our city. Lastly, I will continue to work to make peace and justice the standard for our community — not the exception.
    We can accomplish these goals and more if we work together. That is when we are our strongest.

    In closing, I want to be very clear: I reject any efforts intended to create division and strife in our community. The statements that I made during my campaign for your mayor-president and subsequent inaugural address were not just idle words. I meant every word with every fiber of my being when I spoke of the “new Baton Rouge.” Our future is a shared one. We are inextricably bound together in our search for
    a place that we can be proud to call home. And I, for one, refuse to be deterred in our journey.

    Sincerely,
    Sharon Weston Broome

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Poetry camp offers creative outlet for teen summer enrichment

    Literary arts nonprofit, Forward Arts, is gearing up for Slam Camp – a three-week specialized summer experience for youth, ages 13-19, interested in learning elements of writing and performing poetry. The camp, which will begin on June 12 on the campus of Louisiana State University, offers participants instruction from world-class practitioners of the art form including Forward Arts’ staff members who have excelled at the highest levels of performance poetry.

     “One of the many benefits to participating in Slam Camp is the mastery of fearlessness,” said Chancelier Skidmore, Forward Arts’ Executive Director and former world poetry slam champion. “Public speaking is scary, but when given the tools to write compelling texts and to deliver those texts with ferocity and charisma, it opens up an entire realm of goals that seemed improbable before.”

    A typical day at Slam Camp includes attendees participating in community building exercises, writing workshops, eating lunch at LSU’s student union, group dialogues, reading circles and performance activities. Slam Camp also features special guest artists visiting once a week to do lecture demonstrations. Of past guest lecturers are trumpeter John Gray and former Louisiana Poet-Laureate Ava Haymon.

    Claudia Dixon, a mother of three past camp participants said she witnessed an immediate growth within her otherwise introverted sons.

    “As a returning parent to slam camp, I cannot explain how important it is to allow my children the ability to express themselves using a variety of methods, including verbal art.” Dixon said. “My sons have not only impressed me with their spoken word skills, they are now open to discussing social, political and gender issues that were never of importance to them prior to Slam Camp – my introverts have been converted.”

    More than exploring poetry and personal growth, Slam Camp offers participants a sense of community with likeminded youth.

    “I believe that young people participating in Slam Camp creates a more equitable opportunity for community storytelling,” said Desireé Dallagiacomo, Forward Arts program director and multi-time international slam finalist and viral sensation. “Because we have young folks from all walks of life, they hear stories and narratives from others that they wouldn’t encounter in their normal circles. This creates empathy and understanding, and we need that now more than ever.”

    As a staple of Slam Camp, norms of interaction are established on the first day to create a safe space for open expression. Participants are encouraged to write and dialogue in a manner that is honest and with respect to their fellow campers.

    Registration is now open. Slam Camp will take place June 12 to June 30, Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. A closing showcase of work participants prepared throughout the camp will be held on Friday, June 30.

    The cost of the program is $150 for an individual camp participant. For families registering more than one youth, the cost is $100 per additional participant. Scholarships opportunities are available and determined on a case by case assessment of need. Registration and payment information available at forwardarts.org

    Read more »
  • ,,

    COMMUNITY EVENT: Ponchatoula Samaritans to meet May 11

    Ready to aid community leaders, the Ponchatoula Samaritans have scheduled a May 11 meeting at the St. Joseph Ministries. The public is invited.

    Spearheaded by Nancy Bourgeois, the group helps churches, organizations, city and parish government, and interested residents stay informed about what is being done in the Ponchatoula area to meet the everyday needs of its citizens, especially in times of disaster.

    Organizers said this effort prevents duplication of services, and the information gleaned is shared among the groups, further aiding in the process of lending a hand-up to those in need.

    St. Joseph Ministries is located on the corner of West Pine and North Eighth. The lunch meetings are usually potluck. RSVP to Bourgeois at 985-507-1797.

    Submitted News by Kathryn J. Martin

    Read more »
  • ,,,,

    50 Shades of Pink comes to Downtown Baton Rouge

    Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Incorporated, Nu Gamma Omega Chapter hosted 50 Shades of Pink: A Girls’ Night Out on Friday, April 28, 2017, at 6p.m. at the La State Capitol Visitor Center in downtown Baton Rouge. The event was facilitated by the arts committee of the chapter, and included: wine pairings, makeovers, medical spa consulting, shopping, author expos, fashion model participation, food,and music. All the proceeds of the event will directly benefit sewing camps for young girls in the Baton Rouge community.

    Submitted by Morgan E. Etienne, MPA

    Read more »
  • ,,

    We can not give in ‘to feelings of impotent rage,’ 100 Black Men say

    Through its president Michael Victorian, The 100 Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge released the following statement Thursday morning following the U.S. Justice Department decision on the Alton Sterling case on May 3

    Baton Rouge (LA) Alton Sterling’s death is a tragedy. It is compounded further by the Justice Department’s decision not to bring charges against the officers involved in his death. We respect Alton’s life and mourn the loss to his family and friends. We also state, categorically, that Mr. Sterling’s life mattered. The lives of the young African-American men and women who we mentor, matter and 100 Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge will continue to do everything within its power to help young people reach their full potential. The systematic conditions that led to Mr. Sterling’s tragic death must be met head on with love, compassion, and an unwavering determination to help make all of our communities safe and economically vibrant.

    We recognize that the findings released on yesterday are frustrating. However, we urge all people of goodwill to use this moment as a call for greater and more meaningful engagement. It is meaningful and constructive to vent, protest, and fully engage in the democratic process. However, we cannot give in, though, to feelings of impotent rage through acts of violence.  Such action will only endanger our community.

    We call on those who wish to improve the lives of people here at the corner of Fairfield and N. Foster Drive (Baton Rouge, LA) to get directly involved in dismantling injustice. Furthermore, we applaud the leadership of our East Baton Rouge Parish Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome who early in her administration took steps to execute much needed reforms to the Baton Rouge Police Department, including these five policy changes:

    1.      Officers are required to give a verbal warning, before using deadly force, except where there are exigent circumstances.

    2.      Officers are required to de-escalate situations, when possible, before using force.  De-escalation strategies include disengagement, area containment, waiting out a subject, summoning reinforcements, calling in specialized units or employing other strategies.

    3.      Officers will not employ chokeholds or strangleholds, except in emergency circumstances where it is immediately necessary to use deadly force and the authorized weapons are inoperable, inaccessible or otherwise not available.

    4.      Officers are prohibited from discharging a firearm at a moving vehicle unless the vehicle or the persons within the vehicle pose an immediate deadly threat to others.

    5.      Officers will be required to intervene to prevent another officer from using excessive force and to immediately report when they observe the use of excessive force by another officer

    In order for these policies to have their intended effect, the Baton Rouge Police Department and its leadership must take active measures to ensure that those officers that do not comply with these policies will face serious significant discipline

    The 100 Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge is committed to continuing to engage our youth and families to strengthen our community. We hope that area citizens will answer this call to a crisis and set an example to the nation and the world as they watch.

    One Hundred Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge, LTD. is a non-profit organization through which African-American males step forward and assume roles of community leadership, responsibility, and guidance.  Michael Victorian currently serves as the president and chairman of the board.

     

    Read more »
  • ,,

    AKA Debutante Cotillion presented ten maids, princesses, Miss Amity

    Ten beautiful young women were presented by Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, Nu Gamma Omega Chapter at its annual Debutante Cotillion and Spring Ball on April 8, 2017 at the Belle of Baton Rouge Atrium. The warm welcome to all guests came from chapter President Jacqueline Nash Grant. Junior League of Baton Rouge president Kathy Fletcher Victorian served as Mistress of Ceremonies for the evening themed “An Elegant Array of Precious Pearls”.

    Joy Gustavia Trusclair was crowned as Queen of the Cotillion, the daughter of Donald and Joyce F. Trusclair. She was escorted by Raymond Vincent.

    Taylor Danielle Fields was acknowledged as the 2017 Miss Amity.

    Reigning as princesses were First Princess Cache’ Marchell Brown, daughter of Raymond and Calaundra Clarke and the late Marlon Brown, escorted by Darius Washington; Second Princess Peyton Lauryn Matthew, daughter of Torin Matthew and Veronica Matthew, escorted by Taylor Matthew; Third Princess Taylor Danielle Fields, daughter of John Fields and Brigitte Fields, escorted by Kendall Boults; Fourth Princess Sondra Alexis Williams, daughter of Robert and Carla Williams, escorted by Alvin McCrory III; Fifth Princess Desiree’ Nicole Jones, daughter of Ervin and Jennifer Jones, escorted by Clyde Edwards-Helaire.

    Honored as 2017 Cotillion Maids were First Maid Victoria Lauryn Clark, daughter of Darren Clark and  Sonceree Clark, escorted by Clayton Hunter; Second Maid Mia Geneice Gaines, daughter of Telfry and Melissa Gaines, escorted by Preston Gaines; Third Maid Shania Darnay Stewart, daughter of Shondel Stewart and Chastity Sanders, escorted by Devonte Landry; Fourth Maid Nia Simone Ross, daughter of Ike and India Ross, escorted by Keilen Ross.

    Ball captains for the event were: Nicholas Cloyd, Tristan Matthew, Derick Rheams, Jr., and Carter Tucker.

    Mary A. Darby, Kimberly McCants, Velena Johnson, Jacqueline N. Grant, Kathy F. Victorian, Errin W. Gaines, Danielle Staten, and Brandy Johnson

    Mary A. Darby, Kimberly McCants, Velena Johnson, Jacqueline N. Grant, Kathy F. Victorian, Errin W. Gaines, Danielle Staten, and Brandy Johnson

     

    Errin Gaines served as general debutante chairman, while Brandy Johnson, Kimberly McCants and Danielle Staten served as co-chairman. Other program participants included chapter Vice President Velena Johnson, Carla Harmon, Toyia Charles-Comminey, Joycelyn Green, Mary Alice Darby, Ellen McKnight and Brittnei Shelling.

    Submitted by Morgan Etienne

     

     

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    8 ways to optimize your sleep

    While a healthy lifestyle requires a balanced diet and exercise, sleep is another pillar of overall wellness that is both essential to your health and success, and often overlooked.

    By simply making small changes to your daily routine you can improve your quality of sleep. Follow these tips from Dr. Sujay Kansagra, Mattress Firm’s sleep health consultant and director of Duke University’s Pediatric Neurology Sleep Medicine Program, and get on your way to better rest and a healthier life.

    1. Manage your sleep time. Rather than trying to accomplish everything on your to-do list at the expense of sleep, reverse your approach. As the average adult needs 7-9 hours of sleep each night, make sure to set aside the time needed for a full night of rest.
    1. Stay on schedule. Try to keep your bedtime and wake time consistent on both weekdays and weekends. With time, your brain and body will acclimate to these set times, but until then, rely on an alarm – not only to wake in the morning, but to keep you from staying up too late at night, too.
    1. Find a routine. A routine performed 20-30 minutes prior to bed every night can subconsciously ease your brain into sleep. Unwinding with a book, taking a warm bath or meditating are all ways to slow your mind and transition toward peaceful rest.
    1. Brighten up the morning. Getting plenty of bright light in the morning helps keep your sleep timing on track, particularly if you wake up early. Make opening the drapes and blinds your first task each morning.
    1. Ditch the clock. Fixating on the time can create stress and keep you up at night. Instead, set your alarm, turn your clock around and forget about the time.
    1. Get moving. Research shows that exercise can act as a natural sleep remedy, often leading to a more sound slumber. However, if you exercise late and have difficulty falling asleep, consider moving your workout earlier in the day. The increase in body temperature from exercise tends to be prolonged, sometimes making it hard to fall asleep.
    1. Kick the caffeine habit. Morning caffeine can linger in your system until it’s time to sleep. Coffee, tea, dark sodas and dark chocolate are the main offenders for most people.
    1. Pay back debt. If you are chronically deprived of sleep, allow your body extra sleep time to make up for the loss. In these cases, even 8-9 hours each night may not be enough. Allow your body to catch up then commit to more consistent sleep patterns in the future.

    Find more resources to help improve your sleep, including tips on how to purchase a new mattress, at DailyDoze.com.

    By Family Features
    Photo courtesy of Getty Images

    Read more »
  • ,,

    ‘PHAT’ girls take over Baton Rouge runway

    csbad1 dwbad1

    jjbad1

    Plus-sized women from across Baton Rouge were cheered on has they ripped the runway at PHAT Girl Takeover -The Next Episode Fashion Show at the EpiCenter. The ladies were 17 to 51 years of age and sported attire from local boutiques and designers from across the state.

    For eight weeks, the models attended personal and professional development workshops and were trained to walk the runway by plus-size model and runway coach Patrice Purnell. Jerris Cade was emcee, and Brandon WB Williams of Ivanhoe, North Carolina performed his hit single “The Plus-Size Diva Anthem.”

    The fashion show was organized by SheProductions, LLC, and owner Simone Higginbotham. Photos by Tarnish Jasper. Model attire provided by Big and Desirable.

    Submitted News

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Take a mindful approach to fighting Spring allergens

    While springtime means blooming flowers, warmer temperatures and more time spent outdoors, it also means allergies and pollen. Tackling dust mite matter, tree pollen and animal dander is completely different from protecting your home against the winter flu and requires a new regimen of preparation and cleaning.

    Take on spring allergens by refreshing your home with these simple practices, and help get your family ready to enjoy the warmer months.

    Prep for Bed. Allergens don’t go to bed when you do; they can continue to irritate even while you’re sleeping, causing a restless slumber. To help ensure allergens and pollens aren’t tracked into bedrooms, leave a laundry basket in the hall and have family members remove their clothing before entering their rooms. A quick rinse in a warm shower before bed can help you relax and wind down while also washing away any unwanted pollens still stuck in your hair or on your skin.

    Freshen Fabrics. Clothing, towels and bed linens – items you come in contact with multiple times a day – can trap pollens, dust mite matter, allergens and dander.  It’s important to not only rinse these items but to use a detergent that removes allergens and is gentle on skin, like all free clear liquid and mighty pacs, laundry detergent for sensitive skin. The liquid detergent removes 99 percent of everyday and seasonal allergens, including the top spring allergens: tree and grass pollen, and is the No. 1 recommended detergent brand by dermatologists, allergists and pediatricians for sensitive skin.

    Ingredients Matter. Taking preventative measures against spring allergens can start in a surprising place: the refrigerator. While most people think about treating allergens in their homes and on their clothes, they tend to forget that a good diet is also a good defense. Avoiding aged, pickled or fermented foods like blue cheese and kimchi with naturally occurring histamines can help prevent coughing, sneezing and itching triggered by spring allergens. Instead, look to boost your meals with ingredients found in the Mediterranean Diet, such as fresh fruits and vegetables like apples and broccoli as well as nuts and fatty fishes that have essential vitamins and nutrients known to fight allergy symptoms.

    Give Pets a Makeover.  Your furry friend may be one of the biggest culprits for sneaking allergens and pollen into the house, so this season make sure to give pets twice-a-week baths to wash out dander and pollen. Remember to also wash pet beds and chew toys that are thrown around the yard to help prevent allergens from being transported into and throughout your home.

    With these four steps to help protect your home and family against spring allergens, you can start enjoying a healthy, clean spring.

    By Family Features
    Photo courtesy of Getty Images

    Read more »
  • ,

    Community plans for library renovations following Great Flood

    Two meetings held March 20 regarding renovation plans for Greenwell Springs Road Branch Lbrary
    Monday, March 20, was busy at the Greenwell Springs Road Regional Branch Library, as community members gathered first at an informal architectural charrette and later at a formal architectural presentation of renovation plans for the Library site.  Greenwell Springs Library re-opened March 3 after sustaining water damage from the Historic Flood of August 2016.  Now it’s time to look toward the future of the Library and plans to renovate it so it is updated for meeting rooms, unique spaces for teens and children, technology, resources and much more.
    The public review was of the concept design by Bradley-Blewster / Hidell Architects to determine future, more complex renovation work. Next the architects and Library staff will produce findings to the East Baton Rouge Board of Control, along with suggested renovation plans or changes.
    The Greenwell Springs Library is one of the oldest of 11 “old” Library branches in the parish.  It and six other older sites are scheduled for major renovations through 2025.  All Library projects are completely funded via the Library’s dedicated tax millage, which passed in 2015.  And all Library projects are designed and constructed on the pay-as-you-go plan.  Greenwell Springs Road Regional Library (built in 1997) and Jones Creek Regional Library (built in 1990) are the first two of these renovation projects.
    For Greenwell Springs Library’s renovation, $5.257-plus million has been budgeted for the project.  Architects were selected in August, prior to the flood, and they have begun concept work. To view the concept plan, visit the Greenwell Springs Reginal Branch Library Construction Project Infoguide at http://ebrpl.libguides.com/greenwell.
    For more information, call Greenwell Springs Library at (225) 274-4450, the Main Library at (225) 231-3750 or online at www.ebrpl.com.
    Photo: Library Director Spencer Watts (center, red tie) and experts listen to community members regarding innovation plans for Greenwell Springs Road Branch Library at an open house March 20. (EBRPL photo)
    Read more »
  • ,,

    Museum presents ‘The Thibodaux Massacre’ Book Tour, Feb. 18

    For the first time ever, a limited number of people will experience live, the on-site telling of a key story hidden from people of Louisiana. Join us for this unique tour with the author who recently verified and chronicled the story in his book, The Thibodaux Massacre. The Feb. 18 tour will begin at 10 am from the Road African American Museum, 406 Charles Street, Donaldsonville, and continue down Bayou Lafourche to Thibodaux, returning to Donaldsonville at 3 pm.

    As part of its “When History Hurts” program, the River Road African American Museum (RRAAM) is sponsoring a day-long bus tour of Louisiana’s sugar cane country, which will include the site where striking Black laborers were buried after a mass murder that ended an 1887 tri-parish strike. The incident has since become known as the Thibodaux Massacre. John DeSantis, author of ‘The Thibodaux Massacre: Racial Violence and the 1887 Sugar Cane Labor Strike,” will share vivid details of this history and other events from a chartered bus making stops at locations relevant to the story. The tour includes a stop in Thibodaux where victims of the massacre are believed buried, where plans are afoot for archeological exploration by the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

    Critically acclaimed for its thorough research, the book is interwoven with the story of Jack Conrad, a former Lafourche Parish slave who joined the U.S. Army during the Civil War. After fighting for his freedom with other Black soldiers, he is wounded in the massacre 22 years later while watching vigilantes kill his son and others participating in the strike.

    “Much of this hurtful history until now has been unknown,” said DeSantis. “This is a story of empowerment, because 25 years after emancipation these courageous people dared standing up to an oppressive culture of white supremacy.”

    The tour is limited to 55 people and the tour price is $75 which includes:
    * A signed copy of the book, The Thibodaux Massacre
    * Lunch 
    * A tour of the River Road African American Museum
    * A private bus tour narrated by the author

    The museum’s director, Kathe Hambrick, said this special tour is meant to be “a healing tour” in the memory of those resilient sugar workers who lost their lives fighting for fare wages and equality. The history is painful, but we cannot move forward with reconciliation until there is acknowledgement of the injustices that happened right here in our own communities.

    For more information, call 225-206-1225.

    Read more »
  • ,

    COMMENTARY: Congress should strengthen safety net

    Our new president and Congress have vowed to stand up and defend the interests of ordinary Americans who feel left behind by deepening economic inequality. But actions speak louder than words.

    More than 43 million Americans still live below the poverty line in this country, and that number would actually be twice as high if not for federal anti-poverty policies. So it’s truly puzzling that some members of Congress are preparing to attack key pillars of our safety net programs; programs their constituents depend on to survive, like SNAP (formerly food stamps) and Medicaid.

    Now more than ever, we need to focus on helping hardworking people across the country make ends meet, not put up roadblocks in their way. We must stand up against schemes to “block grant” health and anti-poverty programs and efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act. I hope we can count on our elected officials to reject any proposals that undo what we know works.

    By Rachid Ouedraogo

     

     

    Read more »
  • ,

    Time2Testify Conference comes to Baton Rouge, Feb 23-25

    Bishop Dwight Pate will host the first Time2Testify Conference at the Baton Rouge Radisson Hotel, February 23-25. Registration is free.

    Since 1995, Pate has prayed over olive oil and sent more than 16 million bottles free of charge around the world. People have experienced the miraculous and are coming to Baton Rouge to celebrate the testimonies of GOD. “Now more than ever, people need to be encouraged that the GOD of the Bible is real and more than a two-hour church service on Sunday.”

    For more information call 800-266-5111 or go online to bishopdwightpate.com

    This news item was submitted online.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Divas, Daiquiris, Deals Networking Mixer opens to local female entrepreneurs

    This event is created to have an effective business networking mixer where female entrepreneurs can link together as individuals who, through trust and relationship building, become walking, talking advertisements for one another. While building these relationships, participants also get to enjoy dancing, daiquiris and entertainment. Admission is free. Vendor Spotlight tables are available at bit.ly/dddnetwork2017.

    Please invite your girlfriends out!

    This news item was submitted online.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Celebrating 60 years of marriage

    Charles Clinton and Dolores Ada Poole Moore celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary, Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017.

    They are natives of Mandeville, Louisiana and members Newell United Methodist Church in Mandeville, Louisiana. They contribute their faith in  God and family values as to why God bless them to stay together. They currently attend Winan United Methodist Church where their daughter is the Pastor Darlene A. Moore.

    They had Breakfast Gathering at Picadilly’s in Covington, Saturday, Jan. 7 and spent their honeymoon get-a-way at a Mandeville Bed and Breakfast provided as an anniversary gift from a special family friend. Most weeks they enjoy going to the Washington Parish Council on Aging Center or taking in movies and country drives with daughter. They also help to rear two grandsons Walter Donahue Jr and Joshua James II.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Community dialogue features ‘Cultural Bridges in a Time of Troubled Water,’ Jan. 14

    The 821 Project will host a special interactive dialogue, Voices: Cultural Bridges In A Time of Troubled Waters, Saturday, Jan. 14, This event will be held at TJ Jemison Baptist Student Center, 722 Harding Blvd, Baton Rouge, LA. Event, which includes a keynote presentation and lunch, is free and open to the public.

    The 821 Project provides intercultural and social justice education programs to the southeast Louisiana community through workshops, speaker’s panels, dialogues, and other appropriate programming.

    Preregistration via website encouraged, but not required. For more information contact Jahi Mackey, Program Director at jmackey@the821project.com.

    Read more »
  • ,

    COMMENTARY: Tangipahoa school deseg case should not be downplayed

    Dear Editor:
    Needless to say, the importance of this particular desegregation case definitely should not be downplayed as arguments from every side are well understood. However, there are things that must take precedence as this process continues. Things like the assurance that every single one of our public schools has equitable resources and programs needed to be competitive, for instance, should be a priority. Planning strategically for each school by fairly balancing the clientele it needs to thrive and invigorate the community it services is of equal importance.  Likewise, the life of every single one of the 307 children from the Magazine Street area is even more important.  And, doing what is best for these children (all children for that matter) has to be top priority.
    When considering the latest court report, it is pretty apparent that reflection must take place in all who are involved in the future of our schools and communities. Somewhere and somehow, we seem to have lost sight of what is really important.  Of course, storms can impair vision. Therefore, leaders must strive to ensure all of our children and families are equipped to “weather” the remainder of this storm by practicing sound leadership in the midst. True leaders always acknowledge and stand for what is right. They always stand for what is honorable and just. They always advocate for the underdog. They always fight for those who do not know exactly how to fight for themselves.  And they always love everyone.
    With these same thoughts in mind, at some point we must sincerely question our own motives and leader actions.  By no means am I saying that the actions cited in the most recent court document were intentional. However, I am saying that more consideration regarding the  long term success of all schools, families, and children probably should have been given when engaging in the planning process. This is especially important when considering kids who are already placed at a statistical disadvantage due to various risk factors. Providing children with an opportunity to break family poverty cycles through education is a responsibility that should not and cannot be taken lightly. Think about it.  If the same educational practices and planning that may have very well guided many of these families into poverty for generations in the first place are continued, then it can almost be guaranteed that these same families will continue to remain in poverty for generations to come.  With the dedicated people we have throughout this parish, there is absolutely no excuse for this to continue to be.
    Let’s move forward by planning properly and responsibly for all of our children, schools, and families.
    Patricia Morris
    President
    Greater Tangipahoa Parish Branch NAACP
    Read more »
  • ,

    Dr. Byron Jasper welcomes Jobs for America’s Graduates

    Open Health Care Clinic hosted students of the Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG) Louisiana program in the classroom of Open Health. The program featured a presentation by physician Dr. Byron Jasper a Louisiana native who recently returned to his home state to provide care to underserved patients.

    Jobs for America’s Graduates Louisiana program is a dropout prevention and recovery program that delivers a unique set of services for at-risk students to help them earn a high school diploma. The Jobs for America’s graduates program has been assisting students since 1980. JAG teaches students career development, job attainment, job survival, communication skills, work place skills, and life survival skills.

    Dr. Jasper and pediatrician, Dr. Dionna Matthews, spoke to the Franklin Junior High School JAG students, on Dec. 5, about the challenges they faced and overcame growing up in similar backgrounds. The presentation informed the students on what it takes to become a healthcare professional and through conversation, encourage and motivate the students to work hard in pursuit of their dreams despite the hardships they may encounter._IGP9824

    Dr. Jasper is a family medicine physician at Open Health where he also specializes in caring for patients with HIV and Hepatitis C. Additionally, he is the executive director of the Comprehensive Medical Mentoring Program, a mentoring organization he founded to provide minority students with experiences that foster successful matriculation into medical school and increase overall diversity in the healthcare field. He has continued to volunteer as a community preceptor, teaching local medical students and residents in the Baton Rouge area while also helping undergraduates, medical students, and resident physicians create and improve their application materials.

    As a true community-wide caregiver, Open Health envision a brighter future for the patients it serves. This means providing more educational opportunities, more comprehensive services and more access to quality care. From pediatrics, to dental, to endocrinology, Open Health Care Clinic will provide advanced medical services for every phase of a person’s life regardless of their financial or insurance status. Extended hours, weekend appointments and walk-ins are welcome.

    ONLINE:www.ohcc.org.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Baton Rouge Crusaders to host Winter Classic Semi Pro basketball game, Dec. 17

     

    Let the winter games begin. The Baton Rouge Crusaders are excited to announce their first Winter Classic Semi Pro Basketball Game Saturday, Dec. 17, at Baton Rouge Community College Gym.

    “The Baton Rouge Crusaders are fairly new to the community, so this will be somewhat of an introduction. We would like the parish to attend and continue supporting these men on their professional journey, as we strive to bring about larger opportunities for them. Some are already known for their athletic and professional skills,” said Isaiah Marshall, the CEO of the BR Crusader’s parent company, Capitol City Crusaders.

    Capitol City Crusaders is a sports organization that houses youth basketball programs for students in second through 12th grade, a post graduation basketball program at Capitol City Prep Academy, and the new military developmental league team called Baton Rouge Crusaders. Their mission is to professionally develop local talent who may need more attention and practice before the big leagues. National Director of Men’s and Women’s Basketball, AAU, P.K. Martin and Demetric Hunter, who is the director of military all sports development league, brought the program to Louisiana, earlier this year and partnered with Marshall.

    Before the Dec. 17 game, the team will host a free youth basketball camp for youth ages 9-15, followed by a free community basketball game. “We think it is important for the players to mentor and work with the youth as much as possible, because it helps not only the youth to grow, but the players themselves, and hopefully we are creating a culture of giving back as well,” Marshall said.

    Sable International, a business management consulting firm in Baton Rouge, is also sponsoring tickets for five single mothers and their children to attend the Winter Classic. Email info@batonrougecrusaders.com to be a Good Neighbor sponsor and assist more families with admission.

     

    Read more »
  • ,,

    BR journalists remember Gwen Ifill

    On behalf of the Baton Rouge Area Association of Black Journalists, I would like to express my deepest sympathies to the family of veteran, award winning journalists Gwen Ifill.

    Ifill was a true example of professional journalism and was an inspiration to women of color.

    Ifill handled her career in journalism with style and grace, never compromising herself.

    Cheryl J. Stroy
    president
    Baton Rouge Area Association of Black Journalists

    Read more »
  • ,

    Broome urges White to participate in upcoming public forums

    From now until the run-off election on December 10, several organizations are hosting forums and debates between East Baton Rouge Parish Mayor-President candidates Sharon Weston Broome and Bodi White. Weston Broome and her campaign are concerned with the number of public opportunities White has agreed to attend and participate in.

    “The Broome campaign is pleased to learn that Bodi White has agreed to discuss the issues facing East Baton Rouge parish. Unfortunately, he has only agreed to three public discussions and none will occur before November 21st,” said Michael Beychok, spokesperson for the Weston Broome Campaign. “After agreeing and then backing out of two forums this week, and launching an attack ad from his Super PAC, it is clear that Bodi is not interested in having meaningful and timely discussions about the future of this parish with voters. Rather, and this is no surprise given his leadership style of dividing our parish, Bodi has chosen to use attack ads and limited discussion to speak with voters.

    White has two opportunities to speak publicly with voters this week.

    “Voters deserve to know where Bodi stands so we urge him to accept the Forum 35 invitation tonight and to accept the invitation of the Leaders with Vision invitation later this week so voters can listen to the candidates discuss together how to move Baton Rouge forward,” said Beychok

    The run-off election is Saturday, Dec. 10.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Open Health Care Clinic opens in Mid-City Baton Rouge

    The Caring Clinic of Louisiana, a provider of HIV management and treatment since 2007, launched its new brand, Open Health Care Clinic in Mid-City Baton Rouge.

    Open Health Care Clinic is a full-service, primary health care option located at 3801 North Blvd. The new name is a result of the clinic’s new designation as a Federally Qualified Health Center.

    The facility receives annual federal funds from the Health Resources & Services Administration to provide quality healthcare to the medically underserved in our community. Administrators said Open Health also qualifies for enhanced reimbursements from Medicare and Medicaid, as well as other benefits.  Open Health Care Clinic provides advanced medical services for every phase of a person’s life regardless of their financial or insurance status. Extended hours, weekend appointments and walk-ins are welcome.

    Image-1Open Health Care Clinic is the health services division of HIV/AIDS Alliance Region Two, Inc. (HAART), the legal recipient of the FQHC designation. This new designation enables HAART to transform its clinic to a broad-based provider of quality healthcare. HAART has established an extensive referral system linking together a network of service providers in order to increase access to support services for families.

    ONLINE: www.ohcc.org.

    Read more »
  • ,

    BREC completes improvements at T. D. Bickham Jr. park

    With the help of BREC Planning & Engineering and BREC CIP Crew, T. D. Bickham Jr. Park features new renovations and amenities. The park is located at 6850 Pettit Road. BREC will host a ribbon cutting on Friday, July 15 at 10 a.m. to dedicate the project completion.

    Improvements include new playground equipment with two different play areas, one for young children with an age appropriate play unit and tot swings. The other play area is for older kids featuring six climbers, two slides and an arch swing. A new half basketball court was also added, and a picnic shelter was renovated. New connector walks make all the new amenities accessible to everyone.

    The improvements were completed in time for summer camp kids to enjoy. Due to renovations at Baker Recreation Center, summer camp moved to T. D. Bickham Recreation Center. For years to come, children will benefit from the new playground equipment with heart-healthy exercise, social development in group interaction, and enhanced sensory and motor skills.

    T. D. Bickham is just one of the parks receiving renovations in the area. Scotlandville Park now has a new disc golf park and a grand opening will be held on Saturday, August 6 at 10 a.m. Renovations are currently underway at Anna T. Jordan Community park and a grand opening for an expanded and completely renovated recreation center will be held this fall. In addition, construction on a new visitors and event center is set to begin very soon at the Laurens Henry Cohn, Sr. Memorial Plant Arboretum.

    Read more »
  • Giant Inflatable Colon Comes to Baton Rouge

    Pennington Biomedical Research Center Brings Giant Inflatable Colon to Baton Rouge
    Interactive Experience to Show the Different Stages of Colorectal Cancer

    WHAT In the United States, there are more than one million Americans living with a history of colorectal cancer. Estimates are that one in 20 Americans will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in a lifetime.1
    To combat these staggering statistics, the patient advocacy organization Colon Cancer Alliance has embarked on the 2016 Big Colon Tour, a nationwide educational tour featuring a giant inflatable colon sponsored by Bayer. The tour pulls into Pennington Biomedical Research Center for the Get Your Rear In Gear Run/Walk event.
    WHO: CCA volunteer living with colon cancer, Diane McAdams, and physician Dr. Kelly Finan, MD, from Our Lady The Lake Colon/Rectal are available for media interviews
    WHEN: May 7, 2016 at 7:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
    WHERE: 6400 Perkins Road
    Baton Rouge, LA 70808
    WHY: As with many cancers, early detection of colorectal cancer is important. The survival rate is much higher when the disease is diagnosed early, but research has shown that only 39 percent of patients are diagnosed at the early stage, in part due to the underuse of screening.2 In Louisiana approximately 61 percent of adults over 50 are being screened for colorectal cancer, but that leaves nearly 40 percent who are still not being screened.1 This is important, given that more than more than 60 percent of deaths from colorectal cancer could be prevented with screening.3
    Colon Cancer Alliance’s giant inflatable colon engages the public in a memorable way by providing an interactive experience showing the different stages of colorectal cancer, including advanced disease. These efforts aim to raise public awareness of this disease by encouraging early detection and timely treatment, while raising funding for research nationwide. Help get the word out about colon cancer; together, we can make a difference.
    For more information about the inflatable colon or colon cancer visit ccalliance.org.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    New picture book shares ‘Stories by Grandma’

    Patricia F. Crowley offers vibrantly illustrated tales for young readers, pet-lovers

    GRETNA, La. – Patricia F. Crowley wrote “Stories by Grandma”  for her grandson, who is now 7 years old, to tell him tales that recount their family’s happy times with their beloved pets. With its vibrant illustrations and engaging narrative, this picture provides young readers and pet lovers alike with an entertaining and educational experience centered on the adventures of affable animals.

    Scruffy is a Yorkipoo puppy, Freddie is a finch and Jack is a sorrel-colored horse. Crowley tells their story, as seen from a child’s perspective, showing readers the simple pleasures of life provided by pets and how each has its own personality, making its own unique mark in people’s lives. Crowley depicts the loving bond people form with their pets, the contributions they make to life’s quality and how a child can come to appreciate the presence of each of these creatures in his family.

    “At a time when children seem to be surrounded by negative influence, pet ownership provides children with an opportunity to be loving and caring and to experience unconditional love and devotion,” Crowley says.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Louisiana’s new SCLC president announces 7-point plan for social justice

    Charles Steele Jr., president of the National Southern Christian Leadership Conference announced the official return of the historic civil rights organization to Louisiana on January 4 in New Orleans.

    Louisiana has met all of the requirements to have its charter reinstated under the leadership of the Rev. Reginald Pitcher who the organizing state chair and Baton Rouge Chapter president.

    Steele, national and state officers, and SCLC members met at New Zion Baptist Church in New Orleans. The church is the historic site where the national organization–established by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr–began more than 60 years ago. of the beginnings of SCLC.

    During the ceremony, Pitcher shared this seven Point Plan for Social Justice through Nonviolent Direct Action:

    1. We will continue to embrace the doctrine of the beloved community. We will work to bring about the creation of a truly multi-racial, multicultural democracy, where individual human rights are protected and the dignity and worth of human personality is respected.
    2. We reject the doctrine of modern-day lynching. We will continue to combat and resist the vigilante actions of rouge police officers who continue to commit hate crimes on the streets of our cities by murdering unarmed black and poor people without fear of retribution. We will also continue to address the black on black murders that cannibalizes our communities
      and deprives them of vital human resources through the school-to-prison pipeline.
    3. We reject the doctrine of unequal justice. We will continue to protest against the racial disparities that impose harsher and unequal penalties on Black and poor people on a routine basis in the court systems throughout this state. And until this system is changed, we will continue to embrace the age old cry of “No Justice, No Peace!”
    4. We reject the doctrine of the new Plessey vs. Ferguson. We will continue to fight against the hypocritical opportunists both black and white, who are bent on the destruction of Public Education, who under the guise of Charter Schools have raped and pillaged public school systems throughout this state.
    5. We reject the doctrine of the New Jim Crow. We will continue to resist any attempt to abuse the 13th Amendment as it relates to the school-to-prison pipeline and the mass incarceration of Black and poor people in this state. We will actively lobby our legislature to design and implement alternatives to incarceration, especially as it relates to our youth.
    6. We reject the doctrine of guilty until proven innocent. We will continue to resist any attempt to violate the 14th Amendment and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as it relates to due process under the law. We are tired of our people being arrested, charged, tried and executed on the streets of our cities throughout this nation. They are being lynched by those who have been commissioned to protect and to serve. This practice has got to stop and it’s got to stop now, not tomorrow, not next week, not next month, not next year, but now!
    7. We reject the doctrine of No Vote, No Voice. We will continue to resist any attempt to water down or violate the 15th Amendment and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 as it relates to voter nullification and voter suppression. We will continue to organize our people through voter education, registration and participation drives, and we will continue to aid and assist Black and poor people in understanding and utilizing the power of the vote.
    Read more »
  • ,,,,

    Poet plans to sail into Black history

    ASTORIA, OREGON — The port of Astoria on the Columbia River is the home of Black History in the making as Niccolea Miouo Nance prepares to set sail with The Emuna Endeavor. The Oregon-born, Arizona-raised poet and artist has put her creative work on hold to learn seamanship and navigation at Clatsop Community College in preparation for the June 2016 departure date.

    Sometimes we as individuals going about our daily lives fall accidentally into something much larger than ourselves. This is one of those stories.

    In July of 2012, Niccolea’s  (pronounced “nick-cole-yah”) best friend Dovid, who was planning on sailing around the world, knew she wanted to travel so he invited her to join him. Since then she has been researching others who have done the journey and discovered that there are no Black American women on record who have sailed around the world.

    Nance was born in a land locked small town in the southern part of Oregon just north of the California border. She grew up in Tucson, Arizona and was a desert dweller pretty much all of her life. As such she didn’t have a rich nautical background so she enrolled in maritime studies at the community college.

    Niccolea said, “My whole life has been a lesson in diversity and tolerance (or lack thereof). I am a Black-white biracial so since birth I have been an example of the unification of different people from different backgrounds. Being raised by my Caucasian stepfather and white mother gave me a perspective on race relations that is totally different from my friends who were raised in totally Black families, neighborhoods, etc. I have seen racism first hand, but I have also seen great tolerance and love firsthand. I choose to focus on the good in life and people. I want to continue to be someone who adds to the positivity in this world.”

    Even with the lessons she learned in her life, she said she is filled with cultural stereotypes of pretty much every place in the world and would like to shed that. “I believe that travel will help me to be a better person overall by experiencing things outside my norm. This trip will be a means to becoming a more culturally aware and more life-educated person.” With modern technology it also gives her a chance to show others what she is learning so we can all learn together via her blog and the trip site and YouTube channel.

    “This is more than just a trip for me… It is the beginning step to a goal of creating a bridge between like-minded people with this project as a catalyst. It’s more than a vacation, this is more than just a grand adventure and a test of my physical and mental strength and stamina… it is a chance to learn about the world and the people in it and hopefully create a chain of positivity on a global scale.”

    According to the website, the Emuna Endeavor is the journey of two friends who’s cause is to take you along vicariously on a world wide sailing trip making stops to create community and hopefully unity along the way.

    Then Nance found out that she will inadvertently be a part of history. So far only one Black woman of any nationality has sailed around the world. There was a single sentence in a Wikipedia article about circumnavigation records (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_circumnavigations) that mentioned a woman named Maria Victor; 2007-2013; first woman of African descent (Barbados) to perform a circumnavigation (with stops, past Cape of good Hope, through Panama Canal). There is one other Black woman named Katia who plans to sail around the world who is from Cape Verde and left from Brazil recently (within the past year). As of this writing, she is approximately half the way around. Katia is sailing with her boyfriend Josh (who is from the Netherlands) on SV Hope (http://www.joshandhope.org/). Even with these two ladies, Niccolea will still be the first American of African descent to take on the task.

    ONLINE:  http://emunaendeavor.org/
    Contact: info@emunaendeavor.org/

    Read more »
  • ,,

    SU Ag Center’s Fall Gardening Workshop Draws Large Crowd of Gardeners

    The near-freezing morning temperature didn’t stop almost 100 attendees from showing up for the Southern University Ag Center’s Fall Gardening Workshop, held on November 24 in A.O. Williams Hall – SU Ag Center.

    Prior to the start of the program, attendees were treated to smoothies and a juice breakfast bar made from vegetables grown in the Center’s Urban Demonstration Farm. Stephanie Elwood, Extension Associate at the SU Ag Center, provided the attendees with recipes to make the smoothies and juices at their homes during her presentation on Fall Season Planting and Smoothie and Juice Gardens.

    SU Ag Center Vice Chancellor for Extension Dr. Gina E. Eubanks welcomed the packed crowd to the workshop and to the Southern University Ag Center.

    Other presentations included Pollinators and Pests: Encouraging Healthy Ecosystems, which explained how some insects assist in the pollination of plants; Bee Keeping: Raising Queen Bees in the City, which discussed how to transplant a queen into a bee colony and maintain a bee colony in an urban environment; The Human Element: Maintaining and Growing an Urban Agriculture Community, which focused on community gardening and Non-traditional Uses for Traditional Crops, such as harvesting and selling banana leaves and making jelly from corn cobs.

    Attendees were also given the opportunity to share topics that they would like to learn more about during the next workshop with the Ag Center’s staff.

    The workshop ended with a tour of the Southern University Ag Center’s greenhouses and its Urban Demonstration Farm.

    The Fall Gardening Workshop was co-sponsored by the Southern University Ag Center, its Wisteria Alliance Program and the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) Program.

    For additional information about gardening, the SU Ag Center’s Urban Demonstration Farm or to schedule a tour of the Farm, contact Mila Berhane, Stephanie Elwood, Dawn Mellion Patin or Zanetta Augustine at 225-771-2242.

    PHOTO: Zanetta Augustine, Extension Associate at the SU Ag Center standing on far right in purple, leads Fall Gardening Workshop attendees on a tour of the Center’s greenhouse on November 24. (Photo by LaKeeshia G. Lusk, SU Ag Center.)

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Community Event: Ribbon Cutting and Movie in the Park, Nov. 6

    BAKER–BREC will dedicate the new Pilot Senior Playground on Friday, Nov. 6 at 5 p.m. at Greenwood Community Park! Exercise and physical activity are very important to our senior community and it is BREC’s mission to contribute to a healthier, more vibrant community by providing exceptional parks, open spaces and recreation experiences for all of East Baton Rouge Parish.

    Submitted by Monica Dugas

    Read more »
  • ,,,,

    High school students travel to protest Mississippi flag

    Twenty Louisiana Students Traveled to Mississippi to Rally & March over State Flag

    Students from Kentwood High Magnet School and St. Helena College and Career Academy,traveled to Jackson, Mississippi, on October 11 to participate in the One Flag for All Mississippians March and Rally.

    The 20 students were engaged during their civics classes on the importance of letting their voices be heard, and the many ways they can get involved to do so. This sparked their interest in participating in the history making event.

    The march and rally–which attracted more than 200 participants–were organized by local leaders and was led by South Carolina State Representative Jenny Horne, rapper and former Southern University SGA president David Banner, and civil rights activist Myrlie Evers-Williams to show support of Initiative 55, which calls for the removal of the Confederate battle emblem from the State of Mississippi’s flag.

    Standing from left on the steps of the Mississippi State Capitol during a rally following the One Flag for All March are, South Carolina State Rep. Jenny Horne, civil rights activist Myrlie Evers-Williams, rapper David Banner, and Mississippi activist Sharron Brown.

    Standing from left on the steps of the Mississippi State Capitol during a rally following the One Flag for All March are, South Carolina State Rep. Jenny Horne, Civil Rights Activist Myrlie Evers-Williams, Former SU SGA President & Rapper David Banner and Sharron Brown.

    The march began at the intersection of J.R. Lynch and Rose Street and ended at the steps on the south side of the Mississippi State Capitol, where the rally lasted from 3:40 p.m. to 5 p.m.

    “We shouldn’t have a flag that represents a bad time in our history,” said Sharron Brown, who proposed Initiative 55 to the Mississippi legislature which would force a constitutional amendment to change the flag. Brown has started collecting signatures for the initiative, and she said she is hoping to see it on the state’s ballot in 2018.

    The students traveled from Baton Rouge with Southern University Ag Center’s assistant area agent Nicolette Gordon, youth coordinator Toni Melton, and St. Helena College & Career Academy’s civics teacher Idella Smith.

    Submitted by the Southern University Ag Center

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Ancona’s delivers quality meat, service for 57 years

    There is a banner hanging on the wall of Ancona’s Stop & Save Inc. that reads, “50th Anniversary Reunion and Block Party. Music by D. J. Sammy the Entertainer. Celebrating 50 years of service to the community. Same Location – 2nd Generation Owners”.

    The banner is dated 2008 and even today, the Italian, family-owned and operated business is celebrating its success.

    Herald as one of the best meat markets in the city, Ancona’s opened its doors in 1958.

    The corner store has been at 2705 North Street where the Ancona family–Roy Sr., Frank, Luke, and Johnny–has developed a successful food business by accommodating thousands of customers who pour into the store monthly for staple groceries, meats, and hot lunches.

    The Italian descendents were raised on 29th Street and Easy Street in Easy Town and embedded with a very rich culture and legacy. The family siblings–a total of 11–played sports on the sole gravel road: North Street where the business now stands. The store grew under the vision of Roy Ancona Sr and is now under the management of the Ancona children, Mark and Roy Jr.

    FAMILY HISTORY
    Frank Ancona attended Louisiana State University majoring in chemical engineering and worked at Exxon for several years and as a math instructor at the St.Paul Adult Learning Cente.

    Roy Ancona Jr. attended Southeastern University and has owned the store since 1996. He started working in the store at the age of six years old bagging in the meat market and has been involved in the family store since that time. Roy Jr. said he is very proud of the family achievements and takes great pride in being one of the business managers.

    Mark Ancona was a part of the Submarine Corps Group and lived in Hawaii for many years. While in the military service, “many recognized and identified the Ancona name as relationship and being located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana,” Mark said. In 1966, he bagged groceries and worked with his father and was paid fifty cents an hour. He attended St. Thomas Moore, Catholic High School, and Broadmoor High School. He was employed with Louis Mechanical Plumbing, Lanehart Paint Company, and stated a lawn company before joining the military.

    In 1995, Robbie Ancona provided support to Mark and Roy to buid the business before relocating to Lexington, Kentucky.

    Another legacy of the family is also Vince Ancona, oldest brother who owned and operated a grocery store in the Baton Rouge Community during the time of World War II.

    ANCONA’S OFFERING
    Ancona’s community store includes groceries, hot deli, a meat market, breakfast and lunch plates, ,oney orders, and check cashing services. It is an establishment that welcomes the Baton Rouge community residents and other outline areas. The doors are opened and it is in an excellent location. Major businesses including Benny’s Cafe, Cafe Express, and the Match Box, continuously purchase meat specials from Ancona’s.
    “Business is good,” the owners said,  “Thanks the Baton Rouge Community for continued support and efforts in allowing the doors to stay open and for many others to follow.”

    By Mada McDonald
    Community Reporter

    Read more »
  • ,

    Set in Louisiana, ‘Sugar’ is a vivid read for youth

    In Jewel Parker Rhodes’ novel, Sugar, 10-year-old Sugar is adventurous and brave. In this book, you go through her expeditions and the ups and down. Even having a forbidden friend, Billy (the white plantation owner’s son), Sugar is careful about what she does. When Billy tells her about the China men who were coming to River Road Plantation to work with them, she becomes more curious about the world. When they arrive, she goes over to their sacks to greet them and share stories from their country. Having her mother die and her best friend move north, Sugar is accepted into the Beals’ family and becomes friends with the Chinese family. When the plantation owner Mr. Wills fired the overseer he got revenge and burned the mill. Mr. Wills had no choice but to sell River Road. The big lessons of Ms. Parker Rhodes’ book, Sugar, is too never be afraid to overcome every obstacle and to allow nothing to interfere with your friendship, not even race.BuytheBook

    This book review submitted by a Glen Oaks Park Elementary student. To send your review, email news@thedrumnewspaper.info

    Read more »
  • ,

    Southeast Regional Biblical Institute (SRBI)

    The Baton Rouge community has another opportunity to study God’s word and prepare ministers and laypersons for the work of ministry. The 2015 Fall Semester class for first term at Southeast Regional Biblical Institute, at 185 Eddie Robinson Sr Dr., will begin on August 17, at 6 pm.

    This diploma program is through Samford Ministry Training Institute, Birmingham, Alabama. The student will earn the Biblical Studies diploma after the completion of 6 classes of concentration in Biblical Studies plus an additional four classes of electives chosen by the student. This Diploma Program of biblical and theological education is being offered to ministers and laypersons. This Extension Institute has been designed for persons who want to improve their biblical and theological knowledge. This Institute will further prepare men and women for ministry. ALL interested persons, with or without college degrees are invited to participate. The courses will be taught by seminary trained instructors and experienced pastors.

    ONLINE: www.srbi-br.org

    For more information, contact: Dr. Mary W. Moss, Director of The Southeast Regional Institute at (225) 772-0307 or email-pastormoss@att.net or Thelma Jones,
    tjones1972@cox.net.

    By Community News Submission

    Read more »
  • ,,,,

    Family walks and 3,100 petition for justice

    Friends and Family of Lamar Johnson holds “Walk for Justice” in Downtown Baton Rouge

    On Monday, July 6, the family and friends of Lamar Alexander Johnson, led a peaceful protest in downtown Baton Rouge in response to the controversy surrounding Johnson’s death while in police custody.

    The 27-year-old’s death has sparked controversy about the series of events that led to his passing while being held at the East Baton Rouge Parish Prison.

    Friends and Family of Lamar Johnson to “Walk for Justice” in Downtown Baton Rouge. (From Facebook page)[/caption]While the East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office has claimed Johnson hung himself from his isolated jail cell, Johnson’s family and friends have insisted that this could not have been the case, especially considering Johnson believed he was being held for minor offense.

    IMG_2404Johnson, a father of three who was engaged to be married, was arrested on May 26 after an officer pulled him over for a window tint violation. According to the family, Johnson admitted to the officer that he had an outstanding 2011 warrant for what he believed, at the time, was a failure to appear for a traffic violation. On May 30, when the family tried to inquire about Johnson’s status, they were informed he was in the hospital, after prison officials said they discovered him hanging from his bed sheet in his cell. Johnson’s family said Lamar had no history of mental illness or depression.

    “Throughout the process, I stayed in touch with my son,” said Linda Johnson Franks, Lamar Johnson’s mother. “He kept assuring me that this was small potatoes and he’d either serve a few days or figure out how to pay whatever fines might be levied. This wouldn’t make sense in any situation, but especially if you knew Lamar. No way.”

    Johnson passed away on Sunday, June 10 from a total brain injury due to lack of oxygen.

    Friends and Family of Lamar Johnson to “Walk for Justice” in Downtown Baton Rouge. (From Facebook page)

    Friends and Family of Lamar Johnson to “Walk for Justice” in Downtown Baton Rouge. (From Facebook page)

    While the EBRSO said it conducted an internal review of the incident that confirmed their original story, the family has called for EBR city-parish officials to sanction an “uninterested, third-party investigation” into the series of events that led to Johnson’s injury. An online, Change.org petition started late last week calling for the same had 3,078 signatures at the time of this story.

    “We’re not making any accusations, we just want answers,” said Karl Franks, Lamar’s father. “And to get them, the investigated shouldn’t be conducting the investigation. That’s just common sense.”

    ONLINE: Change.org
    TWITTER: #JusticeforLamar
    FACEBOOK:https://www.facebook.com/pages/Justice-for-Lamar-Johnson/1116391165045014?fref=ts

    Read more »
  • ,

    Urban Ag Farm opens for tours

    The Southern University Ag Center’s Sustainable Urban Agriculture Demonstration Farm has launched its farm tours. The show-and-tell garden provides information on vegetable varieties, planting instruction, composting techniques, and other relevant information. The farm tours will be available throughout the year.  To schedule a tour, please contact Dawn Mellion-Patin or Zanetta Augustine at the SU Ag Center by calling 225-771-2242.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    COMMENTARY: When different is the same in EBR schools

    Our Schools Our Excellence, an initiative of MetroMorphosis, which the Rev. Raymond Jetson created in Baton Rouge, is a great example of a different approach to addressing the educational needs of our children. The initiative was founded on the principle that every child deserves an excellent education.

    Sadly, every child is not getting an excellent education. Students within the same school districts-even students in the same building-are not receiving an excellent education. This is especially the case in magnet and charter schools in districts where many of the traditional public schools are considered “failing.”

    In the East Baton Rouge School District, most of the majority minority schools in North Baton Rouge are considered failing. At the same time, new charter schools are cropping up across the parish. There is a highly sought after magnet school, Baton Rouge Magnet High School, in the district that is popular, in part, because of the many advanced placement course offerings. The school is 38 percent White and about 43 percent Black. About 34% of students receive free or reduced lunch. The school district is about 45 precent Black and over 80 percent of students qualified for free or reduced lunch as if October 2014, before recent changes making all students in the district eligible.

    Another magnet school, Lee High Magnet School, which is in year two of transiting from a failed traditional public school to a magnet school, is increasing in popularity because of a focus on science, engineering, and math, and dual enrollment courses with the state’s flagship institution, among other reasons. Traditional public schools either offer no such classes or dual enrollment classes with Baton Rouge Community College.

    As Lee High Magnet continues to transition, many minority students who survived the turbulent first year may get to the mountain top, but seeing the promised land is doubtful. They are in a “different” situation than many in their cohort who were ill-prepared to maintain the required grade point average and were ultimately sentenced to serving out the remainder of their high school careers in failing neighborhood schools. The students who survived will not have access to all the promised technological changes, internships, additional course offerings, etc. as these will be phased in for new cohorts. For example, new cohorts are scheduled to enjoy Chrome Books with e-versions of all required textbooks and older cohorts will continue to haul around heavy and costly textbooks in new aged buildings that don’t have lockers or desks where books can be stored.

    EBR schools are not alone in these regards. Administrators of magnet and charter schools in districts with “failing” schools across the country apparently read from the same script, which requires the repeated use of the term, “different.” Magnet and charter schools, the administrators often contend, will have “different” curriculum, or produce “different” results, when compared with traditional public schools, when in fact, many of these schools represent more of the “same.”

    The schools represent the perpetuation of an unjust system that privileges some people, and is at the same time a continued source of misery and despair for others, especially people of color and the poor. The celebration of “difference” is in many ways an indictment of the quality of education available to communities of color and the poor. It is also an acknowledgement of the existence of a two-tiered system, which prepares some for success and citizenship while simultaneously reminding others of their place in a social institution, and in the broader society, that perpetuates inequality all the while extolling the virtues of fairness and justice.

    It’s time to take off the blindfolds and throw out the pacifier that is privilege.

    According to these administrators of choice schools, considered by some the mouthpieces of a misguided movement to use public schools as a profit generating machine, parents with children in their schools should feel grateful that their children have the opportunity to enjoy a “different” academic experience. On the contrary, parents, community leaders, school administrators, teachers, elected officials, etc. everywhere should all feel the “same” moral outrage. Our Schools Our Excellence got it right. “Every” child deserves an excellent education and no one should turn a blind eye to the injustices that are preventing the initiative’s rallying cry from becoming a reality.

    Lori Martin, Ph.D.

    Lori Martin, Ph.D.

    By Lori Latrice Martin
    Guest Columnist


    Lori Latrice Martin, Ph.D., is associate professor of sociology and African American Studies. She is the author of Big Box Schools: Race, Education, and the Danger of the Wal-Martization of Public Schools in America.

    Read more »
  • ,

    Month with Mada: Awards luncheon, golf tournament, lawyers’ gala

    The Gloryland Educational Resource Center, Incorporated, will host the 10th Year Anniversary “A Decade of Service”  Awards Luncheon, Saturday, June 6, at Boudreaux’s, 2647 Government Street.

    Warren Drake, the newly appointed superintendent of the East Baton Rouge Parish School System. 

    The Resource Center concentrates on five programs:  Filling The G.A. P. (Gloryland After-School Program); Operation R.E.A.C.H. Summer Enhancement Program; Balm in Gilead Health and Wellness Educational Program; Food Pantry and Clothes Closet; and the Scholastic Scholarships Program. Scholarship recipients, scholastic achievers, graduates and the community service award to Amerigroup and Demetria Perkins for volunteer service will be recognized during the noon luncheon.

    Tickets are available for a donation of $25 per person (tax deductible).  For information, contact Gloryland Baptist Church at (225) 356 – 0577.

    The Capitol City Golf Association will observe its 50th Annual Capitol City Golf Association Amateur Open Tournament to be held June 13-14.  It will be held at the Copper Mill Golf Course in Zachary, Louisiana. Approximately, 120 golfers from Louisiana, Alabama, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi and Florida are expected to participate.  Members of CCGA over many years has provided an array of golf activities.  CCGA concentrates on providing opportunities to help youth play and understand golf tips and techniques and reinforce life skills as well as mastering educational experiences.

    One major accomplishment for 2015 is to support the First Tee of East Baton Rouge Parish and the Melrose Elementary mentoring and assistance project.  There have been other community based charitable projects as approved by the CCGA Board of Directors.  The CCGA was established in 1961 and the legacy of the CCGA was founded and organized by Coach Larney Owens.

    The association is a chartered non-profit corporation.  In recognition of the 50th Anniversary, CCGA will appreciate any support from corporate sponsors, sponsor a hold and/or initiate merchandise for prizes to be given away at the tournament.  The Capitol City Golf Association invites the Baton Rouge Community to come and be a part of this endeavor and offer any assistance for our youth related to positive golf activities.

    During the Greater Baton Rouge Chapter of the Louis A. Martinet Legal Society Annual Scholarship Gala held Friday, April 17, Donna M. Lee, Esq., of the Louisiana First Circuit Court of Appeal presented the Martinet Southern University Law Center Scholarship to Lillian Williams, the Martinet Paul M. Hebert Law Center, LSU Scholarship  to Andrew Hairston, and the Martinet High School Scholarship to Cameron Murray of Catholic High School. Rolando R. Urbina, Esq., presented the A. P. Tureaud Award to Southeast Louisiana Legal Services, the Dutch Morial Award to Kean Miller, LLP, and the Lifetime Achievement Award to attorney Johnnie A. Jones Sr.  Quintillia K. Lawrence, commissioner, 19th Judicial District Court conducted the swearing in of the society’s president Rolando Urbina, 1st vice-president Tayla Bergeron, 2nd vice-president Carlton Miller, treasurer Lykisha Vaughn, secretary Ashley Greenhouse, and immediate past president Christopher Hebert.  About 300 people attended the festive gala. ONLINE: http://www.louismartinetbr.com/

    By Mada McDonald
    Drum Columnist

    The Month with Mada column shares commentary on community and current events compiled by Mada McDonald, a public relations professional and community activist in Baton Rouge. Leave your comments below.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Community Meeting Snap Shots

    Share photos from your recent community meeting with The Drum readers. Email photos and cutlines to news@thedrumnewspaper.info or submit your photos online.   The Southern University Ag Center recently held an official ribbon cutting ceremony for the Sustainable Ag Urban Demonstration Farm located on the Baton Rouge campus, March 19. Two local schools attended  along with […]

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    ER closure creates ‘Jindal Death Zone’

    Baton Rouge legislators and citizens gathered on the steps of the capitol regarding the proposed closure of the Baton Rouge General Mid-city  Hospital Emergency Room.   Almost before the diverse crowd could finish saying “amen” for Victory and Power Ministries Pastor Ralph Moore’s invocation, Senator Yvonne Dorsey-Colomb was at the  mike laying out the problem with closing the only emergency facility for people in the heart of the city pointing out if you work downtown, live or work for Exxon  or business in the chemical corridor you are in a “Jindel Death Zone”.  The District 14 democrat called the plan to shut down the last critical care facility in central Baton Rouge “bad government”.  “We know that if Mr. Jindal gets sick he has a helicopter at his disposal,” Dorsey-Colomb said.

    Republican Governor Bobby Jindal  has refused Medicare Expansion causing millions to be without insurance coverage. One colleague of then legislator Bobby Jindal reminded those present at the rally that he had helped push LaCHIP through in 1998. It is a Medicaid expansion program for children.

    State Representative Edward “Ted” James was on hand for what he considers and emergency situation.  The lawyer and McKinley High School grad wishes Earl K. Long had not been shut down before he was elected to office.  The District 101 representative says he wants to work to help fix this problem.

    Senator Yvonne Dorsey-Colomb calls the center of Baton Rouge a "Jindal Death Zone" with the proposed closure of the last critical care emergency room in the area. Photo by Stephanie Anthony

    Senator Yvonne Dorsey-Colomb calls the center of Baton Rouge a “Jindal Death Zone” with the proposed closure of the last critical care emergency room in the area. Photo by Stephanie Anthony

    Father Richard R. Andrus pastor of Saint Paul Catholic Church told the crowd, “the Gospel demands justice”. He also said that in the case of heart attack or a stroke every moment counts. “Our Lives Matter!,” Andrus said.

    Senator Sharon Weston Broome served as moderator of the rally and although the Baton Rouge delegation has not thus far been included in the conversations for solutions they have made individual suggestions including having major corporations like Exxon donate annually to the General.  Another suggestion was to readjust  the state contribution to the B.R. General emergency room to be on par with its contribution to Our Lady of the Lake Regional ME=edical Center.  A stop gap suggestion was to extend the shutdown date beyond 60 days. Several participants suggested that all urgent care clinics operate 24 hours a day until the crises is over.  Most agreed the best long term solution was to have Go. Jindal accept the federal Medicaid expansion.

    By Stephanie Anthony
    LDPnews

    Feature Image: Student activist Blair Brown holds sign with a question at the February 11, 2015 rally at the Capitol regarding the closing of the Baton Rouge General Hospital Emergency Room. photos by Stephanie Anthony

    Read more »
  • Baton Rouge Chapter of The Links celebrates 50 years

    The Baton Rouge Chapter of The Links, Incorporated continued its year-long celebration marking 50 years of friendship and service to the Baton Rouge community with a social event for its members and their guests held on Sunday, November 2, 2014 at the home of Edmund and Terrie Sterling.
    Chartered on November 28, 1964, the Baton Rouge Chapter of The Links, Incorporated is committed to implementing programs that provide opportunities for community development in partnership with local, regional and national agencies. The accomplished and dedicated members are active in the community as role models, mentors, activists and volunteers who work toward ensuring that the name “Links” is not only a chain of friendship, but also a chain of purposeful service.
    During this 50th Anniversary year, the members have continued their history of service to the Baton Rouge community with the following service programs:
    Partnership with the ExxonMobil YMCA, sponsoring the Links Kids Zone
    The Childhood Obesity Initiative
    Links Rosebud Club, a youth mentoring program
    Links International Foreign Affairs & Business Empowerment for Youth
    Manna Givers at the Bishop Ott Homeless Shelter
    Louisiana Links Day at the Capitol, legislative advocacy program with 8 state Links’ chapters

    The Links, Incorporated, founded in 1946, is an international, women’s non-profit, social welfare and service organization. From its inception, the organization’s members have been developing and implementing programs that target issues affecting its members and communities. The Links, Inc. has a membership of more than 12, 000 women in 276 chapters in 41 states, the District of Columbia, and the Bahamas. Community service has been the cornerstone of the organization’s outreach with members contributing more than 500,000 documented service hours annually – strengthening their communities and enhancing the nation. The Links, Incorporated has been internationally known for its programs that are focused on topics such as health, economics, education, youth and policy efforts. Through its philanthropic arm, The Links Foundation, Incorporated, has contributed more than $25 million to charitable causes since its founding.
    ONLINE:
    www.brlinksinc.org

    Read more »
  • ,

    CADAV crowns Miss Banks

    Community Against Drugs and Violence hosted its 19th annual Miss Banks Holiday Pageant.

    In front of a crowd of 100 at the new North Banks Middle School, formerly Banks Elementary, Dashira Raby, Amirah Montgomery and Jacquell Hoyt were crowned Ms. Banks, Ms. Banks Jr and Little Ms. Banks.

    The judging and tallying consisted of a three part scoring. The girls were scored on: sportswear, dress wear, and their response to the essay topic “What I like about my neighborhood and what I would like to do to make a change.”

    This judges were Janae Boothe, former Ms. Louisiana. Evelyn Bickham, Monica Bertrand, Helen Toliver Isaiah Marshall.  Photos were compliments of Eric Singleton. Mascot, Bailey Monet Galloway.

    State Rep Regian Barrow, Ms Jr Banks, Amirah Montgomery. Ms. Banks Dayshira Raby, Little Ms banks Jacquell Hoyt and Pat McCallister-LeDuff, President

    State Rep Regian Barrow, Ms Jr Banks, Amirah Montgomery. Ms. Banks Dayshira Raby, Little Ms banks Jacquell Hoyt and Pat McCallister-LeDuff, President

    Ms. Banks 2012 – 2013, Ciera Fogan, crowned this years winners and Cash prizes were awarded to each of the winners.

    2014 Miss Banks Competitors
    2014 Miss Banks Competitors

     

    Read more »
Back to Top
Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com