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    Local campers visit Baton Rouge City Hall, Mayor Broome

    2018 Camp U. N. I. T. E. D. participants visiting Baton Rouge City Hall and Mayor Sharon Weston Broome.  Standing on bottom row from left to right: Kayleigh Tran and Heaven Adams; Second row left to right:  McKenzie Milton and Madison Lathers; Third row left to right:  Aarionna Barg, Tyra Porter, and Haven Franklin (Teen Volunteer);  Fourth row left to right:  Brooke Butler, Nyrielle Davis, and Adelay Smith.

    2018 Camp U. N. I. T. E. D. participants visiting Baton Rouge City Hall and Mayor Sharon Weston Broome. Standing on bottom row from left to right: Kayleigh Tran and Heaven Adams; Second row left to right: McKenzie Milton and Madison Lathers; Third row left to right: Aarionna Barg, Tyra Porter, and Haven Franklin (Teen Volunteer); Fourth row left to right: Brooke Butler, Nyrielle Davis, and Adelay Smith.

    Several local campers spend a summertime of learning and fun by participating in a local program called, Camp U.N.I.T.E.D. over the past few weeks. Camp U. N. I. T. E. D. (Uplifted, Nurtured, and Inspired Together Each Day), they had the opportunity to participate in daily workshops that focused on leadership development, healthy nutrition and body image, time management skills, communication skills, internet safety, and community/public service.  The girls’ primary focus was on the three paths to empowerment as they start their journey into middle school.  Their unique journeys began with discovering their individual personal power or the power within.  Then, they moved to the power of team or the power of reaching across to work with others.  The final path was the power of community/public service or the power of reaching out.  The highlights of their camp were a 90 minute SKYPE session with girls their age in Migosi, Kenya, Africa and a field trip to City Hall to meet with Mayor Sharon Weston Broome, Councilwoman Tara Wicker, and Councilman Chandler Loupe.  Each girl received a certificate of commendation signed by Mayor Broome and was also given the opportunity to visit the new Metro-Council chambers where they were allowed to participate in a mock Metro-Council meeting.  These girls have experienced a unique summer filled with awesome opportunities.

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    NAACP honors Stewart with Cobb Award

    On July 16, Louisiana Center for Health Equity President Alma C. Stewart received the NAACP Dr. William Montague Cobb Award “For her outstanding efforts to advance health policy, health advocacy, and social justice in the State of Louisiana.” The award was presented at the NAACP Annual Convention in San Antonio. This award is given annually in recognition of the legacy of Dr. William Montague Cobb, who served as the President of the NAACP from 1976 to 1983, to honor individuals and organizations that have made a significant impact in the field of health.

    Stewart has served as the state health committee chair for the Louisiana State Conference of the NAACP since 2014. She also organized the statewide, multi-year Campaign for Healthcare for Everyone Louisiana in 2013. The goal of this campaign was to advocate for statewide policy change and build grassroots momentum to implement Medicaid expansion by 2016.

    In an effort to address Louisiana’s high rate of uninsured adults, keeping the Louisiana State Conference of the NAACP and HCEL partner organizations engaged, over the course of three years Stewart organized public testimony at legislative hearings, rallies, press conferences and prayer vigils under the mantra of “Dying for Coverage” as part of a movement to bring attention to this issue on a state and national level. HCEL was successful in shaping public opinion about Medicaid expansion which polls favorably in Louisiana despite cascading contributions from well-financed conservative out-of-state organizations that have opposed it. She coordinated the hosting and production of a gubernatorial candidate forum on healthcare that was televised and livestreamed across the state in 2015. Alma has personally penned numerous articles and delivered countless speeches and presentations.

    On January 12, 2016, Governor John Bel Edwards signed an executive order expanding Medicaid in Louisiana on his first day in office making Louisiana the first state in the Deep South to expand Medicaid. Not only was this a win for Stewart and her organization, the Louisiana State Conference of the NAACP and others, but also for the hundreds of thousands of people who gained health insurance when this law went into effect on July 1, 2016. “Many of the more than 470,180 Louisiana citizens who now have health insurance coverage, in rural and urban areas, under the Medicaid expansion are doing so for the first time, and are receiving preventive care, early diagnosis and treatment for cancer, diabetes, mental health conditions, and addictions. Early diagnosis and access to care both help reduce costs to the state and the healthcare system,” said Stewart.

    The infusion of federal dollars for Medicaid expansion created and supported 19,200 jobs that have brought in state and local tax receipts of $103 million and $74.6 million, respectively, according to a March 2018 report by the Louisiana State University’s Public Administration Institute. Medicaid expansion saved the state $199 million in fiscal year 2017, according to a 2017 report from the Louisiana Department of Health. The reasons include the state spending match is lower under Medicaid expansion than it was before, both for most Medicaid populations and for supplemental payments to hospitals. The decrease in the uninsured population has also reduced “disproportionate share payments” to hospitals for people without coverage who receive treatment.

    “Medicaid expansion has benefitted Louisiana in several ways and there is growing evidence to support the fact that it is working. Moreover, it is saving lives. That’s why the NAACP Dr. William Montague Cobb Award means so much to me,” said Stewart.

    About Louisiana Center for Health Equity

    Louisiana Center for Health Equity which is a statewide 501(c) (3) tax-exempt organization, dedicated to the mission of addressing health and healthcare disparities, and fostering health equity in Louisiana. Founded in January 2010, the organization has partnered with over forty other Louisiana organizations on a state, local and national level to eliminate health disparities caused by poverty, lack of access to quality health care, and unhealthy environmental conditions.

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    COMMUNITY EVENT: Virginia College Back to School Event, August 2

    Virginia College in Baton Rouge will host a Back to School Event for the community Thursday, Aug. 2 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the campus located at 9501 Cortana Place. The event is free and open to the public and will feature refreshments and candy for kids, a spelling bee, photobooth, campus tours, a scavenger hunt, backpack and school supply giveaways while supplies last and more. Additionally, attendees 18 and older can enter to win gift cards and other prizes.

    The event will also allow attendees to explore programs offered through Virginia College, including: Business Administration, Culinary Arts, Medical Assistant, Medical Office Specialist, Network Support Technician, Network and System Administration, Electrical Technician, HVAC-R Technician, Pastry Arts, Pharmacy Technician and Surgical Technology.

    WHAT: Virginia College Back to School Event
    WHEN: Thursday, Aug. 2 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    WHERE: Virginia College in Baton Rouge – 9501 Cortana Place, Baton Rouge, LA 70815
    PHONE: (225) 236-3900

    “With the start of a new school year comes a great deal of excitement and anticipation, promise and possibility,” says Campus President Joe Dalto. “No matter your age or stage of life, we want to celebrate education and the aspirations of all members of our community. We invite everyone to come by our Back to School Event and say hello, and for those interested in pursuing a new career, talk with a member of our staff about the fast and focused career training we offer at our campus.”

    The event is part of Virginia College parent company Education Corporation of America’s national Back to School Events being held at 62 other Virginia College, Brightwood Career Institute and Brightwood College locations throughout 17 states.

    ONLINE: vc.edu/batonrouge.

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    Slave cemetery video released

    As the River Road African American Museum approaches twenty five years of preserving the history of the formerly enslaved and their descendants in Louisiana’s sugarcane plantation country, one of the greatest accomplishments this year is a successful collaboration with SHELL Convent to protect the African burial grounds found near the Tezcuco refinery.

    Watch the video here.

    Submitted news

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    COMMUNITY EVENTS: Scotlandville Interfaith Community Health Fair, August 4

    The Scotlandville Interfaith Community Health Fair is scheduled for Saturday, August 4, 8am – 1pm at Camphor Memorial United Methodist Church located at 8742 Scenic Highway, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

    There will be a Faith Walk to begin the event at 8am.

    The Health Fair will promote preventive health care services, to bring about awareness to the services that are available and to assist people in making improved health decisions for their family. The fair will also provide healthful information and practices to the Scotlandville Community.

    The Scotlandville Interfaith Community Health Fair will include on site examinations, educational information, blood pressure checks; cancer awareness; cardiovascular-heart healthy tips; immunizations, mental health counseling; diabetes tests and consultation; cholesterol-glucose screening; foot examinations (podiatry); hearing screenings; nutrition consultations; oral health; prescription medication management; vision; and tobacco use dangers. There will be drawings for gift cards and door prizes.

    The Baton Rouge Community is invited to attend.

    Submitted by Mada McDonald

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    COMMENTARY: Medicare steps up its fight against diabetes

    Diabetes affects as many as one in four older adults with Medicare. It costs hundreds of billions of dollars to treat and results in the loss of tens of thousands of lives every year.

    If we could better control diabetes, we’d be taking a huge leap toward creating a healthier America.

    Diabetes occurs when your body doesn’t make enough insulin or doesn’t respond to the insulin it does make. Insulin is what your body uses to process sugar and turn it into energy.

    When too much sugar stays in your blood, it can lead to serious complications and even life-threatening problems, including heart disease, strokes and kidney damage.
    Medicare is committed to fighting the diabetes epidemic.

    If you’re on Medicare and at risk for diabetes, you’re covered for two blood sugar screenings each year at no out-of-pocket cost to you. Risk factors include high blood pressure, a history of abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride levels, obesity or a history of high blood sugar.

    If you’re diagnosed with diabetes, Medicare will help pay for blood sugar self-testing equipment and supplies, as well as insulin and other anti-diabetic drugs. In the event of diabetic foot disease, it will also help pay for therapeutic shoes or inserts as long as your podiatrist prescribes them.

    Because living with diabetes can pose day-to-day challenges, Medicare covers a program to teach you how to manage the disease. With a written order from your physician, you can sign up for training that includes tips for monitoring blood sugar, taking medication and eating healthy.

    If you’d like to learn more about how to control diabetes, visit Medicare’s website at www.medicare.gov or call Medicare’s 24/7 help line at 1-800-633-4227 and visit with a counselor.

    In addition to the 30 million Americans with diabetes, another 86 million live with a condition known as pre-diabetes, where blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis.

    Pre-diabetes is treatable. But only one in 10 people with the condition will even know they have it. Left untreated, one in three will develop the full-blown disease within several years.

    Confronted with those statistics, Medicare is ramping up its efforts to prevent diabetes among the millions of Medicare beneficiaries who are at a heightened risk of developing it.

    Several years ago, Medicare partnered with YMCAs nationwide to launch an initiative for patients with pre-diabetes. The pilot project showed that older people could lose weight through lifestyle counseling and regular meetings that stressed healthy eating habits and exercise.

    About half of the participants shed an average of 5 percent of their weight, which health authorities say is enough to substantially reduce the risk of full-blown diabetes. Through adopting a healthier lifestyle, people diagnosed with pre-diabetes can delay the onset of the disease.

    Based on the trial program’s encouraging results, Medicare is now expanding its coverage for diabetes prevention. Using the pilot project as a model, it will help pay for a counseling program aimed at improving beneficiaries’ nutrition, increasing their physical activity and reducing stress.

    If you have Medicare’s Part B medical insurance and are pre-diabetic, you’ll be able to enroll in a series of coaching sessions lasting one to two years and conducted by health care providers as well as community organizations like local senior centers. There will be no out-of-pocket cost.

    Medicare is currently recruiting partners to offer the program so that it will be widely available to beneficiaries.

    Diabetes can be a terribly debilitating disease. It can mean a lifetime of tests, injections and health challenges. Every five minutes in this country, 14 more adults are diagnosed with it. And in the same five minutes, two more people will die from diabetes-related causes.

    If we can prevent more diabetes cases before they even start, we can help people live longer and fuller lives, as well as save money across our health care system. 

    By Bob Moos
    Southwest public affairs officer
    U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

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    COMMENTARY: Death in a EBR parish prison–too common

    Death in a local jail is pretty rare unless you are housed in the East Baton Rouge Parish Prison. The disturbing part of that sentence is the unfiltered sad, truth that 25 people died in this prison between 2012 and 2016. And these deaths were known and not investigated by any independent entity. What should be the safest, most secure place in the parish is instead by all involved, an unacceptable, destabilized, broken system that doesn’t offer either public safety for the general public or those employed in or those exposed to this system. More than 25 individuals whose lives had meaning to God, their families and their friends deserve this situation to be addressed. Many claim it is too hard but nothing could be further from the truth.

    For those families able to muster the resources to get legal representation they can sue but what remains most frightening is the false narrative that continues to live that everyone housed in the East Baton Rouge Parish Prison is a hardened felon who has been convicted of a violent crime. The truth is that 89% of all individuals held in the East Baton Rouge Parish Prison have not been adjudicated. That is a fancy way of saying they haven’t been convicted of anything. Many people are incarcerated because of minor non-violent offenses and a very large percentage of those who cannot afford to make bail will plea not because they are guilty but because that is the only way for them to be released. We do indeed have an active and thriving debtors prison system.

    Some of the deaths were caused be purposeful cruelty such as inadequate basic protections such as socks and blankets. Some of the deaths were caused by policy and procedures that disrespected the most basic protocols for treating healthcare (including mental illness). Almost all the deaths to some degree were caused by the care and feeding of a mass incarceration industry that specifically requires bodies in the building to make payroll and profit. And none of these deaths should have occurred.

    On Thursday, July 19th family and friends gathered at the levee in downtown Baton Rouge for a vigil to call for action and recognition. These individuals deserved each of their deaths to have an independent investigation as a standard practice of law and policy. Each person who loses their freedom under the authority of the state still retains their right to be treated with dignity. And none of the individuals who died had been sentenced to the death penalty EXCEPT they did receive the death penalty. To learn more about changing the narrative please check out the East Baton Rouge Parish Prison Reform Coalition.

    Rev. Alexis Anderson
    PREACH
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana

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    Harris, first Black to walk in space, visits Baton Rouge

    On June 26, Dr. Bernard Harris, CEO of the National Math + Science Initiative (NMSI), visited Baton Rouge to kick off NMSI’s Laying the Foundation Teacher training at Woodlawn High School.  With ongoing support from ExxonMobil, the popular training program was recently expanded to an additional 400 teachers across the state, doubling the number of teachers from last year.  In addition to his role at NMSI, Dr. Harris is the founder of The Harris Foundation, a nonprofit organization that supports math and science education programs for America’s youth.  Harris worked at NASA for 10 years, where he conducted research in musculoskeletal physiology and disuse osteoporosis.  During his career at NASA, Harris became the first Black person to walk in space.  A veteran astronaut for more than 18 years, he has logged more than 438 hours and traveled more than 7.2 million miles in space.

    Dr. Bernard Harris talks with Summer STEM Lab campers .

    Dr. Bernard Harris talks with Summer STEM Lab campers .

    Dr. Bernard Harris autographs a space mural in North Baton Rouge at Kuttin’ Kornerz Barbershop.

    Dr. Bernard Harris autographs a space mural in North Baton Rouge at Kuttin’ Kornerz Barbershop.

    While in town, Dr. Harris joined ExxonMobil for a tour of the local community.  He interacted with North Baton Rouge students at Summer STEM Lab, a BREC summer camp designed to curb effects of summer learning loss and to increase interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics topics and careers.  Campers were inspired by Harris to realize their potential through problem solving skills learned in STEM courses.

    Dr. Bernard Harris New Orleans artist, Lionel Milton, at Kuttin’ Kornerz Barbershop stand in front of a space-themed mural in North Baton Rouge.

    Dr. Bernard Harris New Orleans artist, Lionel Milton, at Kuttin’ Kornerz Barbershop stand in front of a space-themed mural in North Baton Rouge.

    Following the camp visit, he autographed a space-themed wall mural painted by New Orleans artist, Lionel Milton, at Kuttin’ Kornerz Barbershop.  He wrapped up his tour of Baton Rouge at Knock Knock Children’s Museum where he participated in space related pop-up activities with museum guests.

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    Jordan joins Urban Congress on African American Males

    The Urban Congress on African American Males welcomes James “Jay” Jordan who is currently interning with the organization. He is a second-year student pursuing his doctorate in LSU’s Sociology Department. His research interests include: African-American self-government, food security education, and community supported agriculture. Before moving to Baton Rouge, James led an organic gardening program at an elementary school in San Francisco. After falling in love with this work, he moved to Baton Rouge to create child-centered gardening programs and to study the benefits that they offer to people living in food deserts. Given his passion for teaching young children lessons associated with their health and happiness, James will be supporting Urban Congress Goal #3: Expand the number of African American boys entering kindergarten who are ready to learn and who are able to advance annually at or above their grade level. Jordan said he’s very grateful to have the opportunity to work with the Urban Congress because it enables him to join forces with people who are committed to empowering the marginalized citizens of Baton Rouge.

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    Son shares father’s legacy of Cook’s Theatre

    The North Baton Rouge Blue Ribbon Commission hosted “Meet and Greet with Dr. James Cook Jr., son of Cook’s Theatre founder, the late James Cook Sr.​, at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Scotlandville, June 10.
    Dr. Cook, a cardiologist in Medford, Oregon, discussed the history of his family, local community, and the theatre business. According to Councilwoman Chauna Banks, the event “brought back great memories of Cook’s Theatre and the legendary entrepreneurial spirit that was alive and well in the Scotlandville community.”
    Submitted by Rachel Emmanuel Ph.D.
    Feature photograph is of Myrtly Ricard, Lyle Mouton, Natalie Ricard, and Dr. James Cook
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    Congressional Black Caucus speaks out on immigration bills, family separation

    The Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) – led by CBC Chair Cedric L. Richmond (D-LA-02) and the CBC Immigration Task Force Chair Yvette D. Clarke (D-NY-09) – released the following statement on two immigration bills that House Republicans are trying to pass this week, the Securing America’s Future Act and the Border Security and Immigration Reform Act.

    “Make no mistake about it, both of these bills – the Securing America’s Future Act and the Border Security and Immigration Reform Act – are extreme measures that seek to allow Republicans to avoid responsibility in an election year for a crisis that they themselves created, rather than actually bringing justice to the more than 1.5 million DREAMers who have been waiting for years for Congress to act.

    “Both bills would allocate billions of dollars to an unnecessary and ineffective border wall, rather than opening our borders and hearts to immigrants.

    “Both bills are an attack on immigrant families that would limit, if not completely eliminate, key family reunification policies, including sponsorships for married family members. In addition, children would still be able to be separated from their parents, or else forcibly detained with them for an indefinite period as many of them were over Father’s Day weekend. Uniting families strengthens communities, which is something the party of family values should support.

    “In addition, by threatening to end the Diversity Immigrant Visa Program, a program whose recipients are typically from Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean, both bills seek to keep black and brown immigrants out of this country, even though recipients are required to have a high school diploma and pass a thorough background check.

    “Finally, both bills don’t have any Democratic support because Republicans chose to ditch the bipartisan approach to immigration that the House was taking until last week.

    “The most famous line from the poem mounted on the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty says, ‘Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.’ It is in that spirit that the Congressional Black Caucus will continue to do all that we can to prevent these inhumane and unjust bills from becoming law.”

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    The Congressional Black Caucus was established in 1971 and has a historic 48 members for the 115th Congress, including one Republican member and two senators. Congressman Cedric L. Richmond (D-LA-02) is the chairman of the caucus.

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    DrumCall: Our history is not something can just be cast aside.

    Black history, our history, matters. Yet the College Board, the massive non-profit that administers Advanced Placement (AP) classes, is in the process of removing Black and Brown history from their AP World History course – a course taken by millions of students every year.1

    Under new changes announced by the College Board, the AP World History course will no longer cover material prior to 1450—approximately the beginning of European colonialism. This alteration effectively erases the pre-colonial history of people of color from Africa, Asia, the Americas and the Middle East. Instead of being one of the few opportunities for students across the country to learn about diverse histories and perspectives, the course will now reinforce the false centrality of white European colonialism in history.

    Our history is not something can just be cast aside. But because of mounting pressure from students and teachers across the country to challenge the College Board’s decision we have a chance to make sure that it is not. The College Board has stated they are willing to reexamine their decision, but have not committed to any concrete changes, so we need to push for a full reinstatement of this content and a commitment to promote Black and Brown histories throughout their AP courses.

    Save Black history. Tell the College Board to keep Black history in their courses.

    These changes to the AP World History course matter. We live in a country where the people in power tell Black and Brown students every day that their history and their lives don’t matter.2 A just history curriculum may be the only place where these students are exposed to histories beyond that of white Europeans.

    In the past couple of years we’ve seen sustained efforts to erase Black and Brown histories from school curriculum. In Texas, the state school board pushed to downplay slavery as a cause of the Civil War and minimize the racial segregation of the Jim Crow era. Textbook publisher McGraw-Hill got caught calling African slaves “immigrants” and “workers.”3 Earlier this year, it was revealed that a far-right Koch Brothers backed group is offering free curriculum to budget strapped teachers, offering a revisionist version of slavery that paints it as a necessary evil to further freedom and democracy.4 And just this week, Michigan announced a proposed curriculum change that would eliminate references to the NAACP, scale down the importance of the civil rights movement and eliminate mentions of gay rights, Roe v. Wade, and climate change.5

    Our history is under constant attack, but because the College Board’s AP World History course is taught in thousands of schools to millions of students every year, the College Board plays a powerful role in setting de facto curriculum standards for all high school students. With this power, the College Board has the responsibility to ensure that students everywhere are exposed to histories beyond that of colonial Europeans and understand that the histories of Black and Brown people did not start when European colonists arrived in their lands.

    Demand the College Board keep Black and Brown histories in their AP World History course.

    What’s particularly cruel about the College Board’s decision to cut Black and Brown history from their AP course curriculum is that they are using it as an opportunity to push teachers to pay for their new and expensive “pre-AP courses” by offering to put the Black and Brown histories they removed into that course instead. But unlike the free curriculum for AP courses, pre-AP courses cost schools thousands of dollars a year effectively putting this content out of reach for most students.6

    All too often, the rich pre-colonial history of Africa, Asia, Americas and the Middle East is either erased or merely left as a footnote. For students of color, who rarely see themselves represented in high school courses, this erasure tells them that they do not matter. The College Board says that they are “dedicated to equity in education.” If they are dedicated to equitable education, then they must not play a role in erasing Black and Brown histories.

    Save Black history. Tell the College Board to keep Black history in their courses.

    Until justice is real, 

    –Brandi, Rashad, Arisha, Jade, Evan, Johnny, Future, Corina, Chad, Mary, Saréya, Eesha, Angela, Sam and the rest of the Color Of Change team

     References:

    “AP World History gets a makeover, and high school teachers rebel,” Politico, 11 June 2018 https://act.colorofchange.org/go/59248?t=9&akid=14668%2E2802358%2EPexbd2
    “Donald Trump Says ‘Our Ancestors Tamed a Continent’ and ‘We Are Not Going to Apologize for America’,” Newsweek, 25 May 2018 http://act.colorofchange.org/go/59249?t=11&akid=14668%2E2802358%2EPexbd2
    “Texas textbook calling slaves ‘immigrants’ to be changed, after mom’s complaint,” LA Times, 5 October 2015 http://act.colorofchange.org/go/59250?t=13&akid=14668%2E2802358%2EPexbd2
    “Millions of Students Are Quietly Being Taught the Koch Brothers’ Whitewashed Version of Black History,” The Root, 14 March 2018 https://act.colorofchange.org/go/59251?t=15&akid=14668%2E2802358%2EPexbd2
    “Proposed Michigan social studies standards erase references to gay rights, Roe v. Wade, and KKK ,” DetroitMetro Times, 12 June 2018 https://act.colorofchange.org/go/59252?t=17&akid=14668%2E2802358%2EPexbd2
    “Teachers Fight To Keep Pre-Colonial World History In AP Course,” Colorlines, 12 June 2018 https://act.colorofchange.org/go/59253?t=19&akid=14668%2E2802358%2EPexbd2

    Color Of Change is building a movement to elevate the voices of Black folks and our allies, and win real social and political change. Help keep our movement strong.

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    Historic independent police monitor bill heads to Governor’s desk

    The Louisiana House of Representatives unanimously passed legislation that recognizes the potential value for local law enforcement agencies of an independent police monitor.

    House Concurrent Resolution 98, sponsored by State Representative Marcus Hunter, D-Monroe, received final passage and heads to Gov. John bel Edwards’ desk for signature.

    The legislation provides responsibilities of an independent police monitor, recognizes the potential value for local law enforcement agencies of an independent police monitor, and encourages parish and municipal governing authorities to consider the advantages of such a position for its respective sheriff’s office or police department.

    Hunter presented the resolution on the house floor stating, “effective policing requires effective community support; policing is not done in a vacuum; if civilians are to be as safe as possible, they must work collaboratively with law enforcement officers and agencies, but if citizens come to perceive law enforcement officers to be as much of a threat to their safety as are criminals, the health of the community deteriorates rapidly.”

    Additionally, the resolution states, though citizens and local elected officials desire to hold sheriff’s deputies and municipal police officers to very high standards of integrity and service, many aspects of a law enforcement agency are unique to the law enforcement field. Special expertise is required to evaluate and improve internal practices, procedures, and culture. General management experts and local officials may not be in the best position to determine whether a particular department is fulfilling its duties in a way that meets such high standards; and an independent police monitor can fill that gap by combining law enforcement expertise with an outside-the-department perspective. Thereby playing a role that neither a member of the department nor a traditional government executive or inspector general can play.

    COMPLETE HCR 98

    This bill provides advisement and benefit of developing local police monitoring agencies to build trust and collaboration between law enforcement agencies and citizens. Cultivating agencies that strive for superior community service in every facet of life, including hiring and promotion, training, discipline, interagency cooperation and community outreach.

    By On Notice 4 Justice

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    Southern University wins in NIS national oral and poster competitions

    Southern University and A&M College was well represented by 30 undergraduate and 5 graduate students who participated in the 75th Joint Annual Meeting of the National Institute of Science and Beta Kappa Chi Scientific Honors Society, in Washington, DC.   This scientific conference, hosted by the University of the District of Columbia, aimed to provide young scientists the opportunity to disseminate their research findings and to network with students and peers of like minds.   This Diamond Anniversary Year represents the 75th one for the joint annual meetings of Beta Kappa Chi (BKX) and the National Institute of Science (NIS). Southern University students won several awards at the conference.

    Oral Presentations

    Irene Lewis   1st Place Agricultural Sciences undergraduate

    Kirstin Brooks 2nd Place Psychology undergraduate

    Gagandeep Kaur 1st Place Environmental Tox. graduate

    Poster Presentations

    Prathusha Bagam 1st Place Environmental Tox. graduate

    Demario Vallier 2nd Place Poster Biology graduate

    Students and faculty were elected to national offices as well.  Deadra James Mackie was elected as national executive secretary for the 18th year, student officer, Joenique Woods, was unanimously chosen as the Southcentral Regional Vice President for Beta Kappa Chi and secretary for the National Institute of Science.  Honors student, Ikea McKay, was elected president of the National Institute of Science and Darrell Harry was chosen as student secretary for Beta Kappa Chi Scientific Honor Society and Treasure for the National Institute of Sciences.  As expected, the Jaguar nation made an indelible mark on the conference.

    Beta Kappa Chi Honor Society was founded in Lincoln, Pennsylvania in 1921, and chartered in 1923.  BKX is a member of the certifying body, the National Association of College Honor Societies (www.achsnatl.org).

    Travel to this endeavor would not have been possible were it not for the financial support of the Dolores Margaret Richard Spikes Honors College and the Timbuktu Academy, both led by Diola Bagayoko, Ph.D., the Southern University Foundation, through the Office of Robert Easley, the College of Sciences and Engineering dean Patrick Carriere,Ph.D., and the Department of Biological Sciences.  Collective contributions from these units allowed the students to have scholarly and professional experiences. The students’ advisors were Eric Pugh, Deidra Atkins-Ball, Phyllis Okwan, and Deadra James Mackie. Bagayoko said “the Jaguar Nation is very proud of them for their intellectual and leadership accomplishments.”

     

    Pictured: (first row) Deadra J. Mackie, Dr. Deidra Atkins-Ball, Paige Mitchell, Wes Washington, Joenique Woods, Ashley Lewis, Irene Lewis, Eric Pugh, Chloe Washington, Tiara Johnson, Dr. Phyllis Okwan and Brandon Parker; (Second row) Terani Dillahunty, Kirstin Brooks, Kelvin Wells, Jacara Glover, Jonathan Sumbler, Ikea McKay Naila McCraney, Darrell Harry, Demario Vallier and Edgar Perez

     

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    AT&T Louisiana donation supports future coders in Mayor’s Summer Youth Employment Program

    Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome announced that AT&T Louisiana has contributed $40,000 to the Mayor’s Summer Youth Employment Program as part of AT&T Aspire, the company’s philanthropic initiative which drives innovation in education to promote student success in school and beyond.

    The contribution supports a four-week coding and web development course conducted by The Future’s Fund as a part of the Mayor’s Summer Youth Employment Program. The program will employ 250 young people and 50 of those students will participate in entrepreneurship, technology, and software development courses. This project-based learning environment promotes innovation and creativity to foster skills to meet the needs of the future workforce.

    “I’m grateful for AT&T’s continued dedication to improving access to educational opportunities through this generous contribution,” said Broome. “These STEM-based courses will give students a boost in learning more about the potential career opportunities ahead of them.”

    Sonia Perez, President of AT&T Louisiana, said, “Supporting education and workforce development efforts through contributions like this one to the Mayor’s Summer Youth Employment Program and the coding course conducted through the Future’s Fund is another important way that AT&T Louisiana puts a high priority on growing the economy of the future for the people of Louisiana.”

    AT&T invests in education and job training to create a skilled and diverse workforce that powers our company – and our country – for the future. Through the AT&T Aspire initiative, AT&T helps provide access to education and training people need to get and keep good jobs. Since 2008, AT&T has committed $400 million to programs to help millions of students in all 50 states and around the world. AT&T Aspire brings together the power of our network – our employees, our technology and organizations – to connect people to opportunities through education and job training.

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    Developmental Disabilities Council seeks public comment by June 11

    Public Comment Sought on Council’s 

    FFY 2019 Action Plan

    During its April meeting, the DD Council approved its  Action Plan for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2019 (October 2018 – September 2019).  Highlights of the Council’s Action Plan includes activities to support advocacy and self-advocate leaders; advocacy for adequate funding to ensure quality services are accessible statewide to people with unmet needs; advocacy for support structures for developing and implementing Individual Education Plans; training for people with developmental disabilities and their family members on sexuality, sexual abuse and exploitation; training and technical assistance to build the capacity of child care providers with including children with disabilities; and multiple initiatives designed to build capacity in both supported employment and customized employment, including mentoring in certification of Employment Support Professionals in Customized Employment.
    Comments on the Action Plan should be sent to Derek White at Derek.White@la.gov by June 11, 2018.
    Read more »
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    COMMENTARY: Bishop Curry’s message could’ve blended Malcolm X’s message that love equals self defense’

    Yesterday’s pomp-filled royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle was indeed a captivating, majestic, “heaven on earth” event. Despite the fact that it was held at the St. George church in Windsor, a vibrant American soul-stirring sermon on love stole the spotlight from the stars of the show. As millions of Americans witnessed history, the Most Reverend Bishop Michael Curry delivered a sermon that intertwined the power of love and the prophetic tradition.

    The first African-American Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church skillfully linked dynamic quotes of “The old slaves in the antebellum south who explained the dynamic power of love…,” “When love is the way , poverty will become history,” and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s quote, “We must discover the power of love , the redemptive power of love , and when we do that we will make of this old world a new world. For love is the only way.” The mentioning of Dr. King is what led me to write this opinion piece.

    Yesterday was also El Hajj Malik Shabazz’s birthday. Better known as Malcolm X, Shabazz was an African-American Muslim Minister who was an American icon who also preached the good news of love. He was a man who loved his people so much that he delivered a speech on Valentine ’s Day in 1965 at the Ford Auditorium in Detroit, Michigan after his house was firebombed the same day. America must begin to love the many contributions Malcolm X deposited into the spirit of the American narrative. After returning from his trip to Mecca, in this speech, he said, “And when I got back into this American society, I’m not in a society that practices brotherhood.” He also said, “Black people are victims of organized violence perpetuated upon us by the Klan, the Citizens Council and many other forms, we should defend ourselves.” His heart poured out much love when he mentions his observation of a Black woman in Selma, Alabama who was knocked down and dragged down the street while Black men just stood there.El Hajj Malik Shabazz Valentine

    He articulated love in another form: self-defense. His message was not of violence but of love or self-defense during a time of lynchings and brutal forces of discrimination terrorizing African-American communities. Even though he was an independent voter, if alive today he would probably join the ranks of those who staunchly support the second amendment of the United States constitution.

    Embarrassingly, in the year 2018, it is still considered by many Americans as a sign of heresy to openly quote the words of Malcolm X and this misguiding violent narrative of him must be revisited by all Americans. I’m pretty sure Bishop Curry thought of using a few quotes from perhaps another speech delivered by Malcolm X in honor of his birthday, but Curry probably knew he would have had to endure harsh consequences in the long run. I close by adjusting the closing words of Bishop Curry, “But if humanity ever captures the energy to love {Malcom X}, it will be a second time in history that we have discovered fire.”

    By Billy Washington
    Guest Columnist

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    COMMENTARY: Push for new constitution is suspicious

    A small group of apparently well-funded interest groups are pushing for a constitutional convention to draft a new constitution for the state of Louisiana. Lobbyists have been hired to promote the idea and rumors are circulating that big money will be spent on advertising and electing delegates to the convention. That’s enough to raise suspicions but there are more reasons to be concerned about a convention; primarily that the proponents, whether in the legislature or out, won’t say what the new constitution should contain. How better to sell an idea? Simply make it a vote for a blank slate and claim it’s the panacea for solving state budget problems without explaining how.

    The complaints about the current constitution made by the proponents of HB 500 (the legislative instrument needed to convene a convention) include that it is too long (because of amendments voted on by the people) and that it “locks up” too much state spending. Of course much of the spending that is locked up has nothing to do with the constitution. Mandated federal spending, contractual obligations, consent decrees, election costs and the like add up to billions. Moreover, the constitutionally dedicated fund that contains the real money is the K-12 education fund (the “MFP”) and most of the others are simply trust funds not dependent on yearly appropriations (Coastal Restoration, Rainy Day, various tobacco litigation funds) or have a dedicated funding source (D.O.T.D. funded by the gas tax) or are simply too small to matter. I haven’t heard any of my constituents screaming about the overfunding of public education or that our infrastructure is in great shape and thus we need to take money away from the Transportation Trust Fund. The proponents of HB 500 haven’t said such things either because if that’s what they’re after, it wouldn’t pass the legislature. So what do they want? Our homestead exemption? Our education funding? the prohibition against donations of public property? To eliminate the 2/3 vote required to raise taxes? Some suspect an effort to shift the tax burden to the middle class and simultaneously preserve tax breaks for special interests. We need some answers as to what these proponents of a new constitution actually want. Until we get some truthful answers the public should demand a no vote on HB 500.

    Sincerely,

    Jay Morris
    State Representative / District 14
    Monroe, La

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    Project Power Summer Camp opens registration for youth

    Applications are being accepted for the free American Diabetes Association’s Project Power Summer Camp at LSU’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge. The camp will be from June 11–15, 2018, and is free of charge for children (ages of 7 to 12) who are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes.

    For more information about the camp or to register a potential camper, please contact the American Diabetes Association office at 504-889-0278, extension 6078, or go online at www.diabetes.org/camppowerupbatonrouge. You can also contact Pennington Biomedical for more information at 225-763-2923.

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    South Baton Rouge Breast Cancer Walk and Health Fair start at 7am, May 19

    The Wall of Fame Committee, Councilwoman Tara Wicker, Susan G. Komen® Baton Rouge, State Rep. Patricia Smith, Sen. Yvonne Colomb, and other community groups and civic-minded individuals are hosting a community-wide breast cancer walk and health fair on Saturday, May 19, 2018, 7am—1pm at the Dr. Leo S. Butler Community Center, 950 East Washington Street.

    Woman’s Hospital and Mary Bird Perkins-Our Lady of the Lake Cancer Center will have mobile units on site for health screenings; and other valuable information and services will be available, as well as free t-shirts, conference bags and other exciting giveaways. Please help us to encourage strong participation in this important community event!

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    COMMENTARY: What about the grandparents raising children?

    According to the U.S. 2010 Census, there were more than 2.7 million households with grandparents raising their grandchildren. Census Bureau reported that 67,000 Louisiana grandparents are responsible for meeting the needs of grandchildren. The reasons why are varied.

    There are cases where the parents are unable to care for the children because of drug abuse. Or the parents themself are struggling financially and grandparents have stepped in to help raise the child. And sadly some are raising their grandchildren due to domestic violence. Many were not prepared to do this all over again as they enter retirement age.Believe it or not, some grandparents are still in the workforce.

    The toll taking on the role of parent can be great. Increased household expenses, mental stress of the realities of raising children again.Not to mention having the energy to keep the children involved in extracurricular activities.

    What is also not realized is the legal and financial realities. There are grandparents who go through the process of getting guardianship of their grandchildren or the parent will sign a power of attorney. Doing this will allow them to make more decisions for the children while the parent still retains parental rights.

    What about life insurance ?

    In the middle of raising grandchildren grandparents can easily overlook having life insurance coverage for themselves and the grandchildren. According to LIMRA 2016 Facts About Life, only 44 percent of U.S. households have individual life insurance. That includes the grandparents raising their children.

    Thankfully life insurance rates are not as expensive as some would have you to believe.For grandparents over 50 who do not have life insurance they have options available to them for coverage.In addition there are policies that will not require medical exams.

    One would be a final expense burial life insurance policy. These are small face whole life insurance policies that will take care of their final expenses. Another option would a guaranteed universal life policy. This policy acts like a cross between term and whole life insurance. The death benefit is guaranteed up to certain age, while the policy accumulates cash value. An option younger grandparents may like.

    Then finally we have term life insurance.A term policy will terminate after a set number of years up to 30. It will provide pure life insurance for a grandparent. However the price of term life insurance can be pricey for individuals in their late 50′s into the 60′s. Some policies have questions that will automatically decline older clients. In addition the amount of coverage allowable decreases around age 64.

    Coverage for grandchildren ?

    In each example I cited above, grandparent can purchase a term rider to put their grandchildren on the policy. A rider is simply an add-on allowed to the policy at the time of applying. The term rider will put term coverage on the grandchildren until they are either married. Or they age out of the term coverage. The exact age varies by company. By the way a grandparent has another option at their disposal.

    Companies do sell whole life insurance policies for children ages 14 days old up 17. For the most part they are very inexpensive. Not to mention, the child can keep this policy well into adulthood. One carrier I personally use will you to purchase as much as $50,000 of life insurance on a child.

    Grandparents are being called to duty again as parents. They are answering the call with love and attention. At the same time we should make certain they have knowledge and access to affordable life insurance. Not only for them, but also the grandchildren they are raising.

    Submitted by Thomas Dickson

    Thomas Dickson is a licensed independent life insurance agent in Baton Rouge, La. His company is Acadian Insurance Group. Specializing in senior life insurance. He can be reached at thomas @ acadianinsurancegroup.com

     

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    An open letter to the citizens of Baton Rouge

    During the early morning hours of July 5, 2016, we were placed on a journey to determine how we would understand and respond to the tragic death of Mr. Alton Sterling. There have been moments along the way where we have been confronted by the truth of this journey and reminded it’s not just going to go away. The decision by state and local authorities to look to the United States Department of Justice, the announcement of findings by the DOJ, the passing of the issue to the State Attorney General, the announcement of his decision, the press conference by Police Chief Murphy Paul to share his decision, and then the release of the video footage from that senseless and horrible moment, have all served to remind us that we must all decide how we understand and respond to what happened in the parking lot of a convenience store in North Baton Rouge.

    I believe that any understanding and response must begin with Mr. Sterling’s family. They have endured loss and pain beyond imagination. And they have had to do so under the glaring lights of news cameras and public scrutiny. This family deserves our respect and compassion. We cannot just “co-opt” their loved one to suit our agenda, whatever it is. Alton Sterling is not a hashtag or a character in a horrific video. He was a member of our community with family and friends who cared about him greatly. Any effort to process all of this that does not begin with this reality if fatally flawed in my opinion.

    We must then be willing to be honest with each other about the perceptions and experiences of Black men in Baton Rouge wrapped up in the most difficult 90 seconds I have ever seen. In the last moments of Mr. Sterling’s life we are brought face to face with some harsh realities about our city. There are some people in Baton Rouge who must create ways to make money to live and provide for their families. Opportunity is not readily accessible for all. Those who are sworn to protect and serve are not always professional and respectful of every citizen. Black men are thought to be angry and violent and as a result must be treated differently. For 20 months I have said healing requires the acknowledgement of a wound. As a community we must speak the truth about these perceptions and experiences or all of this pain and strife will be for nothing. Until we do, any effort to understand and respond will be doomed to failure.

    My final belief is that we must move beyond responding to moments and begin to build movements. Moments last through the news cycle or until the next moment happens. Movements challenge what we think and demand that we do something. Movements bring about change, moments don’t. Political science professor Ron Walters, Ph.D, is quoted as saying the difference between a moment and a movement is sacrifice. This is certainly true in our situation. The only way Baton Rouge will learn, grow and change is if there are enough people who are willing to sacrifice and work to make it happen. We can all do something and we don’t all have to do the same thing. Find a place where you can connect with people who are serious about making this city better and get busy doing so. Don’t be distracted by the negative voices screaming for attention. That’s all they know and all they will ever speak. But we are better than their hatred and small minds.

    Most of my life has been lived in Baton Rouge. I have seen and experienced the good, the bad and the ugly in these years. It is my sincere desire to be a part of leaving a better Baton Rouge to the next generation. A Baton Rouge where Black men are seen as assets and vital members of our community. A Baton Rouge where we are all productive, connected, healthy and safe. A Baton Rouge where my neighborhood and zip code don’t determine my access to opportunity and resources. This is the movement I am determined to be a part of building. In April of 2016, I, along with a number of partners, convened the Urban Congress on African American Males in Baton Rouge for the first time. We did so because we could no longer ignore the realities associated with being a Black male in the community we love. Since that time we have continued to build a movement that matters. A movement that makes a difference. Today, I am more committed to the work of the Urban Congress than ever. And you are welcome to join us in this work. But if not the Congress, find something that allows you to get busy doing something that changes Baton Rouge for the better. My prayer is that these painful moments will motivate people us beyond the place of emotions and to a place of ongoing action. This city needs it.

    Sincerely,

    Raymond A. Jetson
    Chief Executive Catalyst
    MetroMorphosis

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  • High schoolers win at national court competition in DC

    On March 23-25, 2018, four East Baton Rouge Parish high school students competed in the Marshall-Brennan National High School Moot Court Competition in Washington, D.C. The competition was hosted by American University Washington College of Law. The East Baton Rouge Parish students, Constance Springer and Jaidyn Bryant juniors at McKinley High School, Maya Jones a senior at Southern University Laboratory High School, an​d Ariel Simmons a senior at Glen Oaks Magnet High School, competed against more than 70 high school students from across the United States. They argued a case involving issues relating to the First Amendment’s freedom of speech and expression, and the Fourteenth Amendment’s equal protection clause. Jaidyn Bryant earned second place in the petitioner category, and Constance Springer placed among the top ten in the respondent category.​ Bryant also received an award as a top four competitor.

    Ariel Simmons, Maya Jones, Constance Springer, and Jaidyn Bryant

    Ariel Simmons, Maya Jones, Constance Springer, and Jaidyn Bryant

     

    Jaidyn Bryant receives her award as a top four competitor

    Jaidyn Bryant receives her award as a top four competitor

     

    The students were the winners of the Southern University Law Center Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Project Regional Moot Court Competition. The Southern University Law Center Marshall-Brennan Project is sponsored by the Louisiana Bar Foundation, Southern University Law Center, Wilson Fields, judge 19th Judicial District Court; Luke Thibodeaux, attorney in the law firm of Gordon McKernan Injury Attorneys; and Alejandro Perkins, partner in the law firm of Hammonds, Sills, Adkins and Guice.

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    COMMENTARY: 3 ways stress takes a toll on your body

    April is Stress Awareness Month

    Did the latest challenge at work bring on a tightening in your stomach? Does constant worry about a loved one’s health make you physically ill yourself?

    Everyone at some point feels the effects of stress. Not everyone deals with stress in the best way, though.

    “Often stressed-out people seek relief through alcohol, tobacco or drugs, but that just makes matters worse,” said Richard Purvis, a health and wellness practitioner and author of Recalibrate: Six Secrets to Resetting Your Age.

    “Instead of relieving stress, those toxic substances tend to keep the body in a stressed state, causing even more physical problems.”

    April is Stress Awareness Month, a good time to reflect on how the demands and anxieties of daily life put a strain not just on our minds, but on our bodies as well.

    Stress, of course, is not always a bad thing. It does serve a positive purpose.

    “It can keep us alert and prepares us to avoid danger,” Purvis said. “But stress becomes a negative factor when a person faces continuous challenges without any time mixed in for relief or relaxation.”

    As a result, he said, people become overworked, and stress-related anxiety and illness can occur. The strain leads them to suffer from such ailments as headaches, upset stomach, elevated blood pressure, chest pain and problems sleeping.

    Purvis says a few examples of how stress can play havoc on our bodies include:

    • Musculoskeletal system. When we experience stress, it’s natural for our muscles to tense up. “It’s the body’s way of guarding against injury and pain,” Purvis said. Usually, the muscles relax once the stressful event passes. But chronic stress keeps the muscles in a constant state of guardedness. “When muscles are taut and tense for long periods of time other reactions in the body are triggered,” he said. Chronic muscle tension in the shoulders, neck and head can lead to tension-type headaches and migraines.
    • Respiratory system. Stress causes people to breathe harder. “That’s not a problem for most people,” Purvis said. “But if you suffer from asthma or a lung disease such as emphysema, getting essential oxygen can be difficult.” He says some studies show that acute stress events – such as the death of a loved one – can trigger asthma attacks in which the airway between the nose and the lungs constrict. Also, rapid breathing associated with stress – or hyperventilation – can result in a panic attack in some people.
    • Gastrointestinal system. Sometimes people who are stressed will eat much more than usual. Sometimes they will eat much less. Neither is healthy. “You can get heartburn or acid reflux if you eat more food or different types of food, or if you increase how much alcohol you drink or tobacco you use,” Purvis said. When you’re stressed, the brain sends alert sensations to the stomach. Your stomach can react with “butterflies,” nausea or pain. “Severe stress can cause vomiting, diarrhea or constipation,” he says. “If your stress becomes chronic, you might develop ulcers or severe stomach pain.”

    So what’s to be done? Purvis pointed out that stress is a natural occurrence in life and happens to everyone.

    “Since you can’t avoid your job, bills, or other life experiences, the best thing to do is learn to manage stress,” he said. “You won’t avoid stress entirely, but it is possible to minimize the effects by eating healthy, exercising regularly, getting enough sleep, and taking care of yourself in general.”

     

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    COMMUNITY EVENT: Celebrate National Minority Health Month

    Submitted news

    UnitedHealthcare Community Plan of Louisiana will celebrate National Minority Health Month in April 2018. This year’s theme released from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health  is “Partnering for Health Equity.” Join us for a time of Community Awareness and free events.

    According to OMH director Dr. Mathew Lin, “Partnerships at the national, state, tribal, and local levels are vital to the work of reducing health disparities.”  UnitedHealthcare will host a series of events that will partner with local government, private, and public community stakeholders.

    The Kick-Off event will be a Lunch and Learn held at the Exxon Mobil YMCA, 7717 Howell Blvd., Baton Rouge, LA. From 12:00 noon until 2:00 pm. This event will feature a key-note speaker, Robert L. Newton, Jr., PhD, Director of the Physical Activity and Ethnic Minority Health Laboratory Director of the Physical Activity and Ethnic Minority Health Laboratory and allow community partners in health equity to share available services that can benefit the community.

    UnitedHealthcare has a host of partners including EBRP District 2 Metropolitan Councilwoman Chauna Banks, the Jewel J. Newman Community Center, Baton Rouge Primary Care Collaborative, Southeast Community Health Systems, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, and the Exxon Mobil YMCA, Save-A-Lot Grocery Store, Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center Pediatric Residency Program, Southern University School of Nursing and Allied Health, Southern University AgCenter, and Smiles on the Go to name a few.

    These community partners and more will host a series of events throughout the month of April.

     

    Diabetes & Hypertension Awareness Fair – Wednesday, April 18, 2018

    Southeast Community Health Systems, 6351 Main St. Zachary, LA at 4:00 pm -6:00pm

    Health Equity Community Summit and Panel Discussion – Thursday, April 19, 2018

    Jewel J. Newman Community Center, 2013 Central Road, Baton Rouge, LA. Doors opening at 4:00 pm for vendor fair and panel discussion at 6:00 pm.

    Preparing Healthy Meals with Community Grocery Stores – Saturday, April 21, 2018

    Save-A-Lot Grocery Store, 12200 Plank Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70811 at 10:00 am until 2:00 pm

     

    Each event is free, opened to the public, and will provide, food, presentations, valuable health information, and more. Come out and learn what an important role partnerships play in health equity for our community!

    For more information, please contact Deborah Jones with United Healthcare Community Plan at 225-413-2198 or email deborah_w_jones@uhc.com.

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    SU Land-Grant Campus to host ‘One Health Symposium’

    The Southern University Agricultural Land-Grant Campus will host a symposium themed, ‘One Health Symposium: Promoting Sustainable Communities.’ The event will be held April 12-13 at the Southern University Law Center.

    The ‘One Health’ concept is a worldwide strategy for expanding interdisciplinary collaborations and communications in all aspects of health care for humans, animals and the environment.

    This symposium, which is free and open to the public, will bring the various disciplines of the One Health community – medicine, veterinary medicine, public health, social sciences, nutrition, food science, engineering, agricultural and environmental sciences – together to improve the health of people, animals and the planet.

    Participants will have an opportunity to come together and share strategies as well as learn about the latest educational tools and resources which could facilitate the improvement of their health, the health of their animals – both pets and livestock – and the overall health of the environment.

    Sessions during the symposium will include:

    • Bacterial Diseases and Zoonosis
    • Community and Economic Development
    • Designing Health Communities
    • Developing a healthy and vibrant food system in Louisiana
    • Diversity in the Health Care Field
    • Economics and Health Disparities
    • Environmental Health
    • Exercise, weight loss and well-being. Is weight loss imperative to obtain wellness?
    • Health Equity: “Health Care for all”
    • Healthy Child Development
    • Human Animal Bond
    • Human Disease Prevention and Intervention
    • Louisiana Opioid Epidemic
    • Mental Health Issues
    • Pet Equity
    • The Effects of Nutrition Policy on Population Health
    • The Science of Human “Sense of Taste and Health Diet”
    • True Care Health and Wellness “Healing with Herbs”

    This is the ideal event for new and beginning farmers, agricultural business owners, community leaders, non-profit and community based organizations, pet owners, students, faculty, staff and anyone eager to learn!

    The symposium is also designed to increase the marketability of the students in the SU College of Agricultural, Family and Consumer Sciences, while exposing them to individuals in their respective professions.

    Students will participate in FASpitch (elevator pitch), oral, and poster competitions. The students will also be able to participate in student ‘HUDDLEs’ where they will meet with agency representatives, academicians, and practitioners one-on-one to share their experiences and learn about job and scholarship opportunities.

    A highlight of this symposium will be a ribbon cutting for the SU Land-Grant Campus’ three institutes – the Southern Institute for One Health One Medicine, the Southern Institute for Medicinal Plants, and the Southern Institute for Food Science, Nutrition and Wellness.

    ONLINE: www.suagcenter.com/symposium.

    By LaKeeshia Giddens Lusk
    Contributing Writer

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    Senator Chabert writes ‘It’s time to end attacks’

    Dear Editor:

    Since 2014, several parishes have filed lawsuits in an attempt to make energy manufacturers pay for rebuilding Louisiana’s coast. These lawsuits are mostly being driven by plaintiff’s law firms that have built reputations for suing our state’s oil and gas companies.

    Restoring our coast and protecting our wetlands is an important mission, but these lawsuits are not the answer. The reality is that there are many parties that contribute to coastal and wetland degradation in our state, not just energy manufacturers. The energy manufacturers are good corporate citizens that contribute to their communities in many ways. These employers are the source of thousands of high paying jobs, tens of billions in economic growth, and billions more in state and local tax revenue. The recent approval of the Bayou Bridge Pipeline project is an example of this recent growth.

    These lawsuits attack the companies that are currently the largest contributors to our coastal restoration funds. If we truly want to grow and maintain our coastline, we should be doing everything possible to encourage the industries to locate and expand in our state. It’s time to end these attacks and come together to create a coastal protection plan that works for everyone.

    Sincerely,

    Senator Norbert “Norby” Chabert
    Louisiana Senate District 20

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    Southern rolls out Ag mobile during annual small farmer conference, hundreds in attendance

    More than three hundred small farmers from throughout Louisiana gathered at the Felton G. Clark Activity Center for the Southern University Land-Grant Campus’s 8th Annual Louisiana Small Farmer Conference. The three-day conference themed, “Transforming and Elevating Louisiana Small Family Farms,” was held March 15-17, 2018.

    Events kicked off on March 15 with a ribbon cutting for the Southern University Agricultural Land-Grant Campus’s Mobile Education and Technology Center.

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    The mobile center will be used to provide educational training, bring Internet access, hands on testing and live instruction to low-to-moderate income families residing in the most marginalized areas and remote corners of the state.

    Sessions held during the day included grant writing, emergency preparedness, and integrated pest management.

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    La Agriculture and Forestry Commissioner Mike Strain DVM

    The second day of the conference began with an address from Louisiana’s Department of Agriculture and Forestry Commissioner Mike Strain, DVM. The keynote address was delivered by Leonard Jordan, the acting chief of the United States Department of Agriculture’s National Resources Conservation Service.

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    Leonard Jordan

    Session included Programs for Veterans, Intensive Small Scale Farming, Agro-Tourism, Farm Liability Insurance, Social Media Marketing, Biodiversity on Your Farm, Estate Planning, Record-Keeping and Urban Farms.

    The Louisiana Living Legends Banquet was held on the evening of March 16 following the conference’s sessions. This banquet honors individuals who have made significant contributions to Southern University in the areas of Agriculture, Family and Consumer Sciences.

    The 2018 honorees were Winzer Andrews, retired county agent/ parish chairman with the LSU AgCenter’s Cooperative Extension Service in Caddo Parish; State Representative Barbara West Carpenter, Ph.D., dean of International Affairs and University Outreach at Southern University; and Veeraraghava R. Bachireddy, Ph.D., professor emeritus of plant and soil sciences at the SU College of Agricultural, Family, and Consumer Sciences.

    The three join 24 others who have been honored with this recognition since 2005.

    Anthony Reed, director of special projects for the School of Agriculture and Applied Sciences at Alcorn State University, served as the speaker for the banquet.

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    The conference concluded with a workshop on Managing Feral Hogs. During the workshop Gene Cavalier, a biologist with the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry spoke to the attendees about the rules and regulations for feral hogs in Louisiana. Derrick Banks, extension agent at Prairie View A & M University also made a presentation on managing feral hogs.

    By LaKeeshia Giddens-Lusk
    Contributing Writer

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    There’s a Juke Joint in West Baton Rouge

    The West Baton Rouge Museum is pleased to announce the grand opening of the Juke Joint exhibit on April 6th at 6:30PM. This new permanent exhibit will interpret the rich blues heritage of West Baton Rouge. It is one of the first projects of the museum’s new curator of exhibits Kathe Hambrick.

    Kathe Hambrick, Curator of Exhibits, West Baton Rouge Museum

    Kathe Hambrick, Curator of Exhibits, West Baton Rouge Museum

    The Juke Joint grand opening is a tribute to Slim Harpo with living legends Henry Gray and Carol Fran along with tomorrow’s legends Carter Wilkerson and the Riverside Blues Band and Rudy “Trey” Richard, III. We will be frying fish and serving up Juke Joint beer from Tin Roof and the all new “Baby Scratch My Back” cocktail invented just for us by Cane Land Distilling Company, said museum planners.
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    Juke joints have a history that is deeply rooted in small towns throughout the south. West Baton Rouge was famous for the juke joints that provided relief to the workers coming in from the sugarcane fields and long hard days of work on the Mississippi River. The night time establishments in West Baton Rouge Parish drew crowds as the Blue Laws of East Baton Rouge did not apply on the west side. You could hear live music playing all night through open windows across the canebrake. Ernest Gaines is quoted in his memoir, Mozart to Leadbelly, “Baton Rouge was a dry town on Sundays; so I…would go across the Mississippi River into Port Allen, into The White Eagle bar.” He wrote about hearing Bobby Rush, Bobby Blue Bland, and Ernie K-Doe in The White Eagle.

    Learn more of the juke joints and the Blues musicians that made West Baton Rouge famous. Be prepared to dance and share your juke joint stories from West Baton Rouge Parish.

    ONLINE: http://westbatonrougemuseum.com

    Photos by James Terry III

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    Homecoming crowd celebrates Tasker Memorial’s anniversary

    Words from two favorite old hymns best describe the recent 150th anniversary celebration at Tasker Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church in Ponchatoula.

    Written after Tasker was organized in 1867 and, like the church, both songs have stood the tests of time: “O what a foretaste of glory divine” (“Blessed Assurance” 1873) and “What a day of rejoicing that will be” (“When We All Get to Heaven” 1898.)

    Indeed, the rejoicing by the congregation was just a sampling of the future awaiting Christians everywhere.

    Former City Councilman Wayne F. Foster was master of ceremonies and two choirs participated, Tasker’s and visiting Amite Butler Chapel A.M.E. Zion.

    The choirs led and were sometimes joined by the congregation in singing as well as solos by Barbara Dixon and Clifford Guy Walker. Songs heard: “He is Lord”, “Leaning on the Everlasting Arms”, “I’ll Go if I Have to Go by Myself”, “Hold to God’s Unchanging Hand”, and “How Great is My God.”

    One song, “He’s an On-Time God,” reminded everyone of God’s timing: “He may not come when you want Him to, but He’ll be right there on time!”

    During the service Jacqueline Brumfield extended a welcome, Debbie Brown gave history and Virginia Jeanpierre and Yvonne Elzy gave reflections.

    Pastor Rev. John E. Hurst Jr., welcomed everyone, introducing Mayor Bob Zabbia who thanked the church for the invitation, expressing what the church and its members mean to the community. He recognized Community Center Director Lynnette Jackson Allen who grew up in the church and introduced Kathryn Martin as the writer of the proclamation.

    Gwen Bankston, read with great feeling its words, some of which are:

    Whereas, Tasker Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church stands at the corner of South Sixth and West Ash Streets in Ponchatoula as a permanent monument and testimonial to the toil and sacrifice of its faithful leaders and members across the years; and

    Whereas, the church has always been of great historical importance to the City of Ponchatoula since its organization October 12, 1867; and

    Whereas, the leaders, members and friends who come and go from the place of the Holy on a regular basis help meet the needs of the church family as well as those of the community and many others through their support of home and foreign missions; and

    Whereas, the church and its family serve as a beacon to the feet and light to the path to lead the way for countless men, women, boys and girls to know our Savior and Lord Jesus Christ;

    Whereas, it is a privilege to extend the expression of our esteem and best wishes to Tasker Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church on its 150th anniversary;

    Now, therefore, I, Robert Zabbia, Mayor of the City of Ponchatoula, Louisiana, hereby proclaim this day as Tasker Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church Day.

    Rev. Dr. John Wesley Forbes III, pastor of Butler Chapel A.M.E. Zion, brought a rousing timely sermon.

    Those working behind the scenes to bring the special day about were the program committee: Helena Brown, Jacqueline Brumfield, Barbara Dixon, Wayne F. Foster, and Joyce Roberts; finance committee: Debbie Brown, Charles Dixon, Wayne F. Foster, M. Nathaniel Kelly, and Joyce Roberts; music committee: Linda Hodges and Lawrence Greely.

    The service was followed by a time of feast and fellowship and this blessed and wonderful day will long live on in the minds and hearts of everyone attending.

     By Kathryn J. Martin
    Contributing Writer

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    3 ways to prepare for a troubled teen’s return from a treatment center

    Raising a teenager can be a challenge under the best circumstances.

    But when a teenager’s addictions, learning disabilities, or emotional and behavioral issues become more than parents can bear, the young people often are placed in residential or wilderness treatment programs where professionals help them work through their issues.

    Success can quickly unravel when the child returns home, though, if parents aren’t ready with a game plan to help with the transition.

    “Parents often fear that their son or daughter is going to relapse into old, unhealthy or dangerous patterns,” said Tim R. Thayne, PhD, a marriage and family therapist and author of Not by Chance: How Parents Boost Their Teen’s Success In and After Treatment (www.drtimthayne.com).

    “They have fears about how their child will connect socially with other people and whether they will find the right friends. They fear their teen will fall further behind in academics.”Unknown-1

    Thayne suggests a few ways to help parents ease the transition:

    • Identify natural mentors for your teen. A natural mentor – such as a neighbor, teacher, relative or coach – is typically more effective than an officially assigned mentor. “Studies suggest that most formal mentoring relationships last less than a year,” Thayne said. “In contrast, natural mentoring relationships, which come from the church, school, family and neighborhood, are far more durable, with the average lasting nine years.”

     

    • Know when and how to grant back privileges and freedoms. Don’t let your teen pressure you into promising the return of certain privileges. Long before they come home, teens in treatment often begin asking what they are going to be able to do and how soon. “They want back the freedoms they once had, such as cell phone and car use, sleepovers, computer time, dating, time with friends and so forth,” Thayne said. “If there is ever a time not to buckle under pressure from your teen, it’s now while they are still in the program. If your teen is going to be angry, let the program deal with the fallout.” When they do come home, don’t make a rule you aren’t willing to back up. Consistency is key. Over time, as your trust grows, be ready to hand out rewards before being asked, but this doesn’t have to be done all at once. “Things can be handed out for a weekend trial, or at a level of 50 percent of what your child initially pushed for,” Thayne said.

     

    • Find someone to talk with. “Parents should have someone they can open up to about their emotions,” Thayne says. He suggests finding a therapist or a coach who has experience working with parents in this situation. “That counselor will be better equipped to help you through this transition,” he said. “Nothing will surprise them; not your fears, not your questions, not your situation.” In addition to an expert coach, Thayne said, it also helps to have a trusted friend you can vent to as well.

    “Long-term success doesn’t come about by chance, by hoping or simply because you shelled out a lot of money and sent your child away to get help,” Thayne said. “It requires work and changes on your part, and it takes a concrete plan.”

     

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    Grocery Delivery begins in Baton Rouge

    Baton Rouge area residents can get groceries delivered from a variety of stores, right to their door.  Instacart, the nation’s largest on-demand grocery delivery service, is launching in the Baton Rouge area starting March 8, through popular local stores including Rouses Markets, Albertsons, Costco, CVS, and Petco. 

    The delivery area will cover over 188,000 households and is bringing income earning opportunities to the area with plans to bring on more than 100 new shoppers. Areas of service include: Baton Rouge, Gonzales, Denham Springs, Zeeland Place, Port Vincent, Dennis Mills, Geismar, Dutch Town, Brittany, Duplessis, Prairieville, Hobart, St. Amant, Acy, St. Gabriel, Walker, Inniswold, Westminster, Acadian Place, Merrydale, Monticello, Park Forest, Old Jefferson, Shenandoah, and West River Oaks. The service is also launching in New Orleans.

    ONLINE: www.instacart.com

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    Honoring Baton Rouge’s centenarian: Ann Isadore Wilson Gray

    Baton Rouge leaders, family, and friends celebrated the life of centenarian Ann Isadore Wilson Gray who was born January 21, 1918, in Covington, La., to Alexander and Viola Wilson. Affectionately known as “Mother Gray,” she has six children, 12 grandchildren, and 12 great-grandchildren. She attended Reddish Street Primary School and finished up at Our Lady of the Lake Nursing School. She loves to read books and will do so for hours. (Photo by Kat Turner-Thalleen)

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    Community Vision Board Party

    Interested in changing your local and global community for the better? Want to be a global citizen?

    Create your own community vision board that molds your vision for global citizenship and social change in your local and global community!

    All supplies will be provided. If you have some old magazines or newspapers you don’t mind cutting up, bring them along. If not, just bring yourself!

    This article was submitted online. .

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    Federal class action suit filed against Johnson and Johnson on behalf of buyers

    Co-counsel Ben Crump says people of color were ‘victimized twice’

    This week, new documents were uncovered as part of existing lawsuits filed by ovarian cancer and mesothelioma victims. The documents indicate J&J knew for decades that cancer-causing asbestos and heavy metals were prevalent in the talc used in its Johnson’s Baby Powder and other products but failed to put a warning label on them. J&J stock prices plummeted after this and earlier disclosures.

    Rosen Law Firm, a global investor rights law firm, and Ben Crump Law, a civil rights and personal injury firm, announced the filing of a federal securities class action lawsuit on behalf of purchasers of the securities of Johnson & Johnson between Feb. 22, 2013, and Feb. 7, 2018, both dates inclusive (“Class Period.”) The lawsuit seeks to recover damages for J&J investors under the federal securities laws.

    FL-2015-Justice-Benjamin-Crump-large

    Ben Crump

    According to the lawsuit, throughout the Class Period defendants made false or misleading statements, and failed to disclose that J&J has known for decades that its talc products include asbestos fibers and that the exposure to those fibers can cause ovarian cancer and mesothelioma. J&J’s denials that talc could cause cancer and mesothelioma were materially false and misleading, and the company concealed contingent liabilities and loss of future revenues from the product. As a result of the company’s actions, the lawsuit claims, investors suffered damages when the true details entered the market.

    Crump said Johnson & Johnson engaged in “cynical tactics to market these products to women of color, while knowing their potential harm.”

    “Johnson & Johnson devalued Black lives by expressly marketing a product to Black customers that they knew for decades to be harmful,” Crump said. “Given that many Black workers’ retirement funds depend on government pension funds that invest in this stock for their retirement, Johnson & Johnson victimized them twice, jeopardizing their physical and their financial health.”

    In the 1990s, Johnson &Johnson began a concerted effort to boost the sales of its baby powder by “targeting” Black and Hispanic women, according to a company memorandum made public in recent lawsuits that led to multimillion-dollar verdicts against the powder manufacturer. In the past, Black women have reported significantly higher use of feminine hygiene products, including genital powder. A 2015 case-control study in Los Angeles found that 44 percent of Black women reported using talcum powder, compared to 30 percent of white women and 29 percent of Hispanic women.

    Rosen said the class action lawsuit has already been filed. Anyone wishing to serve as lead plaintiff, must move the Court no later than April 9, 2018. A lead plaintiff is a representative party acting on behalf of other class members in directing the litigation. Anyone wishing to join the litigation should go to http://www.rosenlegal.com/cases-1288.html or contact Phillip Kim or Daniel Sadeh of Rosen Law Firm toll-free at 866-767- 3653 or via email at pkim@rosenlegal.com or dsadeh@rosenlegal.com. Rosen Law Firm represents investors throughout the globe, concentrating its practice in securities class actions and shareholder derivative litigation. Since 2014, Rosen Law Firm has been ranked #2 in the nation by Institutional Shareholder Services for the number of securities class action settlements annually obtained for investors.

    Ben Crump is well known for representing clients in a wide range of civil rights and personal injury cases and is a former president of the National Bar Association. He has been recognized by the National Bar Association as the Nation’s Best Advocate and listed on The National Trial Lawyers’ Top 100 Lawyers. His firm also focuses on practice areas that include class actions, personal injury, wrongful deaths, and workers’ compensation.

    The Rosen and Crump firms announced a partnership earlier this year to expand and diversify reach and help bring justice to organizations and individuals impacted by securities fraud and corporate misconduct throughout the world.

     

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    Miss Black Louisiana USA 2018, Makeva Armant to participate in Mardi Gras Festival, Feb. 10

    Miss Black Louisiana USA 2018, Makeva Armant, will be part of this years’ annual Baton Rouge Mardi Gras celebrations. She is a French teacher at McKinley Senior High School and pursuing a Masters of Arts in Teaching and Languages through on-line courses from the University of Southern Mississippi. Her hobbies include singing, traveling and spending quality time with family and friends. Her goal is to share her passion for languages, cultures and the wellness of the Black community with as many people as possible in order to spark the same interest in the many young people that she encounters as a professional.  Armant will introduce Henry Turner Jr. at both the Mardi Gras VIP Festival Pre-Party on Thursday, February 8th at Henry Turner, Jr.’s Listening Heritage Museum and at 5th Annual Baton Rouge Mardi Gras Festival at North Boulevard Town Square on Saturday, February 10

    image

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    State asks public for comments on reallocating disaster recovery funds from The Great Food of 2016

    The Louisiana Office of Community Development is accepting public comments on an Action Plan Amendment that reallocates Community Development Block Grant-Disaster Recovery funding received from the Department of Housing and Urban Development for recovery from The Great Floods of 2016.

    Action Plan Amendment 7 will move $22,484,482 from the Multifamily Rental Gap program, which has experienced lower than anticipated demand, into the Neighborhood Landlord and Piggyback rental programs; and will amend the maximum award for the Piggyback program in order to accommodate multiple affordable housing models. The total Rental Housing Allocation will remain the same at $134,163,402.

    The formal public comment period for Action Plan Amendment 7  continues until 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018. Residents, community leaders and elected officials can view the plan by visiting http://www.doa.la.gov/Pages/ocd-dru/Action_Plans.aspx and clicking on the respective APA link.

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    Gov. Edwards Proclaims February 2018 Black History Month in Louisiana

    Gov. John Bel Edwards proclaimed February 2018 Black History Month in the state of Louisiana.

    “Every year during the month of February, we pause to pay special appreciation for the role African Americans have played in our state’s economic, cultural, spiritual and political history. Without a doubt, Louisiana is a better place for everyone to call home because of those who have fought for justice, equality and freedom. We take this time each year to celebrate and learn more about the significant achievements and contributions they have made to our state and our nation.”

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    2018 ESSENCE Festival Initial Line-Up Announced July 5-8 In New Orleans

    ESSENCE wants you to grab your squad and plan your trip as it announces its exhilarating initial talent line-up for the 2018 ESSENCE Festival, taking place July 5-8 in New Orleans. The nightly concert series keeps the spotlight on women, featuring electrifying headline performances from Janet Jackson; Mary J. Blige; a headline set featuring Erykah Badu and Jill Scott, with special guests Snoop Dogg and many others in a special curation by The Roots; Xscape; Fantasia and Miguel*Additional acts will be announced in the coming weeks.

    This year’s Festival will feature chart-topping names and inspiring experiences across four days of music, culture, empowerment and entertainment. The electric nighttime concerts will feature more than 40 acts and will take place across five stages at the Louisiana Superdome—including the Festival’s renowned Mainstage and four intimate Superlounges. For the first-time, the Festival will also feature an ESSENCE Superlounge with a unique DJ-curated experience—with offerings by actor/DJ Idris Elba, MC Lyte and more. Also, for the first-time, the Festival welcomes an interactive music experience with The Read’s Kid Fury and Crissle hosting a Superlounge.

    *Artists scheduled to perform at the nightly ESSENCE Festival concerts over Fourth of July weekend at the Louisiana Superdome include: Janet Jackson; Mary J. Blige; Erykah Badu and Jill Scott, along with Snoop Dogg and more in a special curation by The Roots; 112; Daniel Caesar; D-Nice; Doug E. Fresh’s Legends of Hip-Hop Show featuring Big Daddy Kane, Kool Moe Dee and more; DVSN; Fantasia; H.E.R.; Idris Elba; Kelela; Kelly Price’s For The Love of R&B featuring Dave Hollister and Vaughn Willis; Kevin Ross; MAJOR.; Mali Music; Marsha Ambrosius; MC Lyte; Miguel; Mykia Jovan; Ro James; Teddy Riley’s New Jack Swing Experiencefeaturing Wreckx-n-Effect, Blackstreet and Guy; The Read’s Kid Fury and Crissle; VICTORY, Xscape and many more to be announced soon. Mainstage host: Roy Wood, Jr.

    “In 2018, women are at the forefront of a seismic shift reverberating across the cultural landscape, and this movement comes to life for our community at the ESSENCE Festival,” said Michelle Ebanks, President, Essence Communications. “Some of the most iconic female artists and powerhouse performers of this generation—Janet Jackson, Mary J. Blige, Fantasia and others—embrace ESSENCE and the Festival as a sacred space to entertain, inspire, revel in culture and be renewed.”

    Weekend ticket packages are on sale now with prices starting at $150. For information about ticket sales, accommodations and the latest news about the ESSENCE Festival® visit EssenceFestival.com.

    Join the Festival community: Follow us on Twitter @essencefest #EssenceFest and become a fan of Festival on Facebook. The 2018 ESSENCE Festival® is presented by Coca-Cola®State Farm is a major sponsor. ESSENCE Festival is executive produced by Essence Communications Inc., and produced by Solomon Group with the ESSENCE® Empowerment Experience executive produced by GeChar.

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    Louisiana Travel Association announces new officers, honors graduates of tourism leadership class

    The Louisiana Travel Promotion Association–-which voted Jan. 23 to change its name to the Louisiana Travel Association-– installed a group of tourism industry leaders as new officers for its executive committee and board of directors during the association’s Annual Membership Meeting at the DoubleTree by Hilton in Lafayette.

    “For 57 years, LTA has strengthened Louisiana’s tourism industry through our marketing program, advocacy efforts and educational opportunities,” said Jill Kidder, LTA President and CEO. “We are thrilled that our members have selected tourism industry leaders from throughout the state to lead this organization as we continue to promote a viable job-creating and revenue-producing industry.”

    New officers installed on the executive board committee include:
    · Chairman Travis Napper, Ruston-Lincoln CVB
    · Vice-Chair Janice Delerno Verges, The Stockade Bed & Breakfast
    · Secretary Ben Berthelot, Lafayette CVC
    · Treasurer Kerry Andersen, Pinnacle Entertainment
    · Immediate Past Chair Mark Romig, New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation

    New directors:
    · Timothy Bush, Louisiana’s Cajun Bayou
    · Dustin Gontarski, Compass Media
    · Jennifer Ritter Guidry, Atchafalaya National Heritage Area
    · Kevin Kelly, Houmas House Plantation & Gardens

    Returning directors:
    · Marc Becker, New Orleans Hotel Collection
    · Peggy Benoit, Carmel Inn & Suites Thibodaux
    · Dickie Brennan, Dickie Brennan & Company
    · Alana Cooper, Monroe-West Monroe CVB
    · John Crook, Vernon Parish Tourist Commission
    · Brandy Evans, Shreveport-Bossier CTB
    · Marion Fox, Jeff Davis Parish Tourist Commission
    · Arlene Gould, Natchitoches Parish CVB
    · Andy LeBouef, Mardi Gras World
    · Ralph Ney, Marriot Hotel Baton Rouge
    · Donna O’Daniels, St. Tammany Parish Tourist & Convention Commission
    · Lynette Tanner, Frogmore Plantation & Gins
    · Denise Thevenot, Louisiana Tax Free Shopping

    LTA also honored the Louisiana Tourism Leadership Academy graduates during the meeting. The 18 members of the LTLA class spent all of 2017 developing their leadership skills while learning from seasoned professionals from throughout the tourism industry. The goal of the program is to equip each class member with knowledge and skills that will enrich their tourism-related organizations, therefore strengthening the state-wide tourism industry.

    “LTLA has been a tremendous opportunity for those interested in learning more about Louisiana’s tourism industry, and we are proud of the 2017 graduating class,” said Jill Kidder, LTA President and CEO. “It is our hope that these professionals will utilize their new-found knowledge and experience to better themselves, their organizations and their state.”

    Louisiana Tourism Leadership Academy 2018 graduate

    Louisiana Tourism Leadership Academy 2018 graduate

    The graduating class of LTLA includes: Rebecca Blankenbaker, with Cane River National Heritage Area; Marica Brewster, with Von Mack Agency; Alvon Brumfield, with Louisiana Renaissance Festival; Kimberly Caldarera, with L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles; Megan Gavlick, with L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles; Katherine Johnson, with Natchitoches CVB; Zondra Jones, with St. Tammany Parish Tourist Commission; Leslie Landeche, with Mardi Gras World; Barry Landry, with Louisiana Office of Tourism; Shanna Landry, with Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana CVB; Kaylie Leblanc, with Lafayette CVC; Angie Manning, with Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana CVB; Joshua McNemar, with Office of the Lt. Governor; Jessica Ragusa, with Office of the Lt. Governor; Madeline Sanchez, with Louisiana Travel Association; Timika Spurlock, with Sheraton New Orleans; Stella Thorton, with Louisiana Tax Free Shopping; and Kellie Walters, with Louisiana’s Cajun Bayou.

    LTA is a trade association leading and strengthening Louisiana’s vibrant tourism industry through promotion, education and advocacy on behalf of our members. The membership voted in early 2018 to shorten the association’s name and staff is working with an agency to reveal a full rebrand later this year. Tourism generated $1.04 billion for Louisiana in 2016 and employs more than 230,000 people throughout the state.

    ONLINE: LTPA.org

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    Technical assistance services available for small businesses impacted by floods

    The Louisiana Office of Community Development has announced an application deadline of Wednesday, Feb. 28, for the Restore Louisiana Small Business Program, which offers interest-free, partially forgivable loans to businesses impacted by the 2016 floods.

    The $43 million program is designed to help eligible businesses in the 51 parishes that were impacted by the March and August 2016 floods. To date, the program has funded about $11 million in loans.

    “This program has the potential to help many small businesses impacted by the 2016 floods, but time is running out,” OCD Executive Director Pat Forbes said. “The first step for owners to find out if they qualify is to apply, and we encourage all of those who are in the recovery process to do so before the deadline.”

    There are five participating lenders accepting applications throughout the 51 impacted parishes. Their information, as well as coverage area, office locations, program criteria and application instructions can be found on the Restore Louisiana website.

    The interest-free loans range from $10,000 to $150,000, with 40 percent of the loan forgiven if qualified borrowers comply with all program requirements.

    The loans can be used for working capital—such as rent, mortgage, utilities, non-owner employee wages and inventory—as well as for furniture and movable equipment. Construction-related expenses are not eligible. For more information, call (225) 219-7824.

    Representatives from the Restore Louisiana Small Business program will be available at upcoming outreach events for the Restore Louisiana Homeowner Assistance Program, where representatives will answer questions and accept applications. Due to the recent winter weather, some outreach events have been rescheduled. Please note the new dates:

    • Feb. 5 – East Baton Rouge Parish Library/ Greenwell Springs Road Regional Branch from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    • Feb. 6 – Livingston Parish Library/ Denham Springs-Walker Branch from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    • Feb. 7 – East Baton Rouge Parish Library/ Baker Branch from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.

    Flood-impacted small business owners are also encouraged to contact a local office of the Louisiana Small Business Development Center for technical assistance services. These centers can provide free one-on-one consulting, financial management guidance, business plan development, long-term recovery and sustainability plans, financial projecting and disaster preparedness planning. Click here for a list of locations and contact information.

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    Thank You from the Odell S. Williams Museum

    I am so  proud of the city. Thank you, Baton Rouge, for answering the call for a Day of Peace in Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

    It brightened my day to know that by Wednesday morning, there had been no homicides in the City of Baton Rouge,and for that with pride, we are grateful.

    A Special “Thank You” to all the caring citizens for coming together planting, cleaning, painting and nailing up empty buildings.  Hundreds of volunteers, artists and concerned citizens came together to help create a Better Baton Rouge and a real “Scenic Highway”in Scotlandville.

    I firmly believe that “Little By Little, Day by Day, Working Together, We Can make a Difference.”  We will take this little minute and use the sixty seconds in it to become stronger and better as we work towards justice, peace, and love.

    HARAMBEE! Let’s Pull Together. WE ARE BRPROUD

    Sadie Roberts-Joseph
    Odell S. Williams Now And Then African-American Museum
    Baton Rouge
    Sadie Roberts-Joseph is the founder of the museum. Photo by Daniel Atkinson.

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    Know Your Liver educational session planned for Feb 24

    Rarely are we informed about the importance of a healthy liver, or the ramifications of an unhealthy one. The L. K. Davis Liver Disease Awareness Association was created with this in mind, setting out to address liver health issues in our families and communities. Consisting of physicians, nurses, practitioners, health coaches, counselors, liver disease patients, caregivers, and many other interested parties, our goal is to help educate the public about the necessity of a healthy liver, and support those affected by liver disease, from early diagnosis through end-stage. Our services are free, and all donations are tax-deductible.

    Our first educational session of KNOW YOUR LIVER will be held on February 24, at the Carver Branch of the EBRP Library, at 11am. Our educational sessions will be held monthly, as will our support group meetings for liver patients and their caregivers.

    L. K. Davis Liver Disease Awareness Association is a non-profit organization, which collaborates with local health-care providers, drug/alcohol treatment programs, veteran’s services, schools, and others, in the common interest of liver disease awareness.

    For more information about this topic, email liver.disease.awareness@gmail.com.

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    Metro council to hear public on marijuana penalties, considers fencing downtown area overpass

    Baton Rouge metro council meetings are off to a running start in January. With one meeting out of the way and one upcoming on the 24th, now is the time to get informed and involved in local government.

    At the January 10th meeting, Councilman Matt Watson (District 11) removed his proposal to create a tax for the increase of Police Salaries. By deleting the proposal from the agenda ahead of public comments and a vote, the tax issue can be raised again at another time. Had it gone to a vote and failed, rules state that it cannot be brought forward for another calendar year. He cited a current lack of support as his reason for the removal.

    New BR police chief Murphy Paul made an appearance at the meeting to ask for a budget increase for the Targeted Violent Criminal Program. These funds, which come entirely from a federal grant, would be used to purchase an automated dispatch system.

    Council members deferred a number of items to future meetings. Changes to the city pay plan are on hold for sixty days after a heated debate on how changes will impact newer employees. The decision on whether or not to re-appoint Cleve Dunn Jr. to the Airport District Board was deferred again and is currently set for the next meeting on January 24th. The 24th meeting will also readdress the placement of fences under the overpass at North St. This discussion was deferred out of concern for the homeless population that resides there. The Mayor’s office is working with organizations and stakeholders to create a program to address concerns.

    Issues introduced at the meeting on the 10th will be up for public comment and voting on the 24th. A draft introduced by council members Chandler Loupe (District 3) and Lamont Cole (District 7) will change the enforcement of marijuana possession. The penalty for possession of under 14 grams would be punishable by a $300 fine and no more than 15 days in jail under the changes.

    An item intended to reduce crime in hotels and motels introduced by council members Watson, Erika Green (District 5), and Barbara Freiberg (District 12) could have negative repercussions for hotel owners. Under the changes hotel and motel guests will have to present a valid government issued ID before being allowed to stay in a room. The changes also increase the fines levied if a hotel or motel keeps an incomplete record of previous guests. Under current law, hotels must retain guest records for the previous three years of operation.

    The proposed changes also create a permit system for hotels/motels. These business would have to register with the Department of Development in order to operate. The required permit could be suspended or revoked if the hotel or motel had too many police dispatches for drug or prostitution related crimes over a given time period. Hotels and motels without an up to date permit would not be able to stay open for business.

    By Progressive Social Network of Baton Rouge
    psnbatonrouge@gmail.com
    @PSNBatonRouge.

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    AKA, L’Auberge host 3rd Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Unity Prayer Breakfast

    SUBMITTED NEWS–The Gamma Eta Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. partnered with L’Auberge Casino & Hotel Baton Rouge to host the third annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Unity Prayer Breakfast on January 15,  in the L’Auberge Baton Rouge Event Center.

    The nearly 400 attendees included elected officials, community and business leaders, local law enforcement officers, community members, L’Auberge staff, high school and college students, community partners, and members of the National Panhellenic Council, which encompasses nine historically Black Greek-lettered organizations.

    Gwendolyn Thomas, Gamma Eta Omega Chapter President, presided and provided the occasion. Mickey Parenton, L’Auberge General Manager and Senior Vice President, and Kizzy Smith, L’Auberge Human Resources Director, welcomed the guests, who also received greetings from Monique Edwards, Gamma Eta Omega Chapter Vice President.

    The Woodlawn High School JROTC presented the colors, Danielle Gardner performed the National Anthem, and John Gray Band provided entertainment. LaChondria Holder and Pamela Honoré served as committee chairmen.

    Those in attendance listened to guest speaker Louisiana DOTD Secretary Dr. Shawn Wilson, enjoyed breakfast and united in prayers led by Reverend Patricia Turner-Brown, assistant pastor of Bethel AME Church, and Minister Ashlynn James, associate minister Impact Outreach Ministries. Following the breakfast, Gamma Eta Omega Chapter members participated in The Walls Project community service activity. Members assisted the organization with revitalization efforts in North Baton Rouge encompassing the area from US 190 to Swan Street.

    Special tribute was presented to the members of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated by Mavis Lewis as the organization celebrated its 110th year. The sorority is an international service organization founded on the campus of Howard University in Washington, DC on January 15, 1908. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority is comprised of nearly 300,000 members in approximately 1,012 graduate and undergraduate chapters in the United States, Liberia, Bahamas, US Virgin Islands, Germany, South Korea, Bermuda, Japan, Canada, South Africa, and the Middle East.

    Specifically, Gamma Eta Omega Chapter has served her community since 1940 with multi-faceted programs in education, music & arts, family strengthening, and financial literacy. Also, she provides scholarships annually through her charitable foundation, The Ivy Foundation, Incorporated, to East Baton Rouge Parish graduating high school seniors plus Louisiana State University and Southern University students. Finally, she partners with various organizations to provide impactful community services.

    Picture shown left to right:

    LaChondria Holder
    Committee Chairman

    Mickey Parenton
    L’Auberge General Manager and Senior Vice President

    Kizzy Smith
    L’Auberge Director of Human Resources

    Dr. Shawn Wilson
    Louisiana DOTD Secretary and Guest Speaker

    Gwendolyn Thomas
    Gamma Eta Omega Chapter President

    Pamela Honoré
    Committee Chairman

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    Good Job workshop to teach how to get the job you really want

    Workshop will teach how to set goals and reach them this year 

    It’s a New Year and you’re still doing the same old thing. But it’s never too late to follow your dreams.

    The “Good Job workshop: How to get the job you really want in 2018” will teach you how to set your goals and reach them this year.  The workshop will be held Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018 from 10 a.m. to noon at the EpiCenter, business and event center, 6220 Florida Blvd. Suite B, in Baton Rouge. The cost is $20 in advance and $25 at the door. (Register online)

    As part of the workshop, participants will learn effective goal-setting techniques, how to develop a plan and work it and valuable tips and strategies for pursuing their passions and following their dreams.

    The seminar is sponsored by Michelle McCalope, president of On Assignment Media, and the EpiCenter, a business and event center. The former award-winning journalist, author, and entrepreneur has 30 years of experience in the media and business industry.

    The seminar is based on McCalope’s motivational books, Good Job: A Guide to Pursuing Your Passions and Following Your Dreams  and That Good Job: Strategies for Pursuing Your Passions and Following Your Dreams. She shares the lessons she’s learned along the way to help inspire others to follow their dreams and not just settle for a job that pays the bills.

    Registration starts at 9:30 a.m. Refreshments will be served. For more information, email onassignmentmedia@gmail.com

    ONLINE:  www.goodjobworkshop18.eventbrite.com

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    4th Annual MLK Festival of Service lasts Jan. 12 – 15

    The upcoming Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day presents a great opportunity for anyone to make a direct impact on Baton Rouge from a grassroots level. Together with Mayor-President Sharon Weston-Broome and the City of Baton Rouge, Southern University and CADAV, Inc., The Walls Project is hosting the 4th annual MLK Festival of Service from Friday, Jan. 12 to Monday, Jan. 15. In partnership with 100+ organizations, The Walls Project will reactive a two-mile stretch of historic Scenic Highway from Airline Highway to Swan Avenue.

    Throughout the weekend-long celebration, volunteers are able to participate in working together on projects that include painting, trash cleanup, gardening, and general beautification of Scenic Highway. This event poses an opportunity greater than logging in service hours, volunteers will work hand in hand with citizens from every part of the Baton Rouge community. By strengthening local relationships across the city, we create a more connected community.

    Pat McCallister-LeDuff, director of Community Against Drugs and Violence (CADAV), a longtime Scotlandville resident and business owner said this about the event, “Through the power of collaboration we will drive this charitable plan to create a significant change in our community together for a ‘Better Scotlandville.’”

    More than 50 professional artists from across Louisiana, Texas, Georgia and Florida will create murals on local businesses over the two mile stretch of highway.

    The event will also encompass landscape improvements, such as groves of bald cypress trees planted by BR Green, community garden sites to promote healthy living by SoulFresh Organics, Keep Baton Rouge Beautiful, and G.E.E.P.

    To celebrate the weekend of service, a community block party held on Monday, January 15, from 10am – 4pm, hosted by Build the Fire, BRidge Agency, Small World Int’l, Baton Rouge Music Studios, and BREC. The block party and resource fair  will allow volunteers to enjoy free music, connect to resources provided by local nonprofits, shop at an artists’ market and partake in the international food fair.

    Additionally, an open air town hall will be facilitated by The Drum Newspaper featuring Governor John Bel Edwards, Lt. Governor Billy Nungesser, and Mayor-President Sharon Weston-Broome, Senator Regina Barrow, and Councilwomen Chauna Banks and Tara Wicker.

    For those wanting to become involved with this event, visit www.thewallsproject.org/mlk-festival-of-service for more information, volunteer registration and donations.

     

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    BUSINESS EVENT: Monthly Pitch Competition Networking Mixer

    Best 30 second PITCH wins $250 in FREE marketing & advertising

    Our Purpose
    Build business and personal relationships through recurring networking events.

    Our Vision
    Be the most sought-after networking group in Lousiana.

    Our Mission
    Make each event better than the last by asking for feedback and help.

    Our Goal
    Have each attendee bring at least one of their most trusted and respected professional contacts as a new guest every time they come back to an event.

    We host Networking Events monthly on a Thursday from 6-8PM. We regularly have 1 complimentary drink for each preregistered guest and use the events to promote charitable causes.

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    Masquerade Ball, Silent Auction planned Feb. 10

    The Jewel J. Newman Community Center Annual Masquerade Ball and Silent Auction is planned for Saturday, February 10, 8pm until 12 midnight.  The optional black tie/cocktail attire affair is set to be a great time for everyone, said Baton Rouge Councilwoman Chauna Banks.
    “Come celebrate a night of masked mystery, fun, games, prizes, and dancing. Masks purchased at the door (limited quantity available). Appetizers, beverages, and desserts provided by Victory Catering included in the cost of your ticket.”
    All donations go to Jewel J. Newman Community Center efforts to continue to provide outreach, activities, and funding for needed community center improvements.   Individual tickets ($40) and table of 8 tickets ($300) can be purchased by contacting the Jewel J. Newman Community Center at (225) 775-3935 or 77-JEWEL or email jjncc@brgov.com.
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    Mission to help Baton Rouge kids move more

    Three quarters of children in the United States are not meeting physical activity recommendations, according to a recent report authored by concerned health experts from around the country and by scientists from Baton Rouge at LSU’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center. The report, compiled by the National Physical Activity Plan Alliance, indicates that nearly 63 percent of children are exceeding screen time guidelines, meaning that a majority of kids are sitting more and moving less. These habits put our country’s children at risk for obesity, diabetes and related chronic disease as they get older.

     Here in Louisiana, one out of every two children is considered overweight or obese*. That statistic is unacceptable to Amanda Stain, Ph.D., an assistant professor of research in the Pediatric Obesity and Health Behavior Lab at Pennington Biomedical, who is working to find creative ways to improve children’s health.

    “We know that if we can help children develop healthy habits such as moving more when they are younger, they are more likely to continue those habits past adolescence into adulthood,” said Staiano.

    According to Staiano, the first step to helping kids move more is understanding why they aren’t already moving enough. That’s why she is leading the TIGER Kids research study, which is researching ways to increase kids’ physical activity and decrease sedentary behavior to improve their overall health.

    During the course of the study, Staiano and her team are using state-of-the-art technology like activity trackers and global positioning systems (GPS) to follow kids’ physical activity patterns for seven days to learn more about what prevents them from being active and what motivates them to move more. Kids in the study will also use a mobile phone app to share more information with researchers about who they are with and what they are doing—for example, spending time at the park with friends—when they are most physically active.web tigerkids_poster 9.75x9.75

    “This is a great way for me to teach my daughter about healthy habits,” said Brandy Davis, whose daughter, Ariamarie, is participating in the TIGER Kids study. “Both my son and I have been a part of research studies at Pennington Biomedical before, and we have really gotten some great health information from participating in those studies. My daughter was so excited to be a part of the TIGER Kids study because she is fascinated by the activity trackers and all the great information she’ll get about her own activity levels.”

    Staiano said the TIGER Kids study is still looking for children between the ages of 10 and 16 to participate in the study. In addition to great health information they can share with their doctor, participants who complete the study will also receive compensation for their time.

     

    TIGER Kids Study with Pennington Biomedical

    Study Purpose

    The TIGER Kids research study will evaluate ways to: increase kids’ physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior (help kids move more and sit less), encourage healthy eating, and assess other factors that may influence school performance, body image, stress and mood.

    TIGER Kids participants will also receive valuable health information at no cost. Each participant is eligible to receive a copy of:

    • their lab work; including blood sugar and cholesterol tests;
    • a printout of their DXA scan, which includes total body fat, total muscle mass, total lean mass and bone density readings; and
    • a copy of body measurement data including height, weight, waist circumference, body mass index, blood pressure and heart rate.

    Study Qualifications

    To qualify, participants in this study should:

    • Be between 10 and 16 years old
    • Not be on a restrictive diet

    Compensation

    Total compensation for the completion of this study is $100.

    Study Contact

    Parents, are you ready to see if your child qualifies for the TIGER Kids study? Visit http://www.pbrc.edu/TIGERKids to screen online or call 225-763-3000.

     

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    Flooded Louisiana Schools Receive $14 Million More in Recovery Funding

    Approximately $14 million in federal disaster aid will support schools in Ascension, East Baton Rouge, and Tangipahoa parishes with recovery and repair efforts following the August 2016 floods.

    Some repair projects received supplemental funding to enhance construction, reduce flood damage and break the cycle of repetitive losses.

    Students and schools in these parishes will benefit from the following projects reimbursed by FEMA:

    • Amite Westside Middle Magnet School has been approved for nearly $466,000 for classroom repairs. This includes $7,785 to install watertight doors.
    • Baker High School has been approved for about $2.4 million for repairs to classrooms. FEMA previously approved $5.4 million to reimburse the cost of temporary facilities, debris removal and cleaning expenses along with funding to replace contents and assist with building repairs.
    • Brookstown Magnet Middle School in Baton Rouge has been approved for approximately $2.4 millionfor classroom repairs. FEMA previously approved $1.7 million for cleaning and flood damage removal expenses.
    • Lake Elementary School in St. Amant has been approved for nearly $3.3 million for building and equipment repairs. Of that total, $61,758 will help elevate electrical equipment vulnerable to flooding. FEMA previously approved $7.4 million for temporary facilities and flood-damage removal and debris expenses.
    • St. Amant Primary School has been approved to receive about $1.8 million for classroom repairs. This includes funding of $150,300 to elevate electrical equipment.
    • The Runnels School in Baton Rouge has been approved for about $1.3 million for temporary classroom facilities, contents and repairs to accommodate displaced students and faculty.
    • The Wilma C. Montgomery Center – an East Baton Rouge School Board administration building - has been approved for about $1.3 million for repairs.

    To date, FEMA has reimbursed Louisiana schools more than $133 million for disaster-related projects through the Public Assistance program.

    The PA program has reimbursed over $489 million to local and state government entities as well as certain private nonprofits for August 2016 flood-related expenses. Eligible reimbursement projects include repairing or replacing disaster-damaged facilities and infrastructure, debris removal and emergency response activities.

    FEMA has a long-term commitment to help Louisiana communities and critical infrastructure recover from the August 2016 floods. The agency continues collaborating with the state on recovery projects with 282 applicants in 26 parishes.

    FEMA typically reimburses 75 percent of eligible expenses. However, the agency will reimburse applicants 90 percent of eligible expenses given the magnitude of the August 2016 floods.

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    Network Coalition honors New Orleans, Baton Rouge leaders during Bayou Classic 2017

    VCI International Inc. hosted the 24th Annual Network Coalition Reception at  the Hyatt House hotel in New Orleans honoring business and political leaders during the Bayou Classic weekend festivities. Honored were:

    • Lisa Mims-Devazin, PhD, Chancellor, Southern University New Orleans
    • State Senator Wesley Bishop
    • New Orleans City Councilman James Austin Gray ll
    • Eugene Green of The Green Business Report
    • Tyrone Legette of  Legette Construction
    • Hall Davis V of  Hall Davis and Sons Funeral Home in Baton Rouge
    • Tony Brown of the Eyes Open Foundation in Alexandria Louisiana
    • Sailor Jackson Jr., Louisiana Secretary of State office (retired)

      Tony Brown

      Tony Brown

    Michael McClanahan incoming president Louisiana NAACP State Conference was introduced. Erika McConduit, president of the Urban League Louisiana, Network Coalition chairman WT Whitfield, VCI International president Allen Semien Sr, Bobby Phills, Ph.D, chancellor-dean of the Southern University Land Grant Campus, Martin Burrell, president of the Dallas-based Burrell Group, and State Representative Sam Jenkins of Shreveport welcomed guests to the

    Untitled4pm event.

    Sponsors for the event included Acadian Companies, Baton Rouge Community College Foundation, Maximized Communications, CAWAN Resource Network, JAVA Copy Center, The Burrell Group, Yusef Davis Photography, Dr. Everett D. Gibson, and Ted Ellis Art Gallery.

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    COMMENTARY: FBI’s behavior is classic deja vu

    It’s a classic case of déjà vu. The FBI’s counterterrorism division has identified a supposed new threat: “black identity extremists” (BIE). The FBI claims that BIE’s “perception of police brutality against African Americans has spurred retaliatory lethal violence against law enforcement.”

    In a time when white supremacists march down city streets toting loaded weapons and shouting racist taunts, it comes as a great shock that the FBI would decide to target black identity groups protesting police brutality and their right to exist free of harm.

    Sadly, this news comes as no surprise from an administration that has flaunted its disregard for the civil rights and liberties of people of color and blamed the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville on “many sides.” President Trump and his allies have exuded a lack of compassion and historical understanding that increasingly infects our government and our society.

    It’s up to us to stop the true sources of hate in this country online at action.naacp.org you can join our call to Congress to support the NO HATE Act of 2017, sign the pledge to vote for representatives who know where the true threat to safety and democracy lies; and donate the NAACP to help us defeat hate and advance justice.

    In solidarity,

    Derrick Johnson

    Interim President and CEO, NAACP

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    Participants saught for Occupational Therapy research on Lupus

    The Department of Occupational Therapy at the University of South Alabama’ students and faculty are conducting much-needed research on how lupus affects African American women’s ability to participate in the everyday activities they need and want to do.

    To do so, simply visit https://sites.google.com/southalabama.edu/lupus and click “Take Survey.” The survey is a short, 33-item questionnaire that can be completed in 20 minutes or less. Your results will remain anonymous and will contribute to the overall effort to help all who are diagnosed with lupus.

    ONLINE: www.louisianalupusfoundation.org

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    Superintendent does not deserve all the blame

    Many I Have talked to are very dissatisfied with the performance of the current superintendent. We know that the next superintendent must be someone with a strong background and proven performance record in educating children (all children). Our current su- perintendent is well-versed in nance. Yes, this is what our board chose to lead our kids and schools over the past decade; a nance guy. This is perhaps where the notion that more money is the right answer to solve every educational problem comes into play. Maybe we should ask the districts in our country that spend less per pu- pil and yet outperform others. Or, we can ask those districts in places like New York that spend tens of thousands per pupil while performance still lacks. But, that’s another discussion for another time.

    In the superintendent’s defense, I do not think the current superintendent deserves all of the blame for district perfor- mance. For instance, currently Tangipahoa has an abundance of “magnet” schools. However, there exists absolutely no blueprint or school magnet plan illustrating to the public exactly how each magnet program should look and sound by full implementation. Nor, is there a timeline with performance benchmarks so that the indi- vidual responsible for imple- menting magnet programs District-wide can progress- monitor implementation. What kind of organization does not have these simple processes in place? Ours.

    What is the outcome of this? Well, for one, we have commu- nications magnet schools that have been in existence for over ve years without any real outlying educational experiences than those found in traditional schools. What is the blue print for the Medical Magnet at Amite? Is it just the state’s jumpstart CNA programs? Let’s get serious.
    We have kids dropping out of the high school’s IB program because they were not properly prepared for the Diploma Pro- gramme in K-8. There has been no success in securing the ac- tual Middle Years Programme despite attempts having been made since 2012 or earlier. There’s no wonder our kids are having trouble in high school; they are missing the o cial IB Middle Years. Let’s not even talk about the academic per- formance of the district’s mag- net schools. Basically, most of them are in decline.

    As for our high schools, a high school supervisor reportedly assigned e ective ratings to a high school administra- tor who was removed by the superintendent for basically being determined ine ective. How can such a discrepancy exist? Well, based on the lack of growth performance coupled with culture and climate issues that existed at this particular high school, the superinten- dent probably made the rightdecision. However, the individual who gave that particular school leader e ec- tive ratings should have also been repri- manded. The public must trust that indi- viduals are being held fairly accountable for how they perform with our children, and the ability to properly hold system leaders just as accountable as school lead- ers and teachers is a known weakness of the Tangipahoa Parish School System. This system has been known to place in- dividuals in district leadership roles who have not been proven to have been ef- fective leaders in schools based on, well, school performance. We must do better to win the public over.

    Lastly, Tangipahoa Parish Schools contain a reform measure known to help raise student achievement called the Teacher Advancement Program (TAP). The program involves the hiring of mas- ter and mentor teachers in TAP schools as well as a district Master teacher who supports TAP schools. At one point, the system had as many as nine TAP schools. Now, it has only one. Again, who holds the individual responsible for supporting these TAP schools (District TAP executive TAP Master teacher), and why is this individual still serving in this role when the district only has one TAP school? Who pays for this? How did the one school in which this individual was responsible for perform this past year? It declined.

    In conclusion, yes, the superinten- dent is ultimately responsible for district overall performance. However, the in- dividual responsible for district magnet programs, high school performance, and the individual responsible for the TAP should all be held accountable for the performance (or lack thereof) in these particular schools and programs overall. In addition, the board should request a copy of how the superintendent and/ r designee evaluated each and compare these evaluations with actual school/pro- gram performance. We do expect that, in the future, this superintendent as well as future superintendents do a better job at securing the most e ective individuals for these kinds of positions so that our entire district can be led in a more posi- tive direction, academically.

    By Patricia Morris
    President Greater Tangipahoa Parish Branch NAACP

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    Rotary plans 4th Annual Global Community Day for Nov. 5

    The Baton Rouge Capital City Rotary Club and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana invite the community to join them for a Global Community Day Celebration, 11 am, Sunday, Nov. 5 at the BREC Community Park at 14024 Highland Rd. Everybody is invited, especially the children, to explore cultural exhibits from around the globe, identify international flags and try ethnic foods. Visitors will get a free World Visitor Pass to travel from country to country to learn about different cultures and get the passes stamped. Members of Baton Rouge’s international community, dressed in colorful clothes, will perform traditional ethnic dances from around the world. The event is free and open to the public.

    Countries invited include Cameroon, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, France, Honduras, India, Italy, Ireland, Lebanon, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Russia, Scotland, Swaziland, Turkey, Palestine, Venezuela, Ecuador, Panama, Israel, Uganda, Israel, Burundi, Greece, Republic of Chad and Ukraine. Interested persons may contact us for participation.

    Baton Rouge Mayor Sharon W. Broome has proclaimed Nov. 5 as “Global Community Day.” The Henry Turner Jr. and Flavor band and other entertainment make this event too exciting to miss.

    Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is the International Stage Sponsor. Other sponsors are BREC, EBR Mayor-President’s office, WAFB TV, Entergy, Gerry Lane Chevrolet and Gerry Lane Buick-GMC, Louisiana Lottery, Visit Baton Rouge, Baton Rouge Chapter of The Links Inc. Capital City Rotary Foundation Inc., and Francis Nezianya’s Subway.

    Rotary International began as an idea more than 100 years ago. Today, Rotary flourishes worldwide with 1.2 million members in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. The mission of Rotary International is to provide service to others, promote integrity, and advance world understanding, goodwill, and peace through its fellowship of business, professional, and community leaders.

    Submitted By: Baton Rouge Rotary

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    Personal Health History Workshop opens for registration through Oct 13

    Deadline to pre-register is October 13

    The Southern University Agricultural Land-Grant Campus’ Family and Human Development Unit will host a Personal Health History Workshop, Tuesday, Oct. 31, at the SU Ag Center, 181 B.A. Little Dr., from 9am to 2:30pm.

    The free workshop will show individuals how to create a personal health history journal that can be used to keep track of not only their health history, but also the health history of their family’s including illnesses, medications, treatments and any past medical procedures. This information is often asked for by medical professionals when being admitted to the emergency room or seeing a doctor for the first time.

    Topics covered during the workshop will include:

    • Knowing Your Family Medical History
    • How to Get The Most from Your Doctor’s Visit
    • What’s a Power of Attorney
    • What’s a Living Will
    • Eating Healthy at Every Age
    • Harmful Effects of Tobacco
    • USDA Rural Housing Repair Program

    The event is free, but pre-registration is required.  To request a registration form or to pre-register, email milissia_jbaptiste@suagcenter.comdelores_johnson@suagcenter.com or call 225-771-2583, 225-771-3704.

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    Capitol High School Class of 1957 celebrates with reunion

    The Capitol High School Class of 1957 celebrated their 60th year class reunion on Saturday, September 16, 2017, at Drusilla Seafood Restaurant. On Sunday, September 17, 2017, and the classmates fellowshipped at Living Faith Cathedral at the 10:15am worship service. Classmates travelled from California, Colorado, and Arkansas.

    The Class of Capitol High School/Class of 1957 meets every other month during the Christmas season they join the Class of 1958 for a festive and enjoyable occasion.  Former teacher and instructor Mrs. Elmer Davis, who is 97,  attended the 60th Celebration at Drusilla Restaurant. Committee members for the celebration were Beverly A. Vincent, chair and class president, Joseph Stampley, co-chair and vice-president, Glorius M. Wright, Gloria J. Hall, and Cordelia Antoine.

    Mrs. Elmer Davis, Teacher of the 1957 Class at Capitol Junior High School, and Beverly A. Vincent

    Mrs. Elmer Davis, Teacher of the 1957 Class at Capitol Junior High School, and Beverly A. Vincent

    Pictured on the front row (l to r) are: Beverly A. Vincent, Annette D. Foreman, Eloise B. Ricard, Rita C. Johnson, Leatrice G. Jackson, Bettie S. Dixon, Theda R. Burden, Cordelia Antoine, Bernadine Moore, Glorious M. Wright, Geraldine J. Guyse, Kathryn F. Simous, and Gloria J. Hall. At the back are Rose L. Preston, Samuel Preston, Marvin Foster, Norma F. Reed, Thomas Washington, Russell Morris, Joseph Stampley, and Roosevelt T. Brown who serves as chairman of the yearly Christmas event.

    Submitted By Katrina M. Spottsville

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    Civil Rights Attorney Ben Crump launches law firm with national scope

    TALLAHASSEE—With the aim of more effective activism to promote individual and social justice in America, renowned civil rights advocate and attorney Ben Crump  this week launched a new law firm with a nationwide network of top lawyers. Well known for his work representing the families of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Corey Jones, Tamir Rice and others, Crump said the new firm will have the scale to seek justice for individuals across the nation and broadly extend his advocacy for social justice causes.

    Ben Crump Law PLLC, will focus on civil rights, employment law, personal injury, workers’ compensation, medical malpractice and wrongful death cases, as well as mass torts and class actions.

    “We are at a pivotal time in American history, when the hunger for social justice is spurring a renewal in our civil rights movement,” Crump said. “Tapping into a nationwide team of talent gives us the scale to help individuals across the country and the ability to bring class actions and mass tort cases that can spur the progress toward real change.”

    Offices will be in Washington, D.C., Los Angeles and Tallahassee. Ben Crump Law has established an affiliation with the Morgan & Morgan law firm to create linkages with some of the top lawyers in the country, allowing the firm to handle cases anywhere in the country as part of the Ben Crump Law network.

    People of color are disproportionately affected by environmental racism, discriminatory practices and lack of access to quality schools and the internet — causes that all may be addressed by uniting the interests of many plaintiffs, Crump said.

    “Crump speaks truth to power and gives hope to the hopeless,” said John Morgan, founder of Morgan & Morgan. “He is today’s seminal civil rights lawyer. The go-to guy. A modern-day Johnny Cochran.”

    Crump will host TVOne’s “Evidence of Innocence,” which is based on wrongfully convicted citizens who have been exonerated by clear and convincing evidence. He is also will lead the investigation on A&E’s upcoming documentary series “Who Killed Tupac?” and can be seen on the new film “Marshall,” set to release October 13.

    A distinguished civil rights advocate, Crump has been honored with the Henry Latimer Diversity Award, The Florida Association of Fundraising Professionals, Outstanding Philanthropist of the Year, National Newspaper Publishers Association Newsmaker of the Year, and The Root 100 Top Black Influencers. Crump also has served as president of the National Bar Association. He has been recognized by Ebony magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential African Americans and has received the National Civil Rights Museum’s Freedom Award, the American Association for Justice Johnny Cochran Award, the NAACP Thurgood Marshall Award, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s Martin Luther King Servant Leader Award.

    Visit Ben Crump Law online at www.bencrump.com.

     

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    Trump Approves Louisiana Emergency Declaration

    President Donald J. Trump declared that an emergency exists in the State of Louisiana and ordered Federal assistance to supplement State, tribal, and local response efforts due to the emergency conditions resulting from Tropical Storm Harvey beginning on August 27, 2017, and continuing.

    This action authorizes the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), to coordinate all disaster relief efforts.  This action will help alleviate the hardship and suffering that the emergency has inflicted on the local population, and provide appropriate assistance for required emergency measures, authorized under Title V of the Stafford Act, to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety, and to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe in the parishes of Beauregard, Calcasieu, Cameron, Jefferson Davis, and Vermillion.

    Specifically, FEMA is authorized to identify, mobilize, and provide at its discretion equipment and resources necessary to alleviate the impacts of the emergency.  Emergency protective measures, including direct Federal assistance, will be provided at 75 percent Federal funding.

    Brock Long, Administrator, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Department of Homeland Security, named William J. Doran III as the Federal Coordinating Officer for Federal recovery operations in the affected areas.

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    AppsILike.net encourages, helps create mobile apps

    Savvier Health, LLC has been granted a license to offer the same easy to-use subscription-based app creation platform that has been used by tens of thousands of people around the world to successfully publish hundreds of thousands of apps. Their system uses a simple what-you-see-is-what-you-get format to allow subscribers to easily exchange standard text and pictures with their own in hundreds of ready-to-publish app templates. With this system, even the average high school student can churn out multiple apps each month and make money for college in his spare time.

    Now, anyone who can use a home computer has the potential to copy and paste and write his way into a piece of the explosive international app market that has made more than a few millionaires. Neither coding experience nor a large investment in time or resources is needed to become a part of the app revolution anymore. It’s no secret that people of color, specifically Blacks and Hispanics, are grossly underrepresented in apps on the market, as well as among the ranks of app creators, but that tide is about to turn.

    With AppsILike.net subscribers simply choose from hundreds of templates, change the text and pictures, and then click a button to submit their work to their technical support team, who then ‘builds’ the app and submits it to the AppStore under the subscriber’s AppStore developer account, or provides the code (APK) that subscribers can upload to their GooglePlay or Amazon/Kindle developer accounts. With literally millions of stock photos available online for purchase, the possibilities for creating new apps is endless.

    While not everyone is computer savvy, AppsILike.net provides numerous step-by-step tutorials to help even the most skeptical subscribers create stunning apps with little effort. Free technical support via email is also available.

    While there will be a slight learning curve for many, a person with no app creation experience whatsoever could create a basic app in a Saturday afternoon utilizing their easy methods and A-Z tutorials, and soon be able to create a basic app in less than an hour.

    There are different types of apps, as well as different complexities of apps. For instance, an app for a local beauty shop may only contain a page full of photos of beautiful hairstyles, a page for employees’ contact information, and pages for business hours, specials, and prices. This is a quick and easy app to create. On the other hand, a more complicated app to customize, such as a music app or some game apps, will take more time.

    With more than 200 templates, over 100 features available thru www.AppsILike.net, as well as millions of online stock photos available for purchase, the potential to create, earn and uplift is unlimited.

    By BlackNews.com

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    Covington native serves in Japan aboard USS Germantown

    SASEBO, Japan – A 2016 Covington High School graduate and Covington native is serving in Japan in the U.S. Navy aboard USS Germantown.

    Seaman Recruit Nicholas Brumfield is an operations specialist aboard the ship operating out of Sasebo, Japan.

    A seaman recruit is the Navy’s entry-level enlisted position following graduation from boot camp. Brumfield graduated from the Navy’s Recruit Training Command at Great Lakes, Illinois in July and has begun his apprenticeship training on the Germantown.

    “I decided to become an operations specialist because it sounded cool,” Brumfield said. “It sounded like I would be actually doing something, playing an active role in protecting the ship and my shipmates.”

    With more than 50 percent of the world’s shipping tonnage and a third of the world’s crude oil passing through the region, the U.S. has historic and enduring interests in this part of the world.

    “Our alliance is rooted in shared interests and shared values,” said Adm. Harry Harris, U.S. Pacific Command Commander. “It’s not hyperbole to say that the entire world has benefited from the U.S.-Japan alliance. While our alliance helped stabilize the region after the Second World War, it also enabled the Japanese people to bring about an era of unprecedented economic growth. And for the last six decades, our Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen have worked side by side with the Japan Self Defense Force to protect and advance peace and freedom.”

    Commissioned in 1986, Germantown is the second Navy ship named after the Revolutionary War Battle of Germantown. With a crew of more than 900 sailors and Marines, Germantown is 609 feet long and weighs approximately 16,000 tons. Designed specifically to operate landing craft air cushion small craft vessels, Whidbey Island-class dock landing ships have the largest capacity for these landing craft out of any U.S. Navy amphibious ship.

    “I like my chain of command, they really focus on us as junior sailors, helping us build up not only Navy-wise but far into the future about what we want to do when we leave the service. They genuinely care about us,” said Brumfield.

    Sea duty is inherently arduous and challenging but it builds strong fellowship and esprit de corps among members of the crew. The crew is highly motivated and quickly adapt to changing conditions. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches, and drills.

    “Serving in the Navy, not only does it have benefits for me but I’m doing something greater than myself,” Brumfield said. “Nothing is given to us, you have to work for everything you accomplish.”

    The Navy’s presence in Sasebo is part a long-standing commitment.

    “The U.S.-Japan alliance remains the cornerstone for peace and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region,” said Harris.

    By Chief Petty Officer Bill Steele
    Navy Office of Community Outreach

    Read more »
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    Licensing law changes for Louisiana contractors

    According to the Louisiana Home Builders Association, HB 675, now Act 231 of the 2017 Regular Legislative Session makes several changes to the Contractors’ Licensing Law. Act 231 will go into effect Tuesday, August 1st 2017.

    Licensed residential contractors shall provide in writing:
    1. Name
    2. Contracting license number
    3. Classification
    4. Current insurance certificates evidencing the amount of liability
    insurance maintained and proof of workers’ compensation coverage

    Registered home improvement contractors shall provide in writing:
    1. Name
    2. Registration number
    3. Current insurance certificates evidencing the amount of liability
    insurance maintained and proof of workers’ compensation coverage

    This information shall be provided to the party with whom the contractor has
    contracted to perform contracting services, regardless of whether such information is requested by the contracting party for whom the work is to be performed.

    Also, licensed residential contractors and registered home improvement contractors shall produce to the permitting authority evidence of a license or registration in good standing prior to the issuance of any permit required by law. Click here to read the act in its entirety

    Read more »
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    Cravins tells youth ‘You can have an impact today’

    Former State Senator Donald Cravins, Jr. addressed more than 300 high school student leaders attending Louisiana Youth Seminar, July 19, on Louisiana State University’s campus.

    “You’re here now. You can have an impact today. You are Louisiana’s today and Louisiana’s future,” said Cravins, a former LYS Program Director and current LYS Advisory Committee Member.

    Cravins was the guest speaker before the time-honored LYS presentation of “Louisiana: A Dream State,” which pays tribute to the unique citizens, cultures and traditions of Louisiana.

    “It’s about making this state a better place. I hope that you allow this program to do for you what it has done for me. We have an obligation to leave our state a better place than we found it,” said Cravins.

    Cravins previously served as chief of staff to former U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, a LYS alumna.He is the National Urban League’s senior vice president for policy and executive director of the Washington Bureau. He also serves as a captain in the District of Columbia Army National Guard Judge Advocate General (JAG) Corps.

    Read more »
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    SU Lab coach Rebecca Marshall honored

    The Louisiana High School Athletic Association Coaches Convention recently honored Southern University Laboratory School head track coach Rebecca Marshall.

    Marshall has helped to cultivate a rich athletic history for the Southern University Laboratory School Kittens. She has a bountiful tradition of producing track stars who have ranked amongst the states top track leaders. Many former team members under her leadership have gone on to become elite athletes.

    She has won 21 Class 1-A State Championships and 15 of them were consecutive. She currently holds the position as Athletic Director but has worn many hats over the past years. During her 30 years at Southern University Laboratory School she has served as SGA Sponsor, Assistant Volleyball Coach, Cheerleader Coach, Dancing Doll Coach and Dean of Students.

    Submitted by Rene Marshall-Williams

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    Camphor Memorial United Methodist Church celebrates 100 years

    Camphor Memorial United Methodist Church One-Hundred Years Centennial Celebration was held on Sunday, June 25, at the 10:55am worship service. The theme was “God’s Grace and Witnessing for Jesus Christ.  Founding dates 1917-2017.  

    The centennial message was given by Pastor Stephen Emmanuel Handy, of McKendree United Methodist Church located in Nashville, Tennessee.  He graduated from Dillard University in New Orleans, Louisiana with a bachelors degree in business administration.  He has a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from Tennessee State University, a master’s degree in divinity from Vanderbilt University and is currently working on his doctorate in divinity from Wesley Seminary.  In 2009, Stephen was appointed by the Bishop to become the first African-American Pastor at McKendree United Methodist Church.  His father, Bishop W.T. Handy, served on the United Methodist Ministry for many years and was former minster of the St. Mark United Methodist Church located in Baton Rouge.  

    Camphor Memorial United Methodist Church Centennial Celebration, January-June 2017 Schedule of Events
    Activities and Fellowship, “A Moment of Camphor History”, Black History Sunday, Ecumenical Service, Gospelfest, Writing Essay Contest, Church Outside the Wall, “When Camphor was in Vogue”, Centennial Banquet, Centennial Concert, Prayer Breakfast, Old Fashioned Basket Family Picnic, and the Centennial Celebration Praise and Worship Services. A reception was held after the worship services in the Moses T. Jackson Fellowship Hall.

    The twelve founders and former ministers were recognized.  The Centennial Celebration was very well attended.  Rev. Clifton Conrad Sr., Senior Pastor, Rev. Tiffanie Postell, Associate Pastor, Rev. Ken Irby, Baton Rouge District Superintendent and Rev. Cynthia Harvey,  Bishop, Louisiana Annual Conference.  Camphor Memorial United Methodist Church is located at 8742 Scenic Highway in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 

    By Mada McDonald Clark
    Contributing Writer

    Photographed above are: Julia B. Moore, Claude Tellis DTh., Mada McDonald Clark, Mary Emerson, Rev. Stephen Emmanuel Handy, Associate Pastor Tiffanie C. Postell, Pastor Clifton C. Conrad Sr., Press L. Robinson, Sr. EdD, Marilyn Ray-Jones DTH, Wesley J. Belton, Blanche P. Smith, and Mary T. Charles. Photo by: Tina Bernard. Submitted by: Katrina Spottsville

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    Seven additional community meetings announced on the Zoo

    The community is strongly encouraged to attend 13 community meeting on the Zoo at Greenwood Park. BREC announced six meetings last week. The Keep the Zoo at Greenwood Park Committee are adding seven additional community meetings. BREC Superintendent Carolyn McKnight has been invited to attend all of the additional meetings; however, the Keep the Zoo at Greenwood Park will be on hand for all 13 meetings.

    “Every citizen has a role to play in building community and creating sustainable community investment across our East Baton Rouge parish. The vitality of our Baton Rouge Zoo at Greenwood Park and democracy relies upon the active participation of every person,” said committee member, Becky Bond.

    According to a written statement, the group saw the need for additional meetings to offer a balance in diversity; reaching across lines of race, culture, class, and location to gather participants.

    Meetings planned:

    • July 11 – Perkins Road Community Park, 7122 Perkins Road, 6pm
    • July 11 – City of Baker Council Meeting, Baker Municipal Center, 3325 Groom Road, Baker, LA 6pm
    • July 12 – City Center Development District, Piccadilly Cafeteria, 6406 Florida Blvd., 8:00 am
    • July 13 – Highland Road Community Park, 14024 Highland Road, 6pm
    • July 22 – Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church, 185 Eddie Robinson Sr., Dr., 9:00 am
    • July 25 – CADAV Community Meeting, Scotlandville Library, 7373 Scenic Hwy., 6:00 pm
    • August 1 – Central Library, 11260 Joor Road, Central, LA, 6pm
    • August 01 – Baton Rouge Airport, Conference Room, 2nd Floor, 3:30 pm
    • August 3 – Zachary Library, 1900 Church Street, Zachary, LA ; 6pm
    • August 8 – Independence Park Theatre, 7500 Independence Blvd, 6pm
    • August 10 – Federation of GBR Civic Associations, Goodwood Library, 7711 Goodwood Blvd., 6:00 pm
    • August 14 – Greenwood Waterfront Theater, 13350 Hwy. 19, 6pm
    • August 24 –Visit Baton Rouge Board Meeting, 359 3rd Street, 12 noon
    For more information, contact Metro District 2 at (225) 389-8331

    Read more »
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    Dialogue necessary to move beyond fear

    The reactions to the Department of Justice’s decision to not charge police in the shooting death of Alton Sterling have divided largely along racial lines. Baton Rouge like many cities was racially segregated at its founding.Although the city has undergone “desegregation,” in the last several decades clear racial divisions exist most vividly with Florida Blvd as the racial dividing line.
    Crump

    Crump

    Many institutions and individuals have either ignored their roles in this continued division or looked for ways to explain it or justify an unacceptable situation.Often people wonder what difference talking about these racial divisions can do to make real lasting positive change. Given our name, we obviously believe that talk/dialogue does change things. It matters though what kind of talking it is. Dialogue done badly likely does more harm than good. We work hard at developing a dialogue that is functional and well-fitted to the difficult conversation of race. One thing we do know is that the dialogue must take place outside of a rush to act or in the mist of highly charged, anxiety filled times. In those times, myths and misunderstandings and old unaddressed issues are bursting through, and the dialogue will be ill-informed.
    Webster states, dialogue “seeks understanding and harmony.” In the educational process we use called the Dialogue On Race Series, we stress understanding; which may or may not lead to harmony.  However better understanding has a powerful impact that can lead to changes; changes that benefit everyone.The attempts to address racism in Baton Rouge have not kept pace with the growing problem.

    The fear of explosion and violence is a symptom that says we all know something is wrong. Instead of looking for ways to explain that “wrong,” we need to look for ways to understand the problem.  What has caused the problem and why have we let it go on so long? We also need to ask why so many have stayed quiet, avoided it, or believed that the problem of race has gone.

    Yes we need dialogue but we need dialogue done well. Dialogue on Race Louisiana’s core program, the Dialogue on race series is not just any conversation. The magic of the Dialogue on Race Series is that it is structured, facilitated, backed with factual information. It is formatted to set a safe environment for open, honest, brave conversation.
    The DOR Series is a highly specialized form of discussion that imposes rigorous discipline on the participants.  The series begins by defining the terms used. You have to have a common understanding of the terms being used.
    When dialogue is done well, the results can be extraordinary; long-standing stereotypes can be dissolved, mistrust can be overcome, mutual understanding achieved, vision shaped, grounded in shared purpose, new common ground discovered, new perspectives and insights gained, bonds of community strengthened.
    When Baton Rouge solves institutional racism, the sharp line of racial division will end. Also protest will not be seen as something to fear, instead it will be recognized as it is meant to be; a tool of a free society.

    By Maxine Crump 

    CEO Dialogue on Race Louisiana
    Baton Rouge

    ONLINE: http://dialogueonracelouisiana.org
    https://www.facebook.com/DialogueOnRaceLouisiana

     

    Read more »
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    College offers high school diploma for free

    VIRGINIA COLLEGE ANNOUNCES HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM IN PARTNERSHIP WITH PENN FOSTER TO OFFER COMMUNITY MEMBERS ACCESS TO POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION 

    Virginia College in Baton Rogue has established a  High School Diploma Program  where students can earn an accredited high school diploma at one of 11 Virgina College campuses across the country in as little as 12 weeks and at no cost. Since the program began in January 2017, the Baton Rouge campus has enrolled 20 students, with four already completing the program and graduating with their diplomas – three of those graduates went on to enroll at Virginia College.

    The program is designed for students who have previously faced challenges completing their high school diploma or GED but who are interested in earning a high school diploma as a step toward a new career or further vocational training. Transfer credits will be awarded for comparable high school subjects where a full credit has been earned. Penn Foster also accepts transfer credits from a GED.

    “We are proud to partner with Penn Foster to offer this program at our campus,” says Campus President Bill Wells. “Through the High School Diploma Program, we are uniquely able to equip and empower students, regardless of their situation, to prioritize their education and take the necessary steps toward becoming the leaders, employees and business owners of tomorrow.”

    Students enrolled in the High School Diploma Program work directly with an experienced instructor every step of the way. The program requires students to dedicate a minimum of 12 hours each week to on-campus classwork, and allows for any additional to be completed remotely. These flexible class times and schedules allow many students to still maintain a job while earning their diplomas, accommodating a variety of situations and lifestyles.

    Upon completing the High School Diploma Program and earning a high school diploma, students are given an opportunity to enroll at Virginia College to begin vocational training and work toward a certificate, diploma or degree through any of its various programs.

    ONLINE: www.vc.edu/locations/batonrouge/ or call (225) 236-3900. For more information about the High School Diploma Program, .

     

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    LETTER: Ask legislators for more health centers in schools

    Dear Citizens:

    Did you know that there are 63 School-Based Health Centers in 27 parishes in Louisiana? They are medical offices in a school, staffed by physicians, nurse practitioners, registered nurses and licensed behavioral health professionals. School-based health centers keep children in school by providing medical and mental health care on campuses. More than 70,000 students have access to health care through these centers. There are many benefits including reducing absenteeism and tardiness, reduction in hospital emergency care, the prevention of suicide and depression, and keeping children in school so that they can graduate. We know that 96 percent of students treated in a center RETURN to class.

    We need more school-based health centers in our schools and in more parishes throughout Louisiana. Yet, today the funding for existing School Based Health Centers is in danger due to state budget cuts to healthcare.

    As the president of the Louisiana School-Based Health Alliance and a health professional, I have spent countless hours working with partners across the state to get MORE health centers in our schools. Why? Because they keep students in school and parents at work. They provide Louisiana children with acute care for minor illnesses and injuries, prescriptions for medications, immunizations, diagnosis and treatment of chronic diseases and mental health services. Parents must give permission for their children to be treated.

    Please ask your legislator to fight for School-Based Health Center funding. It’s for children and parents. I encourage you to contact your legislator today and ask him or her to restore funding for School-Based Health Centers.
    Louisiana School-Based Health Alliance

    Tabitha J. Washington, MHA
    President

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    Mayor Broome to citizens: ‘I stand against hatred, division, and words that divide’

    On May 19, 2017, Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome released this letter to residents of East Baton Rouge Parish after seeing racist and bigoted statements posted online.

    At my inauguration in January, I spoke about the fabric of our community and how it could be torn by the challenges of the day. I said that many would look at these challenges and choose to define us by the different and diverse pieces that exist. I stood before this city excited by the opportunity to help lead the unification of our different and disparate pieces of cloth into a wonderful, colorful, distinctive and inclusive quilt that will be the “new Baton Rouge.” I spoke about how we could utilize the common and strong threads of respect, opportunity, fairness, inclusion, equity, and optimism to weave an amazing tapestry of growth and progress that touches every area of this parish and beyond. I had much hope then and I have much hope now.

    I have a profound love for this city, parish and ALL residents. My goal as mayor-president is to unite people around our collective goals of progress and equity. While freedom of speech is one of the pillars that makes this country so beautiful, irresponsibility of such can be used as a tool to separate us as community. As your mayor-president, I stand against hatred, division, and words and actions that only further divide our community. I do not endorse or support the opinions of any individual or media outlet that would attempt to take us down a path of strife and contentiousness. I write to you today to say that this division cannot and will not be the demise of Baton Rouge.

    While this administration has been working diligently to address the priorities that you as citizens have established for Baton Rouge and East Baton Rouge Parish, we still have much work to do. This includes but is not limited to: ensuring that all of our children, regardless of their addresses, receive an optimum education; our police are equipped and trained properly not only to be aligned with 21st century best practices, but to also be aligned with the community they serve; we are adequately prepared for natural disasters and recovery; and that all neighborhoods have the tools necessary to make them the safe, progressive places that residents deserve; and that economic growth touches all parts of our city. Lastly, I will continue to work to make peace and justice the standard for our community — not the exception.
    We can accomplish these goals and more if we work together. That is when we are our strongest.

    In closing, I want to be very clear: I reject any efforts intended to create division and strife in our community. The statements that I made during my campaign for your mayor-president and subsequent inaugural address were not just idle words. I meant every word with every fiber of my being when I spoke of the “new Baton Rouge.” Our future is a shared one. We are inextricably bound together in our search for
    a place that we can be proud to call home. And I, for one, refuse to be deterred in our journey.

    Sincerely,
    Sharon Weston Broome

    Read more »
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    Poetry camp offers creative outlet for teen summer enrichment

    Literary arts nonprofit, Forward Arts, is gearing up for Slam Camp – a three-week specialized summer experience for youth, ages 13-19, interested in learning elements of writing and performing poetry. The camp, which will begin on June 12 on the campus of Louisiana State University, offers participants instruction from world-class practitioners of the art form including Forward Arts’ staff members who have excelled at the highest levels of performance poetry.

     “One of the many benefits to participating in Slam Camp is the mastery of fearlessness,” said Chancelier Skidmore, Forward Arts’ Executive Director and former world poetry slam champion. “Public speaking is scary, but when given the tools to write compelling texts and to deliver those texts with ferocity and charisma, it opens up an entire realm of goals that seemed improbable before.”

    A typical day at Slam Camp includes attendees participating in community building exercises, writing workshops, eating lunch at LSU’s student union, group dialogues, reading circles and performance activities. Slam Camp also features special guest artists visiting once a week to do lecture demonstrations. Of past guest lecturers are trumpeter John Gray and former Louisiana Poet-Laureate Ava Haymon.

    Claudia Dixon, a mother of three past camp participants said she witnessed an immediate growth within her otherwise introverted sons.

    “As a returning parent to slam camp, I cannot explain how important it is to allow my children the ability to express themselves using a variety of methods, including verbal art.” Dixon said. “My sons have not only impressed me with their spoken word skills, they are now open to discussing social, political and gender issues that were never of importance to them prior to Slam Camp – my introverts have been converted.”

    More than exploring poetry and personal growth, Slam Camp offers participants a sense of community with likeminded youth.

    “I believe that young people participating in Slam Camp creates a more equitable opportunity for community storytelling,” said Desireé Dallagiacomo, Forward Arts program director and multi-time international slam finalist and viral sensation. “Because we have young folks from all walks of life, they hear stories and narratives from others that they wouldn’t encounter in their normal circles. This creates empathy and understanding, and we need that now more than ever.”

    As a staple of Slam Camp, norms of interaction are established on the first day to create a safe space for open expression. Participants are encouraged to write and dialogue in a manner that is honest and with respect to their fellow campers.

    Registration is now open. Slam Camp will take place June 12 to June 30, Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. A closing showcase of work participants prepared throughout the camp will be held on Friday, June 30.

    The cost of the program is $150 for an individual camp participant. For families registering more than one youth, the cost is $100 per additional participant. Scholarships opportunities are available and determined on a case by case assessment of need. Registration and payment information available at forwardarts.org

    Read more »
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    COMMUNITY EVENT: Ponchatoula Samaritans to meet May 11

    Ready to aid community leaders, the Ponchatoula Samaritans have scheduled a May 11 meeting at the St. Joseph Ministries. The public is invited.

    Spearheaded by Nancy Bourgeois, the group helps churches, organizations, city and parish government, and interested residents stay informed about what is being done in the Ponchatoula area to meet the everyday needs of its citizens, especially in times of disaster.

    Organizers said this effort prevents duplication of services, and the information gleaned is shared among the groups, further aiding in the process of lending a hand-up to those in need.

    St. Joseph Ministries is located on the corner of West Pine and North Eighth. The lunch meetings are usually potluck. RSVP to Bourgeois at 985-507-1797.

    Submitted News by Kathryn J. Martin

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    50 Shades of Pink comes to Downtown Baton Rouge

    Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Incorporated, Nu Gamma Omega Chapter hosted 50 Shades of Pink: A Girls’ Night Out on Friday, April 28, 2017, at 6p.m. at the La State Capitol Visitor Center in downtown Baton Rouge. The event was facilitated by the arts committee of the chapter, and included: wine pairings, makeovers, medical spa consulting, shopping, author expos, fashion model participation, food,and music. All the proceeds of the event will directly benefit sewing camps for young girls in the Baton Rouge community.

    Submitted by Morgan E. Etienne, MPA

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    We can not give in ‘to feelings of impotent rage,’ 100 Black Men say

    Through its president Michael Victorian, The 100 Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge released the following statement Thursday morning following the U.S. Justice Department decision on the Alton Sterling case on May 3

    Baton Rouge (LA) Alton Sterling’s death is a tragedy. It is compounded further by the Justice Department’s decision not to bring charges against the officers involved in his death. We respect Alton’s life and mourn the loss to his family and friends. We also state, categorically, that Mr. Sterling’s life mattered. The lives of the young African-American men and women who we mentor, matter and 100 Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge will continue to do everything within its power to help young people reach their full potential. The systematic conditions that led to Mr. Sterling’s tragic death must be met head on with love, compassion, and an unwavering determination to help make all of our communities safe and economically vibrant.

    We recognize that the findings released on yesterday are frustrating. However, we urge all people of goodwill to use this moment as a call for greater and more meaningful engagement. It is meaningful and constructive to vent, protest, and fully engage in the democratic process. However, we cannot give in, though, to feelings of impotent rage through acts of violence.  Such action will only endanger our community.

    We call on those who wish to improve the lives of people here at the corner of Fairfield and N. Foster Drive (Baton Rouge, LA) to get directly involved in dismantling injustice. Furthermore, we applaud the leadership of our East Baton Rouge Parish Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome who early in her administration took steps to execute much needed reforms to the Baton Rouge Police Department, including these five policy changes:

    1.      Officers are required to give a verbal warning, before using deadly force, except where there are exigent circumstances.

    2.      Officers are required to de-escalate situations, when possible, before using force.  De-escalation strategies include disengagement, area containment, waiting out a subject, summoning reinforcements, calling in specialized units or employing other strategies.

    3.      Officers will not employ chokeholds or strangleholds, except in emergency circumstances where it is immediately necessary to use deadly force and the authorized weapons are inoperable, inaccessible or otherwise not available.

    4.      Officers are prohibited from discharging a firearm at a moving vehicle unless the vehicle or the persons within the vehicle pose an immediate deadly threat to others.

    5.      Officers will be required to intervene to prevent another officer from using excessive force and to immediately report when they observe the use of excessive force by another officer

    In order for these policies to have their intended effect, the Baton Rouge Police Department and its leadership must take active measures to ensure that those officers that do not comply with these policies will face serious significant discipline

    The 100 Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge is committed to continuing to engage our youth and families to strengthen our community. We hope that area citizens will answer this call to a crisis and set an example to the nation and the world as they watch.

    One Hundred Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge, LTD. is a non-profit organization through which African-American males step forward and assume roles of community leadership, responsibility, and guidance.  Michael Victorian currently serves as the president and chairman of the board.

     

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    AKA Debutante Cotillion presented ten maids, princesses, Miss Amity

    Ten beautiful young women were presented by Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, Nu Gamma Omega Chapter at its annual Debutante Cotillion and Spring Ball on April 8, 2017 at the Belle of Baton Rouge Atrium. The warm welcome to all guests came from chapter President Jacqueline Nash Grant. Junior League of Baton Rouge president Kathy Fletcher Victorian served as Mistress of Ceremonies for the evening themed “An Elegant Array of Precious Pearls”.

    Joy Gustavia Trusclair was crowned as Queen of the Cotillion, the daughter of Donald and Joyce F. Trusclair. She was escorted by Raymond Vincent.

    Taylor Danielle Fields was acknowledged as the 2017 Miss Amity.

    Reigning as princesses were First Princess Cache’ Marchell Brown, daughter of Raymond and Calaundra Clarke and the late Marlon Brown, escorted by Darius Washington; Second Princess Peyton Lauryn Matthew, daughter of Torin Matthew and Veronica Matthew, escorted by Taylor Matthew; Third Princess Taylor Danielle Fields, daughter of John Fields and Brigitte Fields, escorted by Kendall Boults; Fourth Princess Sondra Alexis Williams, daughter of Robert and Carla Williams, escorted by Alvin McCrory III; Fifth Princess Desiree’ Nicole Jones, daughter of Ervin and Jennifer Jones, escorted by Clyde Edwards-Helaire.

    Honored as 2017 Cotillion Maids were First Maid Victoria Lauryn Clark, daughter of Darren Clark and  Sonceree Clark, escorted by Clayton Hunter; Second Maid Mia Geneice Gaines, daughter of Telfry and Melissa Gaines, escorted by Preston Gaines; Third Maid Shania Darnay Stewart, daughter of Shondel Stewart and Chastity Sanders, escorted by Devonte Landry; Fourth Maid Nia Simone Ross, daughter of Ike and India Ross, escorted by Keilen Ross.

    Ball captains for the event were: Nicholas Cloyd, Tristan Matthew, Derick Rheams, Jr., and Carter Tucker.

    Mary A. Darby, Kimberly McCants, Velena Johnson, Jacqueline N. Grant, Kathy F. Victorian, Errin W. Gaines, Danielle Staten, and Brandy Johnson

    Mary A. Darby, Kimberly McCants, Velena Johnson, Jacqueline N. Grant, Kathy F. Victorian, Errin W. Gaines, Danielle Staten, and Brandy Johnson

     

    Errin Gaines served as general debutante chairman, while Brandy Johnson, Kimberly McCants and Danielle Staten served as co-chairman. Other program participants included chapter Vice President Velena Johnson, Carla Harmon, Toyia Charles-Comminey, Joycelyn Green, Mary Alice Darby, Ellen McKnight and Brittnei Shelling.

    Submitted by Morgan Etienne

     

     

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    8 ways to optimize your sleep

    While a healthy lifestyle requires a balanced diet and exercise, sleep is another pillar of overall wellness that is both essential to your health and success, and often overlooked.

    By simply making small changes to your daily routine you can improve your quality of sleep. Follow these tips from Dr. Sujay Kansagra, Mattress Firm’s sleep health consultant and director of Duke University’s Pediatric Neurology Sleep Medicine Program, and get on your way to better rest and a healthier life.

    1. Manage your sleep time. Rather than trying to accomplish everything on your to-do list at the expense of sleep, reverse your approach. As the average adult needs 7-9 hours of sleep each night, make sure to set aside the time needed for a full night of rest.
    1. Stay on schedule. Try to keep your bedtime and wake time consistent on both weekdays and weekends. With time, your brain and body will acclimate to these set times, but until then, rely on an alarm – not only to wake in the morning, but to keep you from staying up too late at night, too.
    1. Find a routine. A routine performed 20-30 minutes prior to bed every night can subconsciously ease your brain into sleep. Unwinding with a book, taking a warm bath or meditating are all ways to slow your mind and transition toward peaceful rest.
    1. Brighten up the morning. Getting plenty of bright light in the morning helps keep your sleep timing on track, particularly if you wake up early. Make opening the drapes and blinds your first task each morning.
    1. Ditch the clock. Fixating on the time can create stress and keep you up at night. Instead, set your alarm, turn your clock around and forget about the time.
    1. Get moving. Research shows that exercise can act as a natural sleep remedy, often leading to a more sound slumber. However, if you exercise late and have difficulty falling asleep, consider moving your workout earlier in the day. The increase in body temperature from exercise tends to be prolonged, sometimes making it hard to fall asleep.
    1. Kick the caffeine habit. Morning caffeine can linger in your system until it’s time to sleep. Coffee, tea, dark sodas and dark chocolate are the main offenders for most people.
    1. Pay back debt. If you are chronically deprived of sleep, allow your body extra sleep time to make up for the loss. In these cases, even 8-9 hours each night may not be enough. Allow your body to catch up then commit to more consistent sleep patterns in the future.

    Find more resources to help improve your sleep, including tips on how to purchase a new mattress, at DailyDoze.com.

    By Family Features
    Photo courtesy of Getty Images

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    ‘PHAT’ girls take over Baton Rouge runway

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    Plus-sized women from across Baton Rouge were cheered on has they ripped the runway at PHAT Girl Takeover -The Next Episode Fashion Show at the EpiCenter. The ladies were 17 to 51 years of age and sported attire from local boutiques and designers from across the state.

    For eight weeks, the models attended personal and professional development workshops and were trained to walk the runway by plus-size model and runway coach Patrice Purnell. Jerris Cade was emcee, and Brandon WB Williams of Ivanhoe, North Carolina performed his hit single “The Plus-Size Diva Anthem.”

    The fashion show was organized by SheProductions, LLC, and owner Simone Higginbotham. Photos by Tarnish Jasper. Model attire provided by Big and Desirable.

    Submitted News

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    Take a mindful approach to fighting Spring allergens

    While springtime means blooming flowers, warmer temperatures and more time spent outdoors, it also means allergies and pollen. Tackling dust mite matter, tree pollen and animal dander is completely different from protecting your home against the winter flu and requires a new regimen of preparation and cleaning.

    Take on spring allergens by refreshing your home with these simple practices, and help get your family ready to enjoy the warmer months.

    Prep for Bed. Allergens don’t go to bed when you do; they can continue to irritate even while you’re sleeping, causing a restless slumber. To help ensure allergens and pollens aren’t tracked into bedrooms, leave a laundry basket in the hall and have family members remove their clothing before entering their rooms. A quick rinse in a warm shower before bed can help you relax and wind down while also washing away any unwanted pollens still stuck in your hair or on your skin.

    Freshen Fabrics. Clothing, towels and bed linens – items you come in contact with multiple times a day – can trap pollens, dust mite matter, allergens and dander.  It’s important to not only rinse these items but to use a detergent that removes allergens and is gentle on skin, like all free clear liquid and mighty pacs, laundry detergent for sensitive skin. The liquid detergent removes 99 percent of everyday and seasonal allergens, including the top spring allergens: tree and grass pollen, and is the No. 1 recommended detergent brand by dermatologists, allergists and pediatricians for sensitive skin.

    Ingredients Matter. Taking preventative measures against spring allergens can start in a surprising place: the refrigerator. While most people think about treating allergens in their homes and on their clothes, they tend to forget that a good diet is also a good defense. Avoiding aged, pickled or fermented foods like blue cheese and kimchi with naturally occurring histamines can help prevent coughing, sneezing and itching triggered by spring allergens. Instead, look to boost your meals with ingredients found in the Mediterranean Diet, such as fresh fruits and vegetables like apples and broccoli as well as nuts and fatty fishes that have essential vitamins and nutrients known to fight allergy symptoms.

    Give Pets a Makeover.  Your furry friend may be one of the biggest culprits for sneaking allergens and pollen into the house, so this season make sure to give pets twice-a-week baths to wash out dander and pollen. Remember to also wash pet beds and chew toys that are thrown around the yard to help prevent allergens from being transported into and throughout your home.

    With these four steps to help protect your home and family against spring allergens, you can start enjoying a healthy, clean spring.

    By Family Features
    Photo courtesy of Getty Images

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    Community plans for library renovations following Great Flood

    Two meetings held March 20 regarding renovation plans for Greenwell Springs Road Branch Lbrary
    Monday, March 20, was busy at the Greenwell Springs Road Regional Branch Library, as community members gathered first at an informal architectural charrette and later at a formal architectural presentation of renovation plans for the Library site.  Greenwell Springs Library re-opened March 3 after sustaining water damage from the Historic Flood of August 2016.  Now it’s time to look toward the future of the Library and plans to renovate it so it is updated for meeting rooms, unique spaces for teens and children, technology, resources and much more.
    The public review was of the concept design by Bradley-Blewster / Hidell Architects to determine future, more complex renovation work. Next the architects and Library staff will produce findings to the East Baton Rouge Board of Control, along with suggested renovation plans or changes.
    The Greenwell Springs Library is one of the oldest of 11 “old” Library branches in the parish.  It and six other older sites are scheduled for major renovations through 2025.  All Library projects are completely funded via the Library’s dedicated tax millage, which passed in 2015.  And all Library projects are designed and constructed on the pay-as-you-go plan.  Greenwell Springs Road Regional Library (built in 1997) and Jones Creek Regional Library (built in 1990) are the first two of these renovation projects.
    For Greenwell Springs Library’s renovation, $5.257-plus million has been budgeted for the project.  Architects were selected in August, prior to the flood, and they have begun concept work. To view the concept plan, visit the Greenwell Springs Reginal Branch Library Construction Project Infoguide at http://ebrpl.libguides.com/greenwell.
    For more information, call Greenwell Springs Library at (225) 274-4450, the Main Library at (225) 231-3750 or online at www.ebrpl.com.
    Photo: Library Director Spencer Watts (center, red tie) and experts listen to community members regarding innovation plans for Greenwell Springs Road Branch Library at an open house March 20. (EBRPL photo)
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    Museum presents ‘The Thibodaux Massacre’ Book Tour, Feb. 18

    For the first time ever, a limited number of people will experience live, the on-site telling of a key story hidden from people of Louisiana. Join us for this unique tour with the author who recently verified and chronicled the story in his book, The Thibodaux Massacre. The Feb. 18 tour will begin at 10 am from the Road African American Museum, 406 Charles Street, Donaldsonville, and continue down Bayou Lafourche to Thibodaux, returning to Donaldsonville at 3 pm.

    As part of its “When History Hurts” program, the River Road African American Museum (RRAAM) is sponsoring a day-long bus tour of Louisiana’s sugar cane country, which will include the site where striking Black laborers were buried after a mass murder that ended an 1887 tri-parish strike. The incident has since become known as the Thibodaux Massacre. John DeSantis, author of ‘The Thibodaux Massacre: Racial Violence and the 1887 Sugar Cane Labor Strike,” will share vivid details of this history and other events from a chartered bus making stops at locations relevant to the story. The tour includes a stop in Thibodaux where victims of the massacre are believed buried, where plans are afoot for archeological exploration by the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

    Critically acclaimed for its thorough research, the book is interwoven with the story of Jack Conrad, a former Lafourche Parish slave who joined the U.S. Army during the Civil War. After fighting for his freedom with other Black soldiers, he is wounded in the massacre 22 years later while watching vigilantes kill his son and others participating in the strike.

    “Much of this hurtful history until now has been unknown,” said DeSantis. “This is a story of empowerment, because 25 years after emancipation these courageous people dared standing up to an oppressive culture of white supremacy.”

    The tour is limited to 55 people and the tour price is $75 which includes:
    * A signed copy of the book, The Thibodaux Massacre
    * Lunch 
    * A tour of the River Road African American Museum
    * A private bus tour narrated by the author

    The museum’s director, Kathe Hambrick, said this special tour is meant to be “a healing tour” in the memory of those resilient sugar workers who lost their lives fighting for fare wages and equality. The history is painful, but we cannot move forward with reconciliation until there is acknowledgement of the injustices that happened right here in our own communities.

    For more information, call 225-206-1225.

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    COMMENTARY: Congress should strengthen safety net

    Our new president and Congress have vowed to stand up and defend the interests of ordinary Americans who feel left behind by deepening economic inequality. But actions speak louder than words.

    More than 43 million Americans still live below the poverty line in this country, and that number would actually be twice as high if not for federal anti-poverty policies. So it’s truly puzzling that some members of Congress are preparing to attack key pillars of our safety net programs; programs their constituents depend on to survive, like SNAP (formerly food stamps) and Medicaid.

    Now more than ever, we need to focus on helping hardworking people across the country make ends meet, not put up roadblocks in their way. We must stand up against schemes to “block grant” health and anti-poverty programs and efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act. I hope we can count on our elected officials to reject any proposals that undo what we know works.

    By Rachid Ouedraogo

     

     

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    Time2Testify Conference comes to Baton Rouge, Feb 23-25

    Bishop Dwight Pate will host the first Time2Testify Conference at the Baton Rouge Radisson Hotel, February 23-25. Registration is free.

    Since 1995, Pate has prayed over olive oil and sent more than 16 million bottles free of charge around the world. People have experienced the miraculous and are coming to Baton Rouge to celebrate the testimonies of GOD. “Now more than ever, people need to be encouraged that the GOD of the Bible is real and more than a two-hour church service on Sunday.”

    For more information call 800-266-5111 or go online to bishopdwightpate.com

    This news item was submitted online.

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    Divas, Daiquiris, Deals Networking Mixer opens to local female entrepreneurs

    This event is created to have an effective business networking mixer where female entrepreneurs can link together as individuals who, through trust and relationship building, become walking, talking advertisements for one another. While building these relationships, participants also get to enjoy dancing, daiquiris and entertainment. Admission is free. Vendor Spotlight tables are available at bit.ly/dddnetwork2017.

    Please invite your girlfriends out!

    This news item was submitted online.

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    Celebrating 60 years of marriage

    Charles Clinton and Dolores Ada Poole Moore celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary, Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017.

    They are natives of Mandeville, Louisiana and members Newell United Methodist Church in Mandeville, Louisiana. They contribute their faith in  God and family values as to why God bless them to stay together. They currently attend Winan United Methodist Church where their daughter is the Pastor Darlene A. Moore.

    They had Breakfast Gathering at Picadilly’s in Covington, Saturday, Jan. 7 and spent their honeymoon get-a-way at a Mandeville Bed and Breakfast provided as an anniversary gift from a special family friend. Most weeks they enjoy going to the Washington Parish Council on Aging Center or taking in movies and country drives with daughter. They also help to rear two grandsons Walter Donahue Jr and Joshua James II.

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    Community dialogue features ‘Cultural Bridges in a Time of Troubled Water,’ Jan. 14

    The 821 Project will host a special interactive dialogue, Voices: Cultural Bridges In A Time of Troubled Waters, Saturday, Jan. 14, This event will be held at TJ Jemison Baptist Student Center, 722 Harding Blvd, Baton Rouge, LA. Event, which includes a keynote presentation and lunch, is free and open to the public.

    The 821 Project provides intercultural and social justice education programs to the southeast Louisiana community through workshops, speaker’s panels, dialogues, and other appropriate programming.

    Preregistration via website encouraged, but not required. For more information contact Jahi Mackey, Program Director at jmackey@the821project.com.

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    COMMENTARY: Tangipahoa school deseg case should not be downplayed

    Dear Editor:
    Needless to say, the importance of this particular desegregation case definitely should not be downplayed as arguments from every side are well understood. However, there are things that must take precedence as this process continues. Things like the assurance that every single one of our public schools has equitable resources and programs needed to be competitive, for instance, should be a priority. Planning strategically for each school by fairly balancing the clientele it needs to thrive and invigorate the community it services is of equal importance.  Likewise, the life of every single one of the 307 children from the Magazine Street area is even more important.  And, doing what is best for these children (all children for that matter) has to be top priority.
    When considering the latest court report, it is pretty apparent that reflection must take place in all who are involved in the future of our schools and communities. Somewhere and somehow, we seem to have lost sight of what is really important.  Of course, storms can impair vision. Therefore, leaders must strive to ensure all of our children and families are equipped to “weather” the remainder of this storm by practicing sound leadership in the midst. True leaders always acknowledge and stand for what is right. They always stand for what is honorable and just. They always advocate for the underdog. They always fight for those who do not know exactly how to fight for themselves.  And they always love everyone.
    With these same thoughts in mind, at some point we must sincerely question our own motives and leader actions.  By no means am I saying that the actions cited in the most recent court document were intentional. However, I am saying that more consideration regarding the  long term success of all schools, families, and children probably should have been given when engaging in the planning process. This is especially important when considering kids who are already placed at a statistical disadvantage due to various risk factors. Providing children with an opportunity to break family poverty cycles through education is a responsibility that should not and cannot be taken lightly. Think about it.  If the same educational practices and planning that may have very well guided many of these families into poverty for generations in the first place are continued, then it can almost be guaranteed that these same families will continue to remain in poverty for generations to come.  With the dedicated people we have throughout this parish, there is absolutely no excuse for this to continue to be.
    Let’s move forward by planning properly and responsibly for all of our children, schools, and families.
    Patricia Morris
    President
    Greater Tangipahoa Parish Branch NAACP
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    Dr. Byron Jasper welcomes Jobs for America’s Graduates

    Open Health Care Clinic hosted students of the Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG) Louisiana program in the classroom of Open Health. The program featured a presentation by physician Dr. Byron Jasper a Louisiana native who recently returned to his home state to provide care to underserved patients.

    Jobs for America’s Graduates Louisiana program is a dropout prevention and recovery program that delivers a unique set of services for at-risk students to help them earn a high school diploma. The Jobs for America’s graduates program has been assisting students since 1980. JAG teaches students career development, job attainment, job survival, communication skills, work place skills, and life survival skills.

    Dr. Jasper and pediatrician, Dr. Dionna Matthews, spoke to the Franklin Junior High School JAG students, on Dec. 5, about the challenges they faced and overcame growing up in similar backgrounds. The presentation informed the students on what it takes to become a healthcare professional and through conversation, encourage and motivate the students to work hard in pursuit of their dreams despite the hardships they may encounter._IGP9824

    Dr. Jasper is a family medicine physician at Open Health where he also specializes in caring for patients with HIV and Hepatitis C. Additionally, he is the executive director of the Comprehensive Medical Mentoring Program, a mentoring organization he founded to provide minority students with experiences that foster successful matriculation into medical school and increase overall diversity in the healthcare field. He has continued to volunteer as a community preceptor, teaching local medical students and residents in the Baton Rouge area while also helping undergraduates, medical students, and resident physicians create and improve their application materials.

    As a true community-wide caregiver, Open Health envision a brighter future for the patients it serves. This means providing more educational opportunities, more comprehensive services and more access to quality care. From pediatrics, to dental, to endocrinology, Open Health Care Clinic will provide advanced medical services for every phase of a person’s life regardless of their financial or insurance status. Extended hours, weekend appointments and walk-ins are welcome.

    ONLINE:www.ohcc.org.

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    Baton Rouge Crusaders to host Winter Classic Semi Pro basketball game, Dec. 17

     

    Let the winter games begin. The Baton Rouge Crusaders are excited to announce their first Winter Classic Semi Pro Basketball Game Saturday, Dec. 17, at Baton Rouge Community College Gym.

    “The Baton Rouge Crusaders are fairly new to the community, so this will be somewhat of an introduction. We would like the parish to attend and continue supporting these men on their professional journey, as we strive to bring about larger opportunities for them. Some are already known for their athletic and professional skills,” said Isaiah Marshall, the CEO of the BR Crusader’s parent company, Capitol City Crusaders.

    Capitol City Crusaders is a sports organization that houses youth basketball programs for students in second through 12th grade, a post graduation basketball program at Capitol City Prep Academy, and the new military developmental league team called Baton Rouge Crusaders. Their mission is to professionally develop local talent who may need more attention and practice before the big leagues. National Director of Men’s and Women’s Basketball, AAU, P.K. Martin and Demetric Hunter, who is the director of military all sports development league, brought the program to Louisiana, earlier this year and partnered with Marshall.

    Before the Dec. 17 game, the team will host a free youth basketball camp for youth ages 9-15, followed by a free community basketball game. “We think it is important for the players to mentor and work with the youth as much as possible, because it helps not only the youth to grow, but the players themselves, and hopefully we are creating a culture of giving back as well,” Marshall said.

    Sable International, a business management consulting firm in Baton Rouge, is also sponsoring tickets for five single mothers and their children to attend the Winter Classic. Email info@batonrougecrusaders.com to be a Good Neighbor sponsor and assist more families with admission.

     

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    BR journalists remember Gwen Ifill

    On behalf of the Baton Rouge Area Association of Black Journalists, I would like to express my deepest sympathies to the family of veteran, award winning journalists Gwen Ifill.

    Ifill was a true example of professional journalism and was an inspiration to women of color.

    Ifill handled her career in journalism with style and grace, never compromising herself.

    Cheryl J. Stroy
    president
    Baton Rouge Area Association of Black Journalists

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    Broome urges White to participate in upcoming public forums

    From now until the run-off election on December 10, several organizations are hosting forums and debates between East Baton Rouge Parish Mayor-President candidates Sharon Weston Broome and Bodi White. Weston Broome and her campaign are concerned with the number of public opportunities White has agreed to attend and participate in.

    “The Broome campaign is pleased to learn that Bodi White has agreed to discuss the issues facing East Baton Rouge parish. Unfortunately, he has only agreed to three public discussions and none will occur before November 21st,” said Michael Beychok, spokesperson for the Weston Broome Campaign. “After agreeing and then backing out of two forums this week, and launching an attack ad from his Super PAC, it is clear that Bodi is not interested in having meaningful and timely discussions about the future of this parish with voters. Rather, and this is no surprise given his leadership style of dividing our parish, Bodi has chosen to use attack ads and limited discussion to speak with voters.

    White has two opportunities to speak publicly with voters this week.

    “Voters deserve to know where Bodi stands so we urge him to accept the Forum 35 invitation tonight and to accept the invitation of the Leaders with Vision invitation later this week so voters can listen to the candidates discuss together how to move Baton Rouge forward,” said Beychok

    The run-off election is Saturday, Dec. 10.

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    Open Health Care Clinic opens in Mid-City Baton Rouge

    The Caring Clinic of Louisiana, a provider of HIV management and treatment since 2007, launched its new brand, Open Health Care Clinic in Mid-City Baton Rouge.

    Open Health Care Clinic is a full-service, primary health care option located at 3801 North Blvd. The new name is a result of the clinic’s new designation as a Federally Qualified Health Center.

    The facility receives annual federal funds from the Health Resources & Services Administration to provide quality healthcare to the medically underserved in our community. Administrators said Open Health also qualifies for enhanced reimbursements from Medicare and Medicaid, as well as other benefits.  Open Health Care Clinic provides advanced medical services for every phase of a person’s life regardless of their financial or insurance status. Extended hours, weekend appointments and walk-ins are welcome.

    Image-1Open Health Care Clinic is the health services division of HIV/AIDS Alliance Region Two, Inc. (HAART), the legal recipient of the FQHC designation. This new designation enables HAART to transform its clinic to a broad-based provider of quality healthcare. HAART has established an extensive referral system linking together a network of service providers in order to increase access to support services for families.

    ONLINE: www.ohcc.org.

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    BREC completes improvements at T. D. Bickham Jr. park

    With the help of BREC Planning & Engineering and BREC CIP Crew, T. D. Bickham Jr. Park features new renovations and amenities. The park is located at 6850 Pettit Road. BREC will host a ribbon cutting on Friday, July 15 at 10 a.m. to dedicate the project completion.

    Improvements include new playground equipment with two different play areas, one for young children with an age appropriate play unit and tot swings. The other play area is for older kids featuring six climbers, two slides and an arch swing. A new half basketball court was also added, and a picnic shelter was renovated. New connector walks make all the new amenities accessible to everyone.

    The improvements were completed in time for summer camp kids to enjoy. Due to renovations at Baker Recreation Center, summer camp moved to T. D. Bickham Recreation Center. For years to come, children will benefit from the new playground equipment with heart-healthy exercise, social development in group interaction, and enhanced sensory and motor skills.

    T. D. Bickham is just one of the parks receiving renovations in the area. Scotlandville Park now has a new disc golf park and a grand opening will be held on Saturday, August 6 at 10 a.m. Renovations are currently underway at Anna T. Jordan Community park and a grand opening for an expanded and completely renovated recreation center will be held this fall. In addition, construction on a new visitors and event center is set to begin very soon at the Laurens Henry Cohn, Sr. Memorial Plant Arboretum.

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  • Giant Inflatable Colon Comes to Baton Rouge

    Pennington Biomedical Research Center Brings Giant Inflatable Colon to Baton Rouge
    Interactive Experience to Show the Different Stages of Colorectal Cancer

    WHAT In the United States, there are more than one million Americans living with a history of colorectal cancer. Estimates are that one in 20 Americans will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in a lifetime.1
    To combat these staggering statistics, the patient advocacy organization Colon Cancer Alliance has embarked on the 2016 Big Colon Tour, a nationwide educational tour featuring a giant inflatable colon sponsored by Bayer. The tour pulls into Pennington Biomedical Research Center for the Get Your Rear In Gear Run/Walk event.
    WHO: CCA volunteer living with colon cancer, Diane McAdams, and physician Dr. Kelly Finan, MD, from Our Lady The Lake Colon/Rectal are available for media interviews
    WHEN: May 7, 2016 at 7:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
    WHERE: 6400 Perkins Road
    Baton Rouge, LA 70808
    WHY: As with many cancers, early detection of colorectal cancer is important. The survival rate is much higher when the disease is diagnosed early, but research has shown that only 39 percent of patients are diagnosed at the early stage, in part due to the underuse of screening.2 In Louisiana approximately 61 percent of adults over 50 are being screened for colorectal cancer, but that leaves nearly 40 percent who are still not being screened.1 This is important, given that more than more than 60 percent of deaths from colorectal cancer could be prevented with screening.3
    Colon Cancer Alliance’s giant inflatable colon engages the public in a memorable way by providing an interactive experience showing the different stages of colorectal cancer, including advanced disease. These efforts aim to raise public awareness of this disease by encouraging early detection and timely treatment, while raising funding for research nationwide. Help get the word out about colon cancer; together, we can make a difference.
    For more information about the inflatable colon or colon cancer visit ccalliance.org.

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    New picture book shares ‘Stories by Grandma’

    Patricia F. Crowley offers vibrantly illustrated tales for young readers, pet-lovers

    GRETNA, La. – Patricia F. Crowley wrote “Stories by Grandma”  for her grandson, who is now 7 years old, to tell him tales that recount their family’s happy times with their beloved pets. With its vibrant illustrations and engaging narrative, this picture provides young readers and pet lovers alike with an entertaining and educational experience centered on the adventures of affable animals.

    Scruffy is a Yorkipoo puppy, Freddie is a finch and Jack is a sorrel-colored horse. Crowley tells their story, as seen from a child’s perspective, showing readers the simple pleasures of life provided by pets and how each has its own personality, making its own unique mark in people’s lives. Crowley depicts the loving bond people form with their pets, the contributions they make to life’s quality and how a child can come to appreciate the presence of each of these creatures in his family.

    “At a time when children seem to be surrounded by negative influence, pet ownership provides children with an opportunity to be loving and caring and to experience unconditional love and devotion,” Crowley says.

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