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    Hill to host community meeting on House Bill 1177

    Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) District 8 Rep. Carolyn Hill will host a community meeting 6pm, Tues., April 22, at Capitol Middle School, 5100 Greenwell Springs Road, to discuss the impact of House Bill 1177, which would restructure the administration of the East Baton Rouge Parish School System.East Baton Rouge School System Supt. Bernard Taylor, Attorney Domoine Rutledge as well as State Representatives Pat Smith and Alfred Williams will speak. Refreshments and door prizes will be provided.

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  • Landrieu to address SU commencement

    U.S. Sen. Mary L. Landrieu will be the commence-ment speaker for the spring graduation ceremony in the F.G. Activity Center, May 9, at 10:30am. Landrieu, a New Orleans native, is the first woman from Louisiana ever elected to the United States Senate. Landrieu was Louisiana’s State Treasurer from 1988 to 1996. She was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1996 and reelected in 2002 and 2008.

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  • Taylor criticizes media coverage

    EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH SCHOOL Superintendent Bernard Taylor said he believes more of the district’s success and less of its shortcom- ings should be seen in the media.

    “In this environment it seems so many other issues get attention than what our core business is (and that’s) educating children,” Taylor said on March 17 at a Baton Rouge Area Association of Black Journalists meeting.

    Taylor said the media tend to focus on more sa- lacious stories instead of highlighting the schools’ striving to maintain aca- demic excellence.

    “Our students are making a tremendous amount of progress over a very short period of time, they are the most important factor. The media isn’t tell- ing the story of the district, but the story of the student and what they’ve accomplished.”

    According to ebrschools.org, some of the successes for the district include 42 percent of the schools having increased academic performance by one letter grade and 72 per- cent of schools having been deemed “academically ac- ceptable” by the state.

    Taylor said he understands that not all students are alike and that the dis-rict prides itself on the many options it provides to students being educated, such as magnet programs, Montessori and visual and performing arts programs. Taylor also wants parents of special needs students to know that the system is striving to make sure those students are accommodated.

    “One thing that we are going to highlight [is] the choices we offer to special- ed students. We educate students with severe physi- cal disabilities, autistic students, students with speech impediments, students with learning disabilities and students who have emotional disabilities that might impede their learn- ing, but there is no other entity in the community that does that in the totality [like this] school district does.”

    During the past six years EBRPSS has strived to improve and is mere points away from becoming a B rated school district. This year 12 EBR schools improved their state rank- ing to “academically ac- ceptable” and more than 50 percent of the schools in the district are graded “C” or higher.

    “I would dare to say we have seen more stories about fights than we have about an analysis of what the data is telling us.” Tay- lor said that biggest challenge EBRPSS is facing is getting people to under- stand that by working to- gether, the district will educate students successfully and that financially there are issues that will have to be addressed legislatively to ensure all students are afforded the best educational opportunities available to them.

    EBR recently made headlines in Baton Rouge when the state ordered a review of the records of recent public high school graduates. The review was ordered when it was found that an area student gradu- ated without meeting state requirements. An audit completed on March 14 found that were other stu- dents who received grades or credits that differed from those the school system reported to the state.

    According to the audit report, the school system has until April 4 to develop a corrective action plan to prevent such problems from recurring.

    Released March 17, the audit also examined whether some students listed as transferring else- where should be consid- ered dropouts. It also fur- ther explores the case of the initial student records that sparked the audit.

    “People make mis- takes, but at the end of the day there is nothing in the report that points to any level of malfeasance or staff altering the books. We’re talking about human error and unfortunately people make mistakes.” Taylor said he will meet with State Superintendent of Educa- tion John White to discuss the audit’s findings

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  • SU Founders’ Day, March 10, celebrates 134 years

    Southern University Baton Rouge will observe its annual Founders’ Day March 10, 2014, to commemorate 134 years of providing educational opportunities to students from across the globe. The theme for the 2012 commemoration is “Celebrating Southern University 134 Years:  100 Years on Scott’s Bluff.”

    The University was founded in New Orleans in 1880 and relocated to Baton Rouge in 1914.

    Events include:

    Campus / Community Prayer Breakfast
    Royal Cotillion Ballroom
    Smith-Brown Memorial Student Union
    8 a.m.

    SU Laboratory School Pilgrimage
    Clark Gravesite
    10 a.m.

    Founders’ Day Convocation
    F.G. Clark Activity Center
    Guest Speaker: Leon R. Tarver II, SU System president emeritus
    11 a.m.

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  • Ponchatoula native sparks male involvement in BR elem. school

    HISTORY HAS BEEN MADE AS THE MALE  faculty of Claiborne Elementary shared breakfast, fellowship, insight and encouragement with concerned men of all walks of life.

    There were fathers, uncles, brothers and mentors at this standing room only breakfast event. So many in attendance that the facility’s multi-purpose center’s extension had to be opened to accommodate the overwhelming amount of men, who responded to the clarion call given by Claiborne Elementary principal, Stephanie Tate and dean of students Robert Wells Jr.

    Carrying with them a diversity of professions, passions and pasts, all of these men shared one thing in common – genuine concern for the well-being of Claiborne’s students- their children.

    The event “Donuts with Dad” is a grassroots effort to bridge the gap existing between students and the necessary male supportive presence needed in schools.

    This event initiated meaningful dialogue between faculty and fathers who formerly have been underrepresented at parent-teacher conferences, in parent- teacher organizations and in classrooms to monitor student progress in a holistic way.

    The exceptional turnout was largely due to the unyielding dedication and hard work of faculty members James Stampley and Freddie Ward. The two men communicated directly with fathers to ensure their attendance.claiborne students

    This grassroots effort is the beginning of a purposeful relationship between Claiborne and its fathers, which will focus on providing opportunities for men to assist their children in reaching their academic goals.

    “Donuts with Dad” is also the launching pad for more events, which will bring the positivist of male mentorship into the halls of Claiborne to enrich the lives of students.

    The next activity, “Dinner with Dads” will occur later this month. It is an effort to continue the purposeful partnership between Claiborne Elementary faculty, students, families and community at large.

    Claiborne Elementary is a school that continues to rise above difficult circumstances and challenges to focus on bringing together the proverbial village that supports and contributes to the raising of each student who enters its doors.

    The Claiborne community believes that “we are better together” and can accomplish more as a unified body of one, with one vision, one voice and one objective where all stakeholders are important and needed.

     

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  • Fired N.O. teachers win in appeal

    THE Louisiana Fourth Circuit Court of Appeal unanimously ruled that an estimated7,000 teachers and school employees were wrongfully terminated post Hurricane Katrina.

    Teachers filed suit against the Orleans Parish School Board and the Louisiana Department of Education after they lost their jobs post-Katrina and then were not given the first notice new job opportunities that arose once schools began reopening.

    As a result, all tenured employees who were fired after Katrina will be paid two years’ salary by the Orleans Parish School Board. Teachers who meet certain criteria will
    also be paid an additional year’s salary by the state of Louisiana.

    The ruling, passed down by judges James McKay III, Edwin Lombard, Paul Bonin, Daniel Dysart,and Roland Belsome, said it was fair for the School Board to reduce the workforce post-Katrina. However, the teachers had a constitutionally protected right to be recalled to work as soon as opportunities arose for them to do so. The School Board was legally required to create a “recall list” of teachers who were available to return
    and failed to do this. This list should have been used to rehire teachers and staff to fill any openings over the next two years.

    The ruling applies to all employees who had tenure on August 29, 2005. That list includes principals, teachers, paraprofessionals, offi ceadministrators, secretaries,
    social workers, and other support staff.

    Both the school board and the state can ask the Louisiana Supreme Court to review the ruling.

    ONLINE: lasc.org

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