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    DrumCall: Our history is not something can just be cast aside.

    Black history, our history, matters. Yet the College Board, the massive non-profit that administers Advanced Placement (AP) classes, is in the process of removing Black and Brown history from their AP World History course – a course taken by millions of students every year.1

    Under new changes announced by the College Board, the AP World History course will no longer cover material prior to 1450—approximately the beginning of European colonialism. This alteration effectively erases the pre-colonial history of people of color from Africa, Asia, the Americas and the Middle East. Instead of being one of the few opportunities for students across the country to learn about diverse histories and perspectives, the course will now reinforce the false centrality of white European colonialism in history.

    Our history is not something can just be cast aside. But because of mounting pressure from students and teachers across the country to challenge the College Board’s decision we have a chance to make sure that it is not. The College Board has stated they are willing to reexamine their decision, but have not committed to any concrete changes, so we need to push for a full reinstatement of this content and a commitment to promote Black and Brown histories throughout their AP courses.

    Save Black history. Tell the College Board to keep Black history in their courses.

    These changes to the AP World History course matter. We live in a country where the people in power tell Black and Brown students every day that their history and their lives don’t matter.2 A just history curriculum may be the only place where these students are exposed to histories beyond that of white Europeans.

    In the past couple of years we’ve seen sustained efforts to erase Black and Brown histories from school curriculum. In Texas, the state school board pushed to downplay slavery as a cause of the Civil War and minimize the racial segregation of the Jim Crow era. Textbook publisher McGraw-Hill got caught calling African slaves “immigrants” and “workers.”3 Earlier this year, it was revealed that a far-right Koch Brothers backed group is offering free curriculum to budget strapped teachers, offering a revisionist version of slavery that paints it as a necessary evil to further freedom and democracy.4 And just this week, Michigan announced a proposed curriculum change that would eliminate references to the NAACP, scale down the importance of the civil rights movement and eliminate mentions of gay rights, Roe v. Wade, and climate change.5

    Our history is under constant attack, but because the College Board’s AP World History course is taught in thousands of schools to millions of students every year, the College Board plays a powerful role in setting de facto curriculum standards for all high school students. With this power, the College Board has the responsibility to ensure that students everywhere are exposed to histories beyond that of colonial Europeans and understand that the histories of Black and Brown people did not start when European colonists arrived in their lands.

    Demand the College Board keep Black and Brown histories in their AP World History course.

    What’s particularly cruel about the College Board’s decision to cut Black and Brown history from their AP course curriculum is that they are using it as an opportunity to push teachers to pay for their new and expensive “pre-AP courses” by offering to put the Black and Brown histories they removed into that course instead. But unlike the free curriculum for AP courses, pre-AP courses cost schools thousands of dollars a year effectively putting this content out of reach for most students.6

    All too often, the rich pre-colonial history of Africa, Asia, Americas and the Middle East is either erased or merely left as a footnote. For students of color, who rarely see themselves represented in high school courses, this erasure tells them that they do not matter. The College Board says that they are “dedicated to equity in education.” If they are dedicated to equitable education, then they must not play a role in erasing Black and Brown histories.

    Save Black history. Tell the College Board to keep Black history in their courses.

    Until justice is real, 

    –Brandi, Rashad, Arisha, Jade, Evan, Johnny, Future, Corina, Chad, Mary, Saréya, Eesha, Angela, Sam and the rest of the Color Of Change team

     References:

    “AP World History gets a makeover, and high school teachers rebel,” Politico, 11 June 2018 https://act.colorofchange.org/go/59248?t=9&akid=14668%2E2802358%2EPexbd2
    “Donald Trump Says ‘Our Ancestors Tamed a Continent’ and ‘We Are Not Going to Apologize for America’,” Newsweek, 25 May 2018 http://act.colorofchange.org/go/59249?t=11&akid=14668%2E2802358%2EPexbd2
    “Texas textbook calling slaves ‘immigrants’ to be changed, after mom’s complaint,” LA Times, 5 October 2015 http://act.colorofchange.org/go/59250?t=13&akid=14668%2E2802358%2EPexbd2
    “Millions of Students Are Quietly Being Taught the Koch Brothers’ Whitewashed Version of Black History,” The Root, 14 March 2018 https://act.colorofchange.org/go/59251?t=15&akid=14668%2E2802358%2EPexbd2
    “Proposed Michigan social studies standards erase references to gay rights, Roe v. Wade, and KKK ,” DetroitMetro Times, 12 June 2018 https://act.colorofchange.org/go/59252?t=17&akid=14668%2E2802358%2EPexbd2
    “Teachers Fight To Keep Pre-Colonial World History In AP Course,” Colorlines, 12 June 2018 https://act.colorofchange.org/go/59253?t=19&akid=14668%2E2802358%2EPexbd2

    Color Of Change is building a movement to elevate the voices of Black folks and our allies, and win real social and political change. Help keep our movement strong.

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  • ,

    Tell State Rep. Carmody that Louisiana’s Black communities aren’t for sale!

    Earlier this week, the Louisiana Senate narrowly passed SB 365, a bill that would allow predatory payday and car title loan companies to financially exploit Black communities with “installment loans” that carry interest rates of over 167%. Trapping them in a cycle of toxic debt.

    Payday lenders and car title lenders already drain more than $240 million in fees each year from low-income Louisiana residents. Louisiana should be reining in these devastating practices, not expanding them. Similar bills have been blocked in 14 out of 16 states where they were introduced and we’re fighting to block this one in Louisiana.

    We have a real chance to shut down this exploitative bill in the House, but we need to act fast. The legislative session is winding down, and the only way for this bill to move forward is if Chair of the House Commerce Committee, Rep. Thomas Carmody, listens to payday lobbyists and extends the session. A flood of calls from Louisianans is just the pressure we need to stop this exploitative bill.

    Call Rep. Thomas Carmody and tell him to kill SB 365

    Black people are twice as likely to become trapped in long term cycles of debt from predatory loans and that is deliberate. Even when income is the same, payday lenders set up shop in 2x as many Black and Latinx communities than white ones.1 By targeting Black and Latinx communities, this industry is doing everything it can to keep people of color in financial servitude and widen the racial wealth gap. In Louisiana, 79% of payday loans are lent to borrowers on the same day they paid back their previous loan, while 87% of loans went to borrowers who re-borrow within two weeks of paying back their old loan.2

    Fourteen organizations, including Color of Change and the Louisiana NAACP, have signed an open letter asking the Louisiana legislature to block this bill because of the harm it would cause low-income families and Black communities, in particular.3 Under SB 365, payday loan company would still have direct access to your bank account, removing their exorbitant fees from your account before you even get to pay your regular bills or buy groceries. Louisiana needs responsible lenders, like HOPE Credit Union, who offer installment loans that help borrowers build savings and improve their credit score. Support for this payday lender giveaway is waning, and if we put pressure Rep. Carmody we can shut it down for good.

    Tell Rep. Carmody: stop selling out our communities

    Until justice is real, 

    –Evan, Brandi, Rashad, Arisha, Jade, Johnny, Future, Corina, Chad, Mary, Angela, Saréya, Eesha, and the rest of the Color Of Change team

     References:

    “Predatory Profiling: The Role of Race and Ethnicity in the Location of Payday Lenders in California”, Center for Responsible Lending, 26 March 2009 http://act.colorofchange.org/go/24924?t=8&akid=11118%2E2802358%2EWLLCwy
    “Analysis: SB 365 expands the predatory debt trap”, LA Budget Project, 9 April 2018 http://act.colorofchange.org/go/42366?t=10&akid=11118%2E2802358%2EWLLCwy
    Letter to House and Senate Commerce Committee Members, LA Budget Project, April 2018 http://act.colorofchange.org/go/46305?t=12&akid=11118%2E2802358%2EWLLCwy

    Color Of Change is building a movement to elevate the voices of Black folks and our allies, and win real social and political change. Help keep our movement strong.

    If you’re absolutely sure you don’t want to hear from Color Of Change again, click here to unsubscribe.
    This email from Color of change urges Louisiana residents to speak against a bill in the legislature designed to enhance predatory lending throughout the state.

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