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    NAACP — vigilant in removing Judge from bench — thanks community

    During this week of addressing the troubling issue of 23rd Judicial District Court Judge Jessie Leblanc’s use of racial slurs, this matter has resulted in Leblanc’s resignation letter of February 27, 2020.

    To community members and advocates, thank you so much for coming together to ensure this outcome. It is with your continued support and efforts that we can fight injustices like this.

    It is with gratitude that we thank Governor John Bel Edwards for addressing this matter head-on, standing up for what’s right and vocalizing what was needed.

    To the Louisiana Legislative Black Caucus, thank you for your collective strength and support in addressing this matter.

    In addition, we’d like to thank the various media outlets for presenting this issue in a fair and consistent manner.

    Lastly, we thank our state president Michael McClanahan and all NAACP Baton Rouge Branch members for its consolidated and unyielding efforts.

    This issue was disheartening, but it provided an opportunity for us to demonstrate the strength of our collective voice. When we all work together, we win!

    And while this issue has been addressed, we must continue to stay vigilant. As we look to a person to fill this seat vacancy, we must take up the responsibility of voting to ensure that whoever fills that seat is one who is equitable and who fairly represents the broader community.

    Sincerely,

    Eugene Collins Michael W. McClanahan
    President State President
    NAACP Baton Rouge Branch NAACP Louisiana State Conference

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  • LLBC, Gov. Edwards calls on 23rd Judicial District Judge Jessie LeBlanc to Resign

    The Louisiana Legislative Black Caucus and Gov. John Bel Edwards today called on 23rd Judicial Judge Jessie LeBlanc to resign after she admitted to using racial slurs in reference to an Ascension parish deputy and a court employee.

    Gov. Edwards said:

    “The admitted and repeated use of racial slurs by a judge who has taken an oath to administer justice fairly and impartially is wrong, period. There is never any circumstance or context in which such derogatory and degrading language is okay.

    Sadly, inequities still exist in society and in our judicial system. Judge LeBlanc has compromised her ability to preside as a judge, and she has damaged the judiciary. She should resign. The people of the 23rd Judicial District and our state deserve better.”

    Here is the statement from the LLBC:
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    Additionally, the NAACP released this statement, Feb. 26:

    We are dismayed and extremely disappointed that Judge Jessie LeBlanc, through her attorney Jill Craft who has communicated multiple versions of what occurred, is using the cloak of a private conversation to justify the use of intentional racial discourse to refer to various Officers of the Court. It is well known that the N-Word is a profoundly hurtful racial slur meant to stigmatize African Americans and should not be used at any time or in any circumstance.

    Judge LeBlanc has served on the Louisiana Sentencing Commission for several years and has decided thousands of cases, many involving the welfare and freedoms of African Americans. It is impossible to reconcile the possibility that Judge LeBlanc was fair and impartial while serving on this Commission or as magistrate while serving the 23rd Judicial District Court in light of her recent disturbing unsolicited racist remarks to another Officer of the Court.

    Judge LeBlanc has demonstrated that she is racially biased against African Americans, and it is only fair that all of the cases for which she served as a District Court Judge and Hearing Officer be reviewed.

    We applaud Governor John Bell Edwards, The Louisiana Legislative Black Caucus, and leaders, locally, statewide, nationally and internationally for taking a stand to uphold the integrity of the Judicial System. Judge Leblanc’s attempt to double down on the context and forum for which these harmful words were said is shameful.

    Sincerely,

    President. Eugene Collins, BR NAACP Branch
    President. Michael McClanahan, NAACP Convention

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    May 29 is Louisiana Black Chamber Day at the Capitol

    Make plans to join Louisiana Black business leaders from across the state for a day at the Louisiana State Capitol, Wed. May 29, 8:30am – 3pm to interact with legislators, explore the halls of the Capitol, and see how the legislative process works first-hand.

    Attendees will gain insight on the legislative process and can:

    • Engage with Louisiana Legislative Black Caucus members
    • Commemorate a special proclamation in support of Louisiana Black Chamber Day
    • Attend committee meetings and see the legislative process in action
    • Get updates and information from Louisiana Workforce Commission, Louisiana Economic Development, and other state agencies
    • Show pride for Black business within Louisiana

    ONLINE: https://brmbcc.org/

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