LOGO
  • ,

    SALUTE OUR SAILORS: Airman Octavish Morris

    MEDITERRANEAN SEA — Airman Octavish Morris, from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, sews medical-grade cloth face masks in the aviation paraloft aboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) in the Mediterranean Sea, April 7, 2020. The Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group is conducting operations in U.S. 6th Fleet to support maritime security operations in international waters, alongside our allies and partners. Truman has spent at least one day underway for 30 of the last 34 months, in direct support of global security around the world.

    U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Kelsey Trinh

    Read more »
  • ,,,,

    Southern University alumna earns Ship Handler of the Year

    Lt. j.g. Monique Jefferson earned the Ship Handler of the Year award, which is given to Surface Warfare Officers who demonstrate superior performance while standing Officer of The Deck Underway onboard the Navy’s newest platform, the Freedom-class Littoral Combat Ship.

    Jefferson is from Katy, Texas and earned her commission from Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Her qualifications include Surface Warfare, Officer of the Deck, and Anti-terrorism Tactical Watch Officer. She recently completed a seven-month deployment to the Persian Gulf and Eastern Mediterranean Ocean when she was previously stationed onboard the USS James E. Williams (DDG 95).

    Surface Warfare Officers are Naval officers whose training and primary duties focus on the operation of Navy ships at sea, leading Sailors and managing the various shipboard systems and programs. The SWO community offers a wide variety of assignments and duty stations across the world.

    Jefferson is currently the Weapons Officer onboard the USS Indianapolis Blue crew and is the expert for all weapons systems onboard the LCS Platform. Her responsibilities include daily verification that all weapons systems are fully operational and combat-ready. Additionally, she is responsible for ensuring her sailors are fully qualified trained and are developing personally and professionally.

    When asked what her favorite thing is about her ship she eagerly answers, “multiple jobs.” All of the personnel stationed onboard the Indianapolis are required to train and demonstrate proficiency in areas outside their assigned billet. This inter-departmental experience allows everyone aboard LCS to cross-train and be a major player aboard the ship.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Saluting Our Sailors: Petty Officer 2nd Class Errol James

    A 2007 North Texas Job Corps graduate and Baton Rouge native is serving at Naval Station Mayport, Florida.

    Petty Officer 2nd Class Errol James serves as a boatswain’s mate that is responsible for renderings honors for military members and veteran’s funerals.

    James credits his hometown for giving him opportunities he would not have had otherwise experienced that has helped in naval service.

    “My hometown taught me that the world was a lot bigger than just where I’m from,” said James. “It’s helped me to adjust to other people and cultures and beliefs and even food.”

    Naval Station Mayport was commissioned in December of 1942.

    It houses multiple surface ships as well as aviation units.

    James is now a part of a long-standing tradition of serving in the Navy our nation needs.

    “I’m kind of the first of my kind in serving,” said James. “Whatever works for you, whatever is best for you, that’s really what service is about.”

    James said they are proud to be part of a warfighting team that readily defends America at all times.

    “The Navy has taught me a lot of trades that will help me after the military,” said James.

    James is playing an important part in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy.

    “Our priorities center on people, capabilities, and processes, and will be achieved by our focus on speed, value, results and partnerships,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “Readiness, lethality and modernization are the requirements driving these priorities.”

    As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon capital assets, James and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes.

    Serving in the Navy, James is learning about being a more respectable leader, Sailor, and person through handling numerous responsibilities.

    “The Navy has taught me the importance of the commitment to what I’ve done,” said James. “I wanted to get out at four but now I’m at seven because I wanted to see the ‘greater later thing’.” ℜ

    Story by Dusty Good, Navy Office of Community Outreach. Photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer Gary Ward

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    Saluting Our Sailors: Petty Officer 3rd Class Casper Anderson IV

    Modern attack submarines are the most technologically advanced and capable undersea warfighters in the world. Operating these highly complex submarines require sailors from the U.S. Navy’s submarine community, also known as the ‘Silent Service.’

    Petty Officer 3rd Class Casper Anderson IV, a 2013 Baton Rouge Magnet High School graduate and native of Baton Rouge works as a Navy sonar technician serving aboard USS Chicago, one of the world’s most advanced nuclear-powered submarines, homeported at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

    Anderson credits success in the Navy to many of the lessons learned in Baton Rouge.

    “Everyone has their own special talent,” said Anderson. “As a team, it is vital for everyone to bring something different to the table.”

    As a Navy sonar technician, Anderson is responsible for using sound to navigate through the ocean.

    Jobs are highly varied aboard the submarine. Approximately 130 sailors make up the submarine’s crew, doing everything from handling weapons to maintaining nuclear reactors.

    Attack submarines are designed to hunt down and destroy enemy submarines and surface ships; strike targets ashore with cruise missiles; carry and deliver Navy SEALs; carry out intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions; and engage in mine warfare. Their primary tactical advantage is stealth, operating undetected under the sea for long periods of time.

    Because of the demanding environment aboard submarines, personnel are accepted only after rigorous testing and observation. Submariners are some of the most highly trained and skilled people in the Navy. Regardless of their specialty, everyone has to learn how everything on the ship works and how to respond in emergencies to become “qualified in submarines” and earn the right to wear the coveted gold or silver dolphins on their uniform.

    Though there are many ways for sailors to earn distinction in their command, community, and career, Anderson is most proud of earning a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal.

    “I am a repair parts petty officer for sonar,” said Anderson. “I enjoy finding a problem with the system and fixing it.”

    Being stationed in Pearl Harbor, often referred to as the gateway to the Pacific in defense circles, means Anderson is serving in a part of the world taking on a new importance in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances, and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy.

    “Our priorities center on people, capabilities and processes, and will be achieved by our focus on speed, value, results and partnerships,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “Readiness, lethality and modernization are the requirements driving these priorities.”

    The Navy has been pivotal in helping maintain peace and stability in the Pacific region for decades. The Pacific is home to more than 50 percent of the world’s population, many of the world’s largest and smallest economies, several of the world’s largest militaries, and many U.S. allies.

    The U.S. Pacific Fleet is the world’s largest fleet command, encompassing 100 million square miles, nearly half the Earth’s surface, from Antarctica to the Arctic Circle and from the West Coast of the United States into the Indian Ocean.

    Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Anderson, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Anderson is honored to carry on that family tradition.

    “My father was in the Navy, and has always instilled in me a resilient mentality,” said Anderson. As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied-upon assets, Anderson and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes, one that will provide a critical component of the Navy the nation needs.

    “The command is very supportive and wants us all to succeed collectively and individually,” said Anderson. “The Navy gives me the opportunity to do something meaningful to protect my country.” ℜ

    Story by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brian T. Glunt, Navy Office of Community Outreach. Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class David Finley

    Read more »
  • Selena Sanchez serves with High-Tech U.S. Navy Helicopter Squadron

    SAN DIEGO – Petty Officer 3rd Class Selena Sanchez, a native of Leesville, Louisiana, was inspired by her sister to join the Navy.

    “She was in the Air Force and she told me it was the best decision she ever made in her life,” Sanchez said. “I like being around the ocean so I figured I’d go into the Navy.”

    Now, two years later, Sanchez serves with the Scorpions of Helicopter Maritime Squadron (HSM) 49, working with one of the Navy’s most advanced helicopters at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego.

    “It’s hard on some days but everybody really gets along most days,” Sanchez said. “It’s pretty fun. I made a lot of friends and we all work really well together.”

    Sanchez, a 2017 graduate of Leesville High School, is an aviation structural mechanic with HSM 49, a versatile squadron that’s capable of completing a number of important missions for the Navy with the MH-60R “Seahawk” helicopter.

    “I fix helicoptors, such as H-60 Romeos, anti-submarine and search and rescue helicopters,” said Sanchez.

    Sanchez credits success in the Navy to many of the lessons learned in Leesville.

    “I learned the golden rule: Do unto others as you want to be done to you,” said Sanchez.

    HSM 49′s primary mission is to conduct sea control operations in open-ocean and coastal environments as an expeditionary unit. This includes hunting for submarines, searching for surface targets over the horizon and conducting search and rescue operations.

    According to Navy officials, the MH-60R is the Navy’s new primary maritime dominance helicopter. Greatly enhanced over its predecessors, the MH-60R helicopter features a glass cockpit and significant mission system improvements, which give it unmatched capability as an airborne multi-mission naval platform.

    As the U.S. Navy’s next generation submarine hunter and anti-surface warfare helicopter, the MH-60R “Romeo” is the cornerstone of the Navy’s Helicopter Concept of Operations. Anti-submarine warfare and surface warfare are the MH-60R’s primary missions. Secondary missions include search and rescue, medical evacuation, vertical replenishment, naval surface fire support, communications relay, command, control, communications, command and control warfare and non-combat operations.“All our platforms are pretty unique,” Sanchez said. “Rotary wing is completely different than fixed wing because there’s a lot more that goes into it.”

    Serving in the Navy means Sanchez is part of a world that is taking on new importance in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy.

    A key element of the Navy the nation needs is tied to the fact that America is a maritime nation, and that the nation’s prosperity is tied to the ability to operate freely on the world’s oceans. More than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface is covered by water; 80 percent of the world’s population lives close to a coast; and 90 percent of all global trade by volume travels by sea.

    “Our priorities center on people, capabilities and processes, and will be achieved by our focus on speed, value, results and partnerships,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “Readiness, lethality and modernization are the requirements driving these priorities.”

    Though there are many ways for sailors to earn distinction in their command, community, and career, Sanchez is most proud of being promoted to third class petty officer.

    “I worked hard for it,” said Sanchez.

    As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied-upon assets, Sanchez and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes contributing to the Navy the nation needs.

    “Serving in the Navy is a big responsibility and a big commitment and it’s a very good learning experience,” said Sanchez.

    By Jerry Jimenez
    Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class
    Navy Office of Community Outreach

    Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jackson Brown

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Tuquisha Adams takes marines to the fight aboard U.S. Navy Warship

    SAN DIEGO – Petty Officer 3rd Class Tuquisha Adams, a native of Shreveport, Louisiana, was inspired to join the Navy after her mother passed away.
    “I lost my mom and I was on a mission to make her proud,” Adams said. “One morning I woke up and the military was on my mind just out of blue.”

    Now, two years later, Adams serves aboard one of the Navy’s amphibious ships at Naval Base San Diego.“This is my first command,” Adams said. “Every day is a different experience. You never know what you’re going to get, but so far so good. I have had a learning experience. I have grown since I’ve been here.”

    Adams, a 2008 graduate of Fair Park High School, is an aviation boatswain’s mate handler aboard USS Essex, one of four Wasp-class amphibious assault ships in the Navy, homeported in San Diego.

    “I am a landing and launching aircraft petty officer,” Adams said. “I’m also training petty officer and assisting yeoman.”

    Adams credits success in the Navy to many of the lessons learned in Shreveport. “I learned to choose my friends wisely and never let anyone determine my future,” said Adams.

    Essex is designed to deliver U.S. Marines and their equipment where they are needed to support a variety of missions ranging from amphibious assaults to humanitarian relief efforts. Designed to be versatile, the ship has the option of simultaneously using helicopters, Harrier jets, and Landing Craft Air Cushioned (LCAC), as well as conventional landing craft and assault vehicles in various combinations.

    Because of their inherent capabilities, these ships have been and will continue to be called upon to support humanitarian and other contingency missions on short notice.

    Sailors’ jobs are highly varied aboard Essex. More than 1,000 men and women make up the ship’s crew, which keeps all parts of the ship running smoothly, from handling weaponry to maintaining the engines. An additional 1,200 Marines can be embarked.

    “They’re hard workers,” Adams said. “It comes with the field that they’re in.”

    Serving in the Navy means Adams is part of a world that is taking on new importance in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy.

    A key element of the Navy the nation needs is tied to the fact that America is a maritime nation, and that the nation’s prosperity is tied to the ability to operate freely on the world’s oceans. More than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface is covered by water; 80 percent of the world’s population lives close to a coast; and 90 percent of all global trade by volume travels by sea.“Our priorities center on people, capabilities, and processes, and will be achieved by our focus on speed, value, results and partnerships,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “Readiness, lethality and modernization are the requirements driving these priorities.”

    Though there are many ways for sailors to earn distinction in their command, community, and career, Adams is most proud of earning a promotion to third class petty officer.

    “I was proud to see that my hard work didn’t go unnoticed,” said Adams.

    As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied-upon assets, Adams and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes contributing to the Navy the nation needs.

    “Serving in the Navy means that I’m a part of something huge,” Adams said. “I am fighting for people I would never meet a day in my life and that’s a good feeling.”

    By  Jerry Jimenez
    Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class
    Navy Office of Community Outreach
    Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jackson Brown
    Read more »
  • ,,

    Baton Rouge native participates in world’s largest international maritime warfare exercise

    PEARL HARBOR – A 2017 Scotlandville Magnet High School graduate and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, native is serving in the U.S. Navy as part of the world’s largest international maritime warfare exercise, Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC).

    Seaman Apprentice Crystal Paul is a culinary specialist aboard USS Dewey, currently operating out of San Diego, California.

    A Navy culinary specialist is responsible for cooking for the entire crew.

    Paul said she applies the lessons she learned from Baton Rouge to her work in the Navy.

    “I learned how to deal with different people and not to overreact to everything which helps me in the Navy every day,” said Paul.

    As the world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring safety at sea and security on the world’s oceans. RIMPAC 2018 is the 26th exercise in the series that began in 1971.

    The theme of RIMPAC 2018 is Capable, Adaptive, Partners. The participating nations and forces exercise a wide range of capabilities and demonstrate the inherent flexibility of maritime forces. These capabilities range from disaster relief and maritime security operations to sea control and complex warfighting. The relevant, realistic training program includes, gunnery, missile, anti-submarine and air defense exercises, as well as amphibious, counter-piracy, mine clearance operations, explosive ordnance disposal and diving and salvage operations.

    “I’m looking forward to meeting new people during this exercise,” said Paul.

    This is the first time Israel, Sri Lanka and Vietnam are participating in RIMPAC. Additional firsts include New Zealand serving as sea combat commander and Chile serving as combined force maritime component commander. This is the first time a non-founding RIMPAC nation (Chile) will hold a component commander leadership position.

    Twenty-six nations, 46 surface ships, five submarines, and more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel will participate in the biennial Rim of the Pacific Exercise. This year’s exercise includes forces from Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, the United Kingdom, the United States and Vietnam.

    As a member of the U.S. Navy, Paul and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

    “I never saw myself as a risk taker, but being here showed me that I am,” said Paul.

    Additional information about RIMPAC is available at http://www.cpf.navy.mil

    By Electa Berassa
    Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class
    Navy Office of Community Outreach
    Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Theodore Quintana

    Read more »
Back to Top
Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com